(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Radio Digest/Radio Fan Fare (Jun-Oct 1933)"

TK 



,K4 



* 



M- 



1 1 






I i 



I 



H 



B*' 



■ i 






■ 










■ 



HH 



■ ' ! I 




GassXK&ST*£ 
Book_JEjL__ 

GqpghtN 

CDEHHGHT DEPOSIT. 



Scanned from the collections of 
The Library of Congress 



AUDIO-VISUAL CONSERVATION 
at The LIBRARY of CONGRESS 




Packard Campus 

for Audio Visual Conservation 

www.loc.gov/avconservation 

Motion Picture and Television Reading Room 
www.loc.gov/rr/mopic 

Recorded Sound Reference Center 
www.loc.gov/rr/record 




OMBINING RADIO DIGEST 



(jVtf^a 



>aavv5 MA^M%M^X/l^'i 



WILL ROOSEVELT RULE WITH RADIO? 

HAY ■: \ 

ED WYNNS NEW CHAIN PLAN 






^4_Diyi^' 




IS RADIO RUINING YOUR CHILD? 



it 



I KNEW JANE FROHMAN WHEN 




Including PROGRAM FINDER Feature 




Fred Waring calls them THE SECOND EDITION 

Because Priscilla and Rosemary Lane are younger sisters of Lola Lane, 
screen star, Fred Waring dubbed them "The Second Edition." The 
youngsters, still in their teens, are on their way to success with War- 
ing's Pennsylvanians on the Old Gold program. They came to New 
York from Indianola, Iowa. Neither had had a bit of stage or radio 
experience before Fred discovered them, quite by accident. Now, 
wherever the maestro takes them dancing, the girls have a way of 
deciding which gets Fred. Before each dance they match for him! 



t 



AM22W 33 



V 



l-lfo?*'* 






1^1 



SLIPPING and GRIPPING 



j. 



WE HATE TO SAY IT— Ed 

Wynn, Texaco's Fire Chief on 
National stations, is on the slide 
— an opinion that is handed down 
with keen regret. No one has en- 
joyed Ed on stage and radio more 
than we have, and occasionally he 
still seems to have some of the old 
sparkle. But most of his jokes are 
getting older and older, and it is 
obvious that he and Graham Mc- 
Namee are having to work harder 
than ever for the laughs. In fact, 
far too often during the last few 
programs we heard, Ed and Gra- 
ham did all the laughing at some 
of the gags, the studio audience 
apparently being stone cold. Many 
listeners seem to enjoy it, but we 
have never cared for Ed kidding 
the advertising, nor for Graham 
doing the quick switch from feeder 
to commercial announcer. Ed's auto- 
motive jokes always seem dragged 
in by the ears, and rarely funny. 

The whole program would be 
better if Ed's part of it were 
shorter and not so mixed up with 
the other parts. The pattern of the 
show should be varied, although 
admittedly this is difficult to do on 
a half hour program. Any change 
would, to be sure, require a better 
orchestra. Don Voorhees is now 
waving the wand over a brass band 
which would pall a bit in large 
doses. (Perhaps there isn't much 
left in the sponsor's budget after 
the star is paid.) 

We understand Ed plans to stay 
on the air right through the sum- 
mer, which takes courage. Our 
guess is that now is nearly the 
right time for him to take the holi- 
day from radio that he has certainly 
earned many times over. But we 
should want the good old Fire 
Chief back after his vacation, by 
all means . . . with fresher mate- 
rial, better music, and a new pro- 
gram routine. His program has 
had a truly phenomenal run, but it 
should not continue so long at a 
stretch that the public will not thrill 
to the announcement of any new 
programs by Mr. Wynn. 



t 



d 



GRAND BAND WORK— The 

first few Old Gold programs over 
Columbia, with "Waring's Penn- 
sylvanians" and John Medbury, got 
off to a bad start. The trouble 
seemed to be that Mr. Medbury was 
not the right kind of funny-man for 
radio. His material, which he 
wrote, was a little too subtle. It 
needed one of the definitely ac- 
cepted humorous types to put it 
over. Now the program has not 
one, but two of these types, both 
tolerably amusing. One is a Ne- 
gro mammy, Mandy Lou; the other 
is George Givot, well-known dia- 
lectician of Broadway shows, .. 
known as "The Greek Ambassador 
Of Good Will." 

Mr. Medbury still writes the gags 
and his humor sounds newer than 
most of the stuff on the air. The 
points of many of the jokes are 
apparent before they are sprung, 
but even if you won't get any belly 
laughs out of the Old Gold pro- 
gram, you are fairly sure to chuckle 
frequently, unless you're a non- 
chuckler. The sponsors may be de- 
liberately avoiding hilarity, for 
they keep telling you how smooth 
their show and their product is. 

Fred Waring, whose "Pennsyl- 
vanians" are our favorite stage 
band, does a grand job with the 
music. He not only keeps it as 
smooth as an O — G — , but he also 
works in some comedy stuff that is 
even funnier than most c-g-r-t-e 
advertising. Some of Mr. Waring's 
vocal arrangements are a bit con- 
fusing for radio work, especially 
when he uses counter melodies. 
On the stage, the trickier his ar- 
rangements the more interesting 
they are, because your eyes follow 
the changes with ease. 

On second thought, however, with 
the howling need for something 
"different" in radio, perhaps Mr. 
Waring should be allowed to be as 
novel as he pleases. At any rate, 
his part of the show is excellent and 
the whole program is now definitely 
on the upgrade. 



H 



Radio Fan-Fare, combining Eadio Digest. Volume XXX, No. 3. June 1933. Subscription rates yearly, Sl.oO in D. S. A.; Foreign. $3.00; Canada. 5.2.25 : Single copies. 15c. 
Entered as seabnd-class matter October 19. 1932. at the post office 'at Mt. Morris, Illinois, under the art of March 3, ls>79. 'Copyrighted, 1932. by Radio Digest Publishing 
Corporation, /ill rights reserved. Radio Fan-Fare, combining Radio Digest, is published monthly by Radio Digest Publishing Corporation. Publication Office: 404 North 
Wesley Avenue. Mount Morris. 111. Editorial and Advertising office: 420 Lexington Avenue. New York City. Not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts or art received by mail. 



Radio Fan-Fake 



f- 



SLIPPING 



and "Mother, 
"Only on your 



OLD STUFF — Chase and Sanborn's Tea 
Hour on National stations is somewhat disap- 
pointing because that excellent stage comedi- 
enne, Fannie Brice, is handicapped by stale 
material. Also, she doesn't yet seem to be com- 
pletely at ease before the mike. Miss Brice 
really needs to be seen if her personality is to 
register; her singing voice and her accent are 
not quite enough. In radio work she is best, 
we think, in comedy songs and in her Mrs. 
Cohen sketches. We liked her when she sang 
the amusing "Every Night He Brings Me 
Violets." But in the same program she sang 
a sickening hokum song called "Old Fashioned 
Mother," and, believe it or not, she told these 
three (along with others equally ancient) : "I 
want to give you a book." "I've got a book" 
. . . "Ten thousand sea gulls starved to death 
following a Scotch steamer" , 
am I related to monkeys ?" 
father's side." 

Maybe the fans like 'em old and certainly 
anyone to whom those three are new will like 
Fannie. The music on the program is supplied 
by George Olsen's highly efficient orchestra. 
George is likeable in his short spiels, and the 
commercial announcer is inoffensive . . . which 
is our sneering way of paying a compliment. 



15 MINUTES OF YAWNS— "Just Plain 

Bill,", the Kolynos program over Columbia 
stations, is supposed to be a big success, ac- 
cording to the fan mail and the response to a 
give-away offer. As a sustaining show, it 
was so popular that it found a sponsor. Now, 
however, the program is aimed almost entirely 
at getting answers, and we can't believe that 
it will long hold the fans in great numbers. 

"Just Plain Bill" has little humor or action. 
Obviously intended for the back-home cus- 
tomers, it seems to us nothing more than a 
fairly dull continued story about sweet and 
simple home-town folks. The principals, Bill, 
Nancy, David and Kerry, are pleasant enough, 
especially Ted di Corsia, the good actor who 
plays Bill, but the show badly needs fun or 
excitement or suspense — anything that will 
keep it from being only ordinary talk by ordi- 
nary people about ordinary things. To be 
sure, David disappeared, but it was just an- 
other one of those phony disappearances of 
which the listeners have had more than enough. 

The advertising announcements in "Just Plain 
Bill" are as long and boring as any we recall 
hearing in a fifteen minute show. We refer par- 
ticularly to the series having to do with the offer 
of a "free" jig-saw puzzle (free if you buy a 
tube of Kolynos, which we don't call exactly a 
free offer). The words "absolutely free" were 
repeated at least a dozen times in each broad- 
cast, and at the end the characters stepped out 
of their roles and plugged the puzzle and prod- 
uct. This is a mistake, and we suggest that 
hereafter they close each program with a theme 
song that ends, "Oh, you'll ne'er find a frill, on 
Just Plain Bill." The rights to this ditty we 
offer them "absolutely free" . . . for ten bucks. 




FANNIE BRICE 
You can't be better than 
your material . . . 



H 




JUST PLAIN BILL 
A good actor with dul 
lines 



# 




MYRT AND MARGE 

An accident hurt their 
program and now it's off 
the 



* 



GRIPPING 



t 



SWELL VAUDEVILLE— If you haven't done 
it already, be sure to tune in some Thursday 
evening on Rudy Vallee's program for Fleisch- 
mann's Yeast over the National network. Most 
radio experts agree that, with "The March of 
Time" off the air, Vallee's show is the best 
directed of all present radio programs. As you 
know, to get even two experts to agree on 
anything is no small achievement. Of course, 
the radio public frequently thumbs its nose 
politely at the experts and then tunes in pro- 
grams over which the experts cry into their 
beer. But in the case of Rudy's show, the ex- 
perts and the public seem to be hand in hand. 
So the show must be good. 

With a whole hour for his program, Rudy 
has a great chance to offer the customers a 
really different kind of radio entertainment. 
When it comes to giving the public the variety 
it craves, some of radio's famous boys and 
girls are more handicapped than the fans real- 
ize by having only fifteen minutes to half an 
hour to show what they can do. (Which ex- 
plains in part why many otherwise worthy 
shows are damned as monotonous.) Rudy's 
program, with plenty of time, can try some- 
thing that has been tried before but never with 
much success — the good, old-fashioned vaude- 
ville show, plus master of ceremonies and band. 

Vallee and his Connecticut Yankees are 
about as usual, which has been plenty good 
enough for millions of radio listeners for sev- 
eral years. In addition, the guest stars Rudy 
collects each week put his program first with 
those who like their entertainment well mixed 
and full of surprises. Rudy usually gets Big 
Names, but they are not necessarily big radio 
names. And therein lies part of the listeners' 
fun, for it is human nature to be curious as to 
how high the star can soar (or how hard he 
can flop) in a new medium. Each star gets a 
short build-up from Rudy in an introduction 
that makes more sense than the usual master 
of ceremonies stuff. (The Vallee voice and 
manner is, however, a trifle too sophomorically 
world weary for us sometimes, and we wish 
occasionally that his grammar were either 
Yale or Broadway, instead of both. But let 
it pass.) 

The stars on Rudy's programs, whether new 
to radio or not, seldom flop, which is a great 
tribute to the intelligence that goes into the 
selection of material for the show, and into 
the casting and direction of the performers. 
Although it follows much the same formula 
each week, the program has a swell change of 
pace — from scenes out of well known stage 
hits to gags, recent and not so recent, out of 
good comedians. In between, of course, is the 
music — amusing, romantic, dramatic — -from fa- 
mous players and singers. 

So far, if the Vallee hour has had a notice- 
ably weak spot, it has been in the humor, unless 
you don't mind old jokes. In the advertising 
agency which handles the Fleischmann pro- 
gram (and several more), it is rumored that a 
typist was recently assigned the job of copying 
jokes out of an English joke book over one 
(Continued on page 5, right hand column) 



June 



* 



SLIPPING 



HOKUM FOR GUM CHEWERS— The last 
few times we listened to Wrigley's "Myrt and 
Marge" program over Columbia, it seemed 
more than a little sour. (We understand the 
show will be off the air soon, perhaps before 
you read this.) At best, the program is only 
ten-twenty-thirty melodrama with all the old 
hokum laid on thick. While we don't object 
to either melodrama or hokum, our tough old 
heartstrings feel nary a tug unless the stuff is 
pretty well put over. It may be unfair to pan 
"Myrt and Marge" now, however, because of 
Myrt's recent automobile accident in which she 
had her jaw broken. 

Ordinarily you know, Myrt writes the sketch 
and after her accident something had to be 
done pronto to save the show. The only out 
seemed to be to have her disappear until she 
recovered from her injuries. Other writers 
were called in and they created a mystery 
around the idea that Myrt had been abducted. 
Even before we learned of the accident, the 
mystery didn't quite jell with us, but the boys 
deserve credit for pulling a bad situation as 
far out of the fire as they have. 

The program certainly needs Myrt's pen and 
personality, though, and we hope she'll be back 
on the job soon. If she decides to go in for 
any humor in the future, she might do well to 
get advice from a professional humorist. 



ALWAYS THE SAME-For months the 
Robert Burns program over Columbia's hook- 
up has been one of the five most popular on 
the air. George Burns and Gracie Allen, Guy 
Lombardo and his Royal Canadians, and the 
tenors, Phil Regan and Carmen Lombardo, 
make up an array of talent that is hard to beat 
for week-after-week entertainment. But the 
show has started to slip now, regardless of 
what the statistics prove, if anything. In the 
first place, the program has no surprises and 
the monotony is becoming more evident. The 
music is still about as good as any on the air, 
but, unfortunately, most listeners don't tune in 
for the music. The singing, while not so good 
as Guy's orchestra, is still acceptable. The 
comedy is the same as at first, neither funnier 
nor flatter. So what ? Well — so even the most 
hardened radio fan can take the same thing 
only just so long, no matter how good it is. 

We've been told that Gracie Allen's Dumb 
Dora character is a perfect humorous type be- 
cause she reminds every male listener of his 
sister-in-law, and every female listener of her 
husband's folks. It certainly is true that we all 
like to laugh at other people's dumbness, but 
not forever. Perhaps Gracie and George could 
van- their routine if they relied less on gags 
and more on humorous situations which they, 
and other players, acted out. As it is, these 
comics never do anything but tell each other 
what happens. This form of humor is not so 
convincing as it would be if they took the parts 
of characters in a situation. To carry out a 
suggestion of this kind they would have to 
change their style of comedy somewhat, but if 
(Continued on bage 6, left hand column) 





H« 






JACK PEARL 
built a lovable char- 



acter 



t 




BURNS AND ALLEN 
They need a studio 
audience and a new 
routine 



t 




ED WYNN 
This fine comedian is 
staying too long . . . 



# 



GRIPPING 






hundred years old! Well, if the gags they air 
were all that old, they might seem new again, 
but in this agency, and others, the mistake is 
made of taking jokes (and why do they always 
pick the worst ones?) out of books and maga- 
zines only a few years old. We may not be 
elephants, but we don't forget bad jokes so 
quickly as all that. There should be a law ! 

If the humor, however, in Vallee's show is 
sometimes sour, that "dramatized" commercial 
is akaays sour. Dr. Lee's straight announce- 
ment, whether you believe it or not, is easy to 
take, but the little advertising drayma in the 
same program is as insulting (even to the mo- 
ron) as the phony-sounding testimonials which 
the agency doing the Fleischmann advertising 
has used widely, not only for Fleischmann but 
for many of its other clients. It looks as if 
the radio public is in for plenty of this acted- 
out guff before long, as the advertising busi- 
ness will run this idea into the ground just as 
quickly as it does every other fairly new idea. 
"The Rise of The Goldbergs" and "Amos 'n' 
Andy" are doing the same thing now, even go- 
ing so far as to have wee kiddies stop play- 
ing house long enough to plug the product . . . 
which makes these little dramatic gems even 
more sickening, if possible. 

After giving vent to so much spleen, we'll 
return to Mr. Vallee and his fine shows just 
to remark that it does us a world of good to 
see him so close to the top once more, in spite 
of all the wise Broadway boys who have 
"known" again and again that he was all 
washed up. Much of the bad publicity he has 
had may have been his own fault, but there's no 
doubt that plenty of it was handed to him with 
malicious intent. Rudy, we maintain, couldn't 
keep jumping the obstacles put in his way if 
he didn't have lots of stuff. So there ! 



PEARL, TOO— Lucky Strike's comic, Jack 
Pearl, who helps National meet its overhead, 
is more than holding his own, in spite of gags 
enfeebled by the ravages of the years. (And 
speaking of bum gags : The radio world is 
Pearl's oyster, and he's the oyster's Pearl. Ha, 
ha,ha. Get it?) The boys who hire Jack have 
always known how to put on a well paced pro- 
gram that holds attention, but they have never 
been particularly considerate, until recently, of 
the listeners in giving their commercial an- 
nouncements. Lucky Strike's plugs have been 
quite long-winded. They have claimed every 
conceivable advantage for the product. And 
they have been shouted out in a cocksure man- 
ner that must have rasped on the ears of many 
listeners — and perhaps suggested harshness 
rather than mildness in the cigarette. 

But. a month or two ago, a great light ap- 
parently burst upon the makers of Lucky 
Strike. They became almost reticent, limiting 
their radio advertising per program to three 
commercials of only twenty seconds cacli ! This 
new policy amazeth us. It certainly is a break 
for the listeners, and should build good will. 

(Continued on page 6, right hand column) 



Radio Fan-Fare 



V 



SLIPPING 



they don't make some basic changes in their act 
soon, we predict they'll go into a bad slump. 

It would help, too, if George and Gracie had 
a studio audience to get the laughs started. A 
joke usually sounds funnier if you hear some- 
body else laugh at it first. You're encouraged, 
and you don't feel so ashamed if someone looks 
aghast at your ingenuousness. Gracie has al- 
ways objected to having a studio audience and, 
while it's more of her business than ours, we 
hope she changes her mind. She and George 
should also get some new catch phrases and 
some new names to call each other. The old 
ones are wearing a bit thin. Another thing: 
At present these comedians don't seem to give 
any more importance to their good gags than 
to the bad ones. A little more build-up on the 
good ones, please. The objection has often 
been made, of course, that no one can tell which 
jokes the listeners are going to like. Well, we 
don't believe that humor is as much of a 
gamble as all that, but, if it is, that's all the 
more reason for a studio audience to help the 
comedians with their timing. 

After so much carping, we'd like to throw 
a rose to the radio engineers responsible for 
keeping the program running so smoothly 
when Gracie and George were in Hollywood, 
Guy and his orchestra were touring, and Phil 
Regan was in New York. The show was 
put together with hardly a second's delay. 



NOT SO MYSTERIOUS— The Sherlock 
Holmes programs, sponsored by G. Washing- 
ton's Coffee over National Stations, were the 
first widely popular mystery shows on the air. 
The stories were intelligently adapted by Edith 
Meiser and the direction was good. They had 
plenty of suspense and some grand sound ef- 
fects. Joseph Bell, Leigh Lovell and Richard 
Gordon played Mr. Bell, Dr. Watson, and 
Sherlock Holmes to the hilt. The advertising 
announcement was effective from the point of 
view of increasing sales ; it was inoffensive to 
the listener ; and, amazingly, all the experts 
agreed that it was a great idea. So what more 
could anyone want than that? 

Well, we've been crazy before and we may 
be now, but we think that the program is slip- 
ping. In its strength lies its weakness. That 
is, the sponsors have undoubtedly thought they 
had something so uniquely good that they 
couldn't afford to change. (To be sure, they 
tried O. Henry stories for a time, but dropped 
them.) The program now seems to be another 
case of a fine idea that has been worked too 
long. The mysteries aren't so mysterious as 
others on the air (certainly the stories have 
been out of date for years), and lately the de- 
scriptive stuff has seemed much wordier than 
it was at first. The advertising, too (now that 
the formula is so familiar), seems overlong. 

Ah, well, maybe we listen too regularly. 
"Sherlock Holmes" is still, undeniably, one of 
the few intelligently produced sketches on the 
air. And maybe there are enough new listen- 
ers every Wednesday to keep the show going 
fairly strong until the sponsors can get another 
idea as good as their first one. 




RICHARD GORDON 
He plays Sherlock Holmes 
to the hilt . . . 




She 
hey 



KATE SMITH 
has new-mown-hey- 
appeal 



V 




GEORGE GIVOT 
He's paid to commit mur- 
der — on the King's Eng- 
lish ... 






GRIPPING 



; 



For all we know, it may even sell more cigar- 
ettes. At any rate, Lucky deserves great credit 
for taking the lead in minimizing blurbs. 

Jack Pearl has gradually built up an accept- 
ance for Baron Munchausen that is now, de- 
servedly, almost universal. The mistake has 
not been made of giving the listeners too much 
of the Baron at a time. He leaves 'em when 
they're laughing hardest. (Other stars and 
sponsors might well study the Pearl technique.) 
Also, Jack changes his routine just enough on 
each program so that the Baron, with good 
jokes or bad, is never quite the same fellow. In 
other words, the fans can't always tell what to 
expect. (Nothing will kill a popular program 
so quickly as taking every surprise out of it, 
as has been done in radio so often.) Giving 
Jack's excellent foil, Cliff Hall, a gag line oc- 
casionally is one example of what we mean by 
novelty. The addition of new catch phrases 
to Jack's repertoire is another example. 

The fact that so much intelligence has been 
used in building a lovable character makes it 
a pretty safe bet that the Baron will stay on top 
for a long time to come, unless the gags get 
so old that the listeners won't stand for them, 
Baron or no Baron. There are limits to af- 
fection, and the slogan of the American people 
seems to be, "You can do anything but bore 
us." Even the swell Lucky Strike music 
wouldn't save the program if the Baron got 
really insulting about our memory for jokes. 



SOBS, SMILES AND SUGAR— Kate Smith, 
the hearty girl with the fresh-like-a-dew-drop 
technique, who helps La Palina and Columbia 
pay dividends, should be as good a bet for the 
short or long pull as any star on the air. Al- 
though her voice has always sounded a trifle 
nasal to these tone deaf old ears, Kate com- 
bines the best vocal features of crooner and 
soprano, and thus holds two huge audiences. 

She has the new-mown-hey-hey appeal which 
the city folks like because it is different and 
which the country folks like because it is fa- 
miliar. She is able to handle anything well, 
from the sobs to the comics, and she selects 
each program with a good ear for variety and 
contrast. There is something fundamentally 
emotional in everything she sings and says — 
particularly in the "appeals" she makes for 
worthy causes. However sincere she may be, 
there's plenty of hokum in her program, but 
the point is that it doesn't sound like hokum. 
What's more, Kate is almost always bursting 
with cheerfulness, which, we are told, is what 
the world needs most right now. She's smart 
to have so little talk in the entertainment part 
of her program, and to do it all herself. 

The advertising announcement is just an- 
other one of those things, but it is perhaps more 
painless than most. Ted Collins delivers him- 
self of it, however, in a corner-of-the-mouth, 
"now I'm gonna let you in on somethin', folks" 
manner which we don't care for. Still, we 
recommend the program to anyone who likes 
the syrup that soothes — Kate has all flavors. 

— TUNA 



June 




'GUS" NOW "WRITES" AMERICAN ALBUM 



t 



Brief biography, Walter G. Haenschen. 
In college, engineer. In war, Naval offi- 
cer. In peace, yachtsman. In profes- 
sion, musical director responsible in con- 
siderable part for Palmolive, Chase & 
Sanborn, Coca-Cola, Veedol and other 
orchestral winners. Now conducts Amer- 
ican Album of Familiar Music. An im- 
portant figure in development of phono- 
graphic and radio art with special refer- 
ence to popular music. 



Radio Fan-Fare 



mil 



ROOSEVELT 

Rule by Radio? 



THE ANSWER IS YES IF HE 
WINS WOMEN VIA THE AIR 




FRANKLIN D. ROOSEVELT as President quickly 
captivated the people of the United States. He 
came ; he talked ; he conquered — and no Caesar ever 
waxed more victorious than this smiling ruler of our 
republic. But will he continue to dominate all critical 
situations as they affect the people of the country? And 
if so, will that little black microphone on his desk prove 
the modern scepter or token of his supreme authority? 
Both questions are well worth asking and, if we judge 
rightly, the answer to both lies largely in the hands of 
American women. 

There have been few if any complaints to date. On 
the other hand, there have been a great number of com- 
mendations. People feel that at last we have a man in 
the White House who really lives on a level with us, 
and talks our language. His cordial manner, his human 
qualities and his magnificent vocal equipment make him 
a man easily understood and appreciated. All three of 
these things assure him of a phenomenally large audience 
among the fair sex. In fact (as is generally true in 
private marriages) this wedding which Radio has brought 
about between the President's office and the women of 
America looks very much as though it will give women 
their first big chance to exercise a powerful influence 
in public affairs and government. 

President Roosevelt will not utilize his autocratic 
broadcasting powers indiscriminately. Our Washington 
correspondent states that he will keep in touch with 
the people through the radio, but he will not throw him- 
self at us. When he has something to say we will know 
that he is going to say it, and we will be listening. And 
when he is heard he will give us a message of interest 
that could not possibly come to us with the same effect 
in any other way. 

A few days ago a small, dignified brochure was distrib- 
uted by the Columbia Broadcasting System entitled, "We 
Think a Point Has Been Missed." Part of it is worth 
quoting here: 

"We appreciate our modern miracles, of course, but 



they seldom snap our heads back until they are seized 
in the strong hands of a strong man, fired in a crisis, 
lighted by the flame of high personal courage. 

"Something very much like that surely happened in 
Washington, D. C, on March 4th and again on March 
12th. Much has been said about the President's words in 
those two critical hours, about their brilliant candor, 
their complete simplicity. Much will still be said about 
them, we believe, a hundred years from now. And much 
has been said about his use of radio to lift those words — 
intimately and resonantly, with the full ring of the fine 
voice which spoke them — into fifteen million American 
homes. 'My friends, I want to talk for a few minutes to 
the people of the United States' — and in that next fifteen 
minutes that voice, that man, performed a miracle be- 
fore the world." 

Newspapers let loose after the Inaugural address and 
the talk about the bank crisis, conceding almost every- 
thing that the listeners had already come to know. The 
staid New York Times said: "The response was so im- 
mediate and favorable that it confirmed him in his judg- 
ment that the radio was the simplest and most effective 
medium for reaching the people." The Cleveland Plain- 
dealer said : "The President was so moved and gratified, 
so impressed by the magical power of radio as an in- 
dispensable facility of his great office, that the announce- 
ment has come that he intends to use radio in reaching 
the people as often as circumstances warrant." 

The political campaign of last fall proved Roosevelt's 
appreciation of the efficacy of modern methods of com- 
munication. As he traveled across the country his voice 
came sweeping over the air paths, under the window 
ledges and into the homes of the electorate on twenty- 
eight different occasions. There is little doubt that his 
remarkable radio adaptability went far toward satisfy- 
ing millions as to his reliability and intelligent capacity, 
when otherwise if nature had given him a voice not 
easily understood or inexpressive — particularly as con- 
cerns women — they would have decided against him in 



June 



favor of the more conservative candidate. 

His flight to Chicago at the conclusion of the Demo- 
cratic Convention, and his Acceptance speech, broadcast 
on a great hook-up, did much to sell the millions of lis- 
teners that here was a man after their own hearts. 

When he does not personally use the radio how will he 
keep his contact and directional powers over the people 
by that method ? There will be many ways by which the 
presence of the national government will be felt in the 
home through radio receivers. At present there is a 
weekly broadcast series called The National Radio Fo- 
rum over which individual members of the cabinet will 
speak from week to week. They will have a hall hour 
at their disposal during which they will tell the "people 
of the United States" just what their government is do- 
ing or hopes to do to carry on the work of the nation. 
Doubtless, too, the people themselves will be advised 
how to cooperate with the President to assist in bringing 
order out of disorder — just as the President took advice 
when explaining the reasons for the bank moratorium. 

There has been some talk that the President will even- 
tually merge the supervision of radio as it now exists in 
the Federal Radio Commission into a department of gov- 
ernment to be known as a Bureau of Transportation. 
But recent developments would indicate that the Federal 
Radio Commission will continue to function as in the 
past. There also have been intimations that the Admin- 
istration may ultimately take action to assume absolute 
government control and operation of radio. Those who 
are close to the President, however, have maintained that 

Robert Trout officially announces for "F. D. R." over CBS 




f t «M* 

: sf i. fal 



this would be inconsistent with his democratic principles. 

As it now stands he has acknowledged right of way at 
any moment he wishes to address the nation. All the 
radio facilities of the country are at his instant command. 
The citizens would most certainly resent government 
monopoly, just as they have resented it in Canada, and 
Roosevelt no doubt is perfectly satisfied to guide the will 
and better judgment of those who listen through the 
ways and means already tested and found efficient. 

The situation as it now stands is adjusted to a nicety. 
When he has affairs to discuss with his countrymen 
there will be ample announcement to all the people of 
the call to council. They will gather about him as in- 
timately as though they were in the very room with him. 
He will not need to shout or orate, but will speak across 
his desk into that little black cup known as the micro- 
phone, and the little black cup will pour out his message 
to all the country. The people will listen, heed and fol- 
low his leadership. Moreover they will warm up to the 
inspirational and human qualities of what many authori- 
ties regard as the finest male speaking voice ever to be 
broadcast. 

In presidential campaigns prior to that in which Her- 
bert Hoover and Alfred E. Smith were the chief con- 
tenders, radio had not come into its full power as a vote 
getter or vote loser. Apart from the "machine" activi- 
ties in the individual wards, campaign speakers, party 
rallies and the daily press formed the principal means of 
persuading voters to switch this way or that. By the 
time of the Smith-Hoover contest, radio had stepped into 
a role of great national importance. The people of the 
United States were given their first widespread oppor- 
tunity to weigh the contenders on the personal, intimate, 
human basis which radio alone makes possible on a large 
scale. 

Five years after this political battle, the American 
people know that Al Smith talked courageously about many 
things. His vision, his frankness and his human qualities 
are now a matter of common knowledge, but at the time 
of the 1928 campaign, Al Smith suffered materially by 
comparison with Herbert Hoover, insofar as radio was 
concerned. Ex-President Hoover, though endowed with 
little of the oratorical ability for which Al Smith is so 
properly famous, nevertheless appeared through the 
microphone to better advantage. His English seemed 
better, his diction more orthodox, his intellectual attain- 
ments greater. 

Undoubtedly, a large percentage of our population 
voted for Hoover instead of Smith because of the differ- 
ence they heard, "saw" and felt in the two candidates as 
they appeared on the air. Mr. Smith always devoted his 
attention to the immediate group before whom he was 
delivering an address. His managers tried everything, 
including fences and wires, to keep him within proper 
distance of the "mike." Mr. Hoover really appeared to 
better advantage over the air than as an actual speaker 
before crowds. Via the mike, the intellectual and phonetic 
qualities of his voice registered while Al and his "raddio" 
made the public see the brown derby and the sidewalks 
of New York more often than the Happy Warrior. Of 
course, the victory was too smashing for anyone to imply 
that radio won for Mr. Hoover, but it is true that Mr. 
Hoover added materially to his total by the superiority 
of his radio personality. 

Then along came the presidential campaign of 1932 
with the same Herbert Hoover pitted against a new 
opponent. By this time, radio had became of tremendous 
political importance. Both nominees strove to make the 
most of it and nation-wide hook-ups were provided from 
almost every point at which either Hoover or Roosevelt 
spoke. The people of the United States were given the 
best possible chance for intimate air acquaintance with 

(Continued on page 50) 



10 



Radio Fan-Fare 




When you listen to the voice of the Chesterfield Lark, and feel like 
thanking someone for the beauty it brings you, think of this sweet 
lady. She is Jane Frohman's mother, for years Jane's voice teacher. 
It was her efforts and personal sacrifice that gave the Lark its 
golden notes. 

TACK TAYLOR is the editor of the morning edition 
%J of the Sedalia (Missouri) Democrat. This article 
was unsolicited. He wrote it because he wanted people 
to know this girl as her college friends knew her — and 
we bought it because we believe it presents a new angle 
on a brilliant, and particularly deserving, young celebrity. 



A FEW weeks ago a group of the biggest theatrical 
names in New York were seated around a large table 
„ in perplexed silence. Among them were the experts 
who book feature acts for Paramount, Warner Brothers, 
Radio-Keith-Orpheum, and Loew's. Every week these men 
meet to discuss important matters in the entertainment world, 
exchange ideas, and outline programs. In this way they 
keep their different New York theatres supplied with a 
variety of talent that does not conflict to a mutual disad- 
vantage. 

Everything had been going smoothly on this particular 
day until it developed that both Paramount and RKO had 
made elaborate plans to exploit the same air star in their 
biggest houses. The star was Jane Frohman. 

Both companies were so anxious to have her that neither 
would step out of the picture, and it looked like there might 
be a bit of ill feeling until some diplomatic person suggested 
a quick and fair settlement of the problem. They would 
toss a coin for her. The parties accepted the proposal, to 
the amazement of their distinguished companions. So busi- 
ness was suspended and the Big Shots gathered around. 
The arbiter held his coin and everyone held his breath. 

"What will you have?" said the referee, turning to Mr. 
Boris Morris, Paramount's booking chief. 

Boris took a deep breath, gulped, and said, 

"Heads !" 

The coin rose and clinked on the table, as the Big Shots 
craned forward, round-eyed. 

"Heads it is !" declared the referee. Mr. Martin Beck, 



'/ knew 

JANE 
FROHMAN 



when. . . " 



By JACK C. TAYLOR 



of RKO, uncrossed his fingers, swore quietly . . . and the 
Big Shots went back to work. 

This little incident proves that the wise men of Broadway 
have discovered what Jane Frohman's friends back here in 
her college town have known for a long time . . . which is 
that she has extraordinary talent. When these boys start 
gambling for a girl, she is pretty close to the top of the 
ladder. 

And maybe you think we aren't getting a kick out of her 
success ! She may be the Chesterfield Lark to you, but to 
us she is the same sweet, unassuming school kid who always 
had the voice of an angel, and a disposition that ran it a 
close second. 

Jane Frohman is remembered at Columbia, Missouri, as 
a gay, likeable girl, friendly and easy to stare at. She smiled 
a lot, sang a great deal, and made her way around town 
as if she was always in a great hurry. If you happened to 
be near, you could hear Jane humming to herself as she 
flitted about on the streets or university campus. 

Although St. Louis and Cincinnati claim Jane because 
of her professional connections there in the past, she has 
spent most of her life in Columbia — a typical college town 
of 16,000. She was educated there, attending Christian 
College for girls and the University of Missouri. 

At the university Jane was a Kappa Kappa Gamma. She 
was a favorite with the boys, but she had no serious love 
affairs. At least, if she did, the news didn't get around the 
campus. So she probably didn't. The boys went around 
with her in droves. It sounds like canned stuff, but they 
regarded her as a sort of pal. And her closest girl friend 
was her mother, who still lives at Columbia. 

Former students and Columbians automatically prove that 
they "knew her when — " by calling the blue-eyed songstress 
"Ellen Jane." She dropped the "Ellen" for professional pur- 
poses only a few years ago. 

Jane's first two years at college were at Christian, where 
her mother taught voice for many years. Now, do you see 
why Jane can sing? For about four years she sang in the 
First Christian Church mixed quartet. It is not improbable 
that her singing there, particularly her solos, boosted at- 



June 



Jane's mother played the organ 



tendance at the church 
accompaniment. 

Although Jane was well known to town folks, she was vir- 
tually a stranger on the university campus while she attended 
Christian College. But once she entered Missouri Univer- 
sity she jumped immediately into the campus limelight. 

Jane enrolled in the school of journalism. You may have 
read in publicity notices that she started out to be a news- 
paper woman, then discovered she had a voice. Of course 
Jane knew all along that she had a voice. Possibly she was 
in journalism for the same reason too many others are — 
just marking time. With Jane it was an interruption of 
an otherwise well planned career — a career of singing. But 
in addition to what she may have learned about newspaper 
training, Jane's pursuit of journalism had a sudden and 
beneficial effect. She won the lead in the annual journalism 
show. 

These musicals are fair enough for student effort, and 
usually certain scenes, actors and tunes are recalled for a 
few weeks after the show. But with "Bagdaddies" — pro- 
duced about six years ago — it was different. The show 
was an unusual hit. One of its songs is still played at uni- 
versity dances as megaphoned crooners pour out the lyrics. 
The song is "Mystic Moon," and Jane introduced it. Her 
singing of this number was something of a sensation. Those 
who saw "Bagdaddies" think she should sing "Mystic Moon" 
on her programs — in fact she has 
had hundreds of requests for it. 

Jane was a new note in leading 
ladies. For once the journalism 
show had a girl with poise, stage 
presence and a swell voice. News 
of her success got outside the con- 
fines of the campus. Immediately 
she was booked for a week's en- 
gagement at the Grand Central The- 
atre, in St. Louis. There she was 
advertised as "The Blues Singing 
Coed of M. U." 

At that time, "blues singer" as 
applied to Jane was a misnomer. 
She used to be a soprano. 
Her songs were more classical. 
She did not have to develop a 
microphone technique in those 
days and she sang naturally. After 
a fling at radio she changed her 
style and pitched her voice. 

To some Columbians and former 
students this was disappointing. Of 
her radio singing they say: "That 
doesn't sound like Ellen Jane." 
They believe she should have stayed 
with the Jessica Dragonette type 
of songs and singing. Others, how- 
ever, especially her younger friends, 
are glad Jane adapted her voice to 
the Kate Smith-Ruth Etting type 
of songs. Probably everyone real- 
izes she was wise to do this. Kate 
Smith has more fans than Lily 
Pons ; Rudy Vallee has more lis- 



The person you don't see in this picture 
is Don Ross, Jane's husky, good-looking 
husband. The reason is that he held the 
camera. They are a happy-go-lucky pair, 
these two youngsters. When they are 
not knocking about on a boat in their 
spare moments, you'll find them tramping 
around a golf course and behaving like 
a couple of nuts . . . which is exactly 
the way newlyweds should behave. Looks 
like their marriage was a swell idea. 



11 

teners than John McCormack. You can't laugh that off no 
matter how much of a patron of the arts you may be. 

If you ask Jane why she gave up Puccini's arias for 
Berlin's ballads, she will give you the answer she gave me — 
"I'd rather be a successful performer than a starving artist." 

But don't get the idea that this girl has forgotten those 
arias, and dedicated her life to popular music. No indeed. 
Slip up to her apartment some day, listen at the door, and 
you will hear a gorgeous soprano voice reaching up fear- 
lessly for the top notes of "Manon" or "Butterfly." She 
can still hit a high "C" without a tremor of uncertainty — ■ 
though the songs you hear her sing over the air seldom 
range above middle "C." And there is no exaggeration 
about the last part of that statement. 

To those who remember Jane as a cheerful little eye- and 
earful, her success is well deserved. And we are particu- 
larly happy when we see the look on Jane's mother's face, 
as she listens to the voice of The Lark come to her from 
the air — the voice she trained from babyhood. The path to 
the pot of gold was no simple one for this woman and her 
daughter, you can be sure. It took real sacrifices to give 
Ellen Jane the fine musical education that went into the 
development of her voice. They both worked hard — and 
people who work hard deserve to win. That's why every- 
body who knew them shares their triumph — and that's why 
writing this piece is a pleasure. 




12 



Radio Fan-Fare 



TUNEFUL TOPICS 

by Rudy Vallee 



YOU'RE MINE, YOU 

When Johnny Green and Ed Hey- 
mann get together, something good 
generally happens. Johnny's system 
is full of beautiful "class" melodies ; 
and I doubt if he will ever get down 
to the typical melodic style of the 
average popular song writer. Per- 
sonally I hope he never does. It is 
a pleasure to sing his songs because 
of the superior quality he keeps in 
them. 

Ed Heymann did the lyrics for this 
song during his recent West Indies 
cruise, and they are excellent. 

I suppose Larry Spier of the Fa- 
mous Music Company selected it, for 
which I thank him. We find "You're 
Mine, You" most effective when 
played quite slowly. 




TWO TICKETS TO GEORGIA 

Fred Coots, Joe Young and Charlie 
Tobias — three outstanding writers — 
authored this ditty. Somehow it 
seems typical of the firm that pub- 
lished it, Irving Berlin, Inc. 

When we play it, I give only one 
chorus for our two pianists. 

There was a time when this type of 
Southern song was the vogue; but 
just how far "Two Tickets To Geor- 
gia" will carry its composers is 
dubious. It must be played with pep 
and speed. 

"STRIKE ME PINK" MUSIC 

Ever since Ray Henderson left 
Buffalo to seek his fortune along the 
theatrical main stem, the public 
has been humming and singing Hen- 
derson melodies. They are all out- 
standing, different, and have commer- 
cial value. Later Ray teamed up with 
Buddy DeSylva and Lew Brown, 
forming the fool-proof composing 
combination of DeSylva, Brown and 
Henderson. 

After Buddy left the gang to be- 



come a movie producer in Hollywood, 
Ray and Lew went into theatrical 
producing with George White, and 
there is no doubt that their efforts 
were chiefly responsible for the suc- 
cess of Mr. White's "Scandals of 
1931." This is no reflection on 
George. He is still, in my opinion, 
the cleverest musical comedy pro- 
ducer in the business. 

A disagreement over policies caused 
a break-up of this combination, and 
Ray and Lew started out for them- 
selves in a big way. Their first effort 
was "Forward March." It was in- 
differently received in out-of-town 
premieres, so the boys got busy, in- 
duced Jimmy Durante and Lupe 
Velez to desert Hollywood for a fling 
at the stage, changed the name of the 
piece to "Strike Me Pink" — and they 
had a hit. I saw it recently, and went 
to see it again. That's the kind of 
show it is. 

As usual, the haunting Brown and 
Henderson tunes are distinctive fea- 
tures. .There are three hit tunes — 
"Strike Me Pink," "Let's Call It A 
Day," and "I Hate To Think That 
You'll Grow Old, Baby." "Let's Call 
It A Day" seems to be the general 
favorite, though the bands are play- 
ing all three with great avidity. 
Dewey Washington, featured singer 
in "Strike Me Pink," was a guest star 
on one of our recent broadcasts, and 
after rehearsing "Home To Harlem" 
(from the same show) with him, I 
found myself humming this successor 
to "That's Why Darkies Were Born." 

Personally I prefer "I Hate To 
Think That You'll Grow Old, Baby," 
the lyrics of which, peculiarly enough, 
have been banned by the NBC cen- 
sorship department. Just why, I do 
not know. 




DANCING THE DEVIL AWAY 

Howard Johnson, Jack Meskill and 
Vincent Rose .... 

Johnson helped to fashion Kate 
Smith's "Moon Over the Mountain"; 
Meskill and Rose have been writing 
for the past three years. 



A good, peppy fox trot that will 
liven up any program and make good 
dance music. Leo Feist is the pub- 
lisher. 




X J> § 



AN ORCHID TO YOU 

As most of the radio audience 
know, Walter Winchell (the origi- 
nator of the most unusual style of 
columnistic writing and a clever fel- 
low, regardless of what you think of 
him), has originated the custom of 
giving orchids to deserving persons. 
Especially on Sunday nights it is the 
custom of the Florists' Telegraph De- 
livery to send an orchid to the de- 
serving person he mentions. 

Of course someone in Tin Pan 
Alley had to capitalize on the idea 
in melody and verse. Gordon and 
Revel felt the urge, and so we have 
"An Orchid To You." 

We played it on a broadcast short- 
ly after it was published, and our lis- 
teners seemed to like it, from the re- 
sponse. 

I CAN'T REMEMBER 

Here's a song about which I can 
honestly enthuse ! I heard it broad- 
cast several weeks ago by Jack Den- 
ny and was immediately captivated by 
the melody. I should have recog- 
nized the fact that it was the fine 
hand of Berlin, but it was not until 
some investigation that I discovered 
Irving, himself, had fashioned it; and 
that Jack Denny had been given the 
exclusive broadcasting of it for some 
six weeks. He can be justly proud of 
the privilege. 

In my opinion, this is one of Irv- 
ing's best songs. Listen for it your- 
self. A lovely waltz. 

JUST A LITTLE FLOWER SHOP 
AROUND THE CORNER 

Last summer everyone was playing 
and singing "We Just Couldn't Say 
Good-Bye." It was an odd thought, 
a different type of melody, and ex- 
tremely danceable. The writer is 
(Continued on page 50) 



June 



13 








C3 




£ 




## 






DID YoU 
RW<3, SOU? 




D 



HECK Mo! 
WAS TotUWtf 
- 1 Thought you 

y 




5* J Mfc^N^ 



B£gA/A£C> SHAW?- 
-$£££'£ Sb/v\£TH/M(? 

vMoP.RIEC> M£ 
A1^.€HA^^- ^oVoli 

UMDg£ OR oveR 



Yaw/ unsaid he \/as 

■f^cg: So ~tVf£ 

IT// 




14 



Radio Fan-Fare 



Is 



RADIO 



ruining your 



CHILD? 



By MR. & MRS. LESLIE H. ALLEN 



No Desire for sensational publicity caused Mr. and Mrs. 
Allen to write this article. They are parents — they have 
made a conscientious study of radio in their home — and 
this is their verdict. 



AMONG many parents and teachers the conviction 
f\ grows that juvenile radio programs are corrupting 
A. jL. the most valuable asset of the American home — the 
child himself. 

The broadcasting station sniffs, the commercial sponsor 
turns up his nose. and says "highbrow stuff"; but parents 
and teachers who care more for the child's own welfare than 
for the pocketbooks of the station or the sponsor insist that 
juvenile programs shall be made safe for the youngsters. 

In the present commercialized state of radio, the dollar 
sign is rampant. Why then should the commercial sponsor, 
interested only in selling his product, care whether or not 
the child is scared half out of his wits in the process ? 

Why should the script writer, interested only in gleaning 
his pay from the sponsor with the least possible annoyance 
to the brain, care whether or not his script imposes upon 
the child's mind all the crassness of the old-fashioned dime 
novel ? 

What does it matter to the station, interested only in cash 
returns from the sponsor, if the program breeds a flock of 
early-morning nightmares that bring parents rushing to the 
boy's room and mentally cursing radio as the cause? 

Most juvenile programs are put on the air in an effort 
to make money out of the child's interest in them. Perhaps 
it is natural, then, for the station and the sponsor to forget — 
if they ever knew — that the "style of life" a man lives is 
controlled largely by the kind of training and environment 
to which he was subjected during the first few years of his 
childhood. 

Give me the child for the first half dozen years of his 
life, says the modern psychologist, and I can impose upon 
him a style of life so fixed that it will follow him to the 
grave. 

One psychological school insists that a child is born with 
two fears only — the fear of a sudden loud and inexplicable 
noise, and the fearing of falling. All other fears are im- 
posed upon the child from outside himself. The child's 
mind is a film upon which the inhibitions and ignorance of 
his elders and the limitations of environment created and 
controlled by them impose an indelible picture. And in 



among the delicate mechanisms in the minds of helpless 
children stumbles the juvenile program like a bull in a 
china shop. 

Parents and teachers used to think a child should not go 
to school until he was five or six years old. Along came 
the kindergarten to begin his education even before that. 
More recently the pre-kindergarten or nursery school has 
sprung up to begin the child's education soon after he has 
learned to walk. There are plenty of parents still who 
scoff at the pre-kindergarten idea. Whether they admit it 
or not, they are old-fashioned. They do not realize the value 
of proper child training before the fifth or sixth year, when 
the clay of the mind is so fresh and soft that it can be 
molded into any form or style of life. 

The average juvenile program strings along with the 
old-fashioned type of parent. Most letters from parents 
telling the station how Johnny cannot go to bed without 
hearing the latest episode of some juvenile program (de- 
signed in ignorance of modern child psychology) are writ- 
ten by parents of the old-fashioned type. It is not strange, 
then, that the worst type of juvenile program, worst for the 
child mentally and emotionally, should seem best to the sta- 
tion or the sponsor. And it is not strange that a juvenile 
script writer should insist: 

"I'm writing entertainment for children, not educational 
stuff. It's my job to keep the kids coming to the loud 
speaker to hear my programs and help me sell my sponsor's 
goods. It's the job of parents and teachers — not mine — to 
educate the youngsters." 

That script writer is only one of the large group (which 
includes many stations and sponsors) who do not know that 
a great part of child education these days is "put over" 
through entertainment. Progressive schools, public or pri- 
vate, seek first to arouse the pupil's interest in a subject. 
That interest is often best reached through appeals to the 
child's spirit of play. 

Radio also appeals to that spirit. The child switches on 
the set to be entertained. But every sound, he hears is part 
of his education. Whatever comes through the loud speaker 
is part of the environment imposed upon him from outside 
himself. Whether the writer of juvenile scripts knows it or 
not — and it is about time he did — he is, in effect, an edu- 
cator whose medium is entertainment. Therefore his objec- 
tive should be something more laudable than the making of 
a dollar out of the child's love for being entertained in the 
play spirit. 

Usually the juvenile script writer is controlled through his 
pocketbook by a commercial sponsor who is not vitally 
concerned with what goes into the child's mind, so long as 
a plentiful quantity of breakfast food, candy or what-not 
is jammed down his throat. 

Most juvenile programs are hold-up games with the child 
at the business end of the gun. The ammunition is anything 
at all that will hold the child's interest while the sales talk 
is plugged into him in the hope that this buck-shot will 
scatter sufficiently to bring down his parents' cash. 

Was the Scarsdale opposition mentioned? It was not. 
Was there anything wrong with Columbia's programs? Not 
if you believed the announcer. 

Columbia is actually highly enamored of its Buck Rogers 
program, and that program is a fair target for critics who 
have the good of the children at heart. This program pro- 
jects the child audience years into the future. Do the children 
find that man, according to Buck Rogers, has progressed? 
Not at all. He is enlivening that imaginative future with 
the same shortcomings that belittle him today. War, revolu- 
tion, all the melodramatic paraphernalia of the hysterical 
script writer who desires to "throw a scare" into his audi- 
ence — these are the fine achievements to which man has 
progressed in the mythical Buck Rogers future of the year 
two thousand and something or other. Plenty of blood and 
thunder, a most mysterious "disintegrating ray," a series of 

(Continued on page 49) 



June 



15 




THE CHILDREN'S HOUR 



Courtesy Life Magazine 

The idea for this drawing was con- 
ceived by a father who overheard 
his youngsters discussing the so- 
called children's programs. They 
are not allowed to listen any more. 



16 



Radio Fan-Fare 



ALL SINGERS SHOULD MARRY 



says Nino Martini— the romantic 
tenor who still remains a bachelor 



BY HOPE HALE 

Formerly Editor, Love Mirror 



NINO MARTINI is a fatalist. He doesn't crowd 
Providence. He believes that when the time comes 
for him to marry, some girl will make him see it 
that way and he'll have very little say in the matter. 

Nino Martini will be glad when that happens. Because, 
like every other good son of Italy, he wants children and a 
home— sometime. He is only twenty-eight years old now, 
and there is plenty of time. Right now he does his thinking 
about work and lets the girls think about love. 

The only trouble with that system is that there are too 
many girls working at it. Too many' potential Martini 
mates are waiting around the Martini corners. So many 
that Nino's teacher, philosopher and friend, Giovanni 
Zenatello, throws up his hands in loud despair every day. 
For how can Nino concentrate on study — and an intelligent 
singer never stops studying — when the women won't let 
him alone even in the privacy of his own hotel room? 

Signor Zenatello told me all this. Nino Martini is mod- 
est, almost too shy for a good looking man in his profession 
to be for comfort. 

Twelve o'clock at night the phone rings. Or one o'clock. 
Or even two. And again at seven o'clock in the morning 
when he is trying to get his rest. 

"Nino," says a feminine voice — and a sweet one, too — 
"Nino, I love you." 

"Nonsense," says Martini, "you don't know me." 

"I've seen you in the movies," the voice croons eagerly. 
"I've heard you on the radio. I love you." 

"No, you don't," Nino contradicts courteously. "People don't 
love without first knowing the other person, what he is like 
all through. You may feel something about me, but not love." 

"I do love you," the voice insists, "and I'm coming right 

"You are not," says Nino in very youthful panic. "My — 
my wife is here." 

"Your wife!" There is a gasp in the receiver. "I didn't 
know you were married." 

And Nino is not married. But he has ideas about it. 

His first idea about marriage is that it would be com- 
fortable. Love — and plenty of it — a singer must have. But 
a bachelor's love is full of trouble. Complications. Things 
that interfere with his work, get on his mind when he's 
practicing. On every hand an unattached man sees new 
faces and figures. He is attracted. New attractions mean 
fresh distractions. It is as natural for a bachelor to set off 
in pursuit as it is for a bee to take a bee line for honey. It's 
all very exciting, but it isn't studying. And before he 
knows it he's up to his neck in an intrigue. Not with just 
one, perhaps, but two or three, each of whom expect a cer- 
tain amount of attention from him. Where is his career 
then ? 

Oh, yes, marriage would be a grand refuge. For love a 
singer must have, but let it be the quieter, safer, surer love 
of marriage. 

And there are certain things Nino is waiting for before 
he marries. 



For Latin as Nino is in his quick fiery temperament, and 
his youthfully slender dark good looks, he has a keen critical 
mind. It will take a genuinely worthwhile person to sweep 
him off his feet and into marriage. She must measure up to 
the standards Nino has set as his ideal in a "good wife." 
I'm telling these standards here because if a woman can be 
a good wife to an opera singer she can be a world-beater for 
any other man. 

"She must take good care of her man, make him comfort- 
able," Nino says. 

Making a singer comfortable, my friends, is something. 
Remember that he has a throat that he lives by. It must 
be treated like a sensitive plant. He must be kept well, be- 
cause a cold is fatal. Neither his health nor his time is his 
own for the hour of rehearsal and the moment of his broad- 
cast march relentlessly toward him. He must sleep when 
other people are up and about, so vacuum cleaners must not 
buzz and babies must not cry. 

Even after he gets up he must not be queried about the 
routine matters of the best regulated household. He must 
have hot water for his shaving but he must not be con- 
sulted about the water heater. "She must be loving," Nino 
says, "but she must not bother." A singer must have pri- 
vacy to invite his soul. Especially between ten o'clock when 
he rises, and the time when he is ready to greet the world. 
Nino Martini is not the only man who prefers to be let 
severely alone until his coffee has had a chance to slide 
comfortably down the red lane. If more wives would real- 
ize that business men as well as radio stars have their hours 
when solitude is in order there would be more silver-wedding 
Cleopatras. 

Nino Martini has the regular he-man's interest in sons and 
daughters. But not while he is practicing. No tugging at 
his trouser leg while he is singing arias and scales. A good 
wife would have the children in evidence only at the in- 
spired right times, would train them to be a joy and not a 
pest to their father. That is a task all right, but it's one 
that's desired by plumbers and carpenters and lawyers as 
well as opera singers. 

And above all, the perfect wife must not have a career of 
her own. That is fatal. "What happens to the home," asks 
Nino Martini, "if the wife signs a contract to appear in 
Milan for a season when the husband is broadcasting for 
Columbia on Wednesdays and Fridays at eight? A wife 
must follow her husband, think about his work, not spend 
her time making a name for herself." 

"But isn't a wife in the same profession more congenial?" 
I asked. "Can't she talk about his work more understand- 
ingly ?" 

Then I lost some of my ideas about the artistic, compre- 
hending helpmate. "I don't want to talk about my work 
when I go home," Nino says. "I want someone to talk 
about sunsets and pictures and woods and dogs and babies. 
I want a rest from my work. I want a good companion. A 
wife in the same business makes a marriage go ph-h-ht." 

I asked if this was what happened to his friends, the 



June 





Maurice Chevaliers. Mme. Chevalier sings, too, you know. 

But no, that was an exception to the rule, according- to 
Signor Martini. She had been a good wife in spite of it. 
She had loved Maurice, subordinated her career to his, had 
been in all v/ays perfect. But the other girls would not let 
Maurice alone. And he was human, after all. Nino men- 
tioned indiscreet persons — names I can't quote for they are 
ones you see in electric lights. "But he loves his wife," 
Nino went on. "And she loves him. I am sure they will 
be together again. She was a good wife to him." 

That is another thing the ideal wife must avoid : Jealousy. 
It's perhaps the hardest job of all. Because a man in public 
life is bound to be the target for the attentions of all women 
who have nothing to do but listen to the radio. His wife 
must be a help, not an additional complication. His more 
rational self does not really like this particular sort of 
adulation. He likes critical appreciation of his singing, but 
he'd be thankful to be free of gushing; feminine admirers. 



17 

Yet even the strongest man has a soft spot 
for flattery, especially when combined with 
a pretty face. Once in a while he may fall 
and do something foolish. His wife must 
protect him from his own weakness. That's 
not the most pleasant of her duties but it's 
her greatest honor. She should be proud. 
Naturally it requires a very great deal of 
tact, but he will thank her for it in the end 
The wife who keeps a man's .self-respect has 
sealed herself to him in a way diat can 
never quite be broken. 

"Aren't American girls worse about 'chas- 
ing men, leading them on?" I asked. 
"Couldn't they learn a lot about charm and 
allure from Italian girls?" 

"No," Nino answered quickly to the last 
question, ignoring the first. "No, .no. Amer- 
ican girls cannot learn sabout charm from 
anyone. They are already the most at- 
tractive girls in the world." 

"But what about the-tradition of hot Latin 
passion and so on ?" 

"Ah, that is different," Nino said in a 
suddenly wistful voice. "There is not enough 
real passion in this country. Girls have not 
the feeling, the finesse, the tenderness for 
making love. In this country they kiss for 
sport I" 

"You have had unhappy experiences?" I 
probed. 

"Yes," he admitted. "At first I did. Here 
were these beautiful girls, looking made for 
love, and then I find out they have no heart 
at all. But," he added quickly, "there are 
exceptions in any country." 

(Nino Martini would not need to be lim- 
ited in his selection by nationality. He 
could whisper sweet nothings in seven lan- 
guages — and has, too.) 

"But about chasing men?" I persisted. 
"You wouldn't marry the American girl 
who throws herself at men?" 

And then he told me a secret. The most 
recent lady who has disturbed his slumbers 
is a contessa. And since countesses don't 
grow on American trees, we are exonerated 
from this particular charge. "But she 
wouldn't have done it in Italy," Nino said. 
Perhaps it is because women in Italy are 
not so unused to Nino Martini's type of 
slender, dark, melting-eyed romantic looks. 
They admire but have heard other beautiful 
voices, "i don't see how the others could be 
more appealingly boyish and eager, though. 
For, looking at Nino, his imposing history of operatic tri- 
umphs seems quite unreal. The real days of his life, the 
believable ones, seem to me to have been those days when 
as a boy he strummed his guitar and let his gorgeous voice 
swell out under the trees of the Campo Fiera by the tomb ot 
Romeo and Juliet. 

It is in Verona and its care was entrusted to Nino's fa- 
ther. It was, however, only after he graduated from the 
boys' choir in the church that the great Zenatello, discoverer 
of Lily Pons and other headliners, took him under his wing 
and he realized he had found his niche in music. Then he 
had his big moments in opera. He literally "stopped the 
show" with the Philadelphia Grand Opera Company when 
he was forced by the applause to break their tradition and 
sing an encore after "La Donna e Mobile" in "Rigoletto." 
But if any young lady feels herself falling for his mellow 
tones she had better take stock of her virtues and learn the 
rules for being a "good wife." 



18 



Radio Fan-Fare 



ED WYNN'S 



ANEW nameplate now appears with im- 
posing grandeur at the entrance to the 
- three-year-old building at 501 Madison 
avenue, New York. It proclaims the building 
as the home of "The Amalgamated Broadcast- 
ing System" the new "third chain" which Ed 
Wynn is heading up as Prexy. 

Enter and take the elevator to the eigh- 
teenth floor. There you will find a hum of 
activity. At this writing, carpenters, decora- 
tors, and electricians are putting into substance elaborate 
details from a set of blue prints which provide for a 
series of seven modern broadcasting studios, nine offices 
and various other incidentals to comprise a first class 
broadcasting station. 

Return to the elevator and continue up to the twenty- 
second floor. There you will find the chief executive 
offices of the Amalgamated Broadcasting System. On 
the door of the president's office is the name of Ed 
Wynn, known throughout the listening world as The 
Fire Chief. It was only about a year ago that Ed Wynn 



New 
Chain 
Plan 



ting started and in its youthful ignorance and 
arrogance has wandered down bypaths of 
error. 

"My idea," he said, "is to give the listener 
more radio and less advertising ballyhoo. 
There is one thing that attracts the average 
listener to his receiver. He wants entertain- 
ment. The spot on the dial where he finds 
the most entertainment is the spot where the 
dial will stand. So I want Amalgamated to 
give the listener a maximum of the best entertainment 
possible with the least possible advertising talk. 

"I realize that the advertiser has to pay the bill, and 
he feels that he must have a certain amount of sales 
talk with his program to make it worth while. But I 
think he will discover by creating a fine period of enter- 
tertainment, pure uninterrupted entertainment, that a 
few well chosen words at the beginning and the end are 
more effective for his purposes in the long run. So my 
idea is to limit the ballyhoo to thirty words — a curtain 
announcement at the beginning and the end. 






W^ 1 




^Kr^ 




\ HP ? E ^ 


' 1 




MH ' 








2S 


l\tof 


* /* la 




jSN ^H 


R c * 


■ '■.^jjt.'. ^9 


HH^^^Hl ' v, iiH" '■' v jijr'j 


P^^H ^§ 




mM BEL ^i- *l , * i &!$rawl .< 



Aylesworth — WEAF 



Paley— WABC 



Ed— WYNN 



and radio became acquainted with each other. They 
have been the greatest of pals ever since. Now Mr. 
Wynn thinks something should be done to give radio, 
and the radio listener, bigger and better opportunities. 
He has conceived a plan. It has become known along 
Radio Row as "Wynn's third chain plan." The idea 
back of the plan is perhaps more momentous than the 
chain conception. Many people have thought of a third 
chain and tried to forge one, but a radio chain is a gold 
chain and the metal is scarce in these times. 

What is the Wynn idea? How is he going to make 
it work? Who is going to back him? What has he got 
to do it with? When will he get going? These and a 
thousand other questions have been reverberating be- 
neath the great antennas that reach across the radio can- 
yons of New York. 

A few weeks ago Mr. Wynn invited the radio press 
(including the writer) to a dinner at the Edison Hotel. 
There he propounded the plan in his own language. Ob- 
viously it was a matter of great personal moment to him. 
He wanted to produce something permanent which 
would endure after he gives up a long and successful ca- 
reer as a stage comedian. He believes radio is just get- 



"Then in the broadcasting station the plan for the 
whole day's schedule should be in the hands of the pro- 
gram manager. No prerogatives should be surrendered 
there to commercial interests. We contemplate a daily 
schedule of entertainment schemed to give variety from 
one program to the next. We shall not have one crooner 
follow another on the next program. The program di- 
rector must be the absolute czar over his domain. 

"As for talent, we aim to have at all times the finest 
to be had. We have been carrying on auditions for over 
six months and have over 600 names of artists who will 
be available for our programs. Out of this number we 
will be able to create a great variety of entertainment. 
The listener will know that by tuning in one of our 
programs at any time from 8 a. m. until 1 a. m. he will 
be able to hear a fine program." 

This plan of arranging programs on the basis of the 
day as a whole, Wynn explained, would certainly attract 
a great audience, especially from the great number of 
listeners who have lost interest in radio because they 
have become bored with commercial announcements. 
There will be every kind of feature already found acceptable, 
he said, and perhaps a few new (Continued on page 48) 



June 



RADIO 



F A N - F A R E 



PROGRAM 



19 



FINDER 



RADIO FAN-FARE 
PROGRAM FINDER 

Introducing 

A Greater Service to Radio Listeners 



OUR new Program Finder Section offers a service 
to those discriminating listeners who enjoy radio 
as a truly vital and important factor in the modern 
American home. We mean the listeners who really 
appreciate modern radio programs for their educa- 
tional and entertainment value and not merely as a 
background for a bridge game, a cocktail party, or an 
evening of reading. For some time past, the world's 
greatest artists, educators, political and economic 
leaders, doctors and philosophers have been available, 
absolutely free, to those who make a point of listening 
to them over, the air. No previous generation has 
been offered such an opportunity to keep in personal 
touch with the great and near great of all the world 
and in all walks of life. Yet for many listeners it has 
been all but impossible to locate the most interesting 
and entertaining programs through the machinery 
hitherto available. 

Radio Fan-Fare, in its new Program Finder 
■ Section, provides its readers with a more compre- 
hensive, accurate and useful guide to the leading radio 
chain programs than has ever been offered before. It 
is a stupendous task to undertake, first, the selection 
of the better programs and next to so arrange the 
data about them that the listings will be truly con- 
venient, regardless of what information our readers 
may be seeking. In spite, however, of all that is done 
at our end, it is only with your help that the Program 
Finder Section can be made of greatest service. 



Hence we hope you will send us your ideas and com- 
ments as to improvement, including both refinements 
and additions. 

CERTAIN limitations must be considered in any 
such guide. Naturally, the information must be 
largely limited to chain programs covering a fairly 
wide territory. Selection is also necessary in order 
to avoid crowding the listings to such an extent that 
the Program Finder Section would be too cumber- 
some for ready reference. We have listed, therefore, 
what we deem to be the better programs, bearing in 
mind that we must restrict our choice to programs 
which are continuous enough in point of schedule, to 
warrant inclusion in a monthly magazine. 

Radio Fan-Fare program finder enables you to 
• select your radio entertainment as you select the 
books for your library, the movies you attend, or the 
Broadway stage productions you desire most to see. 
It tells you what programs of each type are on the 
air and when they are being broadcast. It tells you 
also how and when to avoid those programs which do 
not suit your individual tastes. There are bound to 
be differences of opinion as to which programs interest 
Mrs. Jones and which delight Mrs. Smith. Our 
selection, however, includes a generous listing of the 
better programs of each type. We cannot, of course, 
be responsible for last minute changes in programs or 
stations, but we shall do everything humanly possible 
to limit errors. 



Section can be made of greatest service. to limit errors. 

How to Use Radio Fan-Fare Program Finder 

ly schedule. The outstanding network programs on Artist schedule. Names of artists and other radii 

: listed in order, first of the days of the week, sec- alities have been arranged in alphabetical order. 

Tie of the dav. i. e.. bv morniner. afternoon and case an Index Number is also siven. Bv referrin 



Day by day schedule. The outstanding network programs on 
the air are listed in order, first of the days of the week, sec 
ond by time of the day, i. e., by morning, afternoon and 
evening programs, and third in order of the starting hour. 
Some programs are omitted due to the fact that they are 
broadcast only once or have not been scheduled far enough 
in advance to warrant including. Almost all programs worthy 
of mention and practical for a monthly magazine to list, have 
been included. 

The "Index" number shown in the Datf by Day Schedule is 
for your convenience in securing additional information as to 
the programs. By referring to this number in the Classified 
Schedule, pages 29 ta 43, you will find all details as to sta- 
tions over which the program is broadcast, other periods at 
which it can be heard, and the principal personalities appear- 
ing on each program. The Day by Day Schedule seeks to tell 
you what you can get at any given time. 

Classified schedule. The programs are grouped according to 
the nature of program. Through using this section, you can 
locate the kind of programs you like best and make sure that 
you hear them when they are broadcast. The details of each 
program here _ presented include, (a) the days of the week; 
(b) the duration; (c) the artists and other personalities; (d) 
the starting hour in the different time zones, and (e) the in- 
dividual stations divided according to time zones. 



Artist schedule. Names of artists and other radio person- 
alities have been arranged in alphabetical order. In each 
case an Index Number is also given. By referring to this 
Index Number, in the Classified Schedule, you can locate the 
specific programs on which your favorite stars and personali- 
ties are appearing. 

Station schedule. All stations over which programs of the 
three principal chains are broadcast are listed alphabetically 
according to their call letters. Through this listing you can 
locate the home city of each station you hear announced over 
the air on chain programs, also determine its wattage power, 
its wave length, its 1 time zone, and whether it currently oper- 
ates on daylight saving or standard time. The basic stations 
of each chain are also indicated. 

Other schedules. In future issues it is our plan to develop 
additional schedules which will serve such purposes as (a) 
listing programs with speakers or artists when special series 
have been arranged, to run over a period of months; (b) high- 
spotting outstanding programs originated and broadcast by in- 
dividual stations and sectional chains. Radio Fan-Fare pro- 
gram finder will aim to serve you along ever more compre- 
hensive, accurate and useful lines. We invite your interest and 
active cooperation. Meanwhile, we trust you will find this 
initial effort a worthwhile contribution to solving the what, 
when, who and where of the best that is on the air. 

THE PUBLISHERS 



RADIO FAN-FARE PROGRAM FINDER 



20 



Radio Fan-Fare 



R 


A D 1 O 


F A N - F A. R E 


P 


ROCRAM FINDE 




DAY BY DAY SCHEDULE 


Start 


HrsJ Key 


Index 


i 

Program Description 


Start 


Hrs. 


Key 


Index 


Program Description 


SUNDAY MORNING 


SUNDAY EVENING, (cont'd) 


8:00 


1 


WEAF 


L25 


Chamber Music 


9:30 


Vi 


WABC 


T21 


Andre Kastelanetz, Mary Eastman, Male Chorus 


8:00 


1 


WJZ 


N16 


Medley, organ and vocal 


9:30 


Vi 


WJZ 


V10 


Walter Winchell, news comment 




9:00 


Vi 


WEAF 


T32 


Male Chorus 


9:30 


Vi 


WEAF 


Tl 


American Album of Familiar Music 




9:00 


V2 


WABC 


C2 


Columbia Junior Bugle 


9:45 


X. 


WJZ 


R29 


Pickens Sisters, Popular Songs 




9:00 


1 


WJZ 


C9 


NBC Children's Hour 


10:00 


X 


WEAF 


V7 


David Lawrence talks on Current Government 


9:30 


X 


WABC 


G3 


Modern Living Health Talk 


10:00 


X 


WJZ 


Til 


Phil Dewey, Fireside Songs, Standard Music 


10:00 


V* 


WJZ 


T29 


Southland Sketches, Folk Songs 


10:00 


Yt 


WABC 


DD6 


Columbia Revue with John P. Medbury 




10:00 


Vi 


WABC 


W2 


Columbia Church of the Air (Protestant) 


10:00 


X 


WABC 


X9 


John Henry, Black River Giant 




10:30 


x 


WABC 


Jl 


Aeolian String Quartet 


10:15 


Vi 


WJZ 


M28 


Vincent Lopez and Orchestra 




10:30 


V2 


WJZ 


P5 


Waldorf-Astoria Organ Recital 


10:15 


Vi 


WEAF 


T34 


Standard Music, Concert and Orchestra 




11:00 


V2 


WABC 


T3 


Rhoda Arnold and Charles Carlile, Duets 


10:30 


Vi 


WABC 


K7 


Madison Singers, chorus 




11:00 


X 


WEAF 


T38 


Hill Billy Songs 


10:45 


x. 


WABC 


P8 


Quiet Harmonies 




11:00 


1 


WJZ 


J3 


Chamber Music 


10:45 


Vi 


WEAF 


X16 


Sunday at Seth Parkers, Dramatic Sketch 




11:15 


1 


WEAF 


N9 


Major Bowes Capitol Family, Medley 


10:45 


Y 


WJZ 


Y5 


Orange Lantern, Detective Sketch 




11:30 


1 


WABC 


S5 


Salt Lake Tabernacle Choir and Organ (WABC 
added at 11:45) 


11:00 


2 


WABC 


M9 


Dance Orchestras 










11:15 


X 


WABC* 


F19 


Angelo Patri "Your Child" 










11:15 


x 


WEAF 


Q3 


Patter and Songs 






SUNDAY AFTERNOON 


11:30 
12:00 


Y. 

i 


WEAF 
WJZ 


T37 
M10 


Standard Music, Orchestral 
Dance Orchestras 










12:00 


i 


WEAF 


Mil 


Dance Orchestras 




12:15 


m 


WEAF 


BB3 


Seeing the other Americas 









12:15 


i 


WJZ 


N21 


Medley, Symphony and Chorus 








12:30 


X 


WABC 


T10 


Emery Deutsch Orchestra, Standard Music 








12:30 
12:45 

1:00 


X 


WEAF 
WABC 

WEAF 


L27 
R33 

02 


Medley 
Street Singer 

Garcia's Mexican Marimba Band 




MONDAY MORNING 




6:45 


IX 


WEAF 


G4 


Tower Health Exercises 




1:00 


l /2 


WABC 


W3 


Columbia Church of the Air (Non-Protestant) 


7:30 


X 


WJZ 


Q3 


Patter and Song 




1:15 


X 


WJZ 


BB1 


Cook Travelogues 


8:00 


X 


WJZ 


Qll 


Patter and Song 




1:30 


Vi 


WABC 


R19 


Lazy Dan the Minstrel Man 


8:00 


Vi 


WEAF 


P3 


Organ Rhapsody, Doc Whipple 




1:30 


Vi 


WJZ 


W8 


Sabbath Reveries 


8:30 


X 


WEAF 


K15 


Glee Club 




2:00 


X 


WABC 


Q10 


Patter and Song 


9:00 


X 


WJZ 


W6 


Morning Devotions, Religious Music 




2:00 


x 


WJZ 


T36 


Standard Music 


9:00 


Y 


WEAF 


Z4 


Cheerio, Inspiration and Song 




2:00 


Vi 


WEAF 


K13 


Pilgrims Chorus 


9:00 


X 


WABC 


Q9 


Tony Wons, Patter and Song 




2:15 


X 


WABC 


R2 


Albert Bartlett the Tango King 


9:15 


V2 


WJZ 


M60 


Dance Band 




2:15 


Vi 


WJZ 


F8 


International Radio Forum 


9:15 


X 


WABC 


Q15 


Goldy and Dusty, Silver Dust Twins 




2:15 


X 


WABC* 


R13 


Wendell Hall "Red-headed Music Maker" 


9:30 


X 


WABC 


R35 


Popular Music, Fred Berrens 




2:30 


Vi 


WJZ 


S2 


Northwestern Chronicle 


9:45 


X 


WJZ 


Q14 


Patter and Song 




2:30 


/l 


WEAF 


03 


Joe Green's Marimba Band 


9:45 


X 


WABC 


R18 


Little Jack Little, Vocalist, Pianist 




3:00 


Yl 


WEAF 


A3 


Lady Esther Serenade, Wayne King 


9:45 


X 


WEAF 


V3 


Anne Hard, Current Events 




3:00 


1 


WABC 


U3 


Symphony Music 


10:00 


Y. 


WABC 


T18 


Standard Music, Emery Deutsch 




3:00 


1 


WJZ 


L26 


National Opera Concert 


10:15 


X 


WJZ 


Z5 


Clara, Lu 'n' Em, Humorous Sketch 




3:00 


X 


WABC* 


L9 


Sprague Warner Program 


10:30 


X. 


WABC 


R24 


Popular Music, Fred Berrens 




3:30 


V2 


WEAF 


W5 


The Radio Pulpit 


10:45 


X 


WABC 


R7 


Will Osborne Orchestra, Pedro De Cordoba 




4:00 


X. 


WJZ 


C5 


Dick Daring a Boy of Today 


10:45 


X 


WJZ 


H3 


The Cellophane Program, Emily Post 




4:15 


M 


WJZ 


U4 


Symphony Concert 


11:00 


X 


WABC 


F22 


The Voice of Experience 




4:30 


Vi 


WEAF 


K14 


Choir 


11:00 


Vi 


WABC 


T23 


Morning Moods, Standard Music 




5:00 


X 


WABC 


B2 


Poets Gold, Poetic Readings 


11:30 


Vi 


WABC 


M46 


Rhythm Kings, Fred Berrens 




5:00 


V2 


WEAF 


L5 


Impressions of Italy, Medley 


11:45 


X 


WABC* 


R7 


Will Osborne Orchestra, Pedro De Cordoba 




5:00 


V2 
X. 


WJZ 
WABC 


W7 
K4 


The World of Religion, Dr. Stanley High 
Four Clubmen Quartet 


11:45 


X 


WABC 


R31 


Rhythm Kings, Popular Music 




5:15 








5:30 


V2 


WABC 


Q2 


Frank Crumit and Julia Sanderson 








5:30 
5:30 


Y 
Yi 


WEAF 
WJZ 


Ol 

S4 


Clyde Doerr's Saxophone Octet 
Pages of Romance, Dramatic Sketch 




MONDAY AFTERNOON 










12:00 


X 


WEAF 


R39 


Popular Songs 






SUNI 


DAY EVENING 


12:00 
12:30 


X 
Y. 


WJZ 
WABC 


Z16 
T8 


Variety Show 

Concert Music, Emery Deutsch 










12:30 
12:45 


X 
X 


WJZ 
WJZ 


N10 
T25 


Male Quartet 
Dance and Song 




6:00 


Vl 


WEAF 


Wl 


Catholic Hour, Religious Service 


6:00 


Vi 


WABC 


F12 


The Lawyer and the Public 














6:00 


Vi 


WJZ 


L24 


String Quartet 


1:00 


Y. 


WABC 


M21 


Dance Orchestra 




6:30 


Y 


WABC 


Z12 


Roses and Drums 


1:05 


Yi 


WJZ 


N22 


Medley, Organ and Vocal 




6:30 


Yi 


WJZ 


K12 


Women's Octet 


1:15 
1:30 


X 

V2 


WEAF 
WABC 


M59 
R28 


Golden Pheasant Dance Orchestra 
Popular Music 




6:30 


Y. 


WEAF 


F25 


Our American Schools 


1:30 


1 


WJZ 


H5 


National Farm & Home Hour, Talks 




6:45 


X. 


WJZ* 


C5 


Dick Daring a Boy of Today 














7:00 


X. 


WABC 


N4 


Fray and Braggiotti, Piano Team 


2:00 


X 


WABC 


F18 


National Student Federation of America 




7:00 


X. 


WEAF 


T22 


James Melton, Tenor, Standard Music 


2:00 


1 


WEAF 


DD14 


Revolving Stage, Variety Show 




7:00 


X 


WJZ 


06 


Borrah Minevitch and Harmonica Rascals 


2:15 
2:30 


X 
X 


WABC 
WABC 


Lll 
R5 


Sylvia Sapira, Clavichord 

The Captivators, Popular Music 




7:15 


x. 


WABC 


V2 


Currents Event — H. V. Kaltenborn 


2:45 


Y. 


WABC 


PI 


Ann Leaf at the Organ 




7:15 


X 


WEAF 


Z8 


Horse Sense Philosophy, Humorous 














7:15 


l A 


WJZ 


G2 


Dr. Howard W. Haggard, Health Talks 


3:00 


Y 


WJZ 


Z2 


Betty and Bob, Humorous Sketch 




7:30 


X 


WABC 


T27 


Lon Ross Romany Troupe 


3:15 


X 


WABC 


T7 


Salon Orchestra, Standard Music 




7:30 


Y 


WEAF 


M36 


Joe Moss Dance Orchestra 


3:30 
3:45 


Vi 
X 


WEAF 
WABC 


F23 
05 


Women's Radio Review 
Meissner Electronic Piano 




7:30 


Vi 


WJZ 


X8 


Great Moments in History, Dramatic 


4:00 


H 


WABC 


M58 


Dance Orchestra 




7:45 


x 


WABC 


F19 


Angelo Patri — "Your Child" 














8:00 


i 


WEAF 


DD2 


Chase and Sanborn Hour, Variety Show 


4:00 


1 


WJZ 


DD20 


Radio Guild 




8:00 


i 


WJZ 


N7 


Riesenfeld's Viennese Program 


4:30 


Vi 


WABC 


T6 


Artists' Recital, Standard Music 




8:00 


H 


WABC 


N5 


The Gauchos, Vincent Sorey, Tito Guizar 


4:45 
5:00 


X 

X 


WEAF 
WABC 


C7 
C15 


Lady Next Door, for Children 
Don Lang, True Animal Stories 




8:30 


Vi 


WABC 


DD4 


Chicago Variety Show 


5:15 


X 


WJZ 


C5 


Dick Daring, a Boy of Today 




9:00 


Vi 


WEAF 


R40 


Manhattan Merry-Go-Round, Popular Music 














9:00 


Yi 


WJZ 


D5 


Gulf Program with Will Rogers 


5:15 


X 


WABC 


M3 


Berrens' Orchestra, Brad Reynolds, Tenor 




NO 


'E: — Column 1. Eastern 


Daylight Saving Time. Column 3, key station of chai 


os, WEA 


F indicates Red Network of NBC. WJZ indicates Blue Network of NBC 


and 


WABC 


indicates network of CB 


S. Column 4, index number refers to the Classified 


Schedule, 


which is arranged alphabetically as to subjects, and numerically as to 


each cia 


ssification. Wherever, i 


n column 3, key station is marked with ("), program 


- are bro< 


dcast over part of chain, but key station in New York is omitted. 




T 1 


! L L s 


YOU WHAT, 


w 


HEN AND WHER 





"Notice of copyright. Method of arrangement copyrighted. Infringement will be proseeuted. 



June 



RADIO 



21 



F A N - F A R E 



PROGRAM 



FINDER 



DAY BY DAY SCHEDULE 



Start Hrs. Key 



Index 



Program Description 



MONDAY AFTERNOON (cont'd) 



5:30 


H 


WJZ 


C13 


5:30 


J 4 


WABC 


C14 


5:45 


J 4 


WABC 


T15 


5:45 


y 


WJZ 


C8 


5:45 


y 


WEAF 


Cll 



The Singing Lady, for Children 

Skippy 

Tito Guizar, Mexican Tenor 

Little Orphan Annie, for Children 

Paul Wing, the Story Man for Children 



MONDAY EVENING 



6:00 


H 


WABC 


Q5 


6:00 


V? 


WEAF 


L12 


6:15 


y 


WABC 


M19 


6:15 


y 


WJZ* 


C5 


6:15 


l A 


WJZ t 


C6 


6:30 


y 


WABC 


R23 


6:30 


J 4 


WJZ 


Q6 


6:30 


J 4 


WABC* 


C14 


6:45 


'4 


WABC 


X10 


6:45 


Va. 


WEAF 


T24 


6:45 


Va 


WJZ 


V8 


6:45 


J 4 


WJZ* 


C8 


7:00 


y 


WJZ 


Zl 


7:15 


% 


WABC 


Z3 


7:15 


A 


WEAF 


BB4 


7:15 


V* 


WJZ 


R21 


7:30 


y 


WABC 


R41 


7:30 


H 


WABC* 


C4 


7:30 


H 


WJZ 


D4 


7:45 


M 


WABC 


VI 


7:45 


M 


WEAF 


X7 


8:00 


y 


WABC 


R32 


8:00 


M 


WABC* 


Kll 


8:00 


H 


WJZ 


DD5 


8:00 


Yi 


WEAF 


X15 


8:15 


V- 


WABC 


Z14 


8:45 


V* 


WABC 


N4 


8:45 


y 


WJZ 


D3 


8:45 


y 


WEAF 


T4 


9:00 


Vi 


WEAF 


Nl 


9:00 


M 


WABC 


K3 


9:00 


y?, 


WJZ 


DD18 


9:30 


y 


WABC 


R10 


9:30 


V, 


WEAF 


X13 


9:30 


y 


WJZ 


N6 


9:45 


y 


WJZ 


D3 


10:00 


y 


WABC 


DD15 


10:00 


y 


WEAF 


K2 


10:00 


i 


WJZ 


T35 


10:30 


'A 


WABC 


V5 


10:30 


y 


WEAF 


F17 


10:45 


y> 


WABC 


Rl 


11:00 


y 


WEAF 


P6 


11:00 


y 


WJZ* 


Zll 


11:00 


y 


WJZ 


Q13 


11:15 


y 


WJZ* 


R21 


11:15 


y 


WEAF 


M42 


11:30 


V* 


WEAF 


M56 


11:30 


iy 


WABC 


M12 


11:45 


y 


WABC 


R27 


12:00 


5m 


WEAF 


T20 


12:00 


H 


WJZ 


M41 


12:05 


y 


WEAF 


M27 



Reis and Dunn, Novelty Orchestra 
Waldorf-Astoria Orchestra, Classical 
George Hall Dance Orchestra 
Dick Daring, a Boy of Today 
King Kill Kare and Adolph 

Happy Wonder Bakers 

Tastyeast Jesters 

Skippy 

Just Plain Bill (after May 22, 7:30 p. m.) 

Countess Olga Albani, Standard Songs 

Lowell Thomas, Today's News 

Little Orphan Annie 

Amos 'n' Andy 

Buck Rogers in the Year 2433 

Burton Holmes, Century of Progress 

Everett Marshall, Al Mitchell's Orchestra 
Dolph Martin's Orchestra, Travelers Quartet 
Devil Bird 

Five Star Theatre, Groucho and Chico Marx 
Boake Carter 

The Goldbergs, Dramatic Sketch 
Singin' Sam the Barbasol Man 
Swiss Yodelers 

Clicquot Club Eskimos, Variety Show 
Soconyland Sketches, Dramatic Sketch 

Triple Bar X Days and Nights 
Fray and Braggiotti, Two Pianos 
Phil Cook and Ingram Shavers, Comic 
Ferde Grofe's Orchestra, with Ranny Weeks 
A. & P. Gypsies, Medley Music 

The Eton Boys, Male Quartet 

Sinclair Greater Minstrels, Variety Show 

An Evening in Paris 

Neighbors by Zona Gale, Dramatic 

Jack Frost Melody Moments, Medley 

Phil Cook and his Ingram Shavers 
The Richfield County Club 
Contented Program, Medley 
Standard Music, Orchestral and Vocal 
Edwin C. Hill, Human Side of News 

Talks by President's Cabinet 

Howard Barlow and Symphony Orchestra 

Organ and Vocal 

Amos 'n' Andy 

Patter and Song 

Everett Marshall, Al Mitchell's Orchestra 
Hotel Pennsylvania Dance Orchestra 
Waldorf-Astoria Dance Orchestra 
Dance Orchestra 
William O'Neal, Tenor, Popular Music 

Ralph Kirbery in Song (Standard) 
Park Central Dance Orchestra 
Dance Orchestras 



TUESDAY MORNING 



6:45 


iy 


WEAF 


G4 


7:30 


a 


WJZ 


Q3 


8:00 


y 


WJZ 


Q8 


8:00 


y 


WEAF 


P4 


8:30 


y 


WEAF 


K15 


9:00 


y 


WEAF 


Z4 


9:00 


y 


WJZ 


W6 


9:00 


y 


WABC 


Q9 


9:15 


y 


WABC* 


T18 


9:15 


y 


WABC 


Q15 


9:15 


y 


WJZ 


M60 


9:30 


y 


WABC 


G3 


9:45 


y 


WJZ 


Q14 


9:45 


y 


WABC 


R18 



Tower Health Exercises 
Patter and Song 
Wife Saver, Patter and Song 
Organ Music, Radio City 
Glee Club 

Cheerio, Inspiration and Song 
Morning Devotions, Religious Music 
Tony Wons, Patter and Song 
Luxembourg Gardens, Standard Music 

Goldy and Dusty, The Silverdust Twins 

Dance Band 

Modern Living Health Talk 

Patter and Song 

Little Jack Little, Piano, Song 



Start Hrs. Key Index 



Program Description 



TUESDAY MORNING, (cont'd) 



9:45 


y 


WEAF 


V3 


10:00 
10:00 
10:15 
10:30 
10:45 


y 
y 
y 
y 
y 


WEAF 

WABC 

WJZ 

WABC 

WABC 


E4 

T23 

Z5 

K7 

R42 


11:00 
11:00 
11:15 
11:15 
11:30 


y 
y 
y 
y 

V2 


WEAF 

WABC* 

WEAF 

WABC 

WEAF 


F24 

F22 

El 

M49 

11 


11:30 
11:45 


y 
y 


WABC 
WABC 


G5 
L4 



Anne Hard, Current Events 

Mystery Chef, Food Talk 

Morning Moods, Standard Music 

Clara, Lu 'n' Em, Humorous Sketch 

Chorus 

Popular Music, Vincent Sorey 

Your Child, Lectures 
The Voice of Experience 
Frances Lee Barton, Food Talk 
Vincent Sorey and Dance Orchestra 
U. S. Army Band 

Academy of Medicine Program 
Ben Greenblatt, Pianist 



TUESDAY AFTERNOON 



12:00 


y 


WEAF 


R39 


12:00 


y 


WJZ 


Z16 


12:00 


y 


WABC 


M20 


12:30 


y 


WABC 


T8 


1:05 


y 


WJZ 


N22 


1:15 


y 


WEAF 


N3 


1:30 


y 


WEAF 


L15 


1:30 


i 


WJZ 


H5 


1:30 


y 


WABC 


J2 


2:00 


y 


WABC 


PI 


2:30 


y 


WJZ 


M50 


3:00 


y 


WABC 


F9 


3:00 


y 


WJZ 


Z2 


3:00 


y 


WEAF 


N17 


3:15 


y 


WABC 


T6 


3:15 


y 


WJZ 


M43 


3:30 


y 


WABC 


M58 


3:30 


y 


WEAF 


F23 


4:00 


y 


WEAF 


B3 


4:00 


y 


WABC 


T16 


4:30 


y 


WABC 


M3 


4:45 


y 


WEAF 


C7 


5:00 


y 


WABC 


F14 


5:15 


y 


WABC 


T9 


5:15 


y 


WJZ 


C5 


5:30 


y 


WJZ 


C13 


5:30 


y 


WABC 


C14 


5:45 


y 


WEAF 


C10 


5:45 


y 


WJZ 


C8 


5:45 


y 


WABC 


M19 



Popular Songs 

Variety Show 

Buddy Harrod Dance Orchestra 

Concert Miniatures, Emery Deutsch 

Medley, Organ and Vocal 

Medley Music 

Essex House, Classical Music 
National Farm and Home Hour 
Madison Ensemble, Chorus 
Ann Leaf at the Organ 

Dance and Song 

Talks, Educational 

Betty and Bob, Humorous Sketch 

Medley Music 

Artist Recital, Standard Music 

Dance and Song 

Frank Westphal Dance Orchestra 

Women's Radio Review 

Poetry Reading and Music 

Gypsy Music Makers, Standard Music 

Freddie Berrens Dance Orchestra 
Lady Next Door, for Children 
Bob Taplinger Interviews 
Dancing Echoes, Standard Music 
Dick Daring, a Boy of Today 

The Singing Lady, for Children 

Skippy 

Nursery Rhymes, for Children 

Little Orphan Annie 

George Hall Orchestra 



TUESDAY EVENING 



6:00 
6:00 
6:15 
6:15 
6:30 


y 
y 
y 
y 
y 


WABC 

WEAF 

WABC* 

WJZ* 

WABC 


Q5 
LI 

M37 

C5 

T28 


Reis and Dunn 
Classical Songs, Frances Alda 
Ozzie Nelson Dance Orchestra 
Dick Daring, a Boy of Today 
Russian Gypsies, Standard Music 




6:30 
6:30 
6:45 
6:45 
6:45 


y 
y 
y 
y 
y 


WEAF 

WABC* 

WEAF 

WABC 

WJZ 


SI 

C14 

T22 

X10 

V8 


Religious Hymns 

Skippy 

James Melton, Tenor, Standard Music 

Just Plain Bill (after May 22, 7:30 p. m.) 

Lowell Thomas, Today's News 




6:45 
7:00 
7:15 
7:15 
7:15 


y 
y 
y 
y 

y 


WJZ* 

WJZ 

WEAF 

WABC 

WJZ 


C8 
Zl 
BB4 
Z3 

F15 


Little Orphan Annie, for Children 
Amos 'n' Andy 

Burton Holmes, Century of Progress 
Buck Rogers in the Year 2433 
Educational Lectures 




7:30 
7:30 
7:45 
7:45 
7:45 


y 
y 
y 
y 
y 


WABC* 
WABC 
WABC 
WJZ 

WEAF 


C4 
Z7 
VI 

R22 
X7 


The Devil Bird 

Jack Dempsey's Gymnasium 

Boake Carter 

Irene Bordoni, Emil Coleman 

The Goldbergs, Dramatic Sketch 




8 

8 
8 
8 
8 


00 
00 
00 
15 
30 


y 
y 
y 
y 
y 


WJZ 

WABC 

WEAF 

WABC 

WJZ 


Y2 

L2 

Ql 

R20 

Gl 


Enos Crime Clues, Mystery Stories 

Mary Eastman, Soprano 

Blackstone Plantation, Sanderson and Crumi 

The Magic Voice, Elsie Hitz, Nick Dawson 

Adventures in Health, Dr. Bundesen 


t 


8 

8 
8 


30 

30 

45 


y 
y 
y 


WABC 
WEAF 
WABC 


R17 
A3 

R14 


La Palina Presents Kate Smith 
Lady Esther Serenade, Beauty Talk 
Hot from Hollywood 





NOTE: — Column I, Eastern Daylight Saving Time. Column 3, key station of chains, WEAF indicates Red Network of NBC, WJZ indicates Blue Network of NBC and 
WABC indicates network of CBS. Column 4, index number refers to the Classified Schedule, which is arranged alphabetically as to subjects, and numerically as to 
each classification. Wherever, in column 3, key station is marked with ("), programs are broadcast over part of chain, but key station in New York is omitted. 



TELLS YOU WHAT, WHEN AND WHERE 



*Notice of copyright. Method of arrangement copyrighted. Infringement will be prosecuted. 



22 



Radio Fan-Fare 



RADIO FAN-FARE PROGRAM FINDER 



DAY BY DAY SCHEDULE 



Start Hrs 



Key 



Index 



Program Description 



TUESDAY EVENING, (cont'd) 



9:00 


V* 


WABC 


X3 


9:00 


y% 


WEAF 


D2 


9:00 


M 


WJZ 


T26 


9:15 


% 


WABC 


R34 


9:30 


\t 


WABC 


L28 


9:30 


M 


WEAF 


D7 


9:30 


Vi 


WJZ 


Q7 


10:00 


M 


WABC 


DD8 


10:00 


V? 


WJZ 


T17 


10:00 


V? 


WEAF 


Xll 


10:30 


M 


WABC 


V5 


10:45 


Vi 


WABC 


Rl 


11:00 


M 


WJZ* 


Zl 


11:15 


y 


WABC* 


K34 


11:30 


y 


WABC 


M8 


11:45 


H 


WJZ* 


Gl 


12:00 


y 


WJZ 


M8 


12:00 


5M 


WEAF 


T20 


12:30 


y 


WEAF* 


D2 


12:30 


% 


WJZ 


M17 



Easy Aces 

Ben Bemie's Blue Ribbon Orchestra 

Willard Robison Orchestra, Folk Music 
Andre Kostelanetz Dance Orchestra 
Nino Martini and Symphony Orchestra 
Ed Wynn and Fire Chief Band 
Tune Detective, Sigmund Spaeth 

Five Star Theatre 

Household Musical Memories, Edgar A. Guest 

Lives at Stake, Dramatic Sketch 

Edwin C. Hill — The Human Side of the News 

Howard Barlow, Symphony Orchestra 

Amos 'n' Andy 

Threads of Happiness 

Dance Orchestra 

Adventures in Health, Dr. Bundesen 

Cotton Club Dance Orchestra 

Ralph Kirbery in Song (Standard) 
Ben Bernie's Blue Ribbon Orchestra 
Edgewater Beach Dance Orchestra 



WEDNESDAY MORNING 



6:45 


iy 


WEAF 


G4 


7:30 


y 


WJZ 


Q3 


8:00 


y 


WEAF 


P3 


8:00 


y 


WJZ 


Qll 


8:30 


y 


WEAF 


K15 


9:00 


y 


WJZ 


W6 


9:00 


y 


WEAF 


Z4 


9:00 


y 


WABC 


Q9 


9:15 


y 


WJZ 


M60 


9:15 


y 


WABC 


Q15 


9:30 


y 


WABC 


G3 


9:45 


y 


WEAF 


V3 


9:45 


y 


WJZ 


Q14 


9:45 


y 


WABC 


R18 


10:00 


Vi 


WABC 


Q4 


10:15 


y 


WABC 


T18 


10:15 


y 


WEAF 


K5 


10:15 


y 


WJZ 


Z5 


10:30 


y 


WEAF 


L23 


10:45 


y 


WABC 


R7 


10:45 


y 


WEAF 


E2 


11:00 


y 


WABC* 


F22 


11:00 


y 


WJZ 


11 


11:15 


y 


WEAF 


E5 


11:45 


y 


WABC* 


R7 



Tower Health Exercises 

Patter and Song 

Organ Rhapsody, Doc Whipple 

Patter and Song 

Glee Club 

Morning Devotions, Religious Music 

Cheerio, Inspiration and Song 

Tony Wons, Patter and Song 

Dance Band 

Goldy and Dusty, The Silver Dust Twins 

Modern Living Health Talk 
Anne Hard, Current Events 
Patter and Song 
Little Jack Little, Piano, Song 
The Oxol Feature 

Standard Music, Vincent Sorey 

Quartet 

Clara, Lu 'n' Em, Humorous Sketch 

Instrumental Music, Classical 

Pedro de Cordoba, Will Osborne Orchestra 

Betty Crocker, Food Talk 

The Voice of Experience 

U. S. Army Band 

Radio Household Institute, Food Talk 

Friendly Philosopher, Popular Music 



WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON 



12:00 


y 


WEAF 


R39 


12:00 


y 


WJZ 


Z16 


12:30 


y 


WJZ 


N10 


12:30 


y 


WABC 


T8 


12:45 


y 


WJZ 


T25 


1:05 


y 


WJZ 


N22 


1:15 


y 


WABC 


M19 


1:30 


y 


WABC 


J2 


1:30 


y 


WABC 


T28 


1:30 


i 


WJZ 


H5 


2:00 


y 


WEAF 


M40 


2:00 


y 


WABC 


PI 


2:30 


y 


WABC 


T6 


2:30 


y 


WJZ 


M50 


2:45 


V2 


WABC 


R31 


3:00 


y 


WJZ 


Z2 


3:00 


y 


WEAF 


L3 


3:15 


y 


WABC 


L14 


3:30 


y 


WEAF 


F23 


3:45 


y 


WABC 


K3 


4:00 


y 


WEAF 


L17 


4:00 


i 


WABC 


M23 


4:45 


y 


WABC 


F6 


4:45 


y 


WEAF 


A4 


5:00 


y 


WABC 


R5 


5:15 


y 


WJZ 


C5 


5:30 


y 


WJZ 


C13 


5:30 


y 


WABC 


C14 



Popular Songs 

Variety Show 

Male Quartet 

Concert Miniatures, Emery Deutsch 

Dance and Song 

Medley, Organ and Vocal 
George Hall Dance Orchestra 
Madison Ensemble, Chorus 
Scherban's Russian Gypsies Orchestra 
National Farm and Home Hour 

Palais D'or Dance Orchestra 

Ann Leaf at the Organ 

Artist Recital, Standard Music 

Dance and Song 

Rhythm Kings, Popular Music 

Betty and Bob, Humorous Sketch 
Grande Trio, Instrumental, Classical 
Madame Belle Forbes Cutter 
Women's Radio Review 
The Eton Boys, Male Quartet 

Medley, Classical 

Dance Orchestras 

Going to Press, by Editors 

Vincent Sorey's Orchestra, Beauty Talk 

The Captivators, Popular Music 

Dick Daring, a Boy of Today 
The Singing Lady, for Children 
Skippy 



Start Hrs. 



Key 



Index 



Program Description 



WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON, (cont'd) 



5:45 
5:45 
5:45 



9:00 
9:00 
9:00 
9:15 
9:15 

9:30 
9:45 
9:45 
9:45 
10:00 

10:00 
10:15 
10:15 



WEAF 
WABC 
WJZ 



Cll 

R8 

C8 



Paul Wing, the Story Man, for Children 
Do Re Mi Female Trio, Popular Songs 
Little Orphan Annie 



WEDNESDAY EVENING 



6:00 


y 


WEAF 


L12 


6:15 


y 


WJZ 


C5 


6:15 


y 


WJZ 


C6 


6:30 


y 


WABC 


R23 


6:30 


y 


WEAF 


V4 


6:30 


y 


WABC* 


C14 


6:45 


y 


WJZ 


V8 


6:45 


y 


WJZ* 


C8 


6:45 


y 


WABC 


X10 


7:00 


y 


WJZ 


Zl 


7:15 


y 


WEAF 


BB4 


7:15 


y 


WJZ 


R21 


7:15 


y 


WABC 


Z3 


7:30 


y 


WABC 


R41 


7:30 


y 


WABC* 


C4 


7:30 


y 


WJZ 


L22 


7:45 


y 


WEAF 


X7 


7:45 


y 


WABC 


VI 


8:00 


y 


WABC 


F22 


8:00 


y 


WJZ 


Y2 


8:00 


y 


WEAF 


T5 


8:30 


y 


WABC 


R17 


8:30 


y^ 


WEAF 


R38 


8:45 


y 


WJZ 


D3 


8:45 


y 


WABC 


R14 


9:00 


y 


WABC 


F7 


9:00 


y 


WEAF 


T4 


9:00 


y 


WJZ 


Yl 


9:15 


y 


WABC 


M32 


9:30 


y 


WABC 


DD16 


9:30 


y 


WEAF 


L7 


10:00 


y 


WJZ 


N12 


10:00 


y 


WABC 


DD13 


10:00 


y 


WEAF 


DD7 


10:15 


y 


WJZ 


D8 


10:30 


y 


WABC 


V5 


10:30 


y 


WEAF* 


BB2 


10:45 


y 


WABC 


U2 


11:00 


y 


WJZ* 


Zl 


11:00 


y 


WEAF 


M27 


11:15 


y 


WABC 


R18 


11:15 


y 


WJZ* 


R21 


11:30 


y 


WEAF 


M35 


11:30 


y 


WJZ 


K8 


11:30 


iy 


WABC 


M13 


12:00 


5M 


WEAF 


T20 


12:00 


y 


WJZ 


M41 


12:05 


y 


WEAF 


M7 


12:15 


y 


WJZ* 


Yl 


12:30 


y 


WJZ 


M42 


12:30 


y 


WEAF 


M17 



Waldorf-Astoria Orcnestra, Classical 
Dick Daring, a Boy of Today 
King Kill Kare and Adolph 
Happy Wonder Bakers 
News in Washington, William Hard 

Skippy 

Lowell Thomas, Today's News 

Little Orphan Annie, for Children 

Just Plain Bill (after May 22, 7:30 p. m.) 

Amos 'n' Andy 

Burton Holmes, Century of Progress 
Everett Marshall, Al Mitchell's Orchestra 
Buck Rogers in the Year 2433 
Dolph Martin's Orchestra, Travelers Quartet 
The Devil Bird 

String Symphony, Classical 

The Goldbergs, Dramatic Sketch 

Boake Carter 

The Voice of Experience 

Enos Crime Clues, Mystery Sketch 

Chase and Sanborn, Fannie Brice, George Olson 
La Palina Presents Kate Smith 
Woodbury Program, Popular Music 
Phil Cook and Ingram Shavers, Comedy 
Hot from Hollywood 

Gulf Program, Irvin S. Cobb 
Ferde Grofe's Orchestra, with Ranny Weeks 
Adventures of Sherlock Holmes 
Manhattan Serenaders, Dance Music 
Robert Burns Panatela Program, Guy Lombardo, 
Burns and Allen, Phil Regan 

Mischa Levitzki 

Revellers Quartet 

Old Gold Program, Fred Warings Pennsylvanians, 

Geo. Givot and "Mandy Lou" 
Corn Cob Pipe Club of Virginia, Variety 
Irene Franklin and Jerry Jarnagin 

Edwin C. Hill, Human Side of News 

Exploring America with Conoco, Carveth Wells 

Light Opera Gems, Channon Collinge 

Amos 'n' Andy 

St. Regis Dance Orchestra 

Little Jack Little, Vocalist, Pianist 
Everett Marshall, Al Mitchell's Orchestra 
Hotel McAlpin Orchestra 
Master Singers, Chorus 
Dance Orchestras 
Ralph Kirbery, Baritone 

Dance Orchestra 

College Inn Dance Orchestra 

Adventures of Sherlock Holmes 

Hotel Pennsylvania Dance Orchestra 

Edgewater Beach Dance Orchestra 



THURSDAY MORNING 



WEAF 

WJZ 

WJZ 

WEAF 

WEAF 

WJZ 

WEAF 

WABC 

WJZ 

WABC 

WABC 

WJZ 

WABC 

WEAF 

WEAF 

WABC 

WJZ 

WABC 



G4 
Q3 
Q8 
P4 
K15 

W6 

Z4 

Q9 

M60 

Q15 

G3 

Q14 

R18 

V3 

E4 

T18 

Z5 

E6 



Tower Health Exercises 

Patter and Song 

Wife Saver, Humorous Sketch 

Radio City Organ 

Glee Club 

Morning Devotions, Religious Music 
Cheerio, Inspiration and Song 
Tony Wons, Patter and Song 
Dance Band 
Goldy and Dusty 

Modern Living Health Talk 
Patter and Song 
Little Jack Little, Piano 
Anne Hard, Current Events 
Mystery Chef, Food Talks 

Luxembourg Gardens, Standard Music 
Clara, Lu 'n' Em, Humorous Sketch 
Ida Bailey Allen, Radio Home Makers 



NOTE: — Column I, Eastern Daylight Saving Time. Column 3, key station of chains, WEAF indicates Red Network of NBC, WJZ indicates Blue Network of NBC and 
WABC indicates network of CBS. Column 4, index number refers to the Classified Schedule, which is arranged alphabetically as to subjects, and numerically as to 
each classification. Wherever, in column 3, key station is marked with ('}, programs are broadcast over part of chain, but key station in New York is omitted. 



TELLS 'YOU WHAT 



WHEN AND WHERE 



•Notice of copyright. Method of 



cment copyrighted. Infringement will be prosecuted. 



June 



RADIO 



F A N - F A R E 



23 



PROGRAM 



FINDER 



DAY BY DAY SCHEDULE 



Start Hrs 



Key 



Index 



Program Description 



THURSDAY MORNING, (cont'd) 



10:30 
10:30 




WEAF 
WABC 


04 
K4 


10:45 
10:45 
11:00 
11:00 
11:15 


Y 

Y, 

y, 


WABC 
WJZ 
WABC* 
WABC 

WEAF 


Al 
H3 

F22 

A2 

El 


11:15 
11:30 
11:45 


y 

Y 

Y 


WABC 
WABC 
WABC 


T23 
N8 
R16 



The Happy Rambler, Novelty Music 
The Four Clubmen, Male Quartet 

Barbara Gould 

The Cellophane Program, Emily Post 

The Voice of Experience 

Fashion Forecast 

Frances Lee Barton, Food Talks 

Morning Moods, Standard Music 

Magic Tenor and Round Towners Quartet 

Keenan and Phillips, Piano, Popular 



THURSDAY AFTERNOON 



12:00 


V, 


WABC 


M20 


12:00 


V* 


WEAF 


R39 


12:00 


M. 


WJZ 


Z16 


12:30 


Y 


WABC 


T8 


12:30 


Yi 


WEAF 


M40 


1:05 


v> 


WJZ 


N22 


1:15 


Y 


WEAF 


M40 


1:30 


Y 


WABC 


R28 


1:30 


y 


WEAF 


Nil 


1:30 


i 


WJZ 


H5 


2:00 


y 


WEAF 


M29 


2:00 


y 


WABC 


PI 


2:30 


y 


WEAF 


Q12 


3:00 


y 


WJZ 


Z2 


3:00 


y 


WABC 


L6 


3:15 


y 


WJZ 


M43 


3:30 


y 


WABC 


M58 


3:30 


y 


WEAF 


F23 


4:00 


y 


WJZ 


N15 


4:00 


■y 


WABC 


11 


4:15 


y 


WEAF 


L21 


4:30 


y 


WJZ 


N14 


4:45 


y 


WABC 


Fl 


4:45 


y 


WEAF 


C7 


5:00 


y 


WJZ 


L20 


5:00 


y 


WABC 


M19 


5:15 


y 


WJZ 


C5 


5:30 


y 


WJZ 


C13 


5:30 


y 


WABC 


C14 


5:45 


y 


WJZ 


C8 



Buddy Harrod and his Orchestra 

Popular Songs 

Variety Show 

Concert Miniatures, Emery Deutsch 

Palais D'or Dance Orchestra 

Medley, Organ and Vocal 
Palais d'or Dance Orchestra 
Palmer House Ensemble, Dance Music 
Medley, Song and Instrumental 
National Farm and Home Hour 

Lotus Gardens Dance Orchestra 

Ann Leaf at the Organ 

Patter and Song 

Betty and Bob, Humorous Sketch 

LaForge Berumen Musicale, Classical 

Dance and Song 

Frank Westphal Dance Orchestra 

Women's Radio Review 

Medley Music 

U. S. Army Band 

Kathleen Stewart, Classical Pianist 
Medley, Orchestral and Song 
American Legion Program 
Lady Next Door, for Children 
Sonata Recital, Classical 

George Hall Dance Orchestra 

Dick Daring, a Boy of Today 

The Singing Lady, for Children 

Skippy 

Little Orphan Annie, for Children 



THURSDAY EVENING 



6:00 


y 


WABC 


V2 


6:00 


y 


WEAF 


L12 


6:15 


y 


WJZ 


C5 


6:15 


y 


WABC* 


M37 


6:30 


y 


WABC 


R3 


6:30 


5M 


WEAF 


V6 


6:30 


y 


WABC* 


C14 


6:30 


y 


WJZ 


S3 


6:45 


y 


WJZ* 


C8 


6:45 


y 


WABC 


X10 


6:45 


y 


WEAF 


T24 


6:45 


y 


WJZ 


V8 


7:00 


y 


WJZ 


Zl 


7:15 


y 


WABC 


Z3 


7:15 


y 


WEAF 


BB4 


7:15 


y 


WJZ 


Z14 


7:30 


y 


WJZ 


L13 


7:30 


v* 


WABC* 


C4 


7:30 


y 


WABC 


Z7 


7:45 


y 


WABC 


VI 


7:45 


y 


WEAF 


X7 


7:45 


y 


WJZ 


V9 


8:00 


y 


WABC 


R9 


8:00 


y 


WJZ 


XI 


8:00 


y 


WEAF 


DD11 


8:30 


y 


WABC 


R17 


8:30 


y 


WJZ 


X14 


8:45 


y 


WABC 


R14 


9:00 


y 


WABC 


X3 


9:00 


y 


WJZ 


X2 



Current Events, H. V. Kaltenborn 
Waldorf-Astoria Orchestra, Classical 
Dick Daring, a Boy of Today 
Ozzie Nelson Dance Orchestra 
Betty Barthell, Popular Songs 

John B. Kennedy, News Comment 

Skippy 

Old Songs of Church, Religious Music 

Little Orphan Annie, for Children 

Just Plain Bill (after May 22, 7:30 p. m.) 

Countess Olga Albani, Standard Song 
Lowell Thomas, Today's News 
Amos 'n' Andy 

Buck Rogers in the Year 2433 
Burton Holmes, Century of Progress 

Booth Tarkington's Maud and Cousin Bill 

Concert Medley, Classical 

The Devil Bird 

Jack Dempsey's Gymnasium 

Boake Carter 

The Goldbergs 

Merle Thorpe, News Comment 

Evan Evans, Do Re Mi ; Freddie Rich 

Captain Diamond's Adventures, Dramatic 

Fleischmann Hour, Rudy Vallee, Variety Show 

La Palina Presents Kate Smith 

Rin Tin Tin Thriller, Dramatic 

Hot from Hollywood 

Easy Aces 

Death Valley Days, Dramatic 



Start Hrs 



Key 



Index 



Program Description 



THURSDAY EVENING, (cont'd) 



9:00 


1 


WEAF 


DD12 


9:15 


y 


WABC 


N4 


9:30 


y 


WJZ 


A3 


9:30 


Yi 


WABC 


Z13 


10:00 


i 


WEAF 


D6 


10:15 


y 


WABC 


M6 


10:30 


y 


WABC 


R4 


10:45 


y 


WABC 


Rl 


11:00 


y 


WJZ* 


Zl 


11:00 


y 


WEAF 


T22 


11:15 


y 


WEAF 


M35 


11:15 


y 


WABC 


R6 


11:30 


ly 


WABC 


M14 


11:30 


y 


WEAF 


M42 


12:00 


5M 


WEAF 


T20 


12:00 


y 


WJZ 


Ml 


12:05 


y 


WEAF 


M8 


12:30 


Y. 


WJZ 


M15 



Capt. Henry's Maxwell House Show Boat 
Fray and Braggiotti, Piano, Popular 
Lady Esther Serenade, Beauty Talk 
Colonel Stoopnagle and Budd 

Lucky Strike Hour, Jack Pearl 

California Melodies, Guest Stars, Raymond Paig 

The Boswell Sisters, Popular Song 

Howard Barlow and Symphony Orchestra 

Amos 'n' Andy 

James Melton, Tenor, Standard Music 

Hotel McAlpin Orchestra 

Charles Carlile, Tenor, Popular Songs 

Dance Orchestra 

Hotel Pennsylvania Dance Orchestra 

Ralph Kirbery in Song, Standard 
Hotel Lexington Dance Orchestra 
Cotton Club Dance Orchestra 
Dancing in the Twin Cities 



FRIDAY MORNING 



6:45 
7:30 
8:00 
8:00 
8:30 


iy 
y 
y 

Yi 

y 


WEAF 

WJZ 

WJZ 

WEAF 

WEAF 


G4 

Q3 

Qll 

P3 

K15 


Tower Health Exercises 

Patter and Song 

Patter and Song 

Organ Rhapsody, Doc Whipple 

Glee Club 


9:00 
9:00 
9:00 
9:15 
9:15 


y 

Yi 

y 

y 
y 


WJZ 

WEAF 

WABC 

WJZ 

WABC 


W6 

Z4 

Q9 

M60 

Q15 


Morning Devotions, Religious Service 
Cheerio, Inspiration and Song 
Tony Wons, Patter and Song 
Dance Band 
Goldie and Dusty 


9:30 
9:45 
9:45 
9:45 
10:00 


y 
y 
y 
y 
y 


WABC 

WJZ 

WABC 

WEAF 

WABC 


G3 

Q14 

R18 

V3 

Q4 


Modern Living Health Talk 
Patter and Song 

Little Jack Little, Popular Music 
Anne Hard, Current Events 
The Oxol Feature 


10:15 
10:15 
10:30 
10:45 
10:45 


y 
y 
y 
y 
y 


WJZ 

WABC 

WEAF 

WEAF 

WABC 


Z5 

T18 
04 
E2 
R7 


Clara, Lu 'n' Em, Humorous Sketch 
Luxembourg Gardens, Standard Music 
The Happy Rambler, Novelty Music 
Betty Crocker, Food Talk 
Will Osborne Orchestra, Pedro de Cordoba 


11:00 
11:30 

11:45 


y 

y 
y 


WABC 

WABC* 

WABC* 


F22 
R3 7 
R7 


The Voice of Experience 

Sprague Warner Program 

Will Osborne Orchestra, Pedro de Cordoba 



FRIDAY AFTERNOON 



12:00 
12:00 
12:30 
12:30 
12:30 


y 
y 
y 
y 
y 


WEAF 

WJZ 

WABC 

WJZ 

WEAF 


R39 

Z16 

T8 

N10 

M40 


Popular Songs 

Variety Show 

Concert Miniatures, Emery Deutsch 

Male Quartet 

Palais d'or Dance Orchestra 


12:45 
1:05 
1:15 
1:30 
1:30 


y. 
y. 
y 
y 
i 


WJZ 

WJZ 

WEAF 

WEAF 

WJZ 


T25 
N22 
M25 
L15 
H5 


Dance and Song 

Medley, Organ and Vocal 

Dance Orchestra 

Essex House Ensemble, Classical Music 

National Farm and Home Hour 


2:00 
2:30 
2:30 
2:45 
3:00 


Yi 

y 
y 
y 

y 


WEAF 
WABC 
WEAF 
WABC 
WABC 


F13 

K10 

Q12 

F3 

T7 


Magic of Speech, Talk 
Round Towners, Male Quartet 
Patter and Song 
Columbia Educational Features 
Salon Orchestra, Standard Music 


3:00 
3:00 
3:15 
3:15 
3:30 


y 
y 
y 
y 
y. 


WEAF 

WJZ 

WABC 

WEAF 

WEAF 


L10 

Z2 
L19 
X4 
F23 


Charles Gilbert Spross, classical music 
Betty and Bob, Humorous Sketch 
Alex Semmler, Concert Pianist 
Famous Lovers, Dramatic 
Women's Radio Review 


4:00 
4:00 
4:15 
4:30 
4:30 


Yi 

y 
y 

y 
y. 


WABC 

WJZ 

WEAF 

WABC 

WJZ 


DD9 

M47 
H2 
11 
T2 


The Grab Bag, Choruses and Glee Clubs 

Dance Orchestra 

Benjamin Moore Triangle Club, decorating 

U. S. Army Band 

Arcadians, Vocal and Instrumental 


4:45 
5:00 


y 

Ya 


WEAF 
WABC 


C7 
C15 


Lady Next Door, for Children 
Don Lang, True Animal Stories 



NOTE: — Column I, Eastern Daylight Saving Time. Column 3, key station of chains, WEAF indicates Red Network of NBC, WJZ indicates Blue Network of NBC and 
WABC indicates network of CBS. Column 4, index number refers to the Classified Schedule, which is arranged alphabetically as to subjects, and numerically as to 
each classification. Wherever, in column 3, key station is marked with (*), programs are broadcast over part of chain, but key station in New York is omitted 



TELLS YOU WHAT 



WHEN AND WHERE 



*Notice of copyright. Method of arrangement copyrighted. Infringement will be prosecuted. 



24 



Radio Fan-Fare 



RADIO FAN-FARE PROGRAM FINDER 



DAY BY DAY SCHEDULE 



Start Hrs 



Key 



Index 



Program Description 



FRIDAY AFTERNOON, (cont'd) 



5:15 
5:15 
5:30 


X 

y< 

X 


WJZ 

WEAF 

WJZ 


C5 

R15 

C13 


5:30 
5:45 
5:45 
5:45 


X 

X 
X 

X 


WABC 
WEAF 
WABC 
WJZ 


C14 
Cll 
C16 
C8 



Dick Daring, a Boy of Today 
Arlene Jackson, Torch Songs 
The Singing Lady, for Children 

Skippy 

Paul Wing, the Story Man, for Children 

Stamp Adventurers Club 

Little Orphan Annie, for Children 



FRIDAY EVENING 



6:00 


Vi 


WEAF 


L12 


Waldorf-Astoria Orchestra, Classical 


6:15 


x 


WJZ 


C6 


King Kill Kare and Adolph, for Children 


6:15 


X 


WJZ* 


C5 


Dick Daring, a Boy of Today 


6:30 


X 


WABC* 


C14 


Skippy 


6:30 


x 


WABC 


R23 


Happy Wonder Bakers 


6:30 


x 


WJZ 


Q6 


Tastyeast Jesters 


6:45 


X 


WABC 


X10 


Just Plain Bill (after May 22, 7:30 p. m.) 


6:45 


X 


WJZ* 


C8 


Little Orphan Annie, for Children 


6:45 


X 


WJZ 


V8 


Lowell Thomas, Today's News 


7:00 


X 


WJZ 


Zl 


Amos 'n' Andy 


7:00 


X 


WEAF 


06 


Borrah Minevitch and Harmonica Rascals 


7:15 


x 


WEAF 


BB4 


Burton Holmes, Century of Progress 


7:15 


y 


WABC 


Z3 


Buck Rogers in the Year 2433 


7:15 


X 


WJZ 


Z14 


Booth Tarkington's Maud and Cousin Bill 


7:15 


X 


WEAF 


Z9 


Variety Show 


7:30 


X 


WABC* 


C4 


The Devil Bird 


7:30 


x 


WJZ 


Y3 


Five Star Theatre, Charlie Chan, Mystery 


7:30 


x 


WABC 


R41 


Dolph Martin's Orchestra and Travelers Quartet 


7:45 


X 


WEAF 


X7 


The Goldbergs, Dramatic Sketch 


7:45 


X 


WABC 


VI 


Boake Carter 


8:00 


x 


WABC 


L2S 


Nino Martini and Symphony Orchestra 


8:00 


Xi 


WJZ 


M38 


Nestle's Program, Medley 


8:00 


i 


WEAF 


N2 


Cities Serv. Concert, Medley, Jessica Dragonette 


8:30 


y 


WJR 


Gl 


Adventures in Health, Dr. Bundeson 


8:30 


X 


WABC 


X6 


The Foreign Legion 


8:45 


X 


WJZ 


D3 


Phil Cook and His Ingram Shavers 


9:00 


y. 


WJZ 


X5 


The First Nighter, Dramatic 


9:00 


x 


WABC 


F7 


Gulf Program, Irvin S. Cobb 


9:00 


X 


WEAF 


BB1 


Best Foods Musical Grocery Store, Variety 


9:15 


x 


WABC 


R3 


Betty Barthell, Popular Music 


9:30 


y?. 


WJZ 


Dl 


Phil Baker, the Armour Jester, Comedy 


9:30 


x 


WEAF 


M44 


Pond's Program, Popular Music 


9:30 


X 


WABC 


F21 


Socony Vacuum Presents "The Inside Story" 
with Edwin C. Hill, Nathaniel Shilkret's Orch. 


10:00 


X 


WEAF 


DD3 


Chevrolet Program, Jack Benny, Variety 


10:00 


x 


WABC 


DD6 


Columbia Review, Variety 


10:15 


X 


WJZ 


D8 


Irene Franklin and Jerry Jamagin 


10:30 


X 


WABC 


R18 


Little Jack Little 


10:30 


x 


WEAF 


DD15 


Richfield Country Club, Variety Show 


11:00 


y 


WJZ* 


Zl 


Amos 'n' Andy 


11:00 


x 


WEAF 


M27 


St. Regis Dance Orchestra 


11:15 


x 


WABC 


R8 


Female Trio, Popular Music 


11:30 


y 


WEAF 


M17 


Edgewater Beach Dance Orchestra 


11:30 


iy 


WABC 


M31 


Dance Orchestras 


11:45 


y 


WJZ* 


Gl 


Adventures in Health, Dr. Bundeson 


12:00 


5M 


WEAF 


T20 


Ralph Kirbery in Song (Standard) 


12:00 


u 


WJZ 


M8 


Cotton Club Dance Orchestra 


12:05 


Vi 


WEAF 


Ml 


Hotel Lexington Dance Orchestra 


12:30 


y* 


WJZ 


M55 


Village Bam Dance Orchestra 


12:30 


y? 


WEAF 


DD1 


Best Foods Musical Grocery Store 


12:30 


X 


WEAF 


M4 


Hotel Biltmore Dance Orchestra 



SATURDAY MORNING 



6:45 


1'4 


WEAF 


G4 


7:30 


'4 


WJZ 


03 


8:00 


X 


WJZ 


08 


8:00 


X 


WEAF 


P4 


8:30 


X 


WEAF 


K15 


9:00 


X 


WJZ 


W6 


9:00 


'/? 


WEAF 


Z4 


9:15 


v> 


WJZ 


M60 


9:45 


X 


WJZ 


014 


9:45 


X 


WABC 


R18 


9:45 


X 


WEAF 


T31 


10:00 


y 


WABC 


W4 


10:15 


y 


WEAF 


N20 


10:45 


X 


WJZ 


P2 


11:00 


y 


WABC 


CI 



Tower Health Exercises 

Patter and Song 

Wife Saver, Alna Prescott, Humorous 

Radio City Organ 

Glee Club 

Morning Devotions, Religious Music 

Cheerio, Inspiration and Song 

Dance Band 

Patter and Song 

Little Jack Little, Popular Music 

Vass Family, Chorus, Folk Song 
Elder Michaux and His Congregation 
Novelty Music 
Larry Larson, Organist 
Adventures of Helen and Mary 



Start Hrs 



Key 



Index 



Program Description 



SATURDAY MORNING (cont'd) 



:00 


a 


:15 


y 


:30 


X 


:30 


y 


:30 


y 



WJZ 

WEAF 

WABC 

WABC* 

WEAF 



E3 

E5 

T8 

R37 

T33 



Forecast School of Cookery 
Radio Household Institute, Food 
Concert Miniatures, Standard Music 
Sprague Warner Program 
Orchestra, Standard and Classical 



SATURDAY AFTERNOON 



12:00 


X 


WEAF 


R39 


12:00 


X 


WJZ 


Z16 


12:30 


y 


WEAF 


M25 


1:00 


x 


WABC 


M19 


1:00 


x 


WEAF 


Ml 


1:05 


y 


WJZ 


N22 


1:30 


y 


WABC 


J2 


1:30 


% 


WEAF 


M4 


1:30 


i 


WJZ 


H5 


2:00 


X 


WABC 


T9 


2:00 


X 


WEAF 


M59 


2:15 


X 


WABC 


RU 


2:30 


y 


WABC 


L18 


3:00 


X 


WABC 


T19 


3:00 


X 


WJZ 


M43 


3:00 


y 


WEAF 


M34 


3:30 


Vi 


WABC 


M51 


3:30 


y 


WEAF 


P7 


3:30 


X 


WJZ 


M5 7 


4:00 


X 


WJZ 


M16 


4:00 


1 


WEAF 


DD19 


4:15 


X 


WABC 


R36 


5:00 


y% 


WJZ 


M48 


5:30 


y 


WABC 


C14 


5:45 


X 


WJZ 


C8 


5:45 


X 


WABC 


T15 



Popular Songs 

Variety Show 

Hotel Kenmore Dance Orchestra 

George Hall Hotel Taft Dance Orchestra 

Hotel Lexington Dance Orchestra 

Medley, Organ and Vocal 
Madison Ensemble, Chorus 
Hotel Biltmore Dance Orchestra 
National Farm and Home Hour 
Dancing Echoes, Standard Music 

Golden Pheasant Dance Orchestra 
Five Octaves, Popular Music 
Savitt String Quartet, Classical 
Italian Idyll, Standard Music 
Radio Troubadours, Dance and Song 

Merry Madcaps, Dance and Tenor 
Hall Thompson's Dance Orchestra 
Lew White at the Organ 
Dance and Song 
Dance Music 

Week-end Review, Variety Show 

Tony Wons, Popular Music 

Sherman Hotel Dance Orchestra 

Skippy 

Little Orphan Annie, for Children 

Tito Guizar, Mexican Tenor 



SATURDAY EVENING 



6:00 


X 


WABC 


Bl 


6:00 


y 


WJZ 


Ml 


6:00 


X 


WEAF 


L12 


6:30 


14 


WJZ 


H4 


6:30 


X 


WABC* 


C14 


6:45 


X 


WJZ* 


C8 


7:00 


X 


WABC 


F20 


7:00 


X 


WJZ 


HI 


7:15 


y 


WEAF 


BB4 


7:15 


X 


WJZ 


R21 


7:30 


K 


WJZ 


M54 


7:30 


y 


WABC 


Z7 


7:45 


X 


WEAF 


VI 1 


7:45 


y 


WJZ 


R22 


8:00 


X 


WJZ 


F10 


8:15 


X 


WABC 


R20 


8:30 


y 


WEAF 


DD10 


8:30 


X 


WABC 


M2 


8:30 


X 


WEAF 


F5 


9:00 


X 


WABC 


X3 


9:00 


X 


WEAF 


T4 


9:15 


X 


WABC 


R4 


9:30 


y 


WEAF 


Y6 


9:45 


X 


WABC 


DD17 


10:00 


X 


WJZ 


T14 


10:00 


i 


WEAF 


M45 


10:15 


X 


WABC 


F4 


10:30 


y 


WJZ 


Z6 


10:45 


y 


WABC 


R25 


11:00 


X 


WEAF 


P6 


11:00 


\y 


WABC 




11:10 


y 


WEAF 


M56 


11:15 


X 


WJZ* 


R21 


11:30 


y 


WEAF 


M4 


12:00 


5M 


WEAF 


T20 


12:00 


X 


WABC 


M18 


12:00 


y^. 


WJZ 


M17 


12:05 




WEAF 


M42 


12:30 




WEAF 


M24 


12:30 


X 


WJZ 


M30 



America's Grub Street Speaks 
Hotel Lexington Dance Orchestra 
Waldorf-Astoria Orchestra, Classical 
Laws That Safeguard Society, Lectures 
Skippy 

Little Orphan Annie, for Children 

The Political Situation, Frederic Wile 

American Taxpayers, Talks 

Burton Holmes, Century of Progress 

Everett Marshall, Al Mitchell's Orchestra 

Paul Victorine's Dance Orchestra 
Jack Dempsey's Gymnasium 
World Today, News Reports 
Irene Bordoni, Emil Coleman 
Educational Lectures 

The Magic Voice, Elsie Hitz, Nick Dawson 
Kaltenmeyer's Kindergarten, Variety Show 
Leon Belasco Dance Orchestra 
Economic World, Lectures 
Easy Aces 

Ferde Grofe's Orchestra, with Ranny Weeks, 

Standard Music 
Boswell Sisters, Popular Music 
K-7, Mystery Sketch 
Saturday Frivolities, Variety Show 
Gilbert and Sullivan, Musical Gems 

Saturday Night Dancing Party 
Columbia Public Affairs Institute 
Cuckoo Program, Ray Knight, Comedy 
Gertrude Niesen, Popular Songs 
Standard Music, Organ and Vocal 

Dance Orchestras 
Waldorf-Astoria Dance Orchestra 
Everett Marshall, Al Mitchell's Orchestra 
Hotel Biltmore Dance Orchestra 
Ralph Kirbery in Song (Standard) 

Ted Fiorito Dance Orchestra, San Francisco 
Edgewater Beach Dance Orchestra 
Hotel Pennsylvania Dance Orchestra 
Hotel Ambassador, Los Angeles 
Hotel Shoreham Dance Orchestra 



NOTE: — Column I, Eastern Daylight Saving Time. Column 3, key station of chains. WEAF indicates Red Network of NBC, WJZ indicates Blue Network of NBC and 
WABC indicates network of CBS. Column 4, index number refers to the Classified Schedule, which is arranged alphabetically as to subjects, and numerically as to 
each classification. Wherever, in column 3, key station is marked with (*), programs are broadcast over part of chain, but key station in New York is omitted. 



TELLS YOU WHAT 



WHEN AND WHERE 



"Notice of copyright. Method of arrangement copyrighted. Infringement will be prosecuted. 



June 



RADIO 



25 



F A N - F A R E 



PROGRAM FINDER 



ARTIST SCHEDULE 



Index 



N 1 

T24 

LI 

Q12 

E6 

04 

S3 

W6 

L23 

L23 

M24 

XS 

X 14 
Z 1 
H4 

Z6 

DD 18 
K2 
T3 
Y2 

G4 
DD 2 
K8 
D 1 
T32 

N2 
T 14 
Rl 
L28 
DD 15 

R3 
R2 
El 
C8 

A4 

M2 
M 12 
R38 
X2 
Y 1 

C8 

T2 
DD3 
X7 
D2 

T33 

M 3 
M 46 
R6 
R24 

R35 
L6 

M 1 
M 4 

Nil 

DD3 

L22 
M 11 
M55 
C 5 

N 16 

D2 

Q6 

X2 

R22 

R4 
N2 
N9 
M 56 
B3 

T5 
X5 
C5 
M 23 
DD9 

Gl 
DD 16 
Q13 
K 14 
M 5 

C8 



Artist 



A. & P. Gypsies 
Albani, Countess Olga 
Alda, Mme. Frances 
Allen, Grant 
Allen, Ida Bailey 

Allen, Lucy 
Allmand, Joyce 
Allmand, Joyce 
Altman, Julian 
Altman, Sylvia 

Ambassador Hotel, Los 

Angeles 
Ameche, Don 
Ameche, Don 
Amos 'n' Andy 
Archer, Dean Gleason L. 

Armbruster, Robert 
Arnold, Jean 
Arnold, Jean 
Arnold, Rhoda 
Backus, Georgia 

Bagley, Arthur 
Bailey, Ilomay 
Baker, Charles 
Baker, Phil 
Balladeers, The 

Banta, Frank 
Barclay, John 
Barlow, Howard 
Barlow, Howard 
Barthell, Betty 

Barthell, Betty 
Bartlett, Albert 
Barton, Frances Lee 
Baruck, Allan 
Baxter, Gladys 

Belasco, Leon 
Belasco, Leon 
Belasco, Leon 
Bell, Joseph 
Bell, Joseph 

Bell, Shirley 
Bello, Ruth Kelly 
Benny, Jack 
Berg, Gertrude 
Bernie, Ben 

Berr, Nanette 
Berrens, Fred 
Berrens, Fred 
Berrens, Fred 
Berrens, Fred 

Berrens, Fred 

Berumen, LaForge 

Bestor, Don 

Biltmore Hotel Concert 

Orchestra 
Biviano, Joe 

Black, Frank 
Black, Frank 
Black, Ted 
Black, Ted 
Blaine, Joan 

Blake, George 
Blue Ribbon Orchestra 
Bonham, Guy 
Bonime, Joseph 
Bordoni, Irene 

Boswell Sisters 
Bourdon, Rosario 
Bowes, Major 
Brandwynne, Nat 
Brewster, John 

Brice, Fanny 
Brickert, Carlton 
Briggs, Donald 
Brooks, Jack 
Brooks and Ross 

Bundeson, Dr. Herman 

Burns & Allen 

Butler, Ann 

Cain, Noble 

Calloway, Blanche & Orch. 

Cansdale, Harry 



Index 


R 1 
R6 
T3 
Q6 


Z5 

V 1 

U3 
N2 
A4 


Z 4 
K 14 
DD 18 
Z 5 
DD 18 


DD 5 
M 34 
F7 
R 22 
M 7 


U2 
DD 11 
Y3 
D3 

X 14 


M 47 


M 8 
Q4 
C9 
C 10 


Ql 

Q2 
L14 


M 57 
N 15 


R20 
R7 
Z 7 
S3 
W6 


T 8 
T 10 
T 18 
T 11 
X 1 


K 12 
F 18 
O 1 
Q3 
R8 


R9 

N 2 
L2 
T21 
K2 


X3 


M 17 


T29 
M 8 
K3 


R3 
R9 

N 17 
M 18 
Q14 


D8 
X2 

N4 
R7 


C 5 
DD 10 
L20 

M 57 
M 10 


O 2 


N 5 
T 33 
N 10 
T 36 



Artist 



Carlile, Charles 
Carlile, Charles 
Carlile, Charles 
Carlson, Wamp 

Carothers, Isabelle 
Carter, Boake 
Cathedral Choir 
Cavaliers, The 
Chase, Dorothy 

Cheerio 

Chicago A Capella Choir 

Childs, Bill 

Clara, Lu 'n' Em 

Clark, Fritz 

Clicquot Club Eskimos 
Cloutier, Norman L. 
Cobb, Irvin S. 
Coleman, Emil 
College Inn Orchestra 

Collinge, Channon 
Connecticut Yankees 
Connolly. Walter 
Cook, Phil 
Corwine, Tom 

Cosmopolitan Hotel Orches- 
tra 
Cotton Club Orchestra 
Coughlin, Bunny 
Cross, Milton 
Cross, Milton 

Crumit, Frank 
Crumit, Frank 
Cutter, Madame Belle Forbes 

& Orchestra 
Davies, Edward 
Davies, Edward 

Dawson, Nick 
De Cordoba, Pedro 
Dempsey, Jack 
Dennis, Richard 
Dennis, Richard 

Deutsch, Emery 
Deutsch, Emery 
Deutsch, Emery 
Dewey, Phil 
Diamond's Adventures, 
Captain 

Dil worth, George 
Dodge, Mrs. Cleveland E. 
Doerr, Clyde 
Donaldson, Grace 
Do-Re-Mi (Trio) 

Do-Re-Mi (Trio) 
Dragonette, Jessica 
Eastman, Mary 
Eastman, Mary 
Eastman, Morgan L. 

Easy Aces (Mr. and Mrs. 

Goodman Ace) 
Edgewater Beach Hotel 

Orchestra 
Edmonson, William 
Ellington, Duke 
Eton Boys, The 

Eton Boys, The 
Evans, Evan 
Evers, Chester 
Fiorito, Ted 
Flynn, Bernardine 

Franklin, Irene 
Frawley, Tim 
Fray and Braggiotti 
Friendly Philosopher, The 

Fugit, Merrill 
Fugit, Merrill 
Gallicchio, Joseph 
Gallicchio, Joseph 
Garber, Jan 

Garcia's Mexican Marimba 

Band 
Gauchos, The 
Gay Gypsies 
Geddes, Bob 
Gilchrest, Charles 



Index 



Artist 



N 11 
M 29 
DD 13 
X 7 

W8 

N 10 

Y 1 
E3 
A 1 
Q4 

Q4 

M 14 
O 3 
L4 
T 4 

N 5 
T 15 
T 17 
T 1 
G 2 

M 19 
Q3 
R 13 
DD 12 

Y 3 

V4 
H 3 

P 5 

Y 1 
M 24 
M 20 

Q 14 

M 21 
N 22 
X9 

W 7 

F21 
V5 
L 15 
N 3 
T 1 

R20 
BB 4 

M 23 
N 1 
N 22 

M 51 
DD 1 
T 14 
Z 13 

S3 

W6 
L 23 
Z4 
R 15 
C 10 
N 16 
D 8 
N 17 
M 42 
DD 10 

Z 16 
V2 
DD 10 
DD 10 

04 
M 25 
R 16 
R36 
Z 8 

M 25 
V6 
Z5 
A3 

T20 
N 17 
T 14 

Z6 

N 15 
T 17 
T 25 



Giles, Erva 
Gill, Emerson 
Givot, George 
Goldbergs, The 
Goodell, Dr. Charles 

Gordon, Norman 
Gordon, Richard 
Goudiss, Mrs. A. M. 
Gould, Barbara 
Graham, Gordon 

Grant, Dave 
Gray, Glen 
Green, Joe 
Greenblatt, Ben 
Grofe, Ferde Orchestra 

Guizar, Tito 
Guizar, Tito 
Guest, Edgar 
Haenschen, Gus 
Haggard, Dr. Howard W. 

Hall, George 
Hall, George 
Hal!, Wendell 
Hanshaw, Annette 
Hard, Anne 

Hard, William 

Harding Sisters (Irene and 

Mathilde) 
Harding, Irene 
Harris, Graham 
Harris, Phil 
Harrod, Buddy 

Harvey, Van 

Hays, Billy 

Hays, Harvey 

Henry, John, Black River 

Giant 
High, Dr. Stanley 

Hill, Edwin C. 
Hill, Edwin C. 
Himber, Richard 
Hiraoka, Yoichi 
Hirsch, Bertrand 

Hitz, Elsie 
Holmes, Burton 
Hopkins, Claude 
Horlick, Harry 
Howard, Charles 

Howard, Shirley 
Howard, Tom 
Hufsmith, Fred 
Hulick, Budd 
Hunt, Arthur Billings 

Hunt, Arthur Billings 
Intondi, Urban 
Isles, J. Harrison 
Jackson, Arlene 
James, Lewis 
Janke, Helen 
Jarnagin, Jerry 
Johanson, Selma 
Johnson, Johnny 
Jordan, Marion and Jim 

Jordan, Marion and Jim 
Kaltenborn, H. V. 
Kaltenmeyer's Kindergarten 
Kamman, Bruce 

Kaufman, Irving 
Kayser, Kay 
Keenan & Phillips 
Keenan & Phillips 
Kelly, Andrew F. 

Kenmore Hotel Orchestra 
Kennedy, John B. 
King, Helen 
King, Wayne 

Kirbery, Ralph 
Kitchell, Alma 
Kitchell, Alma 

Knight, Raymond 
Koestner, Josef 
Koestner, Josef 
Koestner. Josef 



Index 



U4 

DD 18 
R34 
T 21 
L 17 
DD2 

DD 13 

C 15 
DD 1 
P 6 
BB 1 
P2 

Q6 

V 7 
N 10 
R 19 
P 1 

P4 
P6 
T 1 

L 7 
M 12 
M 14 
M 1 



M 7 
R 18 
DD 3 
DD 16 

M 27 
M 28 
M 29 
Y 1 
M 30 
M 41 
K2 

M 31 
N 15 



M 35 


N 22 


DD 18 


Qio 


R 10 


V 11 


X 14 


R34 


D 1 



F23 
J2 
K 7 
N 8 
DD 13 

DD 10 

M 32 
F23 

R21 
QH 
R41 
L28 
R39 

D 4 

K 8 
DD 12 



N3 
N 16 
DD 6 
DD 3 
T 22 

X 5 
N 16 
D 1 
W 4 
L13 

N 11 
06 
R21 
T 17 
DD 12 
T36 



Artist 



Koestner, Josef 

Kogen, Harry 
Kostelanetz, Andre 
Kostelanetz, Andre 
Kriens, Christiaan 
Lahr, Bert 

Lane Sisters, Priscilla and 

Rosemary 
Lang, Don 
Lang, Jeannie 
Langford, Frances 
La Prade, Malcon 
Larson, Larry 

Latham, Dwight 
Lawrence, David 
Lawrence, Earl 
Lazy Dan, The Minstrel Man 
Leaf, Ann 

Leibert, Dick 
Leibert, Dick 
Lennox, Elizabeth 
Levitzki, Mischa 
Lewis, Ted 
Lewis, Ted 

Lexington, Hotel Dance 
Orchestra 

Libuse, Frank 
Little Jack Little 
Livingstone, Mary 
Lombardo, Guy 

Lopez, Vincent 

Lopez, Vincent 

Lotus Garden Orchestra 

Lovel, Leigh 

Lowe, Maxim 

Lown, Bert 

Lullaby Lady 

Lyman, Abe 
Lyon, Ruth 

McAlpin Hotel Orchestra 
McCabe, Sara Ann 
McCloud, Mac 
McConnell, Ed, "Smiling" 

McCoy, Mug 
McDonald, James G. 
McLain, Junior 
McLaughlin, Tommy 
McNaughton, Harry 

MacDonald, Claudine 
Madison Ensemble 
Madison Singers 
Magic Tenor, The 
Mandy Lou 

Mangano, Don 

Manhattan Serenades 
Mariani, Hugo 

Marshall, Everett 
Martha and Hal 
Martin, Dolph 
Martini, Nino 
Marvin, John 

Marx, Groucho and Chico 
Master Singers, The 
Maxwell House Show Boat, 
Capt. Henry's 

Maxwell, Richard 
Maxwell, Richard 
Medbury, John P. 
Melton, James 
Melton, James 

Meredith, June 
Merker, Mary 
Merrie-Men (male quartet) 
Michaux, Elder 
Mickunas, Emily 

Miller, Irving 
Minevitch, Borrah 
Mitchell, Al, Orchestra 
Mock, Alice 
Molasses 'n' January 
Monarch Mystery Tenor 
(Continued on page 28) 



Note: Artists and others are arranged alphabetically by names of individuals, teams or organizations. You can locate the programs on which the individual artists are 
appearing by taking the index number which appears immediately at the left of the name and following it through the CLASSIFIED SCHEDULE. The index numbers on the 
Classified Schedule have been arranged alphabetically as regards the letters which set off the different types of programs and numerically as regards the programs listed under 
each different classification. If you want further information, address Editor of Radio Fan-Fare Program Finder, 420 Lexington Avenue, New York, enclosing return postage. 



*Notice of copyright. Method of arrangement copyrighted. Infringement will be prosecuted. 



26 



Radio Fan-Fare 



REVIEWING THE CURRENT PROGRAMS 



PHIL BAKER, THE ARMOUR JESTER 

(NBC-WJZ, Friday at 9:00 to 9:30 
P. M.) 

Cast — Phil Baker — The Merrymen 
— Neil Sisters — Harry McNaughton 
— Roy Shields and Band. 

Comment — Phil has brought his 
stooge-heckler routine to the air with 
the same effectiveness with which he 
used it on the stage. It is only when 
he deviates from this technique and 
exchanges quips with McNaughton 
that the fun sags. However, this 
may not be a fair criticism, as Phil 
seemed to be a bit too quick for 
Harry's British dialect humor at first, 
probably because they were not ac- 
customed to each other. If Phil can 
keep the laughs coming as steadily 
as he did with his first few shows, he 
will be sitting pretty. The idea of 
the phantom voice that interrupts the 
conversation is certain to get over, 
regardless of whether you knew the 
Phil Baker-Sid Silvers stage combina- 
tion or not. The singing by the 
Merrymen and the Neil Sisters is ac- 
ceptable if not distinguished, and Roy 
Shields does well with a studio group 
of orchestra boys. 

The Plug — The program director 
had a swell idea when he started this 
show. The trick was to sing the com- 
mercial announcement — but they 
didn't let it go at that. For some 
reason sponsors just can't believe that 
you heard them the first time, so in 
the Baker program they had to repeat 
the sentiments of the song in the 
usual dry harangue, which is made 
harder to take by a jig-saw give-away 
speech. 

Opinion — Don't let the announce- 
ment keep you from hearing Phil. 

RICHFIELD COUNTRY CLUB 

(NBC-WEAF, Friday at 10:30- 
11:00 P. M.) 

Cast — Alex Morrison — Betty Bar- 
thell — Jack Golden's Orchestra. — Ben 
Grauer (Announcer). 

Comment — With the golf season 
starting, this program should pull in 
the pasture-pool addicts by the thou- 
sands. Alex Morrison is recognized 
today as one of the most efficient golf 
teachers the game has produced, and 
he has developed such a graphic 
method of explaining his theories 
that it is possible to pick up many 
valuable pointers from his radio 
chats. Perhaps the most interesting 
thing about the Morrison system is 
that he does not attempt to confuse 
you with irrelevant and complicated 
details. He has reduced the golf 
-wing to its simplest elements — which 



you will find a big help after all the 
chit-chat that has been handed out 
for years by so-called experts. (This 
information can be given with au- 
thority, as the writer has been one 
of Mr. Morrison's pupils and has 
played with him a number of times.) 
In addition to the golf talks, there 
is singing by the well known Betty 
Barthell, and music by John Gold- 
en's capable bandsmen. 

The Plug — The gift inducement on 
this program is a copy of the Mor- 
rison golf lesson, which is handed out 
gratis at Richfield Oil stations. Dur- 
ing his spiel, Alex manages to drag 
in the product by trick analogies built 
around the golf swing — the necessity 
for "proper lubrication in the joints," 
etc. The sponsor's name is also 
brought in through the music. The 
advertising altogether is handled bet- 
ter than most commercials. 

Opinion — Good music — intelligent 
program construction — and some real 
help for golfers. 




JOHN HENRY 
. . . the Black River Giant goes voodoo 

DOROTHY FIELDS AND JIMMY 
MCHUGH 

(NBC-WJZ, Friday at 10:15-10:30 
P. M.) 

Cast — Dorothy and Jimmy. 

Comment — Here is a talented team 
that might do well by a sponsor. 
Dorothy, daughter of Lew Fields 
(Weber and Fields), was known only 
as an expert lyricist until somebody 
over at Radio City heard her croon 
and installed her in the Music Hall 
as one of the first attractions to show 
in that edifice. This gave her the in- 
spiration to combine with her old 



composing teammate, Jimmy Mc- 
Hugh, and take a shot at the air. 
Jimmy plays the piano and Dorothy 
sings in a low, throaty voice charac- 
terized by excellent showmanship in 
delivery. In addition to reviving all 
the hits they have written together, 
the team offers brand new stuff, with 
the ink still warm. Among the popu- 
lar ditties they have penned are: "I 
Can't Give You Anything But Love," 
"Hey, Young Fella," "Sunny Side Of 
The Street," "Cuban Love Song," 
"Must Have That Man," "Doing The 
New Low Down" (Bill Robinson's 
favorite jig tune), "Diga-Diga-Doo," 
"Blue Again," and "Go Home And 
Tell Your Mother." 

Opinion — Intelligent entertainment 
— and enough creative talent to pro- 
vide originality and variety on a reg- 
ular program. 

PONTIAC PRESENTS— 

(CBS-WABC, Thursday at 9:30- 
10:00 P. M.) 

Cast — Colonel Stoopnagle and 
Budd— William O'Neil (Tenor)— 
Jeannie Lang ("Cute" Soprano) — 
Andre Kostelanetz and Mixed Cho- 
rus — Louis Dean (Announcer). 

Comment — Stoopnagle and Budd 
were not given the prominence they 
deserved in the first few of these pro- 
grams, but the sponsors evidently saw 
their error — and, by correcting it, 
brightened the show considerably. 
These two lads are good judges of 
the ga-ga, incongruous type of humor, 
know when they've said enough, and 
have the happy trick of never seeming 
important. They also know the re- 
verse-English value of kidding their 
product, and do it as much as the 
sponsors will allow. Mr. O'Neil is an 
exponent of the robust light opera 
school. He is best when singing 
about soldiers of the king and other 
he-man themes which require lung 
power. Miss Lang is about to be too 
cute, if she hasn't been already. She 
should cut down on her giggle and 
get a few new tricks. If feminine 
psychology is what the experts would 
have you believe, Jeannie's coyness 
must annoy plenty of the femme lis- 
teners. The chorus and orchestra 
work can always be relied on. Any 
chorus and orchestra could hardly be 
anything but excellent, under the di- 
rection of Andre Kostelanetz. 

The Plug — The pleasant air man- 
ner of Announcer Louis Dean and 
the kidding of the Colonel and Budd, 
supply much needed relief to the 
rather heavy stuff in the announce- 
ment. 

Opinion — Good all-family program. 



June 



27 



TRIPLE BAR X DAYS AND NIGHTS 

(CBS-WABC, Friday at 8:30 to 
9:00 P. M.) 

Cast — Carson Robison, John and 
Bill Mitchell, Pearl Pickens, and 
others. 

Comment — This program, featur- 
ing "Carson Robison and his Bucka- 
roos," is being given an important 
build-up by Columbia over its whole 
network in an effort to interest a 
sponsor — and I see no reason why 
some advertiser doesn't grab it off. 
The intelligently written and directed 
story and clever sound effects create 
a convincing atmosphere of Western 
pioneer days — the songs cover the en- 
tire field of cowboy and hill-billy 
tunes (over 200 of which were writ- 
ten by Mr. Robison himself) — and the 
unnamed actors who perform in the 
stories of the Old West are consis- 
tently effective. Carson, and the fel- 
low who writes or adapts the plays, 
have shown good judgment in not 
allowing the program to be charac- 
terized by an overemphasis on West- 
ern melodramatic hokum. They not 
only leaven the talk with plenty of 




CARSON ROBISON and PEARL PICKENS 
... a good commercial bet. 

good singing, but they also get the 
adventure angle over without making 
twenty-seven redskins bite the dust 
every few minutes. And they have 
relatively few stagecoach holdups. 

Opinion — Well planned and enter- 
tainingly produced Western sketches. 
If they maintain the high level of the 
first programs, you can let Junior 
listen in without the fear that he may 
get up in the middle of the night and 
scalp his baby sister. 

JOHN HENRY, BLACK RIVER GIANT 

(CBS-WABC, Sunday at 8:00-8:15, 
and 8:45-9:00 P. M.) 
Cast — Juano Hernandez, Georgia 
Burke, and other well known stage 
players in an all-negro cast. 




DOROTHY FIELDS and JIMMIE MC HUGH 
. a sponsor will get 'em if they don't watch out! 



Comment — The character of John 
Henry, the Black River Giant, is 
taken from the writings of Roark 
Bradford. It is drawn with the fine 
imagination and authenticity of detail 
that mark all of Mr. Bradford's works 
dealing with the Southern negro. The 
title role is played by Juano Hernan- 
dez, an actor of considerable ability, 
whose activities in private life have 
fitted him particularly well for the 
part. He has swung a sledge hammer 
as a day laborer, and "rousted" cot- 
ton bales along the Mississippi levees 
— so he knows the language of John 
Henry, and is familiar with the cus- 
toms of the colored folks in the delta 
country. In addition to these quali- 
fications, he is a continuity writer, 
collaborating with Geraldine Garrick 
in the composition of all the "John 
Henry" scripts. The program is in 
two parts. The first fifteen minutes 
are used for building up the charac- 
ter. Then there is a half hour inter- 
val, given to another program, after 
which "John Henry" comes back on 
the air, and the real dramatic action 
of the broadcast is offered. 

Opinion — This one should find 
more favor in rural communities than 
in metropolitan districts, and will be 
especially appreciated in the South. 
Excellent "atmosphere" program — 
good' direction — fine speaking and 
singing voices — exciting and authen- 
tic negro folk lore and "voodoo" cere- 
monials. 

JACK BENNY'S CHEVROLET 
PROGRAM 

(NBC-WEAF, Friday at 10 to 
10:30 P. M.) 

Cast — Jack Benny, Mary Living- 
ston, James Melton, Frank Black's 
Orchestra and Male Chorus. 

Comment — According to the latest 
expert reports, this program has been 
losing favor. We doubt it. If Jack 



Benny's smooth, ingenious sense of 
building up laugh-provoking situa- 
tions is not more enjoyable than the 
usual stale-joke routine of air comed} r 
— well, the country's sense of humor 
should have a new deal. Just how the 
popularity of air stars should be de- 
termined is still a matter of debate 
among the boys who pay the bills. 
The fan-mail test has been a criterion, 
but that is another racket that needs 
a new deal . . . and not from the bot- 
tom of the deck. Anybody can get 
letters by begging for them and using 
written propaganda. 

As an example of Jack's smart fun, 
we recall his Kiddie program . . . with 
each member of his troupe reciting 
Mother Goose with the rhymes con- 
spicuously absent . . . Jack's amusing 
rendition of "Sonny Boy" despite 
concentrated opposition from the or- 
chestra . . . and his Red Riding Hood 
bedtime story, with which he put him- 
self to sleep. (The idea was used in 
a Laurel and Hardy movie comedy, 
but Jack's exploitation topped the 
screen version.) 

Mary Livingston, Jack's wife, con- 
tinues to be an effective stooge . . . 

the chorus work is O. K any 

time you see Frank Black's name in 
the lineup, you know the orchestral 
music will be a treat, and James Mel- 
ton is one of the most popular tenors 
on the air. (And Mr. Melton may be 
surprised to know that this review 
was written by a bird who used to 
applaud his playing and warbling 
when he was in the University of 
Florida band.) 

The Plug — Humorous introduction 
of the advertising makes it more di- 
gestible (and if they will give Jack 
the leeway he had with the Canada 
Dry show, he'll remove even more of 
the sting.) 

Opinion — Excellent music and con- 
sistent fun. (Continued on page 2S) 



28 



Radio Fan-Fare 



RADIO FAN-FARE PROGRAM FINDER 



ARTIST SCHEDULE 









(Continued from page 25) 






Index 


Artist 


Index 


Artist 


Index 


Artist 


Index 


Artist 


N 2 


Montgomery, Lee 


R 13 


"Red Headed Music Maker, 


M 44 


Scholtz, William 


V9 


Thorpe, Merle 


H 2 


Moore, Betty 




The" 


M 16 


Schuster, Mitchell 


BB 3 


Tomlinson, Edward 


DD IS 


Morrison, Alex 


Y2 


Reese, Edward 


N 2 


Seagle, John 


T 29 


Toney, Jay 


DD9 


Mors, Helen 


DD 16 


Regan, Phil 


L 19 


Semmler, Alex 


X4 


Torgerson, Ulita 


M 36 


Moss, Joe 


Q5 


Reis & Dunn 


N2 


Shaw, Elliot 










M 44 


Reisman, Leo 


M 48 


Sherman Hotel Dance Orch. 


R 33 


Tracy, Arthur 
Travelers Quartet, The 
Tucker, Madge 


T 1 
D 1 
A 4 


Munn, Frank 
Neil Sisters 
Nell, Edward 


DD 5 

N 12 


Reser, Harry 
Revellers Quartet, The 


D 1 

Qi 


Shield, Roy 
Shilkret, Jack 


R41 
C 7 


H 3 


Nell, Edward 


M 3 


Reynolds, Brad 


F21 


Shilkret, Nathaniel 




1 


M 12 


Nelson, Ozzie 


DD 6 


Rich, Freddie 


N2 


Shope, Henry 


DD 11 


Vallee, Rudy 


M 37 


Nelson, Ozzie 


K4 


Rich, Freddie 


M 30 


Shoreham Hotel Orchestra 


C 5 
T 31 


Van Harvey, Art 
Vass Family 
Victorine, Paul 


R25 


Niesen, Gertrude 


M 32 


Rich, Freddie 


DD 2 


Sims, Lee 


M 54 


M 59 


Nichols, Red 


R3 


Rich, Freddie 


R 32 


Singin' Sam 


M 55 


Village Barn Orchestra 


B 1 


Niles, Blair 


R9 


Rich, Freddie 


DD 1 


Singing Clerks, The 


DD 12 


Voorhees, Don 


R38 


Novis, Donald 


R25 


Rich, Freddie 


T 29 


Smith, Homer 






T 1 


Ohman & Arden 


N 7 


Riesenfeld, Leo 


R 17 


Smith, Kate 


M 34 


Wade, Fred 


TS 


Olsen, George 


M 35 


Robbins, Sam 






N 17 


Waldo, Earl 










DD 10 


Song Fellows, The 


L 12 


Waldorf Astoria Orchestra 


R27 


O'Neal, William 


T26 


Robison, Willard 


A4 


Sorey, Vincent 


M 56 


Waldorf Astoria Orchestra 


R 7 


Osborne, Will 


Z 15 


Robinson, Carson 


M 49 


Sorey, Vincent 


PS 


Waldorf Astoria Orchestra 






R40 


Rodemich, Gene 


N5 


Sorey, Vincent 






M 6 


Paige, Raymond 


Z 3 


Rogers, Buck 


R42 


Sorey, Vincent 


DD 13 


Waring, Fred 


M 40 


Palais d'or Orchestra 










X 7 


Waters, James R. 
Weeks, Ranny 
Weil, Irving 
Wells Carveth 


R 28 


Palmer House Ensemble 


D 5 


Rogers, Will 


T 23 


Sorey, Vincent 


T 4 


S3 


Palmer, Kathryn 


M 45 


Rolfe, B. A. 


DD 18 


Soubier, Clifford 


K 10 


W6 


Palmer, Kathryn 


L 13 


Rosanoff, Maria 


X5 


Soubier, Clifford 


BE 2 






DD 9 


Rose, Freddy 


T 29 


Southernaires, The 






M 41 


Park Central Dance Orches- 
tra 


Q3 


Rose, Hortense 


Q7 


Spaeth, Sigmund 


DD 9 


Westphal's Orchestra 


N 1 


Parker, Frank 


R 1 


Rose, Mildred 


M 38 


Spitalny, Phil 


M 23 


Westphal's Orchestra 


N2 


Parker, Frank 


M 23 


Roseland Orchestra 


L 10 


Spross, Charles Gilbert 


M 58 


Westphal, Frank 


X 16 


Parker's, Sunday at Seth 


B 2 


Ross, David 


I 1 
Z5 


Stannard, Capt. Wm. J. 
Starky, Louise 


P 3 


Whipple, Doc 


DD 18 


Parsons, Chauncey 


R34 


Ross, David 


M 43 


Steele, Mary 


DD 9 


White, Billy 


DD 18 


Parsons, Joe 


DD 12 


Ross, Lanny 






X 14 


White, Bob 


N6 


Pasternack, Josef 


T 27 


Ross, Lon 


T 25 


Steele, Mary 


N 11 


White, Joe 


F19 


Patri, Angelo 


K 10 


Round Towners, The 


M 4 


Stern, Harold 


H 2 


White, Lew 






N 8 


Round Towners, The 


N 10 


Stewart, Elliott 


P 7 


White, Lew 


S3 


Patton, Lowell 






L21 


Stewart, Kathleen 






W6 


Patton, Lowell 


DD 5 


Rowswell, "Rosey" 






X 2 


Whitney, Edwin W. 


D 6 


Pearl, Jack ("Baron Mun- 


DD 2 


Rubinoff, Dave 


M 50 


Stokes, Harold 


F20 


Wile, Frederic 




chausen") 


W5 


Sackman, Dr. Ralph 


Z 13 


Stoopnagle and Budd, Col. 


M 44 


Wiley, Lee 


T 14 


Pearson, Charles 


X5 


Sagerquist, Eric 


R 33 


Street Singer 






M 17 
M 42 
R40 
T 29 
N 16 
L20 


Pedro, Don 

Pennsylvania Hotel Orchestra 

Percy, David 

Peters Lowell 


M 27 
DD 1 


St. Regis Hotel Orchestra 
Salter, Harry 


N 10 
F 13 


Summerfield, Wesley 
Sutton, Vida Ravenscroft 


Q 12 
DD 12 
T 14 


Wilson, Claire 
Wilson, Muriel 
Wilson, Muriel 


Peterson, Curt 
Pfau, Franz 


Q 1 


Sanderson, Julia 


K 11 


Swiss Yodelers 


V 10 


Winchell, Walter 


Q2 


Sanderson, Julia 


M 19 


Taft Hotel Orchestra 






T 14 


Sanford, Harold 


F 14 


Taplinger, Bob 


C 11 


Wing, Paul 
Winninger, Charles 


R29 


Pickens Sisters 


T 35 


Sanford, Harold 


Z 14 


Tarkington, Booth 


DD 12 


U4 


Pitts, Cyril 


L 11 


Sapira, Sylvia 






DD 10 


Wolf, Johnny 


DD 1 


Polesie, Herbert 






Z 13 


Taylor, H. Chase 


R 36 


Wons, Tony 


H 3 


Post, Emily 


R40 


Sargent, Jean 


C8 


Tedro, Henrietta 


Q9 


Wons, Tony 


DD 10 


Poynton, Loretta 


N3 


Schaeffer, Helen 


X 14 


Tedro, Henrietta 






Q 8 


Prescott, Allen 


T 28 


Scherban, George 


M 50 


Teela, Dick 


M 40 


Woodworth, Julian 


T 38 


Radio Rubes 


M 47 


Schilling, Victor 


M 45 


Terraplane, Orchestra 


D 7 


Wynn, Ed 


N 21 


Rapee, Erno 


L 13 


Schmid, Adolf 


V8 


Thomas, Lowell 


C 5 


Yeo, Billy 



Note: Artists and others are arranged alphabetically by names of individuals, teams or organizations. You can locate the programs on which the individual artists are 
appearing by taking the index number which appears immediately at the left of the name and following it through the CLASSIFIED SCHEDULE. The index numbers on the 
Classified Schedule have been arranged alphabetically as regards the letters which set off the different types of programs and numerically as regards the programs listed under 
each different classification. If you want further information, address Editor of Radio Fan- Fare Program Finder, 420 Lexington Avenue, New York, enclosing return postage. 



REVIEWS OF CURRENT 
PROGRAMS 

(Continued) 

"IRVIN S. COBB" 

(CBS-WABC, Monday and Friday at 9 :00 P. M.) 
Cast — Irvin S. Cobb, Allan Joslyn, Al Good- 
man's Orchestra. 

Comment — The success of this program de- 
pends entirely on Mr. Cobb's ability to amuse 
and entertain the radio public with his humorous 
stories and news comments. The sponsor, Gulf 
Gasoline, has made no elaborate plans to provide 
the star with either situation material or addi- 
tional talent. Al Goodman, an orchestra leader 
of recognized ability due to his many years of 
service under the banner of the late Flo Zeig- 
field, and his present job as conductor with the 
Broadway show, "Strike Me Pink", assures com- 
petent musical support. Mr. Joslyn, veteran 
radio actor, should be a help as a sort of feeder 
for Mr. Cobb. In the script he is known as 
Chris, the man who runs the Gulf filling station. 
In addition to carrying on conversations with 
Mr. Cobb (who appears to be a hanger-on 
around the station), Cliris also does the commer- 
cial announcement, and very pleasantly. _ But 
the fact remains that the customers are going to 
tune in because of Cobb's reputation as a humor- 
ous writer and raconteur — so it's squarely up to 
Irvin. And here's the catch — if there is one. 
Radio fans have become accustomed to gag 
humor. Puns, jokes, humorous exaggerations 
... all with a quick point. In this type of 
fun-making, the build-up to the laugh is not im- 



portant. The big idea is to have a cracker on 
the end that snaps and gets a giggle. Mr. Cobb's 
humor is entirely different. When he tells a 
story, the detail in the telling is often as amus- 
ing, or more amusing, than the actual point. To 
accomplish this he relies on his unusual com- 
mand of English to create humorous surprise in 
description and phrasing. If old John Radio 
Fan follows Mr. Cobb's narratives closely, and 
catches the morsels of erudite fun that flash out 
during his word-juggling, the program will be a 
success. The hundred percent gag lover is 
almost certain to be disappointed, because, like 
all humorous writers, Mr. Cobb can take three 
good jokes and stretch them into an interesting 
serial. We don't think Mr. Cobb should go in 
for Jewish dialect — as witness his door-bell ring- 
ing story of his first broadcast. Excellent mate- 
rial, and beautifully built up, but the listeners 
are used to expert dialecticians, and may resent 
poor imitation. As for his news comments, we 
believe his material will improve. It is quite a 
trick to make humor of news, in the Will Rogers 
manner, hut with his ability as a creative humor- 
ist, Mr. Cobb should catch on. 

The Plug — It was a wise move to use Allan 
Joslyn on the commercial announcement. He 
has an intimate, friendly delivery that is much 
easier to take than the usual diction-conscious 
product plugger. As Chris, the filling station 
attendant, he also gets over the idea of the extra 
courtesies that are extended to customers of Gulf 
stations. (While he was talking about his free 
service the first night, the orchestra, in the back- 
ground, was softly playing, "I'll Take an Option 
on You.") We think it was a mistake to let 
Mr. Cobb announce himself, as he did on the 



first program. Sounded a bit presumptuous, 
which is exactly what he isn't. 

Opinion — Depends entirely on the individual 
sense of humor. We like Mr. Cobb's stuff and 
always have. (And his position would be 
strengthened if air censorship was less strict. 
Then he could _ use such masterpieces as "The 
Flood in the Mississippi Valley.") 

"WILL ROGERS" 

(NBC-WJZ, Sundays at 9:00 P. M.) 
Cast — Will Rogers, Joseph Bell and an or- 
chestra. 

Comment — Here's an air attraction (also 
sponsored by Gulf Gasoline) that is about as 
fool-proof as they come. America has never 
produced a more acceptable entertainer than the 
Oklahoma Sage, and he will be a welcome relief 
from the obvious type of air comedians, of whom 
the listeners are getting a bit tired. Mr. Rogers 
will doubtless stick to his usual routine of com- 
ment on timely news topics — and should. (What- 
ever you do, Will, don't use many gags like 
that one on the first program — you know, when 
you were talking about the China-Japan fighting 
. . . "What do you use in case of a gas attack?" 
. . . Answer — "Bicarbonate of soda." Bert 
Lahr used the same idea every night for over a 
year during the Broadway show, "Flying 
High.") 

The Plug — Joseph Bell (the same man who 
talks so intimately with Doctor Watson about G. 
Washington's Coffee) handles the comparatively 
light announcement with the minimum of annoy- 
ance. 

Opinion — Three cheers! 



'Notice of copyright. Method of arrangement copyrighted. Infringement will be prosecuted. 



June 



RADIO FAN-FARE PROGRAM 



29 



N D E R 



CLASSIFIED SCHEDULE 



A— BEAUTY 



-BARBARA GOULD. Thursday. 34 hour. 

10:45 AM— ED 9:45 AM— ES-ED 8:45 AM— CS 

WABC WAAB WADC WCAO KMBC KMOX 
WKBW WDRC WBBM WKRC WGST WBRC 
WCAU WJAS WHK CKOK WDSU KTRH 
WEAN WOWO WFBL KOMA WCCO 

WSPD WJSV 

WHEC WBT 

WDB.7 



A3— LADY ESTHER SERENADE 
Sunday. Yi hour 
With Wayne King and Orchestra 



3:00 PM— ED 

WEAF WTAG 
WEEI WCSH 
WGY WBEN 
WCAE WLIT 
WJAR 

Tuesday. ' 2 hour 
8:30 PM— ED 
WEAF WTAG 
WCAE WEEI 
WBEN WJAR 
WFI WGY 
WCSH 

Thursday. ' 2 hour 
9:30 PM— ED 
W.7Z WBZ 
WBZA 



2:00 PM— ES-CD 

WLW WRC 
WTAM WWJ 
WJAX WFLA 
WWNC WIOD 
KYW 



1:00 PM 

WJDX 

WOC 

WOW 

WTMJ 

KVOO 

WOAI 

WFAA 

WSMB 

WSB 



— CS 

KSD 

WHO 

WDAF 

KSTP 

WKY 

KPRC 

WMC 

WSM 



M 

7:45 AM 

KXZ 
KSL 



M P 

12:00 PM 11:00 AM 

KOA KGW 

KDYL KHQ 
KGO 
KFI 
KOMO 



7:30 PM— ES-CD 

WRC WTAM 
WWJ WSAI 
WFBR WMAQ 



6:30 PM 

WDAF 



-CS 



8:30 PM— ES-CD 

WBAL WGAR 
WJR WHAM 

WENR 



7:30 PM 

KWK 

KSO 

WREN 



-CS 

KWCR 
KOIL 



A4— VINCENT SOREY'S ORCHESTRA— Wednesday 
Gladys Baxter, Edward Nell, Dorothy Chase. 



4:45 PM— ED 

WEAF WTIC 
WTAG WEEI 
WJAR WCSH 
WLIT WGY 
CKGW CFCF 
WBEN 



3:45 PM— ES-CD 

WFBR WRC 
WTAM WWJ 
WLW WMAQ 



2:45 PM 

KSD 

WHO 

WSB 

WIBA 

WSM 

WMC 

WKY 

KPRC 

WAPI 



34 hour. 

-CS 

WOC 

WDAF 

WTMJ 

KSTP 

WEBC 

WSMB 

WFAA 

WOAI 



M 

1:45 PM 

KOA 
KDYL 



P 
12:45 PM 

KOMO 
KGO 
KFI 
KGW 



B— BOOKS AND LITERATURE 



B1— AMERICA'S GRUB 
Saturday. 34 hour 
Blair Niles 

6:00 PM— ED 

WABC WOKO 
WAAB WGR 
WDRC WJAS 
WLBZ WICC 
WHP WORC 
CFRB 



STREET SPEAKS 



5:00 PM— ES-CD 

WBBM WFBL 
WSPD WFEA 
WLBW WHEC 
WTAR WDBJ 
WMBG WTOC 
WQAM WDBO 
WSJS 



4:00 PM— CS 

KMBC WGST 
WBRC WDOD 
WREC WODX 
WSFA WLAC 
WDSU KRLD 
KTRH KTSA 
WIBW WACO 
KFH WTAQ 
WKBH KFAB 
WISN WSBT 
WMT 



M 

3:00 PM 

KVOR 

KLZ 



P 

2:00 PM 

KHJ 
KOIN 
KGB 
KFRC 
KOL 
KFPY 



B2— POET'S GOLD, POETIC READINGS 



Sunday. 34 hour 
David Ross 
5:00 PM— ED 

WABC WOKO 
WNAC WGR 
WDRC WIP 
WJAS WEAN 
WLBZ WICC 
WHP WORC 
CFRB 



4:00 PM— ES-CD 

WCAO WHK 
CKOK WSPD 
WFEA WLBW 
WKBN WTAR 
WDBJ WTOC 
WQAM WDBO 
WSJS 



3:00 PM— CS 

KMBC WFBM 
WMBD WGST 
WBRC WDOD 
WREC WODX 
WSFA WLAC 
WDSU KRLD 
KTRH WIBW 
WTAQ WKBH 
KFAB WCCO 
WSBT WMT 



M 

2:00 PM 

KVOR 
KLZ 



P 
1:00 PM 

KHJ 

KOIN 

KGB 

KFRC 

KOL 

KFPY 



B3 GULDEN TREASURY BREWSTER— Tuesday. V 2 hour. John Brewster. 
4:00 PM— ED 3:00 PM— ES-CD 2:00 PM— CS 

WEAF WCSH WFBR WTAM WOW WOC 
WGY WTAG WWJ WDAF WHO 
WJAR WCAE WCKY WSAI 
WRC WMAQ 

C— CHILDREN'S PROGRAM 

C1— ADVENTURE OF HELEN AND MARY— Saturday. V 2 hour. M P 

"~ 9:00 AM— CS 8:00 AM 7:00 AM 

KMBC WGST KVOR KHJ 

WODO WREC KLZ KOIN 

WODX WSFA KGB 

WLAC WDSU KFRC 

KTRH KLRA KOL 

WACO WTAQ KFPY 

WCCO WMT 



11:00 AM— ED 

WABC WOKO 
WNAC WKBW 
WDRC WCAU 
WJAS WPG 



WLBZ 
CFRB 



WORC 



10:00 AM— ES-CD 

WADC WCAO 
CKOK WFBL 
WPSD WJSV 
WCAH WFEA 
WLBW WHEC 
WWVA WKBN 
WBIG WDBJ 
WTOC WQAM 
WDBO WDAE 
WSJS 



C2— COLUMBIA JUNIOR BUGLE— Sunday, i, hour. 

9:00 AM— ED 8:00 AM— ES-CD 7:00 AM— CS 

WABC WOKO WADC WCAO KMBC WFBM 

WNAC WGR WHK CKOK WMBD WGST 

WDRC WCAU WFBL WSPD WDOD WREC 

WEAN WPG WJSV WCAH WLAC KRLD 

WLBZ WICC WLBW WHEC KTRH KLRA 

WHP WORC WWVA WKBN KTSA WIBW 

WBIG WDBJ KFH WTAQ 

WTOC WDBO WISN WCCO 

WDAE WMT 



C4-THE DEVIL BIRD 

Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, 
Thursday and Friday. 34 hour. 



5:30 PM— CS 

KMBC WHAS 
KMOX KFAB 
WCCO 



CS DICK DARING, A BOY OF TODAY— Sunday. 34 hour. 

Merril Fugit, Donald Briggs, Joan Blaine, Art VanHarvey, Billy Yio 



6:45 PM— ED 

WJZ KDKA 
WBZ WBZA 



5:45 PM— ES-CD 

WBAL WMAL 
WSYR WHAM 
WCKY KWK 
WENR 



4:45 PM— CS 

KWCR KOIL 
KSO WREN 



Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday and Friday. 34 hour 

6:15 PM— ED 4:15 PM— ES-CD 4:15 PM— CS 

WJZ WBZ WBAL WMAL KWK KWCR 

WBZA KDKA WSYR WGAR KSO WREN 

WCKY KOIL 

5:15 PM— ES-CD 

WENR 

C6— KING KILL KARE & ADOLPH— Monday, Wednesday and Friday. 34 hour. 
6:15 PM— ED 5:15 PM— ES-CD 

WJZ WBZ WBAL 

WBZA 

C7— LADY NEXT DOOR— Monday, Tuesday, Thursday and Friday. 34 hour. 
Madge Tucker, Director 

4:45 PM— ED 3:45 PM— ES-CD 2:45 PM— CS 

WEAF WTAG WFBR WTAM KSD WDAF 
WJAR WCSH WSAI WRC 
WGY WENR 

C8 -LITTLE ORPHAN ANNIE 

Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday and Saturday. 34 hour 
Shirley Bell, Allan Baruck, Henrietta Tedro, Harry Cansdale 



5:45 PM— ED 
WJZ WBZ 
WBZA KDKA 
CKGW 



4:45 PM— ES-CD 

WBAL WJR 

WGAR WIS 

WLW WWNC 

WRVA WJAX 

WHAM 

5:45 PM— ES-CD 

WENR 



4:45 PM-CS 

KSTP KOIL 
WREN WEBC 
WDAY KFYR 
WOAI WKY 



KPRC 
WBAP 
KWK 



KTBS 
KWCR 



C9 NBC CHILDREN'S HOUR Sunday. 1 hour. Milton Cross. 
9:00 AM— ED 8:00 AM— ES-CD 7:00 AM— CS 

WJZ WBZ WBAL WGAR 

WBZA WLW WJR 

WHAM WSYR 

WMAL WENR 



WIBA KWK 
WREN KSTP 
WEBC KFYR 
KDKA 



C10— NURSERY RHYMES 
Tuesday. 34 hour 
Lewis James, Milton Cross 
5:45 PM— ED 

WEAF WGY 
WLIT WTAG 
WEEI WJAR 
WCSH WBEN 



3:45 PM— CS 



KSD 
WHO 



WOC 
WOW 



4:45 PM— ES-CD WDAF WIBA 
WFBR WRC KSTP WDAY 



WTAM WSAI 
WWJ WCKY 
WMAQ 



KFYR KTBS 
WKY WFAA 
WOAI 



2:45 PM 1:45 PM 

KOA KGO 
KDYL KGW 
KOMO 
KHQ 



C11— PAUL WING THE STORY MAN— Monday, Wednesday and Friday. 34 hour. 
5:45 PM— ED 4:45 PM— ES-CD 

WEAF WGY WWJ WTAM 
WBEN 



C13— THE SINGING LADY— Mon., Tues., Wed., Thurs. and Fri. 
5:30 PM— ED 4:30 PM— ES-CD 3:30 PM— CS 

WJZ WBZ WBAL WJR WSM 

WBZA KDKA WLW WHAM 
WGAR 



C14— SKIPPY— Mon., Tues., Wed., Thurs., Fri, and Sat M hour. 



hour. 



5:30 PM— ED 

WABC WOKO 
WNAC WGR 
WDRC WCAU 
WEAN 



4:30 PM— ES-CD 

WCAO WKRC 
WHK CKOK 
WFBL WSPD 
WJSV WHEC 



5:30— PM-CD 

WBBM 



4:30 PM— CS 

KMBC WFBM 
KMOX WCCO 



C15— DON LANG, TRUE ANIMAL STORIES— Monday and Friday. 34 hour. 



5:00 PM— ED 

WABC WOKO 



WGR 

WCAU 

WEAN 

WHP 

CFRB 



WDRC 
WJAS 
WLBZ 
WORC 



4:00 PM— ES-CD 

WADC WCAO 
WBBM WHK 
CKOK WFBL 
WSPD WFEA 
WLBW WHEC 
WWVA WBIG 
WDBJ WTOC 
WQAM WDBO 
WDAE WSJS 



3:00 PM— CS 

WGST WDOD 
WREC WSFA 
WLAC WDSU 
KTRH KLRA 
KTSA WIBW 
WACO KFH 
WTAQ KFAB 
WISN WCCO 
WSBT WMT 



M 

2:00 PM 

KVOR 

KLZ 

KSL 



C16— STAMP ADVENTURER'S CLUB— Friday. \i hour. 
5:45 PM— ED 

WABC WAAB 
WKBW WDRC 
WCAU WJAS 
WEAN WORC 



NOTE: The index number appearing at the left of each program title is keyed for reference from DAY BY DAY SCHEDULE and ARTIST SCHEDULE. Then follows the 
names of the principal artists and the station listings. Time zones are abbreviated as follows: ED for Eastern Daylight. ES-CD for Eastern Standard and Central Daylight, 
CS for Central Standard, M for Mountain, P for Pacific Coast. Last minute changes make absolute accuracy impossible: hence, if you do not find a specific program 
on a specific station, try other stations listed in same time zone. Where no station listing is given, hook-up is variable, but best results can be obtained by tu.ning 
in on key stations of the networks as designated on STATION SCHEDULE. Write Fan-Fare Program Editor, 420 Lexington Avenue, New York, for further information 

you require, enclosing return postage. 



"Notice of copyright. Method of arrangement copyrighted. Infringement will be prosecuted. 



30 



RADIO 



FANFARE 



PROGRAM 



Radio Fan-Fare 



N D E R 



CLASSIFIED SCHEDULE 



D— COMEDIANS 




E— FOOD 






D1— PHIL BAKER, THE ARMOUR JESTER— Friday. V2 hour. 

The Armour Jester, Harry McNaughton, Roy Shield, Merrie-Men, Neil Sisters. 


El— FRANCES LEE BARTON 9:15 AM-CS 

Tuesday and Thursday. J^ hour WHO WSM 

11:15 AM— ED 10:15 AM— ES-CD WMC WSB 






9:30 PM— ED 

WJZ WBZ 
WBZA KDKA 


8:30 PM— ES-CD 7:30 PM— CS 

WBAL WHAM KWK WREN 
WGAR WJR KOIL WTMJ 


6:30 PM 

KOA 
KDYL 


5:30 PM 

KGW 
KOMO 


WEAF WTIC 
WTAG WEEI 
WJAR WCSH 
WLIT WGY 


WRC WFBR 
WTAM WWJ 
WLW WMAQ 


WAPI WSMB 
KTHS KVOO 
KPRC WOAI 
WKY KTBS 
WOW 








WRVA WWNC KSTP WEBC 




KHQ 


WBEN WCAE 










WJAX WIOD WSM WMC 

WMAQ WSB WAPI 

WSMB WFAA 




KGO 
KFI 












E2— BETTY CROCKER 


-Wednesday and Friday. M hour. 


. 






KPRC WOAI 






10:45 AM— ED 


9:45 AM— ES-CD 


8:45 AM— CS 








WKY KSO 






WEAF WTAG 
WEEI WCSH 
WBAP WFI 


WTAM WWJ 
WSAI WFBR 
WRVA WPTF 


KSD WOW 
WOAI KPRC 
WKY WOC 














WBEN WGY 


WJAX WIOD 


WHO KVOO 






D2— BEN BERNIE'S BLUE RIBBON ORCHESTRA— Tuesday. 


Vi hour. 


P 


WJAR WCAE 


WFLA KYW 


KTHS WDAF 






9:00 PM— ED 


8:00 PM— ES-CD 

WRC WFBR 




8:30 PM 

KGO 




WRC 








WEEI WJAR 












WEAF WTAG 


WTAM WSAI 




KFI 


E3 FORECAST SCHOOL OF COOKERY 


Saturday. V, hour. 


Mrs. A. 


M. Goudiss, 


WCSH WEI 


WWJ WCKY 




KGW 


11:00 AM— ED 


10:00 AM— ES-CD 9:00 AM— CS 






WGY WBEN 


WLS 




KOMO 


WJZ WBZA 


WBAL WHAM 


KWK KOIL 






WCAE 






KHQ 


KDKA WBZ 


WGAR WJR 
WCKY KYW 


WREN 






D3-PHIL COOK AND 


HIS INGRAM SHAVERS— Mon., Wed 


., Fri. ! 1 hour. 


E4— MYSTERY CHEF— 
10:00 AM— ED 


Tuesday and Thursday. % hour. 
9:00 AM ES-CD 






8:45 PM— ED 


7:45 PM— ES-CD 6:45 PM— CS 






WEAF WTIC 


WFBR WRC 








WJZ WBZ 


WJR WBAL KWK KWCR 






WBEN WGY 


WWJ WTAM 








WBZA KDKA 


WGAR WCKY KUIL WREN 
WMAL WSYR KSO 
WLS WHAM 






WFI WTAG 
WJAR WCSH 
WEEI WCAE 


WSAI 










E5— RADIO HOUSEHOLD INSTITUTE 


9:15 AM— CS 


M 














D4— FIVE STAR THEATRE; GROUCHO AND CHICO MARX— 1 


. y 2 hour. 


Wednesday and Saturday. ]4. hour 


KSD WOC 


8:15 AM 




(Will be discontinued after last week In May) 
7:30 PM— ED 6:30 PM— ES-CD 






11:15 AM— ED 

WEAF WTAG 


10:15 AM— ES-CD WHO WDAF 
WRC WFBR WTMJ KSTP 


KOA 
KDYL 




WJZ WBZ 


WBAL WHAM 






WEEI WJAR 


WTAM WWJ 


WEBC KVOO 






WBZA KDKA 


WPTF WWNC 






WCSH WLIT 


WSAI KYW 


KPRC WOAI 






WSAZ 


WIS WRVA 
WMAL 






WGY WBEN 
WCAE WTIC 




WKY KTHS 
WSM WSB 
WSMB WAPI 
WMC WBAP 








S WITH WILL ROGERS— Sunday. Vi 


hour. 






D5— GULF HEADLINER 


E6 VISITING WITH IDA BAILEY ALLEN 


-Thursday. \i hour. M 




9:00 PM— ED 


8:00 PM— ES-CD 






10:15 AM— ED 


9:15 AM— ES-CD 


8:15 AM— CS 


7:15 AM 




WJZ WBAL 


WGAR WJR 






WABC WOKO 


WADC WCAO 


KMBC KMOX 


KVOR 




WBZ WBZA 


WLW WSYR 






WAAB WKBW 


WHK CKOK 


WMBD WGST 


KLZ 






WMAL WRVA 






WJAS WLBZ 


WFBL WSPD 


WDOD WREC 


KSL 






WPTF WWNC 






WHP WORC 


WJSV WCAH 


WSFA WLAC 








WIS WJAX 






CFRB 


WLBW WHEC 


WDSU KTRH 








WRDA 








WWVA WHIG 
WDBJ WQAM 
WDBO WDAE 


KLRA WIBW 
KFH WTAQ 

WISN WSBT . 
















D6— LUCKY STRIKE HOUR 


M 


P 




WSJS 








Thursday. 1 hour 


»:uu rim— us 


7:00 PM 


6:00 PM 












"Baron Munchausen' 


■ (Jack Pearl Come- KSD WOC 


KDYL 


KTAR 












10:00 PM— ED 


dian) WHO WOW 


KOA 


KFSD 




F — GEN* 






WEAF WTAG 


9:00 PM— ES-CD WDAF WTMJ 




KGO 












WEEI WJAR 
WCSH WFI 


WFBR WRC KSTP WEBC 
WTAM WWJ WDAY KFYR 




KFI 
KGW 














F1— AMERICAN LEGION PROGRAM 


2:45 PM— CS 


M 




WGY WBEN 


WLW WIS WIBA WRVA 




KOMO 


Thursday. % hour 


3:45 PM— ES-CD 


KMBC WGST 


1:45 PM 




WCAE 


WWNC WJAX WSM KVOO 




KHQ 


4:45 PM— ED 


WCAO WHK 


WBRC WDOD 


KVOR 






WIOD WFLA WMC WSB 






WABC WOKO 


WFBL WSPD 


WODX WSFA 


KLZ 






WPTF WENR WSMB WJDX 






WAAB WGR 


WFEA WLBW 


WLAC WDSU 


KSL 






KTHS WKY 






WIP WJAS 


WKBN WHIG 


KRLD KTRH 








WBAP KPRC 






WPG WLBZ 


WTAR WDBJ 


WIBW WACO 








WOAI KTBS 






WORC 


WMBG WTOC 
WQAM WDBO 
WSJS 


WTAQ WKBH 
WISN WSBT 
WMT WREC 
















D7— ED WYNN AND THE K- strain luestiay.. 


hour. 


















M 


P 


F3 COLUMBIA EDUCATIONAL FEATURES ■ 


M 


P 


9:30 PM— ED 


8:30 PM— ES-CD 7:30 PM— CS 


6:30 PM 


5:30 PM 


2:45 PM— ED 


1:45 PM— ES-CD 


12:45 PM— CS 


11:45 AM 


10:45 AM 


WEAF WCSH 


WFBR WRC KSD WOW 


KDYL 


KFSD 


WABC WOKO 


WADC WCAO 


KMBC WGST 


KVOR 


KHJ 


WFI WGY 


WTAM WWJ WHO WOC 


KOA 


KTAR 


WKBW WIP 


WBBM CKOK 


WDOD WREC 


KLZ 


KOIN 


WBEN WEEI 


WLW WRVA WSM WDAF 


KGIR 


KGO 


WJAS WEAN 


WFBL WSPD 


WODX WSFA 




KGB 


WJAR WCAE 


WWNC WLS WIBA KSTP 


KGHL 


KFI 


WPG WLBZ 


WJSV WCAH 


WLAC WDSU 




KFRC 


WTAG CFCF 


WJAX WIOD WEBC WDAY 




KGW 


WHP WORC 


WFEA WLBW 


KTRH WTAQ 




KOL 




WFLA WMAQ KFYR WTMJ 




KOMO 


CFRB 


WHEC WWVA 


WISN WSBT 




KFPY 




KVOO WMC 




KHQ 




WKBN WBIG 


WMT 








WSB KTHS 








WTOC WQAM 










WSMB WBAP 








WDBO WDAE 










KPRC WKY 








WSJS 










WOAI KTBS 
WJDX 






















F4 COLUMBIA PUBLIC AFFAIRS INSTITUTE— Sat. \ 2 hour. 


M 


P 










10:15 PM— ED 

WABC WOKO 


9:15 PM— ES-CD 

WADC WCAO 


8:15 PM— CS 

KMBC WMBD 


7:15 PM 

KVOR 


6:15 PM 
KHJ 










D8-IRENE FRANKLIN Al iER'lv , >AP!I]AGIW ©>;ul. artJ Fri 


WAAB WKBW 


WBBM WHK 


WGST WDOD 


KLZ 


KOIN 


10:15 PM-ED 


9:15 PM— ES-CD 8:15 PM-CS 






WCAU WJAS 


WFBL WSPD 


WREC WODX 




KGB 


WJZ 


WBAL WMAL KYW KWK 






WEAN WPG 


WJSV WFEA 


WLAC WDSU 




KFRC 




WSYR WGAR KWCR WREN 






WLBZ WICC 


WLBW WHEC 


KLRA KTSA 




KOL 




WJR WCKY KSO WAPI 






WHP WORC 


WWVA WBIG 


WIBW KFH 




KFPY 




WWNC WIS WMC WSMB 








WDBJ WTOC 


WCCO WSBT 








WJAX WIOD WKY WFAA 








WQAM WDBO 










WFLA KTBS WOAI 








WDAE WSJS 









NOTE: The index number appearing at the left of each program title is keyed for reference from DAY BY DAY SCHEDULE and ARTIST SCHEDULE. Then follows the 
names of the principal artists and the station listings. Time zones are abbreviated as follows: ED for Eastern Daylight, ES-CD for Eastern Standard and Central Daylight, 
CS for Central Standard, M for Mountain, P for Pacific Coast. Last minute changes make absolute accuracy impossible; hence, if you do not find a specific program on 
a specific station, try other stations listed in the same time zone. Where no station listing is given, hook-up is variable, but best results can be obtained by tuning in 
on key stations of the networks as designated on STATION SCHEDULE. Write Fan-Fare Program Editor, 420 Lexington Avenue, New York, for further information 

you require, enclosing return postage. 






•Notice of copyright. Mcthoil "f arrangement copyrighted. Infringement will be prosecuted. 



June 



31 



RADIO FAN -FARE PROGRAM FINDER 



CLASSIFIED SCHEDULE 



F5— ECONOMIC WORLD— Saturday. V 2 hour. 


M 


P 


F15 EDUCATIONAL LECTURES 




M 


P 


8:30 PM— ED 


7:30 PM— ES-CD 


6:30 PM— CS 


5:30 PM 


4:30 PM 


Tuesday. Yi hour 




5:15 PM-CS 


4:15 PM 


3:15 PM 


WEAF WEEI 


WIS WRC 


WOW WDAF 


KOA 


KFSD 


7:15 PM— ED 


6:15 PM— ES-CD 


KWK KWCR 


KDYL 


KPO 


WJAR WCSH 


WFBR WTAM 


WIBA WMC 


KDYL 


KPO 


WJZ WBZ 


WWNC WPTF 


KOIL WIBA 


KGIR 


KFSD 


WFI WGY 


WSAI WWJ 


WDAY WJDX 


KGIR 




WBZA KDKA 


WHAM WCKY 


KFYR WSM 


KOA 


KFI 


WBEN WTAG 


WWNC WFLA 


WSMB KPRC 


KGHL 






WSYR WIS 


WSB WJDX 


KGHL 


KGW 




WIOD WMAQ 


WOAI WEBC 
KFYR 








WMAL WENR 


WMC KVOO 
WOAI KTBS 
WREN WEBC 




KHQ 
KTAR 


F6— GOING TO PRESS 


TALKS BY EDITORS— Wed. \i hour. M 


P 














4:45 PM— ED 


3:45 PM— ES-CD 


2:45 PM— CS 


1:45 PM 


12:45 PM 












WABC WOKO 


WADC WCAO 


KMBC WGST 


KVOR 


KHJ 


F17— TALKS BY PRESIDENT'S CABINET 


-Monday. Vz hour 






WAAB WGR 


CKOK WFBL 


WDOD WREC 


KLZ 


KOIN 


10:30 PM— ED 


9:30 PM— ES-CD 


8:30 PM— CS 






WDRC WIP 


WSPD WJSV 


WSFA WLAC 


KSL 


KGB 


WEAF WEFI 


WFBR WWJ 


WSMB WTAG 






WJAS WPG 


WFEA WLBW 


WDSU KRLD 




KFRC 


WJAR WCSH 


WIS WFLA 


WIBA WEBC 






WLBZ WHP 


WWVA WKBN 


KTRH. KLRA 




KOL 


WDAF WRVA 


WTAM WRC 


WDAY WOC 






WORC CFRB 


WBIG WDBJ 


KTSA WIBW 




KFPY 


WWNC WBEN 


WJAX WSAI 


WHO WMC 








WTOC WQAM 


WACO KFH 






WJDX WLIT 


WIOD KYW 


KTBS WSB 








WDBO WDAE 


WTAQ KFAB 






WGY 




WKY' WFAA 








WSJS 


WISN WSBT 
WMT 










WTMJ 








F18 -NATIONAL STUDENT FEDERATION 


-Mon. \i hr. Mr: 


. Clevelam 














1 E. Dodge- 


F7— GULF PROGRAM- 


Wednesday and Friday. ) 










M 




9:00 PM— ED 


8:00 PM— ES-CD 


7:00 PM— CS 






2:00 PM— ED 


1:00 PM— ES-CD 


12:00 PM— CS 


11:00 AM 




WABC WOKO 


WCAO WKRC 


WGST WBRC 






WABC WOKO 


WADC WCAO 


WFBM WMBD 


KVOR 




WNAC WKBW 


WHK CKOK 


WREC WODX 






WAAB WGR 


WHK CKOK 


WGST WDOD 






WDRC WCATJ 


WFBL WSPD 


WLAC WDSU 






WDRC WIP 


WFBL WSPD 


WREC WSFA 






WEAN WORC 


WJSV WCAH 


KRLD KTRH 






WJAS WEAN 


WJSV WCAH 


WLAC WDSU 








WBT WBIG 


KLRA KTSA 






WPG WLBZ 


WFEA WLBW 


KLRA KEH 








WDBJ WMBG 








WORC CFRB 


WHEC WWVA 


WTAQ WISN 








WQAM WDBO 










WBIG WDBJ 


WSBT 








wDae 










WTOC WQAM 
WDBO WDAE 
WSJS 








F8— INTERNATIONAL RADIO FORUM 


12:15 PM— CS 


M 


P 










Sunday. M hour 


1:15 PM— ES-CD 


KWK KWCR 
KSO WREN 


11:15 AM 

KOA 


10:15 AM 

KGO 












2:15 PM— ED 












WJZ CFCF 


WBAL WMAL 


KOIL WDAY 


KDYL 


KFI 


F19— ANGELO PATRI— 


'Your Child"— Sunday. 14 hour 




P 




WSYR KDKA 


KFYR WSM 


KGIR 


KOMO 


(May be discontinued after June 4) 


5:45 PM-CS 




7:15 PM 




WRVA WPTF 


WAPI WMC 


KGHL 


KHQ 








M 


KHJ 




WWNC WIS 


WSMB WEBC 




KFSD 


7:45 PM— ED 


6:45 PM— ES-CD 


KMBC WHAS 


8:15 PM 


KOIN 




WJAX WMAQ 


WJDX WKY 




KTAR 


WABC WNAC 


WCAO WGN 


KMOX WCCO 


KLZ 


KGB 






KVOO WFAA 






WGR WCAU 


WKRC WHK 




KSL 


KFRC 






KTBS KTHS 






WJAS 


CKOK WFBL 






KOL 






WOAI 








WJSV 






KVI 
KFPY 


F9— TALKS— EDUCATIONAL— TiiesHav V, 


hour. 


M 


P 












3:00 PM— ED 


2:00 PM— ES-CD 


1:00 PM— CS 


12:00 PM 


11:00 AM 












WABC WOKO 


WCAO WBBM 


KMBC WFBM 


KVOR 


KHJ 


F20— THE POLITICAL 


SITUATION— Saturday. 




WGR WDRC 


CKOK WFBL 


WGST WDOD 


KSL 


KOIN 


7:00 PM— ED 


6:00 PM— ES-CD 


5:00 PM— CS 






WIP WJAS 


WSPD WFEA 


WREC WSFA 




KGB 


WABC WOKO 


WADC WCAO 


WFBM WGST 






WEAN WPG 


WLBW WHEC 


WLAC WDSU 




KFRC 


WNAC WGR 


WBBM WHK 


WDOD WREC 






WLBZ WICC 


WTAR WDBJ 


KTRH KFH 




KOL 


WDRC WCAU 


WSPD WJSV 


WODX WSFA 






WHP WORC 


WMBG WTOC 


WTAQ WKBH 




KFPY 


WJAS WEAN 


WCAH WFEA 


WDSU 






CFRB 


WQAM WDBO 
WSJS 


KFAB WISN 
WCCO WSBT 
WMT 






WLBZ WICC 
WHP WORC 


WLBW WHEC 
WWVA WBIG 
WDBJ WTOC 
WQAM WDBO 








F10— EDUCATIONAL LECTURES 


6:00 PM— CS 


M 


P 




WDAE 








Saturday. M hour 
8:00 PM— ED 






5-00 PM 


4:00 PM 

KPO 












7:00 PM— ES-CD 


KWK WREN 
WAPI WMC 


KOA 
KDYL 


F21-SOCONY-VACUUM 


—Friday. y 2 hour. 


Edwin C. Hill, Nathaniel Shilkret. 


WJZ 


WBAL WSYR 


WJDX WSMB 


KGIR 










M 


p 


KDKA 


WHAM WMAQ 




KGHL 




9:30 PM— ED 


8:30 PM— ES-CD 


7:30 PM— CS 


6:30 PM 


5:30 PM 










WABC W T OKO 
WNAC WKBW 


WADC WCAO 
WGN WKRC 


KMBC WFBM 
WHAS KMOX 


KLZ 
KSL 


KHJ 












KOIN 


F12— THE LAWYER AND 


M 




WDRC WCAU 


WHK CKOK 


KRLD KTRH 




KGB 


6:00 PM— ED 


5:00 PM -ES-CD 


4:00 PM— CS 


3:00 PM 




WJAS WTAN 


WOWO WFBL 


KLRA KTSA 




KFRC 


WABC WOKO 


WCAO WBBM 


WGST WDOD 


KVOR 




WLBZ WHP 


WSPD WJSV 


WIBW WACO 




KOL 


WAAB WKBW 


WFBL WSPD 


WREC WSFA 


KLZ 




WORC 


WCAH WFEA 


KFH WKBH 




KVI 


WDRC WJAS 


WJSV WFEA 


WLAC WDSU 


KSL 






WLBW WHEC 


WISN WCCO 




KFPY 


WEAN WPG 
WLBZ WICC 


WHEC WBIG 
WQAM WDBO 


WIBW WACO 
KFH WTAQ 






























WHP WORC 
CFRB 


WDAE WSJS 
WLBW WDBJ 
WTOC 


KFAB WISN 
WCCO KRLD 






F22— VOICE OF EXPERIENCE— Mon., Tues., Wed., Thurs., Fri. 
11:00 AM— ED 10:00 AM ES-CD 9:00 AM— CS 


14 hour 












WABC WNAC 


WCAO WBBM 


KMBC WHAS 
















WGR WDRC 


WKRC WHK 


KMOX 






F13— MAGIC OF SPEECH 




WCAU WJAS 


WJSV 














M 


P 


WEAN 










2:00 PM— ED 


1:00 PM— ES-CD 


12:00 PM— CS 


11:00 AM 


10:00 AM 


Wednesday. H hour 
8:00 PM— ED 
















WEAF WJAR 


WFBR WTAM 


KSD WIBA 


KOA 


KPO 


' 7:00 PM— ES-CD 


6:00 PM— CS 








WSAI WCKY 


WEBC WSM 


KDYL 




WABC WGR 


WCAO 


KMBC 








WIS WWNC 


WSMB KVOO 






WNAC WCAU 


WKRC 


KMOX 








WIOD 


KTBS WOAI 






WDRC WEAN 
WJAS 


WBBM 
WJSV 


WHAS 






F14 — MEET THE ARTIS 


T — Tuesday. ^ hour. Bob Taplinger 
4:00 PM— ES-CD 3:00 PM— CS 


Interviews. 

M 
2:00 PM 










5:00 PM— ED 


F23— WOMEN'S RADIO 


REVIEW 


1:30 PM— CS 






WABC WOKO 


WADC WCAO 


WGST WDOD 


KVOR 




Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, 


KSD WOC 






WNAC WGR 


WBBM CKOK 


WREC WSFA 


KLZ 




Thursday, Friday. Vz 


hour. 


WSMB WHO 






WDRC WIP 


WFBL WSPD 


WLAC WDSU 


KSL 




Hugo Mariani, Claudine MacDonald. 


WOW WIBA 






WJAS WEAN 


WJSV WFEA 


KRLD KTRH 






3:30 PM— ED 


2:30 PM— ES-CD 


KSTP WEBC 






WPG WLBZ 


WLBW WHEC 


KLRA KTSA 






WEAF WJAR 


WFBR WTAM 


WDAY WSM 






WICC WHP 


WWVA WBIG 


WIBW WACO 






WGY WBEN 


WWJ WWNC 


WMC WKY 






CFRB 


WDBJ WTOC 


KFH WTAQ 






WCAE WCSH 


WIS WIOD 


KPRC KTBS 








WQAM WDBO 


KFAB WISN 






WFI WTAG 


WJAX WFLA 


WAPI WBAP 








WD.AE WSJS 


WCCO WSBT 
WMT 








WSAI WRC 
KYW 


KFYR WDAF 







NOTE: The index number appearing at the left of each program title is keyed for reference from DAY BY DAY SCHEDULE and ARTIST SCHEDULE. Then follows the 
names of the principal artists and the station listings. Time zones are abbreviated as follows: ED for Eastern Daylight, ES-CD for Eastern Standard and Central Daylight. 
CS for Central Standard. M for Mountain. P for Pacific Coast. Last minute changes make absolute accuracy impossible; hence, if you do not find a specific program on 
a specific station, try other stations listed in the same time zone. Where no station listing is given, hook-up is variable, but best results can be obtained by tuning in 
on key stations of the networks as designated on STATION SCHEDULE. Write Fan-Fare Program Editor, 420 Lexington Avenue, New York, for further information 
you require, enclosing return postage. 



*Notice of copyright. Method of arrangement copyrighted. Infringement will be prosecuted. 



32 



Radio Fan-Fare 



RADIO FAN-FARE PROGRAM FINDER 



CLASSIFIED SCHEDULE 



F24-YOUR CHILD— Tuesday. M hour 



11:00 AM— ED 

WEAF WTAG 
WTIC WJAR 
WCSH WLIT 
WGY WBEN 
WCAE 



9:00 AM— CS 

WOC KFYR 
10:00 AM— ES-CD WHO WSM 

WFBR WRC WIBA WEBC 



WDAF WPTF 
WWNC WIOD 
WWJ WIS 
WRVA 



KTHS KVOO 
WOAI WKY 
WDAY WMC 
KTBS 



M P 

8:00 AM 7:00 AM 

KOA KFSD 

KDYL KGO 
KGIR KFI 
KGW 



FES— OUR AMERICAN SCHOOLS— Sun. V 2 hour. 6:30 PM— ED— WEAF Network 



G— HEALTH 



G1— ADVENTURES IN HEALTH— Tues. and Fri. \i hour. Dr. 



8:30 PM— ED 

WJZ WBZ 
WBZA KDKA 
CKGW 



7:30 PM— ES-CD 

WBAL WHAM 
WLW WGAR 
WLS 



6:30 PM— CS 

KSO 

9:45 PM— CS 

KSO 



Herman 

M 
5:30 PM 

KOA 
KDYL 

M 
8:45 PM 

KOA 
KDYL 



Bundeson. 

P 
4:30 PM 

KGO 
KGW 
KOMO 
KHQ 
KFI 
P 

7:45 PM 
KGO 
KGW 
KOMO 
KHQ 



G2— DR. HOWARD W. HAGGARD— Sunday. 
7:15 PM— ED 6:15 PM— ES-CD 

WJZ WBZ WLS 

WBZA 



hour. 



G3— MODERN LIVING HEALTH TALK— Sun. Tues., Wed., Thurs., Fri. ' 4 hour. 

9:30 AM— ED 8:30 AM— ES-CD 

WABC WNAC WJSV 
WCAU WEAN 
WICC 

G4— TOWER HEALTH EXERCISES— Mon., Tues., Wed., Thurs., Fri., Sat 1M hours. 
Arthur Bagley. 

6:45 AM— ED 5:45 AM— ES-CD 

7:45 AM— ED 6:45 AM— ES-CD 

WEAF WEEI WRC 
WFI WGY 
WBEN WCAE 
CKGW 

G5— ACADEMY OF MEDICINE— Tuesday. 3, hour. 

11:30 AM— ED 10:30 AM— ES-CD 9:30 AM— CS M 

WABC WOKO WCAO CKOK WDOD WREC 8:30 AM 

WNAC WKBW WSPD WJSV WODX WSFA KVOR 

WDRC WJAS WFEA WLBW WLAC KRLD KLZ 

WEAN WPG WWVA WBIG KTRH KLRA 

WLBZ WHP WQAM WDBO WIBW WTAQ 

WORC CFRB WDAE WCCO 



H— HOME AND GARDEN 



HI— AMERICAN TAXPAYERS— Saturday. M hour. 

7:00 PM— ED 6:00 PM— ES-CD 5:00 PM— CS 

WJZ KDKA WBAL WMAL KWCR KSO 
WHAM WSYR WIBA WEBC 
WJR WWNC WSB WMC 
WFLA WSMB KTBS 



M P 

4:00 PM 3:00 PM 

KOA KPO 

KDYL KJR 

KEX 

KGA 

KFSD 



H2— BENJAMIN MOORE TRIANGLE CLUB— Fri. M hr. Lew White, Betty Moore. 
4:15 PM— ED 3:15 PM— ES-CD 2:15 PM— CS 

WEAF WTIC WFBR WRC 
WEEI WGY WTAM WWJ 
WFI CKGW WLW WMAQ 
WCAE 



WOC WHO 
WDAF KSTP 
WEBC WDAY 
WKY WOAI 
WFAA WOW 



H3-THE CELLOPHANE PROGRAM— Mon., Thurs. 
Nell, Harding Sisters. 

10:45 AM-ED 9:45 AM— ES-CD 8:45 AM— CS 

WJZ WBZ WBAL WHAM KWCR WREN 

WBZA KDKA WGAR WJR KOIL KWK 

WLW WMAQ 



hr. Emily Post. Edward 



H4-LAWS THAT SAFEGUARD SOCIETY- 
6:30 PM— ED 5:30 PM— ES-CD 

WJZ WHAM WSYR 

WGAR WMAL 
WMAG 



Sat, H hr. Dean Gleason L. Archer. 
4:30 PM— CS 

KWCR KWK 
WREN 



H5— NATIONAL FARM AND HOME HOUR— Mon., Tues., Wed., Thurs., Fri., Sat. 



1 hour. 

1:30 PM— ED 

WJZ WBZ 
WBZA KDKA 



12:30 PM— ES-CD 11:30 AM— CS 



WBAL WRC 
WLW WCKY 
WJR WRVA 
WPTF WWNC 
WIS WJAX 
WIOD WELA 
WHAM WSYR 
KYW 



KOIL KSO 
KWK KWCR 
WREN WOC 
WHO WOW 
WDAF WSMB 
WKY KTBS 
KTHS WIBA 
KSTP WEBC 
WDAY KFYR 
WSM WSB 
WAPI WJDX 
WMC WFAA 
KPRC WOAI 



M 

10:30 AM 

KOA 



I— MUSIC— BAND 



11— U. S. ARMY BAND— Wednesday. >/ 2 hour. 



11:00 AM— ED 

WJZ KDKA 
CFCF WBZ 
WBZA 



Tuesday. >/ 2 hour. 

11:30 AM— ED 

WEAF WTAG 
WJAR WRC 
WEEI WTIC 
CFCF WGY 
WCSH CKGW 



Thursday. Yt, hour. 
4:00 PM— ED 

WABC WOKO 
WNAC WGR 
WDRC WCAU 
WIP WJAS 
WEAN WPG 
WLBZ WICC 
WORC CFRB 



Friday. V 2 hour. 

4:30 PM— ED 

WABC WOKO 
WAAB WGR 
WDRC WIP 
WJAS WPG 
WLBZ WHP 
WORC CFRB 



KWCR KWK 



10:00 AM ES-CD 9:00 AM— CS 

WBAL WGAR WREN KSO 

WJR WCKY 

WIS WIOD 

WFLA WWNC 

WJAX WHAM 

WSYR WENR 

KYW 



10:30 AM— ES-CD 9:30 AM— CS 

WWJ WSAI WOW WOC 
KFBR WCKY WHO KSD 
WTAM WDAF 
KYW 



Capt. Wm. J. Stannard, Bandmaster. 
M P 

8:00 AM 

KYW 



3:00 PM 

WCAO 

WHK 

WFBL 

WJSV 

WFEA 

WWVA 

WDBJ 

WQAM 

WDAE 



ES-CD 

WBBM 
CKOK 
WSPD 
WCAH 
WHEC 
WKBN 
WTOC 
WDBO 
WSJS 



2:00 PM 

KMBC 

WGST 

WREC 

WLAC 

KRLD 

KLRA 

WIBW 

KFH 

KFAB 

WSBT 



CS 

KMOX 

WDOD 

WSFA 

WDSU 

KTRH 

KTSA 

WACO 

WTAQ 

WISN 

WMT 



3:30 PM 

WCAO 
CKOK 
WSPD 
WLBW 
WTAR 
WMBG 
WQAM 
WSJS 



-ES-CD 

WHK 

WFBL 

WFEA 

WKBN 

WDBJ 

WTOC 

WDBO 



2:30 PM 

KMBC 
WBRC 
WREC 
WSFA 
WDSU 
KTRH 
WACO 
WKBH 
WCCO 
WMT 



CS 

WGST 

WDOD 

WODX 

WLAC 

KRLD 

WIBW 

WTAQ 

WISN 

WSBT 



M 

8:30 AM 
KOA 



M 

1:00 PM 

KVOR 

KLZ 

KSL 



M 

1:30 PM 

KVOR 

KLZ 

KSL 



P 
12:00 PM 

KHJ 

KOIN 

KGB 

KFRC 

KOL 

KFPY 



P 
12:30 PM 

KHJ 

KOIN 

KGB 

KFRC 

KOL 

KFPY 



J— MUSIC— CHAMBER 



J1 -AEOLIAN STRING QUARTET— Sun. \i hr. 10:30 AM— ED— WABC Network. 

J2 MADISON ENSEMBLE— Tues., Wed., and Sat V 2 hour. 1:30 PM— ED— WABC 
Network. 

J3 MORNING MUSICALE— Sunday. 1 hour. 11:00 AM— ED— WJZ Network. 



K— MUSIC— CHORUSES, GLEE CLUBS. 
QUARTETS, ETC. 

K2— CONTENTED PROGRAM— Mon. >/ 2 hr. Jean Arnold, Lullaby Lady, Morgan 
L. Eastman. 

10:00 PM— ED 9:00 PM— ES-CD 

WEAF WGY WTAM WWJ 
WBEN WCAE WLW WENR 
CKGW CFCF 



K3— THE ETON BOYS-Wednesday. \i hour. 3:45 PM— ED— WABC Network. 
Monday. ' ■, hour. 9:00 PM— ED— WABC Network. 



K4-FOUR CLUBMEN— Sunday. % hour. 5:15 PM— ED— WABC Network. Thursday. 
M hour. 10:30 AM— ED— WABC Network. Freddie Rich's Orchestra. 






NOTE: The index number appearing at the left of each program title is keyed for reference from DAY BY DAY SCHEDULE and ARTIST SCHEDULE. Then follows the 
names of the principal artists and the station listings. Time zones are abbreviated as follows: ED for Eastern Daylight. ES-CD for Eastern Standard and Central Daylight, 
CS for Central Standard, M for Mountain. P for Pacific Coast. Last minute changes make absolute accuracy impossible: hence, if you do not find a specific program on 
a specific station, try other stations listed in the same time zone. Where no station listing is given, hook-up is variable, but best results can be obtained by tuning in 
on key stations of the networks as designated on STATION SCHEDULE. Write Fan-Fare Program Editor, 420 Lexington Avenue, New York, for further information 

you require, enclosing return postage. 



•Notice of copyright. Method of arrangement copyrighted. Infringement will be prosecuted. 



June 



33 



RADIO FAN-FARE PROGRAM FINDER 



CLASSIFIED SCHEDULE 



K5— FOUR SHARPS— Wednesday, > , hour. 10:15 AM— ED— WEAF Network. 



K7— MADISON SINGERS— Tuesday. 34 


hour. 10:30 AM— 


ED— WABC Network. 


Sunday. J.£ hour. 


10:30 PM— ED— WABC Network. 






K8— THE MASTER SINGERS— Wednesday, J ; hour. 11:30 PM— ED— 


WJZ Net- 


work. Charles Baker. 








K10— THE ROUND TOWNERS— Friday. 34 hour. Irving Weil 


M 


P 


2:30 PM— ED 


1:30 PM— ES-CD 


12:30 PM— CS 


11:30 AM 


10:30 AM 


WABC WOKO 


WCAO WBBM 


KMBC WGST 


KVOR 


KHJ 


WNAO WGR 


WHK CKOK 


WBRC WDOD 


KLZ 


KOIN 


WDRO WCAU 


WFBL WSPD 


WREC WODX 


KSL 


KGB 


WJAS WEAN 


WFEA WLBW 


WSFA WLAC 




KFRC 


WLBZ WICC 


WHEC W'l'Att 


WDSU KFH 




KOL 


WHP WORC 


WDBJ WMBG 
WTOC WQAM 
WDBO WSJS 


WTAQ WKBH 
KFAB WISN 
WSBT WMT 




KFPY 



K11— SWISS YODELERS— Monday. ] , hour. 

7:00 PM— ES-CD 6:00 PM— CS 

WTAR WDBJ WGST WBRC 
WMBG WTOC WDOD WREC 
WQAM WDBO WSFA WLAC 
WSJS WDSU 

K12— L'HEURE EX QUISE— Sunday. Vz hour. 6:30 PM— ED— WJZ Network. 
George Dilworth, Director. 

K13 PILGRIM'S CHORUS— Sunday. l/ 2 hour. 2:00 PM— ED— WEAF Network. 

K14— TEMPLE OF SONG— Sunday. y 2 hour. 4:30 PM— ED— WEAF Network. 
Noble Cain, Director. 

K15— MORNING GLEE CLUB— Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday and 
Saturday. U hour. 8:30 AM— ED— WEAF Network. 



L— MUSIC— CLASSICAL 

(See also Band, Organ, Religious and Symphony Music) 



LI— MME. FRANCES ALDA 



Tuesday. 3 2 hour 

6:00 PM— ED 

WEAF WFI 
CKGW WBEN 
WJAR WCAE 
WTAG 



5:00 PM— ES-CD 

WDAF WCKY 
WFBR WSAI 
WJAX WWNC 
WIS WIOD 

WMAQ 



4:00 PM— CS 

WSM KSD 
WSB WDAY 
WOC WHO 
WFAA WAPI 
WIBA KFYR 
WSMB KPRC 
WOAI KTBS 



M P 

3:00 PM 2:00PM 

KOA KGW 

KDYL KGO 
KFSD 
KOMO 
KHQ 



L2— MARY EASTMAN, 

Tuesday. 34 hour 
8:00 PM— ED 

WABC WOKO 
WNAC WGR 
WDRC WCAU 
WJAS WEAN 
WPG WLBZ 
WHP WORC 
CFRB 



SOPRANO 

7:00 PM— ES-CD 

WHK CKOK 
WFBL WSPD 
WFEA WLBW 
WHEC WKBN 
WTAR WDBJ 
WMBG WQAM 
WDBO WSJS 



6:00 PM 

KMBC 

WGST 

WDOD 

WSFA 

WDSU 

KTRH 

KFH 

WKBH 

WISN 



CS 

WFBM 
WBRC 
WREC 
WLAC 
KRLD 
WACO 
WTAQ 
KFAB 



M P 

5:00 PM 4:00 PM 

KVOR KHJ 
KOIN 
KGB 
KFRC 
KOL 
KFPY 



L3— GRANDE TRIO— Wednesday. 1/2 hour. 



3:00 PM— ED 

WEAF WTAG 
WEEI WJAR 
WCSH WGY 
WBEN WCAE 
CKGW CFCF 



2:00 PM— ES-CD 1:00 PM— CS 

WFBR WRC WSMB KSD 

WCKY WTAM 

WSAI WWJ 

WRVA WWNC 

WIS WIOD 

WMAQ 



WOW WDAF 
WIBA WDAY 
WKY 



L4— BEN GREENBLATT, 
Tuesday. 34 hour 
11:45 AM— ED 

WABC WOKO 
WNAC WKBW 
WDRC WCAU 
WJAS WEAN 
WPG WLBZ 
WHP WORC 
CFRB 



PIANIST 
10:45 AM— ES-CD 

WCAO WBBM 
WHK CKOK 
WFBL WSPD 
WFEA WLBW 
WHEC WTAR 
WDBJ WMBG 
WTOC WQAM 
WDBO WSJS 



9:45 AM 

KMBC 

WGST 

WDOD 

WODX 

WLAC 

KRLD 

KTSA 

WACO 

WKBH 

WMT 



QC 

WMBD 

WBRC 

WREC 

WSFA 

WDSU 

KTRH 

WIBW 

WTAQ 

WCCO 



M P 

8:45 AM 7:45 AM 

KVOR KHJ 
KSL KOIN 

KGB 
KFRC 
KOL 
KFPY 



hour 



L5— IMPRESSIONS OF ITALY— Sunday. 

4:00 PM— ES-CD 3:00 PM— CS 

WRC WFBR WEBC KFYR 
WTAM WWNC 
WIOD WJAX 
WFLA WMAQ 



5:00 PM-ED 

WEAF WJAR 
WCSH WGY 
WBEN 



KSTP WMC 
WSMB WKY 
WFAA KTBS 
WOAI KPRC 
WTAQ 



M 

2:00 PM 

KOA 
KDYL 



L6-LA FORGE BERUMEN MUSICALE— Thursday. 1/2 hour. M P 

3:00 PM— ED 2:00 PM— ES-CD 1:00 PM— CS 12:00 PM 11:00 AM 

WABC WOKO WADC WCAO KMBC WFBM KVOR KHJ 

WNAC WGR WBBM WHK WMBD WGST KLZ KOIN 

WDRC WJAS CKOK WFBL WDOD WREC KSL KGB 

WEAN WIP WSPD WJSV WSFA WLAC KFRC 

WLBZ WPG WCAH WFEA WDSU KRLD KOL 

WHP WICC WLBW WHEC KTRH KLRA KFPY 

CFRB WORC WWVA WKBN WIBW WACO 

WBIG WDBJ WTAQ KFAB 

WTOC WQAM WISN WCCO 

WDBO WDAE WSBT WMT 

WSJS 



WEAF WTIC 
WTAG WEEI 
WJAR WCSH 
WLIT WBEN 
WCAE CKGW 
CFCF 



WHO WOW 

WDAF 



L7— MISCHA LEVITZKI, PIANIST— Wednesday. >/ 2 hour. 
9:30 PM— ED 8:30 PM— ES-CD 7:30 PM— CS 

WRC WFBR KSD WOC 

WTAM WSAI 

WCKY WWJ 

WWNC WRVA 

WJAX WIS 

WIOD WFLA 

WMAQ 

L9— SPRAGUE WARNER PROGRAM— Sunday. 34 hour. 
2:00 PM— ES-CD 1:00 PM— CS 

WBBM WKRC KMBC KMOX 
CKOK WOWO KFAB WISN 
WMT WCCO 



L10— CHARLES GILBERT SPROSS— Friday. ;., hour. 

3:00 PM— ED 2:00 PM— ES-CD 1:00 PM— CS 

WTAM WFBR WMC WSB 



M P 

6:30 PM 5:30 PM 

KOA KHQ 

KDYL KGO 
KGW 
KFI 
KOMO 



WEAF WGY 



WCSH CKGW WSAI WCKY 


WAPI WSM 






WBEN WCAE WWJ WWNC 


WSMB 






WRVA WMAQ 








WRC 








L11— SYLVIA SAPIRA, SONGS— Monday. 


4, hour. 


M 




2:15 PM— ED 1:15 PM— ES-CD 


12:15 PM— CS 


11:15AM 




WABC WOKO WCAO WBBM 


WGST WDOD 


KVOR 




WNAC WGR CKOK WFBL 


WSFA WLAC 


KLZ 




WDRC WIP WSPD WFEA 


WDSU WACO 


KSL 




WJAS WEAN WLBW WHEC 


KFH WTAQ 






WPG WLBZ WTAR WDBJ 


WKBH WISN 






WICC WORC WMBG WTOC 


WCCO WSBT 






CFRB WQAM WDBO 








WSJS 








L12— WALDORF ASTORIA ORCHESTRA 


4:00 PM— CS 


M 


P 


Monday, Wednesday, Thursday, 


KSD WIBA 


3:00 PM 


2:00 PM 


Friday and Saturday. V'2 hour. 


WSMB KPRC 


KOA 


KPO 


6:00 PM— ED 6:00 PM— ES-CD 


KVOO WOAI 


KDYL 


KFSD 


WEAF WCSH WCYK WWNC 


KTBS WSM 






WJAR WFI WLS WFBR 


WMC WOC 






CKGW WSAI WIOD 


WHO WDAY 






WWJ WMAQ 


WDAF WKY 
WAPI KFYR 






L13— CONCERT MEDLEY— Thurs. 34 hour 


. 7:30 PM— ED- 


WJZ Network. Maria 


Rosanoff, Emily Mickunas, Adolf Schmid. 








L14— MADAME BELLE FORBES CUTTER AND ORCHESTRA— Wed. V, 


hour. 


3:15 PM— ED 2:15 PM— ES-CD 


1:15PM— CS 


12:15 PM 




WABC WOKO WADC WCAO 


WFBM WMBD 


KVOR 




WNAC WGR WBBM WHK 


WGST WDOD 


KLZ 




WDRC WIP CKOK WFBL 


WREC WSFA 


KSL 





WJAS WEAN 
WPG WLBZ 
WICC WHP 
WORC CFRB 



WSPD WJSV 
WCAH WFEA 
WLBW WHEC 
WWVA WKBN 
WBIG WDBJ 
WTOC WQAM 
WDBO WDAE 
WSJS 



WLAC WDSU 
KRLD KTRH 
KLRA WIBW 
WACO WTAQ 
KFAB WISN 
WSBT WMT 



L15— ESSEX HOUSE ENSEMBLE— Tues. and Fri. J - hour. 1:30 PM— ED— WEAF 
Network. Richard Himber. 

L17— MEDLEY— Wed. } 2 hour. 4 PM— ED— WEAF Network. Christiaan Kriens. 



L18— SAVITT STRING 
2:30 PM— ED 

WABC WOKO 
WNAC WGR 
WDRC WCAU 
WJAS WEAN 
WPG WLBZ 
WICC WHP 
WORC 



QUARTETTE— Sat 
1:30 PM— ES-CD 

WADC WCAO 
WBBM WHK 
CKOK WFBL 
WSPD WJSV 
WCAH WFEA 
WLBW WHEC 
WWVA WDBJ 
WTOC WQAM 
WDBO WDAE 
WSJS 



»/ 2 hr. 






12:30 PM— CS 


M 


P 


KMBC WFBM 


11:30 AM 


10:30 AM 


WMBD WGST 


KVOR 


KHJ 


WDOD WREC 


KLZ 


KOIN 


WODX WSFA 


KSL 


KGB 


WLAC WDSU 




KFRC 


KSCJ KTRH 




KOL 


KLRA KTSA 




KFPY 


WIBW WACO 






WTAQ KFAB 






WISN WSBT 






WMT 







NOTE: The index number appearing at the left of each program title is keyed for reference from DAY BY DAY SCHEDULE and ARTIST SCHEDULE. Then follows the 
names of the principal artists and the station listings. Time zones are abbreviated as follows: ED for Eastern Daylight, ES-CD for Eastern Standard and Central Daylight. 
CS for Central Standard, M for Mountain, P for Pacific Coast. Last minute changes make absolute accuracy impossible; hence, if you do not find a specific program on 
a specific station, try other stations listed in the same time zone. Where no station listing is given, hook-up is variable, but best results can be obtained by tuning in 
on key stations of the networks as designated on STATION SCHEDULE. Write Fan-Fare Program Editor, 420 Lexington Avenue, New York, for further information 

you require, enclosing return postage. 



•Notice of copyright. Method of arrangement copyrighted. Infringement will be prosecuted. 



34 



Radio, Fan-Fare 



RADIO FAN-FARE PROGRAM FINDER 



CLASSIFIED SCHEDULE 



L19— ALEX SEMMLER— Friday. ^ hour. 



3:15 PM— ED 

WABC WOKO 



WGR 

WIP 

WPG 

WICC 

WORC 



WDRC 

WJAS 

WLBZ 

WHP 

CFRB 



2:15 PM— ES-CD 

WCAO WHK 
CKOK WFBL 
WSPD WFEA 
WLBW WHEC 
WTAR WDBJ 
WMBG WTOG 
WQAM WDBO 
WSJS 



1:15 PM— CS 
KMBC WFBM 
WGST WBRC 
WDOD WREC 
WODX WSFA 
WLAC WDSU 
KRLD KTRH 
WIBW WACO 
KFH WTAQ 
WKBH KFAB 
WISN WCCO 
WSBT WMT 



M P 

12:15 PM 11:15 AM 

KVOR KHJ 
KLZ KOIN 

KSL KGB 

KFRC 
KOL 
KFPY 



L20-SONATA RECITAL— Thursday. J4 hour. 5:00 PM— ED— WJZ Network. 
Joseph Gallicchio, Franz Pfau. 



L21— KATHLEEN STEWART— Thursday. J4 hour. 4:15 PM— ED— WEAF Network. 

L22— STRING SYMPHONY— Wed. }i hour. 7:30 PM— ED— WJZ Network. 
Frank Black. 

L23— INSTRUMENTAL MUSIC— Wed. M hour. 10:30 AM— ED— WEAF Network. 
Sylvia Altman, Julian Altman, Urban Intondi. 

L24— BRAHM'S SERIES CONCERT— Sun. '/ 2 hr. 6:00 PM— ED— WJZ Network. 



L25-MELODY HOUR— Sun. 1 hour. 8:00 AM— ED— WEAF Network. 



L26- NATIONAL OPERA CONCERT— Sun. 1 hr. 3:00 PM— ED— WJZ Network. 
L27 POP CONCERT— Sunday. y 2 hour. 12:30 PM— ED— WEAF Network. 



128 NINO MARTINI, TENOR, HOWARD BARLOW AND THE COLUMBIA SYM- 
PHONY ORCHESTRA-Tuesday. >/ 2 hour. 



9:30 PM— ED 8:30 PM— ES-CD 7:30 PM— CS 

WABC WOKO WCAO WBBM KMBC WFBM 
WNAC WKBW CKOK WSPD WDOD WREC 
WDRC WJAS WJSV WFEA WODX WSFA 
WEAN WLBZ WLBW WKBN WLAC WDSU 
WICC WHP WBIG WDBJ KTRH KLRA 
WORC CFRB WMBG WQAM KTSA WIBW 
WDBO WDAE WTAQ KFH 
WISN WCCO 
WMT 
Friday. V 2 hour. 8:00 PM— ED— WABC Network 



M 

6:30 PM 

KVOR 
KLZ 

KSL 



M— MUSIC— DANCE 



M1— HOTEL LEXINGTON DANCE ORCHESTRA— SaL y 2 hr. 6 PM— ED— WJZ 
Network. Sat. V 2 hr. 1:00 PM— ED— WEAF Network. Thurs. y 2 hr. 12 Mid.— 
ED— WJZ Network. Fri. V 2 hr. 12:05 AM— ED— WEAF Network. Don Bestor. 

M2— LEON BELASCO AND HIS ORCHESTRA 

Saturday. y 2 hour. 8:30 PM— ED— WABC Network 



M3— FRED BERRENS AND HIS ORCHESTRA— Monday. % hour. 5:15 PM— ED— 
WABC Network. Tuesday. V 2 hour. 4:30 PM— ED— WABC Network. 
Brad Reynolds, Tenor. 



M4-HOTEL BILTMORE CONCERT ENSEMBLE— Saturday. U hour. 1:30 PM— ED 
—WEAF Network. Friday. Saturday. V 2 hour. 11:30 PM— ED— WEAF Network. 
Harold Stern. 



M6 



-CALIFORNIA MELODIES— Thursday. 
10:15 PM— ED 9:15 PM— ES-CD 



>/ 2 hour. Raymond Paige's Orchestra. 



WABC WOKO 
WNAC WKBW 
WJAS WEAN 
WLBZ WICC 
WHP WORC 
CFRB 



WADC WBBM 
WHK CKOK 
WSPD WJSV 
WCAH WFEA 
WLBW WHEC 
WKBN WBIG 
WDBJ WQAM 
WDBO WDAE 
WSJS WTOC 



8:15 PM— CS 

KMBC WFBM 
KMOX WMBD 
WGST WDOD 
WREC WLAC 
WDSU KTRH 
KLRA KTSA 
WIBW KFH 
WCCO WMT 



M 

7:15 PM 

KVOR 

KLZ 

KSL 



P 
6:15 PM 

KHJ 

KOIN 

KGB 

KFRC 

KOL 

KFPY 



M7-COLLEGE INN ORCHESTRA— Wed. M hr. 12:05 AM-ED— WEAF Network. 
Frank Libuse. 



M8-COTTON CLUB ORCHESTRA— Tues. and Fri. J/ 2 hr. 12:00 AM— ED— WJZ 
Network. Thursday. >/ 2 hour. 12:05 AM— ED— WEAF Network. Duke Ellington. 



M9-DANCE MUSIC— Sunday. 2 hours. 11:00 PM— ED— WABC Network. 



M10 DANCE MUSIC— Sun. 1 hr. 12:00 Mid.— ED— WJZ Network. Including 
Jan Garber. 



M11— DANCE MUSIC— Sun. 1 hr. 12:00 Mid.— ED— WEAF Network. Including Ted 
Black, Hotel Adelphia. 



M12— DANCE ORCHESTRAS— Mon. 1'/ 2 hrs. 11:30 PM— ED— WABC Network. 
Including Ted Lewis, Leon Belasco, Ouie Nelson. 



M13— DANCE ORCHESTRA— Wed. V/ 2 hrs. 11:30 PM— ED— WABC Network. 



M14 DANCE ORCHESTRAS Thurs. 1 \> 2 hrs. 11:30 PM— ED— WABC Network. 
Including Ted Lewis, Glen Gray. 



M15 DANCING IN THE TWIN CITIES Thurs. \ 2 hr. 12:30 AM— ED— WJZ Net- 
work. 



M16— MITCHELL SCHUSTER, TANGO DAHL ORCHESTRA— SaL V 2 hr. 
4:00 PM— ED 3:00 PM— ES-CD 2:00 PM— CS 

WJZ WBZ WBAL WMAL KWK KWCR 

WBZA WSYR WHAM KSO KOIL 

WGAR WJR WREN 

WLW KYW 

M17— EDGEWATER BEACH HOTEL ORCHESTRA— Tues. i/ 2 hr. 12:30 AM— ED— 
WJZ Network. Wed. y 2 hr. 12:30 AM— ED— WEAF Network. Fri. y 2 hr. 11:30 
PM— ED— WEAF Network. SaL V 2 hr. 12:00 AM— ED— WJZ Network. Don Pedro 



M18— TED FIORITO AND HIS ORCHESTRA— Saturday. y 2 hour. M 



12:00 M— ED 

WABC WOKO 
WNAC WKBW 
WCAU WJAS 
WICC WHP 



11:00 PM— ES-CD 10:00 PM— CS 

WCAO WHK KMBC WFBM 



CKOK WFBL 
WSPD WLBW 
WHEC WTAR 
WDBJ WTOC 
WQAM WDBO 
WSJS 



WMBD WGST 
WBRC WDOD 
WREC WLAC 
WDSU KRLD 
KTRH WIBW 
WACO KFAB 
WISN WCCO 
WSBT WMT 



9:00 PM 8:00 PM 

KVOR KHJ 



KLZ 
KSL 



KOIN 

KGB 

KFRC 

KOL 

KFPY 



M19— GEORGE HALL AND HIS ORCHESTRA— Mon. X hr. 6:15 PM— ED— WABC 
Network. Wed. % hr. 1:15 PM— ED— WABC Network. Thurs. V 2 hr. 5:00 
PM— ED- WABC Network. SaL V 2 hr. 1:00 PM— ED— WABC Network. Tues. 
M hr. 5:45 PM— ED— WABC Network. 



M20— BUDDY HARROD AND HIS ORCHESTRA— Tues. 



12:00 N— ED 

WABC WOKO 
WGR WNAC 
WIP WDRC 
WEAN WJAS 
WLBZ WPG 
WORC WHP 
CFRB 



11:00 AM— ES-CD 10:00 AM— CS 

WCAO WBBM KMBC WFBM 



CKOK WSPD 
WFEA WLBW 
WKBN WTAR 
WDBJ WMBG 
WTOC WQAM 
WDBO WSJS 



WMBD WGST 
WBRC WDOD 



WREC WODX 
WSFA WLAC 
WDSU KRLD 
KTRH KTSA 
WACO KFH 
WTAQ WKBH 
WISN WSBT 
WMT 



and Thurs. 
M 

9:00 AM 

KVOR 

KLZ 

KSL 



V 2 hour. 

P 
8:00 AM 

KHJ 

KOIN 

KGB 

KFRC 

KOL 

KFPY 



M21— BILLY HAYS AND HIS ORCHESTRA— Mon. i/ 2 hr. 



1:00 PM— ED 

WABC WOKO 
WAAB WGR 
WDRC WCAU 
WEAN WLBZ 
WICC WHP 
WORC CFRB 



12:00 N— ES-CD 

WBBM WHK 
CKOK WFBL 
WSPD WFEA 
WLBW WHEC 
WKBN WTAR 
WDBJ WMBG 
WTOC WQAM 
WDBO WSJS 



11:00 AM— CS 

KMBC WGST 
WBRC WDOD 
WREC WODX 
WSFA WLAC 
WDSU KTRH 
KTSA WTAQ 
WKBH KFAB 
WISN WCCO 
WSBT WMT 



M P 

10:00 AM 9:00 AM 

KVOR KHJ 
KLZ KOIN 



M23— CLAUDE HOPKINS ROSELAND ORCHESTRA— Wednesday. V, hour 
Followed by JACK BROOKS AND WESTPHAL ORCHESTRA At 4:30 

M 

3:00 PM— ES-CD 2:00 PM— CS 1:00 PM 

WCAO WBBM KMBC WFBM KVOR 
WHK CKOK WGST WBRC KLZ 
WFBL WSPD 
WFEA WLBW 
WKBN WTAR 
WDBJ WMBG 
WTOC WQAM 
WDBO WSJS 



4:00 PM— ED 

WABC WOKO 
WAAB WGR 
WDRC WIP 
WJAS WPG 
WLBZ WICC 
WORC CFRB 



WGST WBRC 
WDOD WREC 
WODX WSFA 
WLAC WDSU 
KRLD KTRH 
WIBW WACO 
WTAQ WKBH 
KFAB WISN 
WCCO WSBT 
WMT 



M24 HOTEL AMBASSADOR, LOS ANGELES Saturday. y 2 hour. 12:30 AM- 
ED— WEAF Network. Phil Harris, Coconut Grove. 

M25— KAY KAYSER AND HIS KENMORE HOTEL ORCHESTRA— Fri. \ hr. MS 
PM— ED— WEAF Network. Sat. V 2 hr. 12:30 PM— ED— WEAF Network. 

M27— VINCENT LOPEZ AND HIS ST. REGIS ORCHESTRA— Wed., Fri. '/, hr 
11:00 PM— ED— WEAF Network. Mon. y 2 hr. 12:05 AM-ED— WEAF Network. 



M28— VINCENT LOPEZ AND ORCHESTRA— Sunday. 



10:15 PM-ED 

WJZ WBZ 
WBZA KDKA 



9:15 PM— ES-CD 8:15 PM— CS 



WBAL WJR 
WGAR WLW 
WHAM WMAQ 



WMC KSO 
WJDX KWK 
WREN WTMJ 
WIBA KSTP 
WSM WSB 
KPRC WOAI 
WSMB WKY 
WBAP 



x / 2 hour. 

M P 

7:15 PM 6:15 PM 

KOA KOMO 

KDYL KHQ 
KGW 
KGO 
KFI 



NOTE: The index number appearing at the left of each program title is keyed for reference from DAY BY DAY SCHEDULE and ARTIST SCHEDULE. Then follows the 
names of the principal artists and the station listings. Time zones are abbreviated as follows: ED for Eastern Daylight, ES-CD for Eastern Standard and Central Daylight, 
CS for Central Standard, M for Mountain, P for Pacific Coast. Last minute changes make absolute accuracy impossible; hence, if you do not find a specific program on 
a specific station, try other stations listed in the same time zone. Where no station listing is given hook-up is variable, but best results can be obtained by tuning in 
on key stations of the networks as designated on STATION SCHEDULE. Write Fan-Faro Program Editor, 420 Lexington Avenue, New York, for further information 

you require, enclosing return postage. 



■Notice of copyright. Method of arrangement copyrighted. Infringement will be prosecuted. 



June 



RADIO 



35 



F A N - F A R E 



PROGRAM 



FINDER 



CLASSIFIED SCHEDULE 



M29 LOTUS GARDEN ORCHESTRA— Thursday. Vi hour. 2:00 PM— ED— WEAF 
Network. Emerson Gill. 



M30— HOTEL SHOREHAM ORCHESTRA— Saturday. Vi hour. 12:30 AM— ED- 
WJZ Network. Maxine Lowe. 



M31— ABE LYMAN AND HIS ORCHESTRA— Friday. Vi hour. 



11:30 PM— ED 

WABC WOKO 
WAAB WKBW 
WDRC WCAU 
WEAN WPG 
WLBZ WICC 
WHP WORC 
CFRB 



10:30 PM— ES-CD 

WADC WCAO 
WHK CKOK 
WFBL WSPD 
WJSV WCAH 
WLBW WHEC 
WDBJ WTOC 
WQAM WDBO 
WDAE WSJS 



9:30 PM 

KMBC 

KMOX 

WGST 

WREC 

WLAC 

KTRH 

WIBW 

KFH 

WISN 

WSBT 



cs 

WFBM 

WMBD 

WDOD 

WODX 

WDSU 

KLRA 

WACO 

KFAB 

WCCO 

WMT 



M 
8:30 PM 

KVOR 
KLZ 

KSL 



P 
7:30 PM 

KHJ 

KOIN 

KGB 

KFRC 

KOL 

KVI 

KFPY 

KOH 



M32— MANHATTAN SERENADERS— Wednesday. ' , hour. 9:15 PM— ED— WABC 
Network. Freddie Rich, Conductor. 



M34— MERRY MADCAPS— Saturday. Vi hour. 3:00 PM— ED— WEAF Network. 
Norman L. Cloutier Orchestra, Fred Wade. 



M35— HOTEL McALPIN ORCHESTRA— Wed. Vi hr. 11:30 PM— ED— WEAF Net- 
work. Thurs. ii hr. 11:15 PM— ED— WEAF Network. Sam Robbins. 



M36— JOE MOSS SOCIETY ORCHESTRA— Sunday. Vi hour. 
7:30 PM— ED 

WEAF WTIC 
WJAR WTAG 
WCSH 



M37— OZZIE NELSON AND HIS ORCHESTRA— Tuesday, Thursday. 

6:15 PM— ED 5:15 PM— ES-CD 4:15 PM— CS 

WOKO WAAB WBBM WHK WGST WODX 

WGR WDRC CKOK WSPD WSFA WSBT 

WJAS WLBZ WFEA WLBW 
WICC WORC 
CFRB 



hour. 



6:20 PM— ED 

WABC WOKO 
WAAB WGR 
WDRC WEAN 
WLBZ WORC 
CFRB 



Stations Added at 
5:20 PM— ES-CD 4:20 PM— CS 

WBBM WHK WSBT 
CKOK WSPD 
WFEA WLBW 



M38 NESTLES PROGRAM— Friday. Vi hour. Phil Spitalny. 
8:00 PM— ED 7:00 PM— ES-CD 6:00 PM— CS 

WJZ WBZ WHAM WJR KWK WREN 

WGAR KDKA WBAL WMAL KOIL 
WBZA WSYR WLS 



M40— PALAIS D'OR ORCHESTRA— Thurs., Fri. Vi hr. 12:30 PM— ED— WEAF Net- 
work. Thurs. M hr. 1:15 PM— ED— WEAF Network. Wed. Vi hr. 2:00 PM— 
ED— WEAF Network. Julian Woodworth. 



M41— PARK CENTRAL DANCE ORCHESTRA— Mon., Wed. 12 Mid— ED— WJZ 
Network. Bert Lown. 



M42— JOHNNY JOHNSON HOTEL PENNSYLVANIA ORCHESTRA— Mon. \i hr. 
11:15 PM— ED— WEAF Network. Wed. Vi hr. 12:30 AM— ED— WJZ Network. 
Thurs. Vi hr. 11:30 PM— ED— WEAF Network. Sat. Vi hr. 12:05 AM— ED— 
WEAF Network. 

M43— RADIO TROUBADOURS— Tues., Thurs. Vi hr. 3:15 PM— ED— WJZ Network. 
Sat. Vi hr. 3:00 PM— ED— WJZ Network. Mary Steele. 

M44— POND'S PROGRAM— Fri. Vi hr. Leo Reisman, Lee Wiley, William Scholtz- 
9:30 PM— ED 8:30 PM— ES-CD 7:30 PM— CS 

WEAF WTAG WWJ WFBR WDAF KSD 

WJAR WCSH WRC WTAM WOC WHO 

WLIT WGY WSAI WENR WOW 

WBEN WCAE 

M45— SATURDAY NIGHT DANCING PARTY Sat. 1 hr. B. A. Rolle and Terraplane 



Orchestra. 

10:00 PM— ED 

WEAF WTAG 
WEEI WJAR 
WCSH WFI 
WGY WBEN 
CKGW CFCF 



9:00 PM— ES-CD 8:00 PM— CS 

WRC WFBR KSD WOW 

WTAM WLW WDAF KSTP 

WWJ WOC WSB WSMB 

WHO WCAE WBAP 
WMAQ 



7:00 PM 6:00 PM 

KOA KGO 

KDYL KFI 



M46— RHYTHM KINGS— Mon. Vi hr. 11:30 AM— ED— WABC Network. Fred 
Berrens, Conductor. 

M47— VICTOR SCHILLING HOTEL COSMOPOLITAN ORCHESTRA— 
Friday. i 2 hour. 4:00 PM— ED— WJZ Network 



M48-SHERMAN HOTEL DANCE ORCHESTRA— 
Saturday. ]/ 2 hour. 5:00 PM— ED— WJZ Network 



M49— VINCENT SOREY AND HIS ORCHESTRA— 

Tuesday. M hour. 11:15 AM— ED— WABC Network 

M50-SYNCOPATORS— Tues., Wed. M hr. 2:30 PM— ED— WJZ Network. Harold 
Stokes, Dick Teela. 

M51— HAL THOMPSON'S ORCHESTRA— Saturday. V 2 hour. 3:30 PM— ED— 
WABC Network. Shirley Howard. 

M54— PAUL VICTORINE ORCHESTRA— Sat Mhr. 7:30 PM— ED. WJZ Network. 

M55-VILLAGE BARN ORCHESTRA— Fri. Vi hr. 12:30 AM— ED— WJZ Network. 
Ted Black. 

M56— WALDORF ASTORIA ORCHESTRA— Monday. Vi hour. Nat Brandwynne. 
11:30 PM— ED 10:30 PM— ES-CD 

WEAF WTAG WRC WFBR 
WJAR WTIC 
WCSH 
Also Saturday. Vi hour. 11:10 PM— ED— WEAF Network. 

M57— WEALTH OF HARMONY— Saturday. Vi hour. 3:30 PM— ED— WJZ Network. 
Joseph Gallicchio, Edward Davies. 

M58— FRANK WESTPHAL'S DANCE ORCHESTRA— Mon. Vi hr. 4:00 PM— ED— 
WABC Network. Tues. Thurs. Vi hr. 3:30 PM— ED— WABC Network. 

M59-RED NICHOLS GOLDEN PHEASANT ORCHESTRA— Saturday. ' •> hour. 
2:00 PM— ED— WEAF Network. Monday. M hour. 1:15 PM— ED— WEAF Network. 

M60-BREAKFAST CLUB— 

Mon., Tue., Wed., Thur., Fri., Sat. V 2 hour. 9:15 AM— ED— WJZ Network 

N— MUSIC-MEDLEY PROGRAMS 

N! A. AND P. GYPSIES— Monday. ' ., hour. Harry Horlick, Frank Parker. 

9:00 PM— ED 8:00 PM— ES-CD 

WEAF WTIC WRC WTAM 

WTAG WEEI WWJ WSAI 

WJAR WCSH WMAQ 
WLIT WGY 
WBEN WCAE 

N2— CITIES SERVICE CONCERT— Fri. 1 hr. Jessica Dragonette, The Cavaliers, 
Henry Shope, Frank Parker, John Seagle, Elliot Shaw, Lee Montgomery, Frank 
Banta, Rosarie Bourdon. 



8:00 PM— ED 

WEAF WTIC 
WCSH WCAE 
WLIT WGY 
WBEN WTAG 
CKGW WEEI 
WJAR 



7:00 PM— ES-CD 6:00 PM— CS 

WFBR WRC WDAF WOC 



WTAM WWJ 
WSAI KYW 



WDAI WHO 
KSD WOW 
KSTP KPRC 
KTBS WTMJ 
WEBC WKY 
WFAA 



M 

5:00 PM 

KOA 
KDYL 



N3— CLASSICAL VARIETIES— Tues. 
Yoichi Hiraoka. 
1:15 PM— ED 

WEAF WJAR 
WTAG CFCF 

WBEN WEEI 
WCSH WFI 



}4 hr. Richard Maxwell, Helen Schaeffer, 



12:15 PM— ES-CD 

WWJ WFBR 
WTAM WSAI 
WRC WMAQ 



N4— FRAY AND BRAGGIOTTI, TWO PIANO TEAM— Sunday. 



7:00 PM— ED 

WABC WOKO 
WNAC WIP 
WJAS WEAN 
WLBZ WICC 
WHP WORC 
CFRB WGS 
WORC 



6:00 PM— ES-CD 5:00 PM— CS 

WCAO CKOK WGST WBRC 



WFBL WSPD 
WLBW WHEC 
WTAR WDBJ 
WTOC WQAM 
WDBO WSJS 



WDOD WREC 
WODX WSFA 
WDSU KTRH 
WIBW WACO 
KFH WTAQ 
WKBH KFAB 
WCCO WSBT 
WMT 
Monday '.,' hour 8:45 P.M.— ED— WABC Network 
Thursday K hour 9:15 P.M.— ED— WABC Network 

N5— THE GAUCHOS— Sun. Vi hr. Vincent Sorey, Tito Guizar. 



Vi hour. 
M 

4:00 PM 

KVOR 

KLZ 

KSL 



8:00 PM— ED 

WABC WOKO 
WAAB WGR 
WDRC WCAU 
WJAS WEAN 
WPG WLBZ 
WICC WHP 
WORC CFRB 



7:00 PM— ES-CD 6:00 PM— CS 

WADC WCAO KMBC WFBM 



WHK CKOK 
WFBL WSPD 
WJSV WCAH 
WFEA WLBW 
WHEC WKBN 
WBIG WDBJ 
WTOC WQAM 
WDBO WDAE 
WSJS 



KMOX WMBD 
WGST WDOD 
WREC WLAC 
WDSU KTRH 
KLRA KTSA 
WIBW KFH 
WISN WCCO 
WMT 



M 

5:00 PM 

KVOR 
KLZ 

KSL 



P 
4:00 PM 

KHJ 

KOIN 

KGB 

KFRC 

KOL 

KFPY 



N6— JACK FROST MELODY MOMENTS— Mon. Vi hr. Josef Pasternack. 
9:30 PM— ED 8:30 PM— ES-CD 

WJZ KDKA WBAL WHAM 
WGAR WLW 
WJR WENR 



NOTE: The index number appearing at the left of each program title is keyed for reference from DAY BY DAY SCHEDULE and ARTIST SCHEDULE. Then follows the 
names of the principal artists and the station listings. Time zones are abbreviated as follows: ED for Eastern Daylight, ES-CD for Eastern Standard and Central Daylight, 
CS for Central Standard, M for Mountain, P for Pacific Coast. Last minute changes make absolute accuracy impossible: hence, if you do not find a specific program on 
a specific station, try other stations listed in the same time zone. Where no station listing is given, hook-up is variable, but best results can be obtained by tuning in 
on key stations of the networks as designated on STATION SCHEDULE. Write Fan-Fare Program Editor, 420 Lexington Avenue, New York, for further information 

you require, enclosing return postage. 



♦Notice of copyright. Method of arrangement copyrighted. Infringement will be prosecuted. 



36 



Radio Fan-Fare 



RADIO 



F A N - F A R E 



P R O C R AM 



FINDER 



CLASSIFIED SCHEDULE 



N7— RIESENFELDS VIENNESE PROGRAM— Sun. 1 hr. 
8:00 PM— ED 7:00 PM— ES-CD 6:00 PM—CS 

WJZ WBZ WBAL WSYR KWK KWCR 
WBZA KDKA WGAR WCKY KSO WREN 
WMAL WLS KOIL 

N8 -MAGIC TENOR AND ROUND TOWNERS QUARTET— Thursday. U hour. 

(May be discontinued after May 18) M P 

11:30 AM— ED 10:30 AM— ES-CD 9:30 AM— CS 8:30 AM 7:30 AM 

WABC WOKO WBBM WKRC KMBC WHAS KLZ KHJ 

WNAC WKBW WHK CKOK KMOX KOMA KSL KOIN 

WCAU WJAS WOWO WFBL KFAB WCCO KGB 

WEAN WJSV WCAH WMT KFRC 

WKBN KVI 

KFPY 



N9— MAJOR BOWES' CAPITOL FAMILY— Sunday. 1 hour 
11:15 AM— ED 10:15 AM— ES-CD 9:15 AM— CS 

WEBR WRC WDAF KFYR 

WTAM WFLA 

WWJ WSAI 

WIOD WWNC 

WMAQ 



WEAF WJAR 
WTAG WLIT 
WGY 



WAPI WSMB 

KPRC WEBC 

WHO WIBA 

KSTP WMC 

WKY WBAP 

KTBS WOAI 
WOC 



M 

8:15 AM 

KOA 
KDYL 



P 
7:15 AM 

KFSD 

KGO 

KHQ 

KTAR 

KFI 

KGW 

KOMO 



N10 -MERRIE MEN QUARTET— Mon., Wed., Fri. }4 hr. 12:30 PM— EO— WJZ 
Network. Wesley Summerfield, Elliot Stewart, Bob Geddes, Norman Gordon, 
Earl Lawrence. 

Nil— POPULAR VARIETIES— Thurs. Vz hr. 1:30 PM— ED— WEAF Network. Erva 
Giles, Joe White, Joe Biviano, Irving Miller. 

N12 REVELLERS QUARTET— Wednesday. V. hour. 
10:00 PM— ED 

WJZ 

N14— THE SOUTHEASTERN REVUE— Thurs. V z hour. 4:30 PM— ED— WJZ Network. 

N15-THURSDAY SPECIAL— Thursday. i/ 2 hour. 4:00 PM— ED— WJZ Network. 
Ruth Lyon, Edward Davies, Josef Koestner. 

N16— TONE PICTURES— Sunday. 1 hour. 8:00 AM— ED— WJZ Network. 
George Blake, Mary Merker, Helen Janke, Richard Maxwell, Curt Peterson. 



WEAF WTAG 
WEEI WJAR 
WGY WCAE 
WFI WCSH 
CKGW WBEN 



M 

12:00 PM 

KOA 



N17— VOCAL ART QUARTET— Tuesday. »/ 2 hour. 

Alma Kitchell, Selma Johanson, Chester Evers, Earl Waldo 
3:00 PM— ED 2:00 PM— ES-CD 1:00 PM— CS 

WFBR WRC WSM WSB 

WIOD WWJ WAPI KSD 

WCKY WDAF WOC WHO 

WRVA WWNC WIBA WBAP 

WSAI WFLA KFYR KTBS 

WLS WTAM WDAY WOW 

KSMB WMC 

N20— MORNING PARADE— Saturday. »/ a hour. 10:15 AM— ED— WEAF Network. 



N21— RADIO CITY CONCERT— Sunday. 1 hour. 12:15 PM— ED— WJZ Network. 
Erno Rapee, Director. 



N22— WORDS AND MUSIC 

Mon., Tues., Wed., Thurs., Fri., Sat. y 2 hour. 1:05 PM— ED— WJZ Network. 
Harvey Hays, Sara Ann McCabe, Chas. Howard. 



O— MUSIC NOVELTY 



4:30 PM— ES-CD 

WWJ WSAI 



01— CLYDE DOERR'S SAXOPHONE OCTET— Sunday. >/ 2 hour. 

3:30 PM— CS 

WOW KSD 
WSM WAPI 
WJDX WMC 
WSMB WFAA 
WOAI KTBS 
KTHS 



5:30 PM— ED 

WEAF WTAG 
WBEN WCAE 
WGY CFCF 
WJAR WCSH 



02— GARCIA'S MEXICAN MARIMBA BAND— Sunday. 

WEAF Network 

03— JOE GREEN'S MARIMBA BAND— Sunday. Vz hour. 



y 2 hour. 1:00 P.M.— ED 



2:30 PM— ED 

WEAF WTAG 
WJAR WGY 
WBEN WCAE 
CFCF CKGW 



1:30 PM— ES-CD 12:30 PM—CS 

WCKY WRC WOW WDAF 

WTAM WFBR 

WMAQ 



04— THE HAPPY RAMBLER— Thursday and Friday. 
Network. Irving Kaufman, Lucy Allen. 



hour. 10:30 AM— ED— WEAF 



05-MIESNER ELECTRONIC PIANO— Mon. ' , hour. 3:45 PM— ED— WABC Network. 



06-BORRAH MINEVITCH AND HIS HARMONICA RASCALS. 



7:00 PM— ED 

WJZ CFCF 



Friday. \i hour. 
7:00 PM— ED 

WEAF WTAG 
WJAR WBEN 
WCAE 



6:00 PM— ES-CD 

WBAL WCKY 
WIS WRVA 
WWNC WIOD 
WFLA KFYR 
WLS 



5:00 PM—CS 

KSO KOIL 
WREN WIBA 
WEBC WDAY 
WSMB KVOO 
KPRC KTBS 
WOAI WKY 
KWK 



Sunday. 

M 
4:00 PM 

KDYL 
KOA 



hour. 



6:00 PM— ES-CD 5:00 PM—CS 

WRC WFBR WOW 

WSAI WIS 

WMAQ 



P 
3:00 PM 
KPO 



P— MUSIC— ORGAN 



PI— ANN LEAF AT THE ORGAN— Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday. V 2 hour. Also on 



WABC Network, Monday at 2:45 PM— ED. 



2:00 PM— ED 

WABC WOKO 
WNAC WGR 
WDRC WCAU 
WJAS WLBC 
WICC WORC 
CFRB 



1:00 PM— ES-CD 12:00 PM—CS 

WCAO WBBM WGST WBRC 



CKOK WFBL 
WSPD WFEA 
WLBW WHEC 
WTAR WDBJ 
WMBG WTOC 
WQAM WSJS 



WDOD WREC 
WODX WSFA 
WLAC WDSU 
KTRH KFH 
WTAQ WKBH 
WISN WCCO 
WSBT 



M 

11:00 AM 

KVOR 

KLZ 

KSL 



P2— LARRY LARSON— Saturday. \i hour. 

10:45 AM— ED 9:45 AM— ES-CD 8:45 AM— CS 

WJZ WBAL WJR KWK KWCR 
WMAL KYW WREN KOIL 
KSO 

P3— ORGAN RHAPSODY— Monday, Wednesday, Friday. Vz hour. Doc Whipple. 

8:00 AM— ED 7:00 AM— ES-CD 6:00 AM— CS 

WFBR WTAM WOW WDAF 

WRC WSAI 

WWJ 



WEAF WTAM 
WCAE WBEN 
WGY CFCF 
WFI WJAR 
WEEI WTAG 
WCSH 



P4— RADIO CITY ORGAN— Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday. y 2 hour. Dick Leibert. 
8:00 AM— ED 7:00 AM— ES-CD 6:00 AM— CS 

WDAF WFBR WOW 

WTAM WSAI 

WWJ 



WEAF WTAG 
WJAR CFCF 
WCAE WGY 
WFI WBEN 
WEEI WCSH 



P5 WALDORF ASTORIA ORGAN RECITAL— Sunday. Vz hour. Irene Harding. 
10:30 AM— ED 9:30 AM— ES-CD 8:30 AM— CS 

WJZ WBZ WGAR WJR KWK WREN 

WBZA WHAM WMAL 

WSYR KDKA 

WLW WENR 



PS -FRANCES LANGFORD— Monday, Saturday. H hour. 11:00 PM— ED— WEAF 
Network. Dick Leibert 



P7 MATINEE GEMS— Sat. »/ 2 hour. 3:30 PM— ED— WEAF Network. Lew White. 



P8— QUIET HARMONIES— Sunday. J , hour. 10:45 PM— ED— WABC Network. 

Q— MUSIC, PATTER AND SONG 

Q1— BLACKSTONE PLANTATION— Tuesday. Vz hour. Julia Sanderson, Frank Crumit, 
Jack Shilkret. 

7:00 PM— ES-CD 

WRC WTAM 



8:00 PM— ED 

WEAF WTAG 
WEEI WJAR 
WCSH WFL 
WGY WBEN 
WCAE 



WWJ 



Q2— FRANK CRUMIT AND JULIA SANDERSON— Sunday. >/ 2 hour. 



5:30 PM— ED 

WABC WOKO 
WAAB WGR 
WDRC WCAU 
WEAN WICC 
WORC 



4:30 PM— ES-CD 

WADC WCAO 
WHK CKOK 
WFBL WSPD 
WCAH WJSV 
WWVA WHEC 
WTAR 



3:30 PM—CS 

KMBC WFBM 
WHAS KMOX 
WDSU KOMA 
KFH KFAB 



Q3— DON HALL TRIO— Sunday. ^ hour. 11:15 PM— ED— WEAF Network 
Mon., Tue., Wed., Thurs., Fri., Sat. \i hour. 7:30 AM— ED— WJZ Network 
Geo. Hall, Hortense Rose Grace Donaldson 



Q4— THE OXOL FEATURE— Wednesday, Friday. 
Graham and Bunny Coughlin. 

10:00 AM— ED 9:00 AM— ES-CD 

WABC WOKO WCAO WKRC 
WAAB WDRC WFBL 
WCAU WJAS 
WEAN 



hour. Dave Grant, Gordon 



Q5— LEO REIS AND ARTY DUNN 
Assisted by Novelty Orchestra. 



6:00 PM— ED 

WABC WOKO 
WAAB WGR 
WDRC WLBZ 
WICC WHP 
WORC CFRB 



5:00 PM 

WADC 
CKOK 
WSPD 
WLBW 
WKBN 
WDBJ 
WQAM 
WDAE 



Monday, Tuesday, y^ hour. 

M 

4:00 PM—CS 3:00 PM 

WGST WDOD KVOR 
WREC WSFA KLZ 
WLAC WDSU 
WACO KFH 
WTAQ WISN 
WSBT WMT 



-ES-CD 

WBBM 
WFBL 
WFEA 
WHEC 
WBIG 
WTOC 
WDBO 
WSJS 



Q6— TASTYEAST JESTERS— Monday and Friday. 
Dwight Latham, Guy Bonbam, Wamp Carlson. 
6:30 PM— ED 5:30 PM— ES-CD 

WJZ WBZ WBAL WHAM 

WBZA KDKA WCKY 



hour. 



NOTE: The index number appearing at the left of each program title is keyed for reference from DAY BY DAY SCHEDULE and ARTIST SCHEDULE. Then follows the 
names of the principal artists and the station listings. Time zones are abbreviated as follows: EO for Eastern Daylight, ES-CD for Eastern Standard and Central Daylight. 
CS for Central Standard, M for Mountain, P for Pacific Coast. Last minute changes make absolute accuracy impossible; hence, if you do not find a specific program on 
a specific station, try other stations listed in the same time zone. Where no station listing is given, hook-up is variable, but best results can be obtained by tuning in 
on key stations of the networks as designated on STATION SCHEDULE. Write Fan-Fare Program Editor, 420 Lexington Avenue, New York, for further information 

you require, enclosing return postage. 



"Notice of copyright. Method of arrangement copyrighted. Infringement will be prosecuted. 



June 



37 



RADIO FAN-FARE PROGRAM FINDER 



CLASSIFIED SCHEDULE 



Q7— TUNE DETECTIVE, SIGMUND SPAETH— Tuesday. H hour. 
9:30 PM— ED 8:30 PM— ES-CD 7:30 PM—CS 

WJZ KDKA WBAL WCKY KWCR KWK 

CFCF WJR WSYR KOIL 

WMAQ 

Q8— THE WIFE SAVER— Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday. M hour. Allen Prescott. 



8:00 AM— ED 

WJZ WGAR 
WBAL WRVA 
WCKY WIS 
WWNC WJAX 
WIOD WSYR 
WFLA 



7:00 AM— ES-CD 

KWK KWCR 
WREN KPRC 
KTBS KFYR 
WEBC WAPI 
WOAI KSTP 



09 



-TONY WONS— ARE YOU LISTENIN 
Friday. 14 hour. 
9:00 AM— ED 

WABC WOKO 
WAAB WGR 



WDRC WIP 
WEAN WPG 
WLBZ WICC 
WHP WORC 
CFRB 



8:00 AM— ES-CD 

WADC WCAO 
WBBM CKOK 
WFBL WSPD 
WJSV WCAH 
WFEA WLBW 
WHEC WWVA 
WBIG WDBJ 
WTOC WQAM 
WDBO WDAE 
WSJS 



-Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, 
M 



R4- 



BOSWELL SISTERS 
9:15 PM— ED 

WABC WOKO 
WNAC WKBW 
WCAU WJAS 
WEAN WLBZ 
WICC WHP 
WORC CFRB 



-Saturday. M hour. 

8:15 PM ES-CD 7:15 PM— CS 

WADC WCAO 



7:00 AM— CS 

KMBC WFBM 
KMOX WMBD 
WGST WDOD 
WREC WSFA 
WLAC WDSU 
KRLD KTRH 
KLRA KFH 
WTAQ WISN 
WSBT WMT 



6:00 AM 

KVOR 

KLZ 

KSL 



Q10— SMILING ED McCONNELL— Sunday. 



2:00 PM— ED 

WABC WNAC 
WGR WJAS 
WHP 



1:00 PM— ES-CD 

WBBM WKRC 
CKOK WOWO 
WFBL WJSV 
WHEC WWVA 
WBT 



J4 hour. 
12:00 PM— CS 

KMBC WHAS 
KMOX WGST 
WBRC WLAC 
WDSU WRR 
KOMA KFH 
WCCO WMT 



Q11— MARTHA AND HAL— Mon., Wed., Fri. \i hour. 8:00 AM— ED— WJZ 
Network. 

Q12— CLAIRE WILSON AND GRANT ALLEN— Thursday and Friday. ' , hour. 2:30 
PM— ED— WEAF Network. 

Q13— ANN BUTLER— Monday. M hour. 11:00 PM— ED— WJZ Network. 

Q14— VIC AND SADE— Mon., Tue., Wed., Thurs., Fri., Sat. H hour. 9:45 AM— ED— 
WJZ Network. Van Harvey, Bernardine Flynn. 

Q15— GOLDY AND DUSTY AND THE SILVER DUST TWINS— Mon., Tues., Wed., 
Thurs. and Fri. M hour. 

9:15 AM— ED 8:15 AM— ES-CD 

WFBL WHEC 
WWVA 



WABC WOKO 
WGR WDRC 
WCAU WJAS 
WHP WORC 



R— MUSIC— POPULAR 

(See also Dance and Variety Music and Patter and Song) 



R1— HOWARD BARLOW AND SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA— Monday, Tuesday, Thurs- 
day. i-2 hour. Charles Carlile, Mildred Rose. 



10:45 PM— ED 

WABC WOKO 
WAAB WGR 
WDRC WCAU 
WJAS WEAN 
WPG WLBZ 
WICC WHP 
CFRB 



9:45 PM— ES-CD 

WADC WCAO 
WBBM WHK 
CKOK WFBL 
WSPD WJSV 
WCAH WLBW 
WHEC WDBJ 
WTOC WQAM 
WDBO WDAE 



8:45 PM— CS 

KMBC WFBM 
WMBD WGST 
WDOD WREC 
WLAC WDSU 



M 

7:45 PM 

KVOR 

KLZ 

KSL 



KTRH 
WIBW 
KFAB 
WSBT 



KLRA 
WACO 
WISN 



P 
6:45 PM 

KHJ 

KOIN 

KGB 

KFRC 

KOL 

KFPY 



R2 ALBERT BARTLETT, THE TANGO KING 

tinued June 18.) 



-Sunday. \i hour. (May be discon- 



2:15 PM— ED 

WABC WOKO 
WNAC WCAU 
WJAS 



1:15 PM— ES-CD 

WCAO WBBM 
WKRC WHK 
CKOK WOWO 
WJSV WHEC 



12:15 PM— CS 

KMBC 



R3— BETTY BARTHELL, SONGS— Thursday. M hour. 

6:30 PM— ED 5:30 PM— ES-CD 4:30 PM— CS 

WABC WAAB WFBL WFEA WGST WODX 
WDRC WLBZ WSFA WLAC 

WORC WSBT 



Friday. H hour. 
Betty Barthell, Eton 
S:15 PM— ED 

WABC WOKO 
WNAC WKBW 
WDRC WCAU 
WJAS WEAN 
WLBZ WICC 
WHP WORC 
CFRB 



Boys, Freddie Rich's Orchestra. 
8:15 PM— ES-CD 7:15 PM— CS 

WCAO WHK 



CKOK WFBL 
WSPD WFEA 
WLBW WHEC 
WTAR WDBJ 
WMBG WTOC 
WQAM WDBO 



KMBC WFBM 
WGST WBRC 
WDOD WREC 
WODX WSFA 
WLAC WDSU 
KRLD WIBW 
KFH WTAQ 
WKBH KFAB 
WISN WCCO 
WMT 



M 

6:15 PM 

KVOR 

KLZ 

KSL 



P 
5:15 PM 

KHJ 

KOIN 

KGB 

KFRC 

KOL 

KVI 

KFPY 



WBBM CKOK 
WFBL WSPD 
WJSV WCAH 
WFEA WLBW 
WHEC WBIG 
WDBJ WTOC 
WQAM WDBO 
WDAE WSJS 



KMBC WFBM 
KMOX WMBD 
WGST WDOD 
WREC WODX 
WLAC WDSU 
KRLD KTRH 
KLRA KTSA 
WIBW KFH 
WISN WCCO 
WSBT WMT 



M 
6:15 PM 

KVOR 

KLZ 

KSL 



P 
5:15PM 

KHJ 

KOIN 

KGB 

KFRC 

KOL 

KFPY 



Thursday. M hour. 10:30. PM— ED— WABC Network. 



R5— THE CAPTIVATORS-Wednesday. M hour. 5:00 PM— ED— WABC Network. 
Monday. M hour. 2:30 PM— ED— WABC Network. 



R6— CHARLES CARLILE— Thursday. 
Fred Berrens 



V. hour. 11:15 PM— ED— WABC Network. 



R7— WILL OSBORNE ORCHESTRA 
"The Friendly Philosopher" 



Mon., Wed., Fri. \i hr. Pedro De Corboda, 



10:45 AM— ED 9:45 AM— ES-CD 

WABC WOKO WCAO WHK 
WNAC WGR WFBL WJSV 
WEAN WCAH WBT 

WTAR WMBG 

10:45 AM— ES-CD 9:45 AM— CS 
WBBM WOWO KMBC WHAS 
KMOX WGST 
KRLD WCCO 



R8— DO RE Ml— Wednesday. M hour. 5:45 PM ED— WABC Network. 
Friday. ' , hour. 11:15 PM— ED— WABC Network. 



R9— EVAN EVANS, DO 
Thursday. Vz hour. 
8:00 PM— ED 

WABC WOKO 
WNAC WGR 
WDRC WCAU 
WJAS WEAN 
WPG WLBZ 
WHP CFRB 



RE Ml, FREDDIE RICH'S ORCHESTRA M 



7:00 PM 

WADC 

WHK 

WFBL 

WCAH 

WHEC 

WKBN 

WDBJ 

WQAM 

WDAE 



ES-CD 

WCAO 

CKOK 

WSPD 

WLBW 

WWVA 

WBIG 

WTOC 

WDBO 

WSJS 



6:00 PM— CS 

WFBM WGST 
WDOD WREC 
WSFA WLAC 



5:00 PM 

KVOR 



WDSU 

KTRH 

KTSA 

KFH 

WISN 



KRLD 
KLRA 
WIBW 
WTAQ 
WMT 



R10 AN EVENING IN PARIS— Monday. V 2 hour. Mug McCoy. M 



9:30 PM— ED 

WABC WNAC 
WCAU WJAS 
WEAN 



8:30 PM— ES-CD 

WCAO WGN 
WHK CKOK 
WJSV 



7:30 PM— CS 

KMBC KMOX 
WGST WDSU 
KOMA WCCO 



6:30 PM 

KLZ 
KSL 



R11— FIVE OCTAVES— Saturday. M hour. 2:15 PM— ED— WABC Network. 

R13— FITCH PROGRAM, "THE RED HEADED MUSIC MAKER"— Sunday. M hour. 
Wendell Hall. 1:15 PM— ES-CD 12:15 PM—CS 

WGN WISN WCCO 

WMT 

R14— HOT FROM HOLLYWOOD— Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday. ' 4 hour. 
8:45 PM— ED 7:45 PM— ES-CD 6:45 PM—CS 

WADC WCAO 
WGN WKRC 
WHK CKOK 
WFBL WSPD 
WJSV 



WABC WOKO 
WNAC WGR 
WDRC WCAU 
WJAS WEAN 



KMBC WFBM 
WHAS KMOX 
WCCO 



R15 



-ARLENE JACKSON 
5:15 PM— ED 

WEAF WTAG 
WGY WBEN 



-Friday. l /i hour. 
4:15 PM— ES-CD 

WTAM WSAI 
WIS WJAX 
WIOD 



3:15 PM—CS 

WIBA KSTP 
WDAY WSM 
WAPI WSB 



WMC 
WKY 
KTBS 



WSMB 
KPRC 
WOAI 



M P 

2:15 PM 1:15 PM 

KOA KGO 

KDYL KFI 
KGW 
KOMO 
KHQ 



R16— KEENAN AND PHILLIPS— Thursday. }i hour. 11:45 AM— ED— WABC Network. 



R17— LA PALI N A— Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday 



8:30 PM— ED 

WABC WOKO 
WGR WCAU 
WJAS 



7:30 PM— ES-CD 

WADC WCAO 
WGN WKRC 
WHK CKOK 
WOWO WFBL 
WSPD WJSV 
WHEC WKBN 



hour. 
6:30 PM— ES 

KMBC WFBM 
WHAS KMOX 
WISN WCCO 
WMT 



Kate Smith. 



R18— LITTLE JACK LITTLE— Mon., Tues., Wed., Thurs., Fri., Sat. U hour 



9:45 AM— ED 

WABC WOKO 
WAAB WGR 
WDRC WIP 
WJAS WEAN 
WPG WLBZ 
WHP WORC 
CFRB 



8:45 AM— ES-CD 

WADC WCAO 
WHK CKOK 
WCAH WFEA 
WLBW WWVA 
WBIG WDBJ 
WTOC WSJS 



7:45 AM— CS 

KMBC WFBM 
WMBD WGST 
WDOD WREC 
WSFA WLAC 
WDSU KRLD 
KTRH KLRA 
WTAQ WISN 
WSBT WMT 



6:45 AM M 

KVOR 

KLZ 

KSL 



NOTE: The index number appearing at the left of each program title is keyed for reference from DAY BY DAY SCHEDULE and ARTIST SCHEDULE. Then follows the 
names of the principal artists and the station listings. Time zones are abbreviated as follows: ED for Eastern Daylight, ES-CD for Eastern Standard and Central Daylight, 
CS for Central Standard, M for Mountain, P for Pacific Coast. Last minute changes make absolute accuracy impossible; hence, if you do not find a specific program on 
a specific station, try other stations listed in the same time zone. Where no station listing is given, hook-up is variable, but best results can be obtained by tuning in 
on key stations of the networks as designated on STATION SCHEDULE. Write Fan-Fare Program Editor, 420 Lexington Avenue, New York, for further information 

you require, enclosing return postage. 



'Notice of copyright. Method of arrangement copyrighted. Infringement will be prosecuted. 



38 



Radio Fan-Fare 



RADIO FAN-FARE PROGRAM FINDER 



CLASSIFIED SCHEDULE 





Wednesday. K hour. 

11:15 PM— ED 10:15 PM— ES-CD 9:15 PM— CS 

WABC WOKO WCAO WHK KMBC WFBM 
WAAB WKBW CKOK WFBL WMBD WGST 
WDRC WCAU WSPD WFEA WBRC WDOD 
WJAS WEAN WLBW WTAR WREC WODX 
WPG WLBZ WMBG WQAM WLAC WDSU 
WICC WHP WDBO WSJS KTRH WIBW 
WORC CFRB WCCO WMT 
Friday. H hour. 10:30 PM— ED— Same network 


M 

8:15 PM 

KVOR 
KLZ 


P 
7:15 PM 

KHJ 

KOIN 

KGB 

KFRC 

KOL 

KFPY 


R34 


— THREADS OF HAPPINESS— Tuesday. H hour. Andre Kostelane 
McLaughlin, David Ross. M 
9:15 PM— ED 8:15 PM— ES-CD 7:15 PM— CS 6:15 PM 

WABC WOKO WADC WCAO KMBC WFBM KLZ 
WNAC WKBW WGN WKRC WHAS KMOX KSL 
WDRC WCAU WHK CKOK WGST WBRC 
WJAS WEAN WOWO WFBL WREC WLAC 
WSPD WJSV WDSU KRLD 
WHEC WBT KTRH KLRA 
WTAR WTOC KOMA KTSA 
WQAM WDBO KFH WCCO 
WDAE 


tz, Tommy 

P 
5:15 PM 

KHJ 

KOIN 

KGB 

KFRC 

KOL 

KVI 

KFPY 


R19 


-LAZY DAN, THE MINISTREL MAN— Sunday. V 2 hour. 
1:30 PM— ED 12:30 PM— ES-CD 11:30 AM— CS 

WABC WAAB WCAO WBBM KMBC WHAS 
WCAU WJAS WKRC CKOK KMOX WCCO 

WJSV WCAH 

WMBG 










R35— WALTZ DREAMS— Monday. M hour. 9:30 AM— ED— 
Fred Berrens, Conductor. 


WABC Network. 




R36 


—TONY WONS— Saturday. }i hour. 4:15 PM— ED— WABC Networ 
Keenan and Phillips. 


k. 


R20 


-THE MAGIC VOICE— Tuesday, Saturday. ' 4 hour. 
Elsie Hiti, Nick Dawson. 

8:15 PM— ED 7:15 PM— ES-CD 6:15 PM-CS 

WABC WOKO WADC WCAO KMBC WFBM 
WNAC WGR WGN WKRC WHAS KMOX 
WDRC WCAU WHK CKOK KRLD 
WJAS WEAN WFBL WSPD 
WJSV WBT 








R37 


— SPRAGUE WARNER PROGRAM— Friday, Saturday. > 4 
10:30 AM— ES-CD 9:30 AM— CS 

WBBM CKOK KMBC KMOX 
WOW KFAB WISN 
WCCO WMT 


hour. 






R38 


—WOODBURY PROGRAM— Wednesday. V 2 hour. Donald Novis, Leo 
8:30 PM— ED 7:30 PM— ES-CD 6:30 PM— CS 

WEAF WTIC WFBR WRC KSD WOC 
WTAG WEEI WTAM WWJ WHO WOW 
WJAR WCSH WDAF WSM 
WLIT WGY WMC WSB 
WBEN WCAE WAPI WJDX 

WSMB KVOO 
WKY KTHS 
WFAA KTBS 
WOAI 


ii Belasco. 


R21 


-EVERETT MARSHALL— AL MITCHELL'S ORCHESTRA— Mon., Wed., Sat. 
M hour M P 
7:15 PM— ED 6:15 PM— ES-CD 9:15 PM— CS 8:15 PM 7:15 PM 

WJZ WBZ WBAL WMAL KWK KWCR KDYL KGO 
WBZA KDKA WJR WSYR KGO KOIL KFI 
WCKY WREN WIBA KGW 
10:15 PM KSTP WEBC KOMO 
KYW WMC WDAY KHQ 

KFYR WSB 

WJDX WSMB 

WKY KPRC 

KTHS WOAI 

WTMJ WFAA 






R39— JOHNNY MARVIN— Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday, Saturday. 
\i hour. 12:00 N— ED— WEAF Network. 




R40 


—MANHATTAN MERRY-GO-ROUND— Sunday. Vi hour. 
Percy, Gene Rodemich. 

9:00 PM— ED 8:00 PM— ES-CD 7:00 PM— CS 

WEAF WJAR WFBR WWJ KSD WOW 
WGY WTIC WSAI WRC WDAF WOC 
WENR WHO 


Jean Sari 




R22 


-IRENE BORDONI— EMIL COLEMAN— Tuesday and Saturday. ', hour 
7:45 PM— ED 6:45 PM— ES-CD 5:45 PM— CS 

WJZ WBZ WBAL WMAL KWCR KWK 
WBZA KDKA WHAM WGAR KSQ KOIL 
CFCF CKGW WSYR WJR WREN WSM 

WCKY WIS WMC WSMB 

WRVA WIOD WSB 

KYW 


ent, David 




R41 


— DOLPH MARTIN'S ORCHESTRA— Mon., Wed., Fri. M hour. Th 
Quartet. 

7:30 PM— ED 6:30 PM— ES-CD 

WABC WOKO WCAO WFBL 
WNAC WGR WJSV WFEA 
WDRC WCAU WHEC 
WJAS WEAN 
WLBZ WHP 
WORC 


a Travelers 


R23 


-THE HAPPY WONDER BAKERS— Mon., Wed. and Fri. ' , hour 
6:30 PM— ED 5:30 PM— ES-CD 

WABC WOKO WHEC 
WAAB WDRC 
WICC WORC 
WMAS 








-THE MERRYMAKERS— Monday, i, hour. 10:30 AM 
Fred Berrens, Conductor. 


-ED— WABC Network. 




R24 


R42 


—MELODY PARADE— Tuesday. }i hour. 10:45 AM -ED 
Vincent Sorey Conductor 


-WABC Ne 


work. 


R25 


-GERTRUDE NIESEN— Saturday. > 4 hour. 10:45 PM 
Freddie Rich's Orchestra. 


-ED— WABC Network. 






S— MUSIC— RELIGIOUS 

(See also Organ Music) 




R27 


-WILLIAM O'NEAL— Monday. M hour. 11:45 PM— ED- 


-WABC Network. 




R28 


-PALMER HOUSE ENSEMBLE FROM CHICAGO— Monday, Thursday. '/, hour. 
1 :30 PM— ED— WABC Network. 




R29 


-PICKENS SISTERS— Sunday. '., hour. 

9:45 PM— ED 8:45 PM— ES-CD 7:45 PM— CS 

WJZ CKGW WBAL WJR KWCR KOIL 
KDKA WMAL KYW WREN KWK 

KSO 






S1- 


-MID WEEK HYMN SING— Tuesday. \ j hour. 

6:30 PM— ED 5:30 PM— ES-CD 4:30 PM— CS 

WEAF WTAG WIS WSAI WDAF KSD 

WGY WWJ WWNC KFYR WVOO 

WMAQ WSB WOAI 

WIBA KTBS 

KTHS WJDX 

WOW 


M 

3:30 PM 

KGIR 


P 
2:30 PM 

KGO 
KGW 
KFSD 


R31 


-RHYTHM KINGS- Monday. ', hour. 11:45 AM— ED 
Wednesday. } i hour. 2:45 PM— ED— WABC Network. 


-WABC Network. 


KTAR 
KHQ 


R32 


-SINGIN' SAM THE BARBASOL MAN— Monday. U hour. 
8:00 PM— ED 7:00 PM— ES-CD 6:00 PM— CS 

WABC WOKO WADC WCAO KMBC WFBM 
WNAC WGR WGN WKRC KMOX 
WDRC WCAU WHK CKOK 
WJAS WEAN WFBL WSPD 
WJSV 




S2- 


-NORTHWESTERN CHRONICLE— Sunday. V 2 hour. 
2:30 PM— ED 1:30 PM— ES-CD 12:30 PM—CS 

WJZ WBZ WBAL WHAM KWK WREN 
WBZA KDKA WGAR WJR KOIL WTMJ 
WLW WRVA WIBA KSTP 
WPTF WWNC WEBC WDAY 
WIS WIOD KFYR WSM 
WFLA WJAX WSB WAPI 
WSYR WMAL WJDX WSMB 
KYW KTHS KVOO 
KWCR WOAI 
WFAA WMC 
KSO KTBS 


M 

11:30 AM 

KOA 
KGIR 
KDYL 
KGHL 


P 
10:30 AM 

KTAR 
KFS 
KGW 
KGO 

KFI 


R33 


STREET SINGER— Sunday. M hour. Arthur Tracy. 
12:45 PM ED 11:45 AM— ES-CD 10:45 AM— CS 

WABC WOKO WCAO CKOK KMBC WMBD 
WAAB WGR WFBL WSPD WGST WBRC 
WDRC WJAS WFEA WLBW WDOD WREC 
WPG WLBZ WKBN WQAM WODX WSFA 
WORC CFRB WDBO WDSU KRLD 

KTRH KTSA 
WIBW WACO 
WTAQ WKBH 
KFAB WISN 
WCCO WSBT 
WMT 


M 

9:45 AM 

KVOR 

KLZ 

KSL 


P 
8:45 AM 
KHJ 
KOIN 
KGB 
KFRC 
KOL 
KFPY 


KOMO 
KHQ 




S3- 


-OLD SONGS OF THE CHURCH— Thursday. ' , hour. 

Kathryn Palmer, Soprano; Joyce Allmand, Contralto; Richard Dennis, Tenor; Lowell 
Patton, Organist; Arthur Billings Hunt, Basso and Director. 
6:30 PM— ED 5:30 PM— ES-CD 4:30 PM—CS 

WJZ WSYR KWK KWCR 
WREN 



NOTE: The index number appearing at the left of each program title is keyed for reference from DAY BY DAY SCHEDULE and ARTIST SCHEDULE Then follows the 
names of the principal artists and the station listings. Time zones are abbreviated as follows: ED for Eastern Daylight, ES-CD for Eastern Standard and Central Daylight, 
CS for Central Standard, M for Mountain, P for Pacific Coast. Last minute changes make absolute accuracy impossible; hence, if you do not find a specific program on 
a specific station, try other stations listed in the same time zone. Where no station listing is given, hook-up is variable, but best results can be obtained by tuning in 
on key stations of the networks as designated on STATION SCHEDULE. Write Fan-Fare Program Editor, 420 Lexington Avenue, New York, for further information 

you require, enclosing return postage. 






* Notice of copyright. Method of arrangement copyrighted. Infringement will ho prosecuted. 



June 



RADIO 



39 



F A N - F A R E 



PROGRAM 



FINDER 



CLASSIFIED SCHEDULE 



S4 PAGES OF ROMANCE— Sunday. ' 2 hour. 

5:30 PM— ED 4:30 PM— ES-CD 3:30 PMCS 

WJZ WBZ WBAL WLW KWK KSO 

WBZA KDKA WJR KYW KWCR WREN 
WGAR CKGW KOIL WTMJ 



WIBA 
WEBC 
KFYR 
KVOO 
WBAP 
WOAI 



KSTP 

WDAY 

KTBS 

WKY 

KPRC 



M 
2:30 PM 

KOA 
KDYL 
KGIR 
KGHL 



P 
1:30 PM 

KGO 

KFI 

KGW 

KOMO 

KHQ 

KFSD 

KTAR 



S5— SALT LAKE TABERNACLE CHOIR AND ORGAN— Sunday. 
11:30 AM— ED 10:30 AM— ES-CD 9:30 AM— CS 

WOKO WPG WCAO CKOK KMBC WMBD 
WLBZ WHP WFBL WSPD 

WFEA WLBW 

WKBN WDBJ 

WTOC WQAM 

WDBO 



WABC added at 11.45 AM— ED— for y 2 
hour. 



WGST WDOD 
WREC WLAC 
WDSU KRLD 
KTRH WIBW 
WACO KFH 
WTAQ WKBH 
KFAB WCCO 
WSBT WMT 



1 hour. 
M 

8:30 AM 

KVOR 

KLZ 

KSL 



P 
7:30 AM 

KHJ 

KOIN 

KGB 

KFRC 

KOL 

KFPY 



T— MUSIC— STANDARD FOLK SONGS 



T1 AMERICAN ALBUM FAMILIAR MUSIC— Sunday. V 2 hour. Gus Haenschen, Frank 



Munn, Elizabeth Lenox, Ohman and Arden, Bertrand Hirsch. 



9:30 PM— ED 

WEAF WCSH 
WJAR WTAG 
WFI WGY 
WBEN WCAE 
WEEI 



8:30 PM— ES-CD 

WCKY WFBR 
WRC WTAM 
WWJ WSAI 
WIOD WFLA 
WRVA WJAX 
WENR 



7:30 PM-CS 

KSD WOC 

WHO 

WSM 

WSB 

WJDX 

WFAA 

KPRC 

WAPI 

KSTP 



WOW 

WMC 

WOAI 

KTHS 

WKY 

WSMB 

WTMJ 

WDAF 



M 

6:30 PM 

KOA 
KDYL 



P 
5:30 PM 

KGO 

KOMO 

KFI 

KGW 

KHQ 



T2— ARCADIANS— Friday. y 2 hour. 4:30 PM— ED— WJZ Network. Ruth Kelly Bello. 



T3— RHODA ARNOLD AND CHARLES CARLILE DUETS— Sunday. y 2 hour. 11:00 
AM— ED— WABC Network. 



T4— FERDE GROFE'S ORCHESTRA WITH RANNY WEEKS— Monday. H hour. 

8:45 PM— ED 7:45 PM— ES-CD 

WEAF WTIC WRC WTAM 

WTAG WEEI WWJ WLW 

WJAR WCSH 

WLIT WGY 

WBEN WCAE 



Wednesday, Saturday. \i hour. 

9:00 PM— ED 8:00 PM— ES-CD 

WEAF WTAG WWJ WTAM 
WJAR WCSH WRC WLW 
WGY WFI 
WCAE WEEI 
WBEN 



7:00 PM 

WMAQ 



CS 



M P 

6:00 PM 5:00 PM 
KSD WDAF 



T5— CHASE & SANBORN TEA PROGRAM 
George Olsen. 

8:00 PM— ED 7:00 PM— ES-CD 

WEAF WTIC WFBR WRC 

WTAG WEEI WTAM WWJ 

WJAR WCSH WSAI WCKY 

WLIT WGY WLS 
WBEN WCAE 



—Wednesday. y 2 hour. Fanny Brice, 

6:00 PM— CS 

KSD WOW 
WDAF WOC 
WHO 



T6 COLUMBIA ARTIST RECITAL— Mon. y 2 hour. 4:30 PM— ED— WABC Network. 
Tuesday. H hour. 3:15 PM— ED— WABC Network. 
Wednesday. H hour. 2:30 PM— ED— WABC Network. 

T7— COLUMBIA SALON ORCHESTRA— Monday. y 2 hour. 3:15 PM— ED— WABC 
Network. Friday, y hour. 3:00 PM— ED— WABC Network. 

T8— CONCERT MINIATURES— Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday. »/ 2 



hour. Emery Deutsch. 

12:30 PM— ED 11:30 AM— ES-CD 10:30 AM— CS 

WABC WOKO WADC WCAO KMBC KMOX 

WGR WIP WBBM CKOK WGST WDOD 

WJAS WEAN WFBL WSPD WREC WSFA 

WPG WLBZ WJSV WCAH WLAC WDSU 

WHP CFRB WFEA WLBW KTRH WIBW 

WHEC WWVA WACO KFH 

WBIG WTOC WTAQ WISN 

WQAM WDBO WSBT WMT 
WDAE WSJS 



Saturday. "U hour 
11:30 AM— ED 

WABC WOKO 

WGR WIP 

WJAS WEAN 

WPG WLBZ 

WHP CFRB 



10:30 AM— ES-CD 9:30 AM— CS 

WADC WCAO KMBC KMOX 



WBBM CKOK 
WFBL WSPD 
WJSV WCAH 
WFEA WLBW 
WHEC WWVA 
WBIG WTOC 
WQAM WDBO 
WDAE WSJS 



WGST WDOD 
WREC WSFA 
WLAC WDSU 
KTRH WIBW 
WACO KFH 
WTAQ WISN 
WSBT WMT 



M 

9:30 AM 

KVOR 

KLZ 

KSL 



8:30 AM 

KVOR 
KLZ 

KSL 



T9— DANCING ECHOES Tuesday. J^ hour. 5:15 PM— ED— WABC Network. Satur- 
day. ' j hour. 2:00 PM— ED— WABC Network. 

T10— EMERY DEUTSCH AND HIS ORCHESTRA— Sunday. M hour. 12:30 PM— ED— 
WA3C Network. 

T11— PHIL DEWEY AND HIS FIRESIDE SONGS— Sunday. M hour. 
10:00 PM— ED— WJZ Network. 

T14— GILBERT AND SULLIVAN GEMS— Saturday. V 2 hour. Alma Kitchell, Con- 
tralto; Muriel Wilson, Soprano; Fred Hufsmith, Tenor; John Barclay, Baritone; 
Charles Pearson, Bass; Harold Sanford. 

10:00 PM— ED 9:00 PM— ES-CD 8:00 PM— CS 

WBAL WMAL KSO KWK 
WSYR WGAR KWCR KOIL 
WCKY WRVA WREN 
WWNC WLS 
WJAX WFLA 
WJR WHAM 



WJZ WBZ 
WBZA KDKA 



T15— TITO GUIZAR— Monday, Saturday. M hour. 



6:45 PM— ED 

WABC WOKO 
WAAB WGR 
WDRC WCAU 
WJAS WEAN 
WLBZ WORC 
CFRB 



4:45 PM ES-CD 3:45 PM— CS 

WCAO WHK KMBC WGST 



CKOK WFBL 
WSPD WFEA 
WLBW WHEC 
WKBN WTAR 
WDBJ WMBG 
WTOC WQAM 
WDBO WSJS 



WBRC WDOD 
WREC WSFA 
WLAC WDSU 
KRLD KTRH 
KTSA WACO 
KFH WTAQ 
WKBH KFAB 
WISN WMT 



M P 

2:45 PM 1:45 PM 

KVOR KHJ 



KLZ 
KSL 



KOIN 

KGB 

KFRC 

KOL 

KFPY 



T16— GYPSY MUSIC MAKERS— Tuesday. y 2 hour. 4:00 PM— ED— WABC Network. 



T17— HOUSEHOLD MUSICAL MEMORIES— Tuesday. 
Koestner, Alice Mock. 

10:00 PM— ED 9:00 PM— ES-CD 

WJZ WBZ WHAM WSYR 

WBZA KDKA WJR WBAL 
WMAQ 



hour. Edgar Guest, Josef 



T18— IN THE LUXEMBOURG GARDENS-Monday. y 2 hour. Thursday. y" hour. 
10:00 AM— ED— WABC Network. Emery Deutsch, Conductor. Tuesday. J { hour. 
9:15 AM— ED— WABC Network. Wednesday. Vz hour. Friday. 34 hour. 10:15 
AM— ED— WABC Network. Vincent Sorey, Conductor. 



T19— ITALIAN IDYLL— Saturday. y 2 hour. 
3:00 PM— ED 2:00 PM— ES-CD 

WABC WOKO WCAO WBBM 
WAAB WGR WHK CKOK 
WDRC WCAU WFBL WSPD 
WJAS WPG WFEA WLBW 
WLBZ WICC WHEC WTAR 
WHP WORC WDBJ WNBG 
CFRB WTOC WQAM 

WDBO WSJS 



1:00 PM— CS 

KMBC WFBM 
WGST WBRC 
WDOD WREC 
WSFA WLAC 
WDSU KRLD 
KTRH KTSA 
WACO KFH 
WTAQ WKBH 
KFAB WISN 
WSBT WMT 



12:00 N 

KVOR 
KSL 



P 
11:00 AM 

KHJ 

KOIN 

KGB 

KFRC 

KOL 

KFPY 



T20— RALPH KIRBERY— Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday, Saturday. 
5 Minutes. 12:00 Mid.— ED— WEAF Network. 



T21 



-ANDRE KOSTELANETZ PRESENTS:— Sunday. y 2 hour. 
Mary Eastman, Soprano; Male Chorus 



9:30 PM— ED 

WABC WOKO 
WNAC WGR 
WDRC WJAS 
WEAN WLBZ 
WICC WHP 
WORC 



8:30 PM— ES-CD 

WADC WCAO 
WBBM WHK 
CKOK WFBL 
WSPD WJSV 
WCAH WFEA 
WLBW WHEC 
WKBN WDBJ 
WDBO WDAE 
WSJS 



7:30 PM— CS 

KMBC WFBM 
KMOX WGST 
WDOD WREC 
WSFA WLAC 
WDSU KRLD 
KTRH KLRA 
KTSA WIBW 
WISN WCCO 
WMT 



6:30 PM 5:30 PM 

KVOR KHJ 



KLZ 

KSL 



KOIN 

KGB 

KFRC 

KOL 

KFPY 



T2Z— JAMES MELTON, 
7:00 PM— ED 

WEAF WTAG 
WJAR WBEN 

Tuesday. 34 hour. 
6:45 PM— ED 

WEAF WTAG 
WFI WJAR 

Thursday. 34 hour. 
11:00 PM— ED 

WEAF CKGW 
WCAE WFI . 



TENOR Sunday. 34 hour. 
6:00 PM— ES-CD 5:00 PM— CS 

WWJ WFBR WDAF KSD 

WSAI WTAM 

WMAQ 



5:45 PM— ES-CD 4:45 PM— CS 

WRC WIS WSM WSAI 

WFBR WSAI WOC WHO 

WMAQ WOW KSD 



M 

3:45 PM 

KOA 



10:00 PM— ES-CD 9:00 PM— CS 

WFBR WRC WOC WHO 
WWJ WCKY 

WTAM 



T23— MORNING MOODS— Monday. V 2 hour. 11:00 AM— ED— WABC Network. 
Tuesday. y-> hour. 10:00 AM— ED— WABC Network. Thursday. 34 hour. 11:15 
AM— ED— WABC Network. Vincent Sorey, Conductor. 



T24— OLGA, COUNTESS ALBANI— Monday, Thursday. 34 hour. 
6:45 PM— ED 5:45 PM— ES-CD 4:45 PM— CS 

WEAF WTAG WFBR WIS WOC WHO 

WCAE WJAR WSAI WWNC WSM WSB 

WBEN WRC WJAX WMC WOW 

WMAQ 



P 
2:45 PM 

KGO 

KFSD 

KGW 

KOMO 



T25— RHYTHMIC SERENADE— Monday, Wednesday, Friday. 34 hour. 12:45 PM 
ED— WJZ Network. Josef Koestner's Orchestra, Mary Steele. 



NOTE: The index number appearing at the left of each program title is keyed for reference from DAY BY DAY SCHEDULE and ARTIST SCHEDULE. Then follows the 
names of the principal artists and the station listings. Time zones are abbreviated as follows: ED for Eastern Daylight. ES-CD for Eastern Standard and Central Daylight, 
CS for Central Standard, M for Mountain, P for Pacific Coast. Last minute changes make absolute accuracy impossible; hence, if you do not find a specific program on 
a specific station, try other stations listed in the same time zone. Where no station listing is given, hook-up is variable, but best results can be obtained by tuning in 
on key stations of the networks as designated on STATION SCHEDULE. Write Fan-Fare Program Editor, 420 Lexington Avenue, New York, for further information 

you require, enclosing return postage. 



'Notice of copyright. Method of arrangement copyrighted. Infringement will be prosecuted. 



40 



Radio Fan-Fare 



RADIO FAN-FARE PROGRAM FINDER 



CLASSIFIED SCHEDULE 



T26— WILLARD ROBISON DEEP RIVER ORCHESTRA— Tuesday. > 2 hour. 
9:00 PM— ED 8:00 PM— ES-CD 7:00 PM— CS 

WJZ WBZ WBAL WMAL KWK WREN 

WBZA KDKA WJR WCKY KSO 
WGAR WENR 



T27-LON ROSS ROMANY TROUPE— Sunday. H hour. 



7:30 PM— ED 

WABC WOKO 
WNAC WGR 
WDRC WJAS 
WEAN WLBZ 
WHP WORC 



6:30 PM— ES-CD 

WCAO CKOK 
WSPD WLBW 
WHEC WKBN 
WTOC WQAM 
WDBO WSJS 



5:30 PM— CS 

KMBG WFBM 
WGST WDOD 
WREC WSFA 
WODX KTRH 
WDSU WACO 
WIBW WTAQ 
KFH WISN 
WKBH WSBT 
WCCO 



M 

4:30 PM 

KVOR 

KLZ 

KSL 



P 
3:30 PM 

KH.J 

KOIN 

KGB 

KFRC 

KOL 

KFPY 



T28— GEORGE SCHERBAN'S RUSSIAN GYPSIES ORCHESTRA. Tuesday, M hour. 

M 

3:30 PM 
KVOR 
KLZ 
KSL 



6:30 PM— ED 

WABC WOKO 
WAAB WGR 
WDRC WIP 
WJAS WPG 



WLBZ 
CFRB 



WORC 



5:30 PM— ES-CD 

WCAO WHK 
CKOK WFBL 
WSPD WFEA 
WLBW WHEC 
WKBN WTAR 
WMBG WTOC 
WQAM WSJS 



4:30 PM— CS 

KMBC WGST 
WBRC WDOD 
WREC WODX 
WSFA WLAC 
WDSU KTRH 
WIBW WACO 
KFH WTAQ 
WKBH WISN 
WCCO WSBT 
WMT 



T29— SOUTHLAND SKETCHES— Sunday. y 2 hour. 10:00 AM— ED— WJZ Network. 
Southernaires, Homer Smith, Lowell Peters, Jay Toney, William Edmonson 



T31— VASS FAMILY— Sat. 
9:45 AM— ED 

WEAF WEEI 
WJAR WTAG 
WGY WCAE 
WCSH WTIC 



}i hour. Seven South Carolina Children Singing. 
7:45 AM— CS 

KFYR KSD 
WOW KSTP 



T32— THE BALLADEERS— Sunday. y 2 hour. 9:00 AM— ED— WEAF Network. 

T33— GAY GYPSIES ORCHESTRA— Sat. y 2 hour. 11:30 AM— ED— WEAF Network. 
Nanette Berr. 

T34— HIGHLIGHTS AND SHADOWS— Sunday. V 2 hour. 10:15 PM— ED— WEAF 
Network. 

T35— HOUR GLASS— Monday. Vz hour. 10:00 PM— ED— WJZ Network. Harold Sanford. 

T36— MONARCH MYSTERY TENOR— Sunday. M hour. 2:00 PM— ED— WJZ Net- 
work. Charles J. Gilchrest. 

T37— ORCHESTRAL GEMS— Sunday. »/ 2 hour. 11:30 PM— ED— WEAF Network. 

T38— RADIO RUBES— Sunday. M hour. 11:00 AM— ED— WEAF Network. 

U— MUSIC— SYMPHONY 



U2— LIGHT OPERA GEMS— Wednesday. 
Channon Collinge, Conductor. 



10:45 PM-ED 

WABC WOKO 
WAAB WGR 
WDRC WJAS 
WEAN WLBZ 
WICC WHP 
WORC CFRB 



9:45 PM— ES-CD 

WCAO WHK 
CKOK WFBL 
WSPD WFEA 
WLBW WHEC 
WTAR WDBJ 
WMBG WTOC 
WQAM WDBO 
WSJS 



'/ 2 hour. 
8:45 PM— CS 

KMBC WFBM 
WMBD WGST 
WBRC WDOD 
WREC WODX 
WLAC WDSU 
KTRH KTSA 
WIBW KFH 
WKBH WCCO 
WSBT WMT 



M 

7:45 PM 

KVOR 

KLZ 

KSL 



P 
6:45 PM 

KHJ 

KOIN 

KGB 

KFRC 

KOL 

KFPY 



03 SYMPHONIC HOUR Sunday. 1 hour. 3:00 PM— ED— WABC Network. 



U4 



-SYMPHONETTE 
Josef Koestner. 



-Sunday. H hour. 4:15 PM— ED— WJZ Network. Cyril Pitts, 



V— NEWS REPORTS 



V1— BOAKE CARTER— Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday. 
7:45 PM— ED 6:45 PM— ES-CD 5:45 PM— CS 

WABC WNAC WCAO WBBM KMBC WHAS 
WGR WCAU WHK CKOK KMOX WCCO 
WJAS WJSV WBT 

V2 CURRENT EVENTS— Thursday. ' , hour. H. V. Kaltenborn M 
6:00 PM— ED 

WABC WOKO 
WAAB WKBW 
WDRC WIP 
WJAS WEAN 
WLBZ WICC 
WHP WORC 
CFRB 



hour. 



5:00 PM— ES-CD 4:00 PM— CS 

WADC WCAO WGST WDOD 



WBBM CKOK 
WFBL WSPD 
WFEA WLBW 
WHEC WKBN 
WBIG WDBJ 
WTOC WQAM 
WDBO WDAE 
WSJS 



WREC WSFA 
WLAC WDSU 
WACO KFH 
WTAQ KFAB 
WISN WCCO 
WSBT WMT 



3:00 PM 

KVOR 
KLZ 



Sunday, J4 hour. 
7:15 PM— ED 

WABC WOKO 
WNAC WGR 
WIP WJAS 
WEAN WPG 
WLBZ WICC 
WHP WORC 



6:15 PM 

WADC 

WFBL 

WJSV 

WLBW 

WWVA 

WBIG 

WTOC 

WDBO 

WSJS 



-ES-CD 

WCAO 
WSPD 
WCAH 
WHEC 
WKBN 
WDBJ 
WQAM 
WDAE 



5:15 PM— CS 

WFBM WGST 
WDOD WREC 
WSFA WDSU 
KRLD KTRH 
WIBW WACO 
KFH KFAB 
WISN WSBT 
WMT 



M 

4:15 PM 

KVOR 
KLZ 

KSL 



V3— CURRENT EVENTS— Mon., Tues., Wed., Thurs., Fri. H hour. Anne Hard. 
9:45 AM— ED 8:45 AM— ES-CD 7:45 AM— CS 

WEAF WEEI WRC WTAM 
WJAR WGY WCKY WWJ 
WCSH WBEN WSAI WMAQ 



KSD WOW 
WDAF WOC 
WHO 



V4— BACK OF NEWS IN WASHINGTON— Wednesday. M hour. 
William Hard 
6:30 PM— ED 

WEAF WBEN 
WJAR 



5:30 PM— ES-CD 

WFBR WCKY 
WWNC WIS 
WMAQ 



4:30 PM— CS 

WJDX KSD 

WDAF KVOO 

WIBA KTHS 



M P 

3:30 PM 2:30 PM 

KOA KPO 



WOAI 
KFYR 
WMC 
WSMB 



KTBS 
WEBC 
WAPI 



V5— EDWIN C. HILL— "Human Side of News" 



Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday. 
10:30 PM— ED 9:30 PM 

WABC WOKO 
WAAB WKBW 
WDRC WJAS 
WEAN WPG 
WLBZ WICC 
WHP WORC 
CFRB 



WADC 

WHK 

WFBL 

WJSV 

WFEA 

WHEC 

WBIG 

WTOC 

WDBO 

WSJS 



hour. 
ES-CD 

WBBM 
CKOK 
WSPD 
WCAH 
WLBW 
WKBN 
WDBJ 
WQAM 
WDAE 



8:30 PM— CS 

KMBC WFBM 
WMBD WGST 
WDOD WREC 
WLAC WDSU 



M 

7:30 PM 

KVOR 
KLZ 



KTRH 
KTSA 
WISN 
WMT 



KLRA 
WIBW 
WCCO 



P 
6:30 PM 

KHJ 

KOIN 

KGB 

KFRC 

KOL 

KFPY 



V6— JOHN B. KENNEDY— Thursday. 5 Minutes. 

6:30 PM— ED 5:30 PM— ES-CD 4:30 PM— CS 

WEAF WTAG WWJ WWNC WDAF WIBA 

WGY WIS WSAI KFYR KSD 

WCKY WMAQ KTBS WAPI 

WSMB WOAI 

KTHS WDAY 

WSB WOW 

V7— DAVID LAWRENCE, CURRENT GOVERNMENT 



Sunday. J4 hour. 
10:00 PM— ED 

WEAF WCAE 
WGY WBEN 
WJAR WCSH 



8:00 PM— CS 
9:00 PM— ES-CD WJDX WSMB 



WSAI WTAM 
WRC WIS 
WWNC WFLA 
WFBR WIOD 
WENR 



WKY WFAA 

WMC KPRC 

KTHS WOAI 

WSM WAPI 

WSB WDAF 

WIBA WOW 

WEBC WDAY 

KFYR WTMJ 
KTBS 



3:30 PM 2:30 PM 

KOA KECA 

KPO 
KFSD 



M P 

7:00 PM 6:00 PM 

KOA KGW 

KDYL KOMO 
KGIR KGO 
KGHL KHQ 
KFSD 
KFI 



V8— LOWELL THOMAS, TODAY'S NEWS— Mon., Tues., Wed., Thurs., Fri. M hour. 
6:45 PM— ED 5:45 PM— ES-CD 

WJZ WBZ WLW WHAM 

CKGW KDKA WGAR WBAL 
WBZA WJR WSYR 

V9— MERLE THORPE— Thursday. M hour. M P 

7:45 PM— ED 6:45 PM— ES-CD 5:45 PM— CS 4:45 PM 3:45 PM 

WJZ KDKA WBAL WMAL KWK KWOR KOA KGW 

WSYR WHAM KSO KOIL KGIR KFSD 

WGAR WWNC WREN WSM 

WIS WIOD WSB WAPI 

KYW WMC WJDX 

V10— WALTER WINCHELL— Sunday. H hour. 

9:30 PM— ED 8:30 PM— ES-CD 7:30 PM— CS 

WJZ WBZ WBAL WHAM 

WBZA KDKA WGAR WLW 
WJR KYW 



KWCR KWK 
WREN KOIL 
KSO 



V11— WORLD TODAY— Saturday. Vi hour. James G. McDonald. 
7:45 PM— ED 6:45 PM— ES-CD 5:45 PM— CS 

WFBR WWJ WHO WOC 

WSAI WTAM 

WDAF WWNC 

WIS WJAX 

WFLA WIOD 

WRC WPTF 

WENR 



WEAF WTAG 
WJAR WGY 
WBEN 



WOW WKY 
WIBA KFYR 
KTBS WOAI 



NOTE: The index number appearing at the left of each program title is keyed for reference from DAY BY DAY SCHEDULE and ARTIST SCHEDULE. Then follows the 
names of the principal artists and the station listings. Time zones are abbreviated as follows: ED for Eastern Daylight, ES-CD for Eastern Standard and Central Daylight. 
CS for Central Standard M for Mountain, P for Pacific Coast. Last minute changes make absolute accuracy impossible; hence, if you do not find a specific program on 
a specific station, try other stations listed in the same time zone. Where no station listing is given, hook-up is variable, but best results can be obtained by tuning in 
on key stations of the networks as designated on STATION SCHEDULE. Write Fan-Fare Program Editor, 420 Lexington Avenue, New York, for further information 

you reguire, enclosing return postage. 



•Notice of copyright. Method of arrangement copyrighted. Infringement will be prosecuted. 



June 



41 



RADIO FAN-FARE PROCRAM Fl 


N D E R 


CLASSIFIED SCHEDULE* 


W— RELIGIOUS SERVICES " 


—EASY ACES— Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday. \i hour. 

(May be discontinued after May 30) 

9:00 PM— ED 8:00 PM— ES-CD 7:00 PM— CS 

WABC WOKO WADC WCAO KMBC WFBM 
WNAC WGR WGN WKRC WHAS KMOX 
WDRC WCAU WHK CKOK WCCO 
WJAS WEAN WFBL WSPD 
WJSV 


W1— CATHOLIC HOUR— Sunday. >/ 2 hour. 
6:00 PM- ED 6:00 PM— ES-CD 

WEAF WTAG WFBR WRC 
WEEI WJAR WTAM WWJ 


M P 
4:00 PM— CS 3:00 PM 2:00 PM 

WEBC KFYR KOA KTAR 
WOAI WOC KGHL KPO 


WCSH WLIT WIOD WRVA 
WGY WBEN WSAI WFLA 
WCAE WWNC WIS 

WJAX WMAQ 


WHO WOW KDYL 

WDAF WIBA KGIR X4 

WSM WMC 

WSMB WKY 

WJDX KVOO 

WBAP KPRC 

WAPI KSD 

WDAY WSB 


—FAMOUS LOVES— Friday. \i hour. Ulita Torgerson. 
3:15 PM— ED 2:15 PM— ES-CD 1:15 PM— CS 

WEAF WTAG WFBR WTAM KSD WIBA 

WEEI WGY WSAI WWJ WDAY WSMB 

WBEN WCAE WDAF WIS WSM WMC 

WRVA WWNC WKY KTBS 

WIOD WRC WOC WHO 


M 
12:15 PM 

KOA 




KTBS X5 


-THE FIRST NIGHTER— Friday. U Hour June Meredith 
Brickert, Cliff Soubier, Eric Sagerquist's Orchestra. 
9:00 PM— ED 8:00 PM ES-CD 7:00 PM— CS 

WJZ WBZA WBAL WHAM KWK WREN 
KDKA WBZ WGAR WCKY KOIL KSTP 
WJR WLS WEBC WSB 
WOAI KPRC 
WKY KTBS 
WAPI WTMJ 
WSMB WSM 


, Don Ameche, Carlton 

M P 

6:00 PM 5:00 PM 

KOA KTAR 
KDYL KGO 
KFI 
KGW 
KOMO 
KHQ 
KFSD 


W2— COLUMBIA CHURCH OF THE AIR (Protestant)— Sunday. >/ 2 hour. 
10:00 AM— ED 9:00 AM— ES-CD 8:00 AM— CS M 

WABC WOKO WADC WBBM KMOX WMBD 7:00 AM 
WAAB WDRC CKOK WFBL WGST WDOD KVOR 
WIP WJAS WSPD WJSV WREC WSFA KLZ 
WLBZ WHP WFEA WLBW WLAC WDSU 
WORC WBIG WDBJ KTRH KLRA 
WTOC WDBO WIBW WACO 
WDAE KFH WTAQ 




KFAB WCCO v - 
(VMT *"■ 


-THE FOREIGN LEGION— Friday, y, hour. 

8:30 PM— ED 7:30 PM— ES-CD 6:30 PM— CS 

WABC WOKO WADC WCAO KMBC WFBM 
WAAB WKBW WBBM WHK WMBD WGST 
WDRC WCAU CKOK WFBL WDOD WREC 
WJAS WEAN WSPD WJSV WLAC WDSU 
WLBZ WICC WCAH WFEA KTRH KLRA 
WORC CFRB WLBW WHEC KTSA WIBW 
WHP WKBN WBIG WCCO WSBT 

WDBJ WTOC WMT 

WQAM WDBO 

WDAE WSJS 


M P 

5:30 PM 4:30 PM 

KLZ KHJ 
KOIN 
KGB 
KFRC 
KOL 
KFPY 


W8— COLUMBIA CHURCH OF THE AIR (Other than Protestant)— 

Sunday. y 2 hour. M P 
1:00 PM— ED 12:00 N— ES-CD 11:00 AM— CS 10:00 AM 9:00 AM 

WABC WOKO CKOK WFBL KMBC WFBM KVOR KHJ 
WAAB WDRC WSPD WLBW WGST WDOD KLZ KOIN 
WJAS WPG WHEC WWVA WREC WLAC KGB 
WLBZ WHP WDBJ WTOC WDSU KTRH KFRC 
CFRB WQAM WDBO KTSA WIBW KOL 
WDAE WSJS WTAQ KFAB KFPY 
WCCO WSBT 


WMT X7 


—THE GOLDBERGS— Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday. \i hour. 
Gertrude Berg, James Waters. 

7:45 PM— ED 6:45 PM— ES-CD 5:45 PM— CS 

WEAF WTAG WRC WTAM WKY WFAA 
WEEI WJAR WWJ WSAI WOAI WOW 
WCSH WLIT WBFR WENR WDAF WTMJ 
WGY WBEN KFYR KPRC 
WCAE 


W4— ELDER MICHAUX AND CONGREGATION— Saturday. \' 2 hour. 
10:00 AM— ED 9:00 AM— ES-CD 8:00 AM— CS 

WABC WOKO WBBM CKOK WGST WBRC 
WAAB WGR WFBL WSPD WDOD WREC 
WDRC WCAU WLBW WHEC WODX WLAC 
WEAN WPG WTAR WDBJ WDSU KRLD 


WHP WORC WQAM WDBO 
CFRB WSJS 


KFH WTAQ X8 
SVSBT WMT 


-GREAT MOMENTS IN HISTORY— Sunday. y> hour. 
7:30 PM— ED 6:30 PM— ES-CD 5:30 PM— CS 

WJZ WBZ WGAR WBAL KWK WREN 
WBZA KDKA WHAM WJR WTMJ WIBA 
WLW WRVA WEBC WDAY 
WWNC WIOD KFYR WFAA 
WFLA WJAX WMC WSM 
WMAL WPTF KSTP WOAI 
WLS KOA WSB WJDX 
WSMB KVOO 
WKY KSO 
KWCR KPRC 
KOIL 


M P 

4:30 PM 3:30 PM 

KOA KGO 
KDYL KFI 
KGW 
KOMO 
KHQ 
KTAR 


W5— THE RADIO PULPIT— Sunday. V 2 hour. 

Dr. Ralph W. Sackman M P 
3:30 PM— ED 2:30 PM— ES-CD 1:30 PM— CS 12:30 PM 11:30 AM 

WEAF WEEI WRC WFBR KTHS WOW KOA KGO 
WCSH WBEN WWJ WRVA WDAF WEBC KDYL KGW 
WLIT WGY WIS WWNC KFYR KSD KGIR KHQ 
WJAR WCAE WIOD WJAX KVOO KPRC KFSD 
WTAG WTAM WFLA WOAI WKY • KOMO 
WPTF WSAI WOC WHO KFI 
WIBA WMC 


WJDX WSMB vo 
WSM WSB xs 


-JOHN HENRY— BLACK RIVER GIANT— Sunday. K hour. 

M P 
10:00 PM— ED 9:00 PM— ES-CD 8:00 PM— CS 7:00 PM 6:00 PM 

WABC WOKO WADC WCAO KMBC WFBM KVOR KHJ 
WNAC WGR WBBM CKOK KMOX WGST KLZ KOIN 
WDRC WJAS WFBL WSPD WDOD WREC KSL KGB 
WEAN WLBZ WJSV WCAH WSFA WLAC KFRC 
WHP WORC WFEA WLBW WDSU KRLD KOL 

WHEC WKBN KTRH KLRA KFPY 

WDBJ WDBO KTSA WIBW 

WDAE WSJS WACO WISN 
WCCO 


W6 MORNING DEVOTIONS— Mon., Tues., Wed., Thurs., Fri., Sat. 14 hour. 9:00 AM 
— ED — WJZ Network. Kathryn Palmer, Joyce Allmand, Richard Dennis, Lowell 
Patton, Arthur Billings Hunt. 


W7— THE WORLD OF RELIGION— Sunday. V> hour. 

Dr. Stanley High M P 
6:00 PM— ED 4:00 PM— ES-CD 3:00 PM— CS 2:00 PM 1:00 PM 

WJZ WBZ WBAL WGAR WREN KFYR KOA KGW 
WBZA WBAP WPTF KWK WSM KGHL KGO 


WIOD WFLA WJDX KPRC KFSD XI 
WJAX WRVA WOAI KTBS KTAR 
WHAM WCKY KOIL WSMB KOMO 
WCFL KVOO WTMJ 
KSTP WKY 


)— JUST PLAIN BILL— Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday. M hour. 
After May 22nd, 45 minutes later. 

6:45 PM— ED 5:45 PM— ES-CD 

WABC WAAB WCAO WHK 
WKBW WCAU CKOK WJSV 


WEBC WMC X1 


—LIVES AT STAKE— Tuesday. y 2 hour. 8:00 PM— CS 
10:00 PM— ED 9:00 PM— ES-CD WSB WJDX 
WEAF WEEI WFBR WENR WKY KPRC 
WCSH WTAG WRC WTAM KTHS WHO 
WJAR WFI WWJ WOAI WAPI 
WBEN WGY WMC WBAP 

KTBS WOC 
WDAF KSD 


M P 

7:00 PM 6:00 PM 

KDYL KFI 
KOA KOMO 
KGO 
KGW 
KHQ 


W8— SABBATH REVERIES— Sunday. ) ■■ hour. 1 :30 PM— ED— WJZ Network 
Dr. Charles L. Goodell 


X— SKETCHES— DRAMATIC 


X1 -CAPTAIN DIAMOND'S ADVENTURES— Thursday. Vi hour. X1 
8:00 PM— ED 

WJZ WBZ 
WBZA KDKA 


)— NEIGHBORS— Monday. Vz hour. 7:30 PM— CS 
9:30 PM— ED 8:30 PM— ES-CD KSD WOC 

WEAF WTIC WRC WFBR WHO WOW 
WTAG WEEI WTAM WCKY WDAF WIBA 
WJAR WCSH WSAI WWJ KSTP WEBC 
WLIT WGY WWNC WJAX WDAY KFYR 
WBEN WCAE WIOD WFLA WSM WSB 
CKGW CFCF WMAQ WJDX WMC 

WSMB WKY 
KTHS KPRC 
WFAA 


M P 
6:30 PM 5:30 PM 

KOA KGO 
KDYL KFI 
KGIR KGW 
KGHL KOMO 
KHQ 
KFSD 
KTAR 


X2 DEATH VALLEY DAYS— Thursday. »/ 2 hour. Tim Frawley, Joseph Bell, Edwin 
W. Whitney, Joseph Bonime, Director. 

9:00 PM— ED 8:00 PM— ES-CD 7:00 PM— CS 

WJZ WBZ WLW WJR KOIL WREN 
WBZA KDKA WBAL WHAM KWK 
WGAR WLS 


NOTE: The index number appearing at the left of each program title is keyed for referen 
names of the principal artists and the station listings. Time zones are abbreviated as foil 
CS for Central Standard, M for Mountain, P for Pacific Coast. Last minute changes ma 
a specific station, try other stations listed in the same time zone. Where no station lis 
on key stations of the networks as designated on STATION SCHEDULE. Write Fan-F 

you require, enclosing re 


e from DAY BY DAY SCHEDULE and ARTIST SCHEDULE. Then follows the 
ows: ED for Eastern Daylight, ES-CD tor Eastern Standard and Central Daylight, 
ce absolute accuracy impossible; hence, if you do not find a specific program on 
ing is given, hook-up is variable, but best results can be obtained by tuning in 
ire Program Editor, 420 Lexington Avenue, New York, for further information 
tern postage. 


LOCATES 


W HA T 


. O U LIKE BEST 



*Notice of copyright. Method of arrangement copyrighted. Infringement will be prosecuted. 



42 



Radio Fan-Fare 



RADIO FAN-FARE PROGRAM FINDER 



CLASSIFIED SCHEDULE 



X14— RIN TIN TIN THRILLER— Thursday. \i hour. Junior McLain, Henrietta Tedro, 
Don Ameche, Bob White, Tom Corwine. 

8:30 PM— ED 7:30 PM— ES-CD 6:30 PM— CS 

WJZ WBZ WGAR WHAM KWK WREN 
WBZA KDKA WLW WLS KOIL 


Z5 -CLARA, LU 'N' EM— Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday. H hour. 
Louise Starky, Isabelle Carothers, Helen King. M 
10:15 AM— ED 9:15 AM— ES-CD 8:15 AM— CS 7:15 AM 

WJZ WBZ WBAL WGAR KWK WREN KDYL 
WBZA KDKA WJR WCKY KOIL WTMJ KOA 


X15— SOCONYLAND SKETCHES— Monday. \ 2 hour. 
8:00 PM— ED 

WEAF WTIC 
WTAG WEEI 
WJAR WCSH 
WGY WBEN 


WRVA WPTF WIBA WEBC 

WWNC WIS WDAY KFYR 

WJAX WIOD WSM WSB 

WFLA WHAM WAPI WSMB 

WGN WJDX KVOO 

KPRC WOAI 

WKY WBAP 

KSTP 


X1S SUNDAY AT SETH PARKERS 8:45 PM— CS M P 
Sunday. ^ hour WOC WHO 7:45 PM 6:45 PM 


10:45 PM— ED 3:45 PM— ES-CD WOW WDAF KOA KGO 
WEAF WJAR WFBR WRC WTMJ WIBA KGHL KGW 
WCSH WFI WTAM WWJ KSTP WEBC KDYL KFSD 
WGY WBEN WSAI WRVA WDAY KFYR KHQ 
WCAE CFCF WIS WJAX WSM WMC KTAR 
CKGW WTAG WIOD WFLA WSB WAPI KOMO 
WEEI WWNC WCKY WJDX WOAI 
KYW KTBS KPRC 
WSMB WBAP 


Z8 CUCKOO PROGRAM— Saturday. y 2 hour. Raymond Knight, Robert Armbruster. 
10:30 PM— ED 9:30 PM— ES-CD 

WJZ KDKA WBAL WHAM 
WGAR WCKY 
WIS WJAX 
WIOD WWNC 
WRVA WFLA 
WSYR KYW 


KTHS 


Z7— JACK DEMPSEY'S GYMNASIUM— Tuesday, Thursday. Saturday. U hour. 


Y— SKETCHES— Detective and Mystery 

Y1— ADVENTURES OF SHERLOCK HOLMES— Wednesday. \ z hour. Richard Gor- 
don, Leigh Lovel, Joseph Bell, Graham Harris. M P 
9:C0 PM ED 8:00 PM— ES-CD 7:00 PM— CS 9:15 PM 8:15 PM 

WJZ WBZ WHAM WBAL WREN KWK KDYL KOA 
WBZA KDKA WLW WGAR KWCR KOIL KGIR KFI 
CKGW CFCF WJR WMAL KGHL KOMO 
WSYR WLS KTAR 

KGO 
KGW 
KHQ 
KFSD 


(Beginning May 23, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, H hour. 6:45 PM— ED.) 
7:30 PM— ED 6:30 PM— ES-CD 
WABC WKBW WCAO WKRC 
WCAU CFRB WHK 


Z8— HORSE SENSE PHILOSOPHY— Sunday. M hour. Andrew F. Kelly. 
7:15 PM— ED 6:15 PM— ES-DC 5:15 PM— CS 

WEAF WEEI WRC WTAM WDAF WOC 
WJAR WLIT WWJ WMAQ WHO 
WGY 


Z12— ROSES AND DRUMS— Sunday. i/ 2 hour. 

6:30 PM— ED 5:30 PM— ES-CD 4:30 PM— CS 

WABC WAAB WADC WCAO KMBC WHAS 
WGR WJAS WGN WKRC KMOX WDSU 


Y2— ENOS CRIME CLUES— Tues. and Wed. \ 2 hour. Edward Reese, Georgia Backus. 
8:00 PM— ED 7:00 PM— ES-CD 


WHK CKOK KRLD WCCO 
WJSV 


WJZ WBZ WHAM WGAR 
WBZA KDKA WBAL WLW 
WJR WMAL 
WMAQ 


Z13 COLONEL STOOPNAGLE AND BUDD. Thur. >/ 2 hour. M P 

9:30 PM— ED 8:30 PM— ES-CD 7:30 PM— CS 6:30 PM 5:30 PM 

WABC WOKO WADC WCAO KMBC WFBM KSL KHJ 
WNAC WKBW WGN WKRC WHAS KMOX KOIN 


Y3— FIVE STAR THEATRE— CHARLIE CHAN— Friday. >/ 2 hour. Walter Connolly. 

(Will be discontinued after last week in May) 
7:30 PM— ED 6:30 PM— ES-CD 5:30 PM— CS 

WJZ WBZ WBAL WHAM WMC WSMB 
WBZA KDKA WPTF WWNC KTBS WSM 


WDRC WCAU WHK CKOK WGST WREC KGB 
WJAS WEAN WOWO WFBL WDSU WRR KFRC 
WSPD WJSV KOMA KTSA KOL 
WHEC WBT KFH WCCO KVI 

KFPY 


WLS WRVA 
WMAL 


Z14— BOOTH TARKINGTON'S MAUD AND COUSIN BILL. Thurs., Fri. if hour. 
7:15 PM— ED 6:15 PM— ES-CD 

WJZ WBZ WBAL WJR 
WBZA KDKA WMAQ 


Y5 ORANGE LANTERN— Sunday. »/ 2 hour. 

10:45 PM— ED 9:45 PM— ES-CD 8:45 PM— CS 

WJZ WBAL WHAM KWCR WREN 
WGAR WSYR KWK KSO 
WJR WMAL KOIL 
WMAQ 


Z15— TRIPLE BAR X DAYS AND NIGHTS. Monday. y 2 hour. 

Carson Robinson. M P 
8:15 PM— ED 7:15 PM— ES-CD 6:15 PM— CS 5:15 PM 4:15 PM 


YS— "K-7"— Saturday. y 2 hour. 

9:30 PM— ED 8:30 PM— ES-CD 7:30 PM— CS 

WEAF WTAG WRC WFBR KSD WOC 
WEEI WCSH WTAM WSAI WHO WOW 
WJAR WFI WWJ WMAQ WDAF 
WGY WBEN 
WCAE 


WABC WOKO WCAO WHK KMBC WFBM KVOR KHJ 
WGR WDRC CKOK WFBL WGST WDOD KOIN 
WCAU WJAS WSPD WFEA WREC WODX KGB 
WLBZ WICC WLBW WHEC WSFA WLAC KFRC 
WHP WORC WTAR WDBJ WDSU KTRH KOL 
CFRB WMBG WTOC WTAQ WKBH KFPY 

WQAM WDBO KFAB WISN 

WSJS WCCO 






Z— HUMOROUS SKETCHES 


Z16— SMACKOUT— Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday, Saturday. > 4 
hour. 12:00 N— ED— WJZ Network. Marian and Jim Jordan. 


Z1— AMOS 'N' ANDY— Mon., Tues., Wed., Thurs., Fri. 3 4 hour. M P 

7:00 PM— ED 6:00 PM— ES-CD 9:00 PM— CS 8:00 PM 7:00 PM 

WJZ WBZ WLW WCKY KWK WREN KOA KHQ 
WBZA KDKA WMAL WRVA WDAF KOIL KDYL KGO 
CKGW WPTF WFLA WTMJ KSTP KFI 

WIOD WJR WSM WMC KGW 

WGAR WHAM WSB WSMB KOMO 
KTHS WBAP 

10:00 PM— CD KPRC WOAI 

WMAQ WENR WKY 




BB— TRAVEL 


BB1— COOK TRAVELOGUES— Sunday. \i hour. Malcon LaPrade. 
1.15 PM ED 12:15 PM— ES-CD 

WJZ WMAL WBAL 
WHAM WSYR 
WJR WGAR 


12 BETTY AND BOB— Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday. % hour. 


WMAQ WCKY 


3:00 PM— ED 2:00 PM— ES-CD 1:00 PM— CS 

WJZ WBZ WBAL WGAR KWK KOIL 
WBZA KDKA WJR WLW 
WHAM WLS 


BB2— EXPLORING AMERICA WITH CONOCO— Wed. l/ 2 hour. Carveth Wells. 
9:30 PM— ED 8:30 PM— ES-DC 7:30 PM— CS 

WFBR WRVA KSD WOC KOA 
WMAQ WHO WOW KDYL 
WDAF WTMJ KGIR 
WIBA KSTP KGHL 
WEBC WDAY 
KFYR WKY 


23 BUCK ROGERS IN THE YEAR 2433— Mon., Tue., Wed., Thurs., Fri. V. hour. 
7:15PM-ED 6:15 PM— ES-CD 5:15 PM— CS 

WABC WNAC WBBM WHK WHAS KMOX 
WGR WCAU CKOK WCCO 


Z4— CHEERIO— Mon., Tue., Wed., Thurs., Fri., Sat. \ z hour. J. Harrison Isles. 
9.00 AM— ED 6:00 AM— ES-CD 7:00 AM— CS 

WEAF WTAG WRC WTAM WOW WDAF 
WEEI WJAR WWJ WCKY KTBS WKY 
WCSH WFI WRVA WPTF WJDX KPRC 
WGY WBEN WWNC WFBR WOAI WSM 
WCAE CKGW WIS WJAX WSB WAPI 
CFCF WIOD WFLA WMC 
WSAI WCFL 


WEAA KPRC 
KTBS WOAI 
KTHS 


BB3— SEEING THE OTHER AMERICAS— Sun. }.{ hour. Edward Tomlinson. 
12:15 PM— ED 11:15 AM— ES-CD 10:15 AM— CS 

WEAF WCSH WSAI WTAM WOC WDAF 
WFI WTAG WWJ WCKY WHO 
WGY WJAR 



NOTE: The index number appearing at the left of each program title is keyed for reference from DAY BY DAY SCHEDULE and ARTIST SCHEDULE. Then follows the 
names of the principal artists and the station listings. Time zones are abbreviated as follows: ED for Eastern Daylight, ES-CD for Eastern Standard and Central Daylight. 
CS for Central Standard. M for Mountain, P for Pacific Coast. Last minute changes make absolute accuracy impossible; hence, if you do not find a specific program on 
a specific station, try other stations listed in the same time zone. Where no station listing is given, hook-up is variable, but best results can be obtained by tuning in 
on key stations of the networks as designated on STATION SCHEDULE. Write Fan-Fare Program Editor, 420 Lexington Avenue, New York, for further information 

you require, enclosing return postage. 






"Notice of copyright. Method of arrangement copyrighted. Infringement will he prosecuted. 



June 



43 



RADIO FAN- FA 


R E 


PROGRAM FINDER 


CLASSIFIED 


SCHEDULE* 


BB4— BURTON HOLMES, CENTURY OF PROGRESS— Mon., Tiles., Wed., Thurs., 


DD10— KALTENMEYER'S KINDERGARTEN— Sat. V 2 hr. Bruce Kamman, Marion 


Fri. and Sat ]4 hour. 




and Jim Jordan, Song Fellows, Merrill Fugit, Johnny Wolf, Loretta Poynton, Don 


7:15 PM— ED 8:15 PM ES-CD 5:15 PM— CS M 


p 


Mangano. 


WEAF WEEI WFBR WRC WMC WKY 4:15 PM 


3:15 PM 


8:30 PM— ED 7:30 PM— ES-CD 6:30 PM— CS 


WJAR CFCF WGKY WNC KTBS WOAI KOA 


KGO 


WJZ WBZ WBAL WMAL KYW KWK 


WMAQ WOC WHO KDYL 


KOMO 


WBZA CKGW WSYR WHAM KWCR KSO 


WDAF WIBA 
WEBC KFYR 
WAPI WSB 


KHG 


CFCF KDKA WCKY KOIL WREN 


DD11— FLEISCHMANN HOUR— Thurs. 6:00 PM— CS M P 




1 hr. Rudy Vallee, Connecticut Yankees. KSD WOC 5:00 PM 4:00 PM 
8:00 PM— ED 7:00 PM— ES-CD WHO WOW KDYL KFI 






DD— VARIETY SHOWS 




WEAF WTAG WFBR WRC WSB KSTP KOA KGO 
WEEI WCSH WTAM WWJ WEBC WTMJ KGW 
WFI WGY WIOD WJAX WDAF WMC KOM 
WBEN WCAE WFLA WRVA WAPI WJDX KTA 


DD1— BEST FOODS MUSICAL GROCERY STORE— Friday. 


P 


1 2 hour. Tom Howard, Jeannie Lang, Herbert Polesie, 


8:30 PM 


CFCF WJAR WSAI WCKY WSMB WOAI KHQ 


The Singing Clerks, Harry Salter's Orchestra. M 


KGO 


WLW WPTF WKY KFYR 


9:00 PM— ED 8:00 PM— ES-CD 7:00 PM— CS 9:30 PM 


KGW 


WMAQ KDYL WDAY KPRC 


WEAF WTIC WFBR WRC KSD WDAF KDYL 


KHQ 


KOA WSM WBAP 


WTAG WEEI WTAM WWJ KOA 
WJAR WCSH WMAQ 
WGY WBEN 
WLIT 


KOMO 

KFI 

KFSD 


KVOO 


DD12— CAPT. HENRY'S MAXWELL HOUSE SHOW BOAT— Thurs. 1 hr. Charles 


KTAR 


Winninger, Lanny Ross, Annette Hanshaw, Muriel Wilson, Molasses 'n' January, 






Don Voorhees. 7:00 PM— CS M P 
9:00 PM— ED 8:00 PM— ES-CD KSD WOC 10:00 PM 9:00 PM 


DD2— CHASE & SANBORN HOUR 6:00 PM— CS M 


P 


Sunday. 1 hour KSD WOC 5:00 PM 
Bert Lahr, Lee Sims, llomay WHO WDAF KDYL 
Bailey, Rubinoff Orchestra. WSB WTMJ KOA 
8:00 PM— ED 7:00 PM— ES-CD KSTP WEBC 


4:00 PM 


WEAF WEEI WFBR WRC WHO WOW KOA KGO 


KGO 


WTAG WJAR WTAM WWJ WDAF WTMJ KDYL KFI 


KHQ 


WCSH WFI WSAI WRVA WJDX WMC KGW 


KTAR 


WGY WBEN WWNC WIS WSB WAPI KOMO 


WEAF WTIC WTAM WWJ WDAY KFYR 


KFI 


WCAE WJAX WIOD WSMB KTBS KHQ 


WTAG WBEN WLW WWNC WWNC KPRC 


KGW 


WELA WCKY WKY KPRC KFSD 


WCAE CFCF WIS WIOD WKY WMC 


KOMO 


WMAQ WOAI WSM KTAR 


CKGW WJAR WFLA WPTF WJDX WSMB 
WCSH WGY WFBR WRC KVOO WFAA 
WMAQ WOAI WSM 




KSTP WBAP 


DD13— OLD GOLD PROGRAM— Wed. l /2 hour. Fred Waring's Pennsylvanians, Geo- 
Givot, Mandy Lou. M P 


WOW 




10:00 PM— ED 9:00 PM— ES-CD 8:00 PM— CS 7:00 PM 6:00 PM 






WABC WOKO WCAO WGN KMBC WFBM KLZ KHJ 


DD3— CHEVROLET PROGRAM— Fri. \ 2 hr. 8:00 PM— CS M 


P 


WAAB WKBW WKRC WHK WHAS KMOX KSL KOIN 


Jack Benny, Mary Livingstone, James KSD WOC 7:00 PM 


6:00 PM 


WDRC WCAU CKOK WOWO WGST WBRC KGB 


Melton, Frank Black and his Orchestra WHO WOW KOA 


KGO 


WJAS WEAN WFBL WSPD WDOD WREC KFRC 


10:00 PM— ED 9:00 PM— ES-CD WDAF WTMJ KDYL 


KFI 


WJSV WCAH WODX WDSU KOL 


WEAF WTIC WFBR WRC WIBA WSM KGIR 


KGW 


WHEC WBT KTRH WRR KVI 


WTAG WLIT WWJ WTAM WMC WSB KGHL 


KOMO 


WQAM WDBO KLRA KOMA KFPY 


WGY WBEN WIS WRVA WJDX WSMB 


KHQ 


WDAE KTSA WIBW 


WCAE WCSH WWNC WIOD KTBS KVOO 


KFSD 


WCCO 


WEEI WJAR WFLA WJAX WKY KTHS 


KTAR 






WLW WENR WFAA KPRC 




DD14— REVOLVING STAGE— Monday. 1 hour. 


WOAI WEBC 




2:00 PM— ED 1:00 PM— ES-CD 12:00 N—CS 


WDAY KFYR 




WEAF WTAG WRC WFBR WOC WHO 
WBEN WJAR WSAI WTAM WDAF 
WGY WCSH WWJ 
WCAE 


DD4— CHICAGO VARIETY PROGRAM— Sun. y 2 hr. 8:30 PM— ED— WABC Network. 


DD5— CLICqUOT CLUB ESKIMOS— Mon. y 2 hr. "Rosey" Rowswelland 
8:00 PM— ED 7:00 PM— ES-CD 


Harry Reser. 


DD15— THE RICHFIELD COUNTRY CLUB— Mon. \ 2 hour. Alex Morrison, The 


WJZ WBZ WBAL WHAM 




Golden Orchestra, Betty Barthell. 


WBZA KDKA WGAR WCKY 




10:00 PM— ED 9:00 PM— ES-CD 


WMAL WLS 




WABC WOKO WCAO WFBL 
WAAB WKBW WJSV WLBW 
WDRC WCAU WHEC 
WJAS WPG 


DD6— COLUMBIA REVUE— Sun., Fri. >/2 hr. Freddie Rich, John P. Medbury, Mixed 
Chorus, Soloists. 


10:00 PM— ED 9:00 PM— ES-CD 8:00 PM— CS M 


P 


WICC WHP 


WABC WOKO WCAO WBBM KMBC WFBM 7:00 PM 


6:00 PM 




WAAB WKBW WHK CKOK KMOX WMBD KVOR 


KHJ 


Friday. y 2 hour. 

10:30 PM— ED 9:30 PM— ES-CD 


WDRC WCAU WFBL WSPD WGST WDOD KLZ 


KOIN 


WJAS WPG WJSV WCAH WREC WLAC 


KGB 


WEAF WEEI WFBR WRC 


WLBZ WICC WFEA WLBW WDSU KTRH 


KFRC 


WTIC WJAR 


WHP WORC WHEC WKBN KLRA KTSA 


KOL 


WLIT WGY 


CFRB WBIG WDBJ WIBW KFH 
WTOC WQAM WISN WCCO 


KFPY 


WBEN WCAE 


DD16— ROBERT BURNS PANATELA PROGRAM— Wed. >/ 2 hour. Guy Lombardo's 


WDBO WDAE WMT 




Royal Canadians, Burns & Allen, Comedy, Phil Regan, Tenor. M 
9:30 PM— ED 8:30 PM— ES-CD 7:30 PM— CS 6:30 PM 

WABC WOKO WADC WCAO KMBC WFBM KLZ 


DD7— CORN COB PIPE CLUB OF VIRGINIA— Wed. V> hr. M 


P 


10:00 PM— ED 9:00 PM— ES-CD 8:00 PM-CS 7:00 PM 


6:00 PM 


WNAC WKBW WGN WKRC KMOX KTRH KSL 


WEAF WTIC WRVA WRC KSD WOC KOA 


KGO 


WDRC WCAU WHK CKOK WRR KOMA 


WTAG WCSH WFBR WWJ WHO WOW KDYL 


KFI 


WJAS WEAN WOWO WFBL KTSA WCCO 


WLIT WGY WLW WENR WDAF WTMJ KGIR 
WBEN WCAE WIBA WEBC KGHL 
WEEI WJAR WDAY KFYR 

KSTP 


KGW 

KOMO 

KHQ 


WORC WSPD WJSV 


DD17— SATURDAY FRIVOLITIES— Sat. y 2 hour. 9:45 PM— ED— WABC Network. 


DD18— SINCLAIR GREATER MINSTRELS— Mon. »/ 2 hr. Jean Arnold, Chauncey 






Parsons, Joe Parsons, Bill Childs, Fritz Clark, Mac McCloud, Clifford Soubier, 
Harry Kogen. 


DD8— FIVE STAR THEATRE— Tuesday. y 2 hour. 




10:00 PM— ED 9:00 PM— ES-CD 8:00 PM— CS 




9:00 PM— ED 8:00 PM— ES-CD 


WABC WOKO WCAO WFBL WDOD WREC 






WNAC WKBW WJSV WFEA WLAC WDSU 




WJZ WBZ WHAM WGAR 


WDRC WCAU WBT WBIG KLRA 




WBZA KDKA WBAL WWNC 


WJAS WEAN WTAR WDBJ 




WIS WJAX 


WICC WHP WMBG WSJS 




WIOD WJR 


WORC 




WFLA WLW 
WLS 


DD9— THE GRAB BAG— Fri. y 2 hr. Helen Mors, Brooks and Ross, 
Freddy Rose, Westphal's Orchestra M 


Billy White, 

P 


DD19— WEEK-END REVIEW— Saturday. 1 hour. M 


4:00 PM— ED 3:00 PM— ES-CD 2:00 PM— CS 1:00 PM 


12:00 N 


4:00 PM— ED 3:00 PM— ES-CD 2:00 PM— CS 1:00 PM 


WABC WOKO WADC WCAO KMBC WGST KVOR 


KHJ 


WEAF WTAG WFBR WRC WOC WHO KOA 


WNAC WGR WBBM CKOK WDOD WREC KLZ 


KOIN 


WEEI WJAR WWJ WTAM WOW WIBA KDYL 


WDRC WIP WHK WJSV WSFA WLAC KSL 


KGB 


WGY WCAE WSAI WDAF KSTP WEBC 


WJAS WEAN WSPD WFEA WDSU KRLD 


KFRC 


WBEN WFI WCKY WRVA WDAY KFYR 


WPG WLBZ WCAH WWVA KTRH KLRA 


KOL 


CKGW WWNC WIS WSM WSB 


WICC WORC WLBW WBIG KTSA WIBW 


KFPY 


WJAX WIOD WMC WSMB 


CFRB WKBN WTOC WACO KFH 




WFLA WMAQ WKY KPRC 


WDBJ WDBO WTAQ KFAB 
WQAM WSJS WISN WSBT 




KTBS 


DD20— RADIO GUILD 


WDAE WMT 




Monday. 1 Hour. 4:00 PM— ED— WJZ Network 


NOTE: The index number appearing at the left of each program title 


s keyed for r 


'ference from DAY BY DAY SCHEDULE and ARTIST SCHEDULE. Then follows the 


names of the principal artists and the station listings. Time zones an 


abbreviated z 


s follows: ED for Eastern Daylight, ES-CD for Eastern Standard and Central Daylight, 


CS for Central Standard, M for Mountain, P for Pacific Coast. Last 


minute changt 


s make absolute accuracy impossible; hence, if you do not find a specific program on 


a specific station, try other stations listed in the same time zone. Where no stati 


>n listing is given, hook-up is variable, but best results can be obtained by tuning in 


on key stations of the networks as designated on STATION SCHEDULE. Write F 


an-Fare Program Editor, 420 Lexington Avenue. New York, for further information 


you 


require, enclos 


ng return postage. 


LOCATES 


W H 


A T 


YOU LIKE BEST 



^Notice of copyright. Method ot' arrangement copyrighted. Infringement will be prosecuted. 



44 



Radio Fan-Farl: 



RADIO FAN -FARE PROGRAM 



STATION SCHEDULE 



N D E R 



Station 


Key 


K. C. 


Watts 


Time 


City 


Station 


Key J 


K. C. 


Watts 


Time 


City 


KDKA 


WJZ 


980 


50000 


EOT 


Pittsburgh, Pa. 


WFBM 


WABC 


1230 


1000 


CST 


Indianapolis, Ind. 


KDYL 


NBC 


1290 


1000 


MST 


Salt Lake City 


WFBR 


WEAF 


1270 


500 


EST 


Baltimore, Md. 


KFAB 


CBS 


770 


5000 


CST 


Lincoln, Neb. 


WFEA 


CBS 


1430 


500 


EST 


Manchester, N. H. 


KFH 


CBS 


1300 


1000 


CST 


Wichita, Kans. 


WFI 


WEAF 


560 


500 


EDT 


Philadelphia, Pa. 


KFI 


NBC 


640 


50000 


PST 


L03 Angeles, Calif. 


WFLA 


NBC 


620 


1000 


EST 


Tampa, Fla. 














WGAR 


WJZ 


1450 


500 


EST 


Cleveland, Ohio 


KFPY 


CBS 


1340 


1000 


PST 


Spokane, Wash. 














KFRC 


CBS 


610 


1000 


PST 


San Francisco, Calif. 


WGL 


CBS 


1370 


100 


CDT 


Ft. Wayne, Ind. 


KFSD 


NBC 


600 


1000 


PST 


San Diego, Calif. 


WGN 


WABC 


720 


25000 


CDT 


Chicago, 111. 


KFYR 


NBC 


550 


1000 


CST 


Bismarck, N. D. 


WGR 


WABC 


550 


1000 


EDT 


Buffalo, N. Y. 


KGB 


CBS 


1330 


1000 


PST 


San Diego, Calif. 


WGST 


CBS 


890 


250 


CST 


Atlanta, Ga. 












WGY 


WEAF 


790 


50000 


EDT 


Schenectady, N. Y. 


KGHL 


NBC 


950 


1000 


MST 


Billings, Mont. 


WHAM 


WJZ 


1150 


5000 


EST 


Rochester, N. Y. 


KGIR 


NBC 


1360 


500 


MST 


Butte, Mont. 


WHAS 


WABC 


820 


25000 


CST 


Louisville, Ky. 
Rochester, N. Y. 


KGO 


NBC 


790 


7500 


PST 


San Francisco, Calif. 


WHEC 


CBS 


1430 


500 


EST 


KGU 


NBC 


750 


2500 


HST 


Honolulu, Hawaii 


WHK 


WABC 


1390 


1000 


EST 


Cleveland, Ohio 


KGW 


NBC 


620 


1000 


PST 


Portland, Ore. 


WHO 


WEAF 


1000 


5000 


CST 


Des Moines, Iowa 


KHJ 


CBS 


900 


1000 


PST 


Los Angeles, Calif. 


WHP 


CBS 


1430 


500 


EDT 


Harrisburgh, Pa. 


KHQ 


NBC 


590 


1000 


PST 


Spokane, Wash. 


WIBA 


NBC 


1280 


500 


CST 


Madison, Wis. 


KLRA 


CBS 


1390 


1000 


CST 


Little Rock, Ark. 


WIBW 


CBS 


580 


1000 


CST 


Topeka, Kan. 


KLZ 


CBS 


560 


1000 


MST 


Denver, Colo. 


WICC 


CBS 


600 


250 


EDT 


Bridgeport, Conn. 


KMBC 


WABC 


950 


1000 


CST 


Kansas City, Mo. 


WIOD 


NBC 


1300 


1000 


EST 


Miami, Fla. 


KMOX 


WABC 


1090 


50000 


CST 


St. Louis, Mo. 


WIP 


WABC 


610 


500 


EDT 


Philadelphia, Pa. 


KOA 


NBC 


830 


12500 


MST 


Denver, Colo. 


WIS 


NBC 


1010 


500 


EST 


Columbia, 3. C. 


KOH 


CBS 


1380 


500 


PST 


Reno, Nev. 


WISN 


CBS 


1120 


250 


CST 


Milwaukee, Wis. 


KOIL 


WJZ 


1260 


1000 


CST 


Council Bluffs, Iowa 


WJAR 


WEAF 


890 


500 


EDT 


Providence, R. I. 


KOIN 


CBS 


940 


1000 


PST 


Portland, Ore. 


WJAS 


WABC 


1290 


1000 


EDT 


Pittsburgh, Pa. 


KOL 


CBS 


1270 


1000 


PST 


Seattle, Wash. 


WJAX 
WJDX 


NBC 
NBC 


900 
1270 


1000 
1000 


EST 
CST 


Jacksonville, Fla. 
Jackson, Miss. 


KOMA 


CBS 


1480 


5000 


CST 


Oklahoma City, Okla. 


WJR 


WJZ 


750 


10000 


EST 


Detroit, Mich. 


KOMO 


NBC 


920 


1000 


PST 


Seattle, Wash. 


WJSV 


CBS 


1460 


10000 


EST 


Washington, D. C. 
New York City 


KPO 
KPRC 


NBC 
NBC 


680 
920 


5000 
1000 


PST 
CST 


San Francisco, Calif. 
Houston, Texas 


WJZ 


WJZ 


760 


50000 


EDT 














WKBH 


CBS 


1380 


1000 


CST 


LaCrosse, Wis. 


KRLD 


CBS 


1040 


10000 


CST 


Dallas, Texas 


WKBN 


CBS 


570 


500 


EST 


Youngstown, Ohio 


KSCJ 


CBS 


1330 


1000 


CST 


Sioux City, Iowa 


WKBW 


WABC 


1480 


5000 


EDT 


Buffalo, N. Y. 


KSD 


WEAF 


550 


500 


CST 


St. Louis, Mo. 


WKRC 


WABC 


550 


1000 


EST 


Cincinnati, Ohio 


K8L 


CBS 


1130 


50000 


MST 


Salt Lake City, Utah 


WKY 


NBC 


900 


1000 


CST 


Oklahoma City, Okla. 


KSO 


WJZ 


1370 


100 


CST 


Des Moines, Iowa 


WLAO 


CBS 


1470 


5000 


CST 


Nashville, Tenn. 


KSTP 


NBC 


1460 


25000 


CST 


St. Paul, Minn. 


WLBW 


CBS 


1260 


500 


EST 


Erie, Pa. 


KTAR 


NBC 


620 


500 


PST 


Phoenix, Ariz. 


WLBZ 


CBS 


620 


500 


EDT 


Bangor, Me. 


KTBS 


NBC 


1450 


1000 


CST 


Shreveport, La. 


WLIT 


WEAF 


560 


500 


EDT 


Philadelphia, Pa. 


KTHS 


NBC 


1040 


10000 


CST 


Hot Springs, Ark. 


WLS 


WJZ 


870 


50000 


CDT 


Chicago, 111. 


KTRH 


CBS 


1120 


500 


CST 


Houston, Texas 


WLW 


WEAF 


700 


50000 


EST 


Cincinnati, Ohio 


KTSA 


CBS 


1290 


1000 


CST 


San Antonio, Texas 


WMAL 
WMAQ 


WJZ 
WJZ 


630 
670 


250 
5000 


EST 
CDT 


Washington, D. C. 
Chicago, 111. 


KVI 


CBS 


570 


500 


PST 


Tacoma, Wash. 


WMBD 


CBS 


1440 


500 


CST 


Peoria, 111. 
Richmond, Va. 


KVOO 


NBC 


1140 


5000 


CST 


Tulsa, Okla. 


WMBG 


CBS 


1210 


100 


EST 


KVOR 


CBS 


1270 


1000 


MST 


Colorado Springs, Colo. 














KWCR 


WJZ 


1420 


100 


CST 


Cedar Rapids, Iowa 


WMO 


NBC 


780 


500 


CST 


Memphis, Tenn. 














WMT 


CBS 


600 


500 


CST 


Waterloo, Iowa 


KWK 


WJZ 


1350 


1000 


CST 


St. Louis, Mo. 


WNAX 


CBS 


570 


1000 


CST 


Yankton, S. D. 


KYW 


WJZ 


1020 


10000 


COT 


Chicago, 111. 


WOAI 


NBC 


1190 


50000 


CST . 


San Antonio, Texas 


WAAB 


WABC 


1410 


500 


EOT 


Boston, Mass. 


WOO 


WEAF 


1000 


5000 


CST 


Davenport, Iowa 


WABC 
WACO 


WABC 
CBS 


860 
1240 


50000 
1000 


EDT 
CST 


New York City 
Waco, Texas 


WODX 


CBS 


1410 


500 


CST 


Mobile, Ala. 














WOKO 


WABC 


1430 


500 


EDT 


Albany, N. Y. 


WADC 


WABC 


1320 


1000 


EST 


Akron, Ohio 


WORC 


CBS 


1200 


100 


EDT 


Worcester Mass. 


WAPI 


NBC 


1140 


5000 


CST 


Burmingham, Ala. 


WOW 


WEAF 


590 


1000 


CST 


Omaha, Nebr. 


WBAL 


WJZ 


1060 


10000 


EST 


Baltimore, Md. 


WOWO 


WABC 


1160 


10000 


CDT 


Ft. Wayne, Ind. 


WBAP 


NBC 


800 


50000 


CST 


Ft. Worth, Texas 


WPG 


CBS 


1100 


5000 


EDT 


Atlantic City, N. J. 
Raleigh, N. C. 


WBBM 


WABC 


770 


25000 


CDT 


Chicago, 111. 


WPTF 


NBC 


680 


1000 


EST 


WBEN 


WEAF 


900 


1000 


EDT 


Buffalo, N. Y. 


WQAM 
WRC 


CBS 

WEAF 


560 
950 


1000 
500 


EST 
EST 


Miami, Fla. 
Washington, D. C. 


WBIG 
WBRC 


CBS 
CBS 


1440 
930 


500 
500 


EST 
CST 


Greensboro, N. C. 
Birmingham, Ala. 


WREC 


CBS 


600 


500 


CST 


Memphis, Tenn. 


WBT 


CBS 


1080 


25000 


EST 


Charlotte, N. C. 


WREN 


WJZ 


1220 


1000 


CST 


Lawrence, Kans. 


WBZ 


WJZ 


990 


25000 


EDT 


Boston, Mass. 


WRR 


CBS 


1200 


500 


CST 


Dallas, Texas 














WRVA 


NBC 


1110 


5000 


EST 


Richmond, Va. 


WBZA 


WJZ 


990 


1000 


EDT 


Springfield, Mass. 


WSAI 


WEAF 


1330 


500 


EST 


Cincinnati, Ohio 


WCAE 


WEAF 


1220 


1000 


EDT 


Pittsburgh, Pa. 


WSB 


NBC 


740 


5000 


CST 


Atlanta, Ga. 


WCAH 
WCAO 


CBS 
WABC 


1430 
600 


500 
250 


EST 
EST 


Columbus, Ohio 
Baltimore, Md. 


WSBT 


CBS 


1230 


500 


CST 


South Bend, Ind. 


WCAU 


WABC 


1170 


50000 


EDT 


Philadelphia, Pa. 


WSFA 
WSJS 


CBS 
CBS 


1410 
1310 


500 
100 


CST 
EST 


Montgomery, Ala. 
Winston-Salem, N. C. 


WCCO 
WCFL 


CBS 
WJZ 


810 

970 


50000 
1500 


CST 
CDT 


Minneapolis, Minn.-St. Paul 
Chicago, III. 


WSM 
WSMB 


NBC 
NBC 


650 
1320 


50000 
500 


CST 
CST 


Nashville, Tenn. 
New Orleans, La. 


WCKY 


WEAF 


1490 


5000 


EST 


Covington, Ky. 


WSPD 


WABC 


1340 


1000 


EST 


Toledo, Ohio 


WCSH 


WEAF 


940 


1000 


EDT 


Portland, Me. 


WSUN 


NBC 


620 


1000 


EST 


Clearwater, Fla. 


WDAE 


CBS 


1220 


1000 


EST 


Tampa, Fla. 


WSYR 


WJZ 


570 


250 


EST 


Syracuse, N. Y. 














WTAG 


WEAF 


580 


250 


EDT 


Worcester, Mass. 


WDAF 


WEAF 


610 


1000 


CST 


Kansas City, Mo. 


WTAM 


WEAF 


1070 


50000 


EST 


Cleveland, Ohio 


WDAY 


NBC 


940 


1000 


CST 


Fargo, N. Dak. 














WDBJ 


CBS 


930 


250 


EST 


Roanoke, Va. 


WTAQ 


CBS 


1330 


1000 


CST 


Eau Claire, Wis. 


WDBO 


CBS 


580 


250 


EST 


Orlando, Fla. 


WTIC 


WEAF 


1060 


50000 


EDT 


Hartford, Conn. 


WDOD 


CBS 


1280 


1000 


CST 


Chattanooga, Tenn. 


WTMJ 


NBC 


620 


1000 


CST 


Milwaukee, Wis. 














WTOC 


CBS 


1260 


500 


EST 


Savannah, Ga. 


WDRC 


WABC 


1330 


500 


EDT 


Hartford, Conn. 


WWJ 


WEAF 


920 


1000 


EST 


Detroit, Mich. 


WDSU 


CBS 


1250 


1000 


CST 


New Orleans, La. 














WEAF 


WEAF 


660 


50000 


EDT 


New York City 


WWNC 


NBC 


570 


500 


EST 


Asheville, N. C. 


WEAN 


WABC 


780 


500 


EDT 


Providence, R. I. 


WWVA 


CBS 


1160 


5000 


EST 


Wheeling, W. Va. 


WEBC 


NBC 


1290 


1000 


CST 


Superior, Wis.-Duluth 


CFCF 


NBC 


1030 


500 


EDT 


Montreal, Que. 














CFRB 


CBS 


690 


10000 


EOT 


Toronto, Ont. 


WEEI 


WEAF 


590 


1000 


EDT 


Boston, Mass. 


CKAC 


CBS 


730 


5000 


EDT 


Montreal, Que. 


WENR 


WJZ 


870 


50000 


CDT 


Chicago, 111. 














WFAA 


NBC 


800 


50000 


CST 


Dallas, Texas 


CKGW 


NBC 


840 


5000 


EDT 


Toronto, Ont. 


WFBL 


WABC 


1360 


1000 


EST 


Syracuse, N. Y. 


CKOK 


WABC 


540 


5000 


EST 


Windsor, Ont. 



Note: In column I stations are listed alphabetically by call letters. In second column, key stations, WJZ means member of basic blue network of NBC. WEAF means 
member of basic red network of NBC, WABC means member of basic CBS network. NBC designates stations included in supplementary networks of NBC (red and blue) 
and CBS designates supplementary stations included in various hook-ups of CBS. Third column, kilocycles, indicates wave length; fourth column indicates power of each 
station. Fifth column indicates time zone of each station and whether operating on Daylight or Standard time. EDT means Eastern Daylight Time, EST means Eastern 
Standard Time, CDT means Central Daylight Time, CST means Central Standard Time, MST means Mountain Standard Time and PST means Pacific Standard Time. 



TELLS YOU ABOU T THE STATIONS 



•Notice of copyright. Method of arrangement copyrighted. Infringement will be prosecuted. 



June 



FAN-FARE'S 

I 
CAFETERIA 



HUMOR 



(RADIO COMEDIANS HELP YOURSELVES) 



High Mucky-muck: Let's get our 
wives together tonight and have a big 
evening. 

Brother Lion-tamer : O. K., but 
where shall we leave them? 

— Annapolis Log 



PREFERENCE 
By Coe Kiser Smith 
I'd rather have pneumonia, 
I'd rather have a tumor, 
I'd rather have most anything — 
Than have no sense of humor. 

— College Humor 



"Did you-all evah speak befo' a large 
audience, Gawge?" 

"Ah did, once, yowsah." 
"What did you-all say?" 
"Ah said 'Not guilty.' " 

— Farm Journal 



And there they were — the ice all 
around them was cracking. They 
couldn't do anything ! They were des- 
perate ! Would nobody bring the liquor? 
. — Nevada Desert Wolf 



Wife : But I enclosed a steel file in 
that last pie I sent you, Spike. 

Convict : That's your darned pastry 
again, Liz. I didn't even notice it. 

— Humorist 



Even the purest looking surface air 
has rubbish suspended in it, says a doc- 
tor columnist. You're telling us radio 
fans ! — Norfolk Virginia-Pilot 



We had to fire 

Our housemaid Nan ; 
She treated china 

Like Japan. 

— Boston Transcript 



Son : Ma, what's the idea makin' me 
sleep on the mantlepiece every night? 

Mother: Hush, Junior! You only 
have to sleep there two more weeks and 
then your picture will be in "Believe It 
Or Not." — Annapolis Log 



San Francisco now has taxi-aero- 
planes. Passengers can be dropped any- 
where. — Punch 



Wedding Guest : Isn't this your fourth 
daughter getting married? 

Scotchman : Aye, and our rice is get- 
ting a wee bit dirty. 

— Ohio State Sun Dial 



"How tall is that native hunter?" 
"About six feet two, in his stalking 
feet." — Pennsylvania Punch Bowl 



We hope that when business does 

turn the corner, it will be on the square. 

— Tliomaston Times 



Let us have public confidence. And 
let us also have institutions that can 
preserve it without pulling the shades 
down. — Sumter Item 



"Every time I kiss you, dear, it makes 
me a better man." 

"Well, you don't have to try to get to 
Heaven in one night." 

— Annapolis Log 



Is a miser what might be called a 
doueh nut? — Dallas Nezvs 



They say that every day in Europe 
is Pan American Day. 

— Tampa Tribune 

We remember when Hitler's mustache 

was what we disliked about him, and 

now it is the only thing we can stand. 

— Lynchburg Nezvs 



45 



Bearded Lady (retired for the night) : 

Help ! There's a man under my beard ! 

— Colgate Banter 



The position of Germany, in brief, 
is (1) there were no atrocities; (2) 
they will not happen again; (3) if the 
victims don't quit squawking they'll 
wish they had. — Dallas News 



"Let's do the elevator dance." 
"What's that?" 

"Over in the corner with no steps." 
— V. P. I. Skipper. 



"What happened when the police 
searched your house?" 

"It was swell ! They found the front 
door key which my wife had hidden, a 
stamp I lost weeks ago, and four collar 
buttons." — Fliegende Blaetter 



What a language! Sending 250,000 
of us into the forest to get us out of 
the woods. — Los Angeles Times 



"What has become of all the opti- 
mists ?" an editor wants to know. Our 
impression is that they are writing seed 
catalogs. — Atlanta Journal 



For Sale or Trade — Furniture for 
chickens ; phone 1698 Green. 

— Emporia Gazette 
Any settees for hens? 



The Hellertown German bank held 
its weekly rehearsal on Tuesday under 
the direction of M. B. Stackhouse. 

— Allentown (Pa.) paper 

Just a practice run, no doubt. 



In a visit to the Kerbela Shrine 
Temple last night, Imperial Potentate 
Earl C. Mills said etaoin shrdlu etaoi 
shrdlu eatoin utaordlu uau ntaordlu. 

— Knoxvillc Journal 
Teh, tch. These Masons and their old 
secrets. 




Courtesy The Family Circle. 
'Professor Weems will now give his famous imitations of barnyard animals." 



46 



Radio Fan-Fare 



TORN FROM THE 

of Margaret Santry 



By OLIVER CLAXTON 

Her personal secretary 

MARGARET SANTRY'S radio specialty, notably 
during the Linit period last winter, is interview- 
ing people for three minutes about such diverse 
matters as German politics, and decorative effects in 
modern bathrooms. The interviews are held with celeb- 
rities or people prominent in the world of society. This 
activity placed Miss Santry in a misunderstood light with 
her friends and acquaintances. They think that anyone 
who works for a mere three minutes a day on the air 
is in a position to be envied, that she holds down as soft 
a job as a girl could fall into. Their opinion is in deep 
error. The job is extremely arduous and requires far 
more painstaking effort than almost any other type of 
program of which you can think. 

During a radio career that begins almost with the 
radio itself, Miss Santry has publicly interviewed nearly 
a thousand persons from all walks of life. Actresses, 
writers, social leaders and other big-wigs of our modern 
world have stood in front of the mike with her and chat- 
ted about whatever interested them most. Ladies rang- 
ing in the contemporary scheme from the Grand Duchess 
Marie of Russia and Mrs. William K. Vanderbilt to Lupe 
Velez and Peggy Hopkins Joyce have been included in 
these broadcasts. You can hardly think of a celebrity 
without thinking that he, or she, has at sometime or 
other engaged in conversation with Margaret Santry 
while the radio audience listened in. 

Now to lure these people to the microphone and to 
persuade them to be ready and willing to talk about what 
interests them most, involves more than a simple request. 
It requires negotiation, and research, and endless tact, 
and more than an endless amount of being on the job. 
You are literally never off the job. It involves — but let's 
take a page out of Miss Santry's appointment book for a 
day when she was producing the Linit programs. It's 
a good average day for the girl who "only works three 
minutes a day." It goes like this — 

11:30 a. m. Wakes up. Late, you say? Wait until 
you reach her retiring hour. Then she goes through her 
mail, dictates to her secretary from bed, telephones — 
there are five phones, mostly ringing — lines up the day's 
routine, and eats what breakfast she has time for — a skip 
and jump meal like the average commuter's. 

12:30 p. m. She gets up and hurries into clothes. Tele- 
phones Lucien Lelong, couturier, just off the boat from 
Paris and a very likely subject for an interview. She 
joins him at Pierre's. How would Mr. Lelong like to 
tell the palpitating feminine audience about the new 
styles some night? He'll let her know. 

1:15 p. m. Pops into the Larue restaurant to lunch 
with the Baroness Von Hindenburg, niece of the Ger- 
man President. She lunches with the Baroness for an 
hour, but it took two hours preparation. Miss Santry 
had to stuff her mind with facts about Von Hindenburg, 
and German politics. You can't get people to talk about 
what they know unless you know something about it 
yourself. The Baroness is a subject for a broadcast. 

2:15 p. m. She departs from her second lunch at 
Larue's and chases for a few minutes into a swanky 
speakeasy where Fanny Ward, perennial flapper, is hav- 




The Grand Duchess Marie of Russia — and if you think it is a simple 
matter to get a Grand Duchess in front of a microphone, ask 
Margaret Santry. 

ing lunch. This visit is pure contact. Maybe Miss Ward 
can be persuaded to go on the air. Maybe she can't. 
Anyway Miss Santry will try to persuade her. 

2:30 p. m. Home again, and there is no place like this 
home. Mrs. Jerome Napoleon Bonaparte keeps an ap- 
pointment. Miss Santry displays her knowledge of the 
Bonaparte women. She and her visitor discuss a coming 
broadcast until 

3 p. m. when the lady with the easy job taxis over 
to the Waldorf as a member of a committee organizing 
a Charity Carnival. Here she makes contacts — meets 
dowagers and debutantes. And secures more grist for 
her mill. 

3:30 p. m. Just a little weary but still at it, she goes 
home and meets Frieda Hempel and Lady Wilkins who 
drop in for a chat — and at 

4:15 p. m. She has tea with Dorothy Thompson (Mrs. 
Sinclair Lewis) who has just returned from Germany 
where she has been interviewing Hitler and the like. 
Mrs. Lewis will broadcast, but the difficulty is what? 
Most of her information can't be used. She knows more 
than the air waves care to handle. 

5:30 p. m. Rest — meaning a massage and general 
beauty fol-de-rol of an exceedingly pretty woman. This 
is punctuated by dictation and phone calls. Friends and 
guests swim in and out. This is the time on her hands 
that three minutes a day give her. 

6:45 p. m. Dinner with Mrs. Curtis Dall, daughter 



June 



DIARY 



Another elusive mike 
subject, the society 
dictator, Mrs. Wil- 
liam K. Vanderbilt. 
This unusual photo 
was snapped whi 
she was umpiring a 
charity baseball game 
in Newport. 



47 

of President Roosevelt — then Governor of New York 

State — at the Governor's town house. Mrs. Dall is on 

the air at 

8:00 p. m. and the work Santry's friends know about 

is done. 

8:30 p. m. To discuss the next broadcast with Mrs. 

Howard Chandler Christy and skip through a rehearsal. 
Will Hays is there and Mrs. Hays is im- 
portuned to submit to a broadcast, also at 
some future date. 

10:00 p. m. Home — but not to bed. The 
day's notes must be written out. Future 
broadcasts must be written. Information 
relative to the people she is seeing tomor- 
row must be digested, and facts about their 
work, or hobby, must also be taken in. If 
she is lucky and ideas come quickly, maybe 
she gets to bed at 

2 a. m. and maybe she isn't lucky and 
ideas are slow and then she gets to bed at 

4 a. m. or 

5 a. m. — her life being just an easy 
round. 

Perhaps by now you, too, think that this 
kind of a program is no soft job. During 
the entire winter Miss Santry was only 
able to crowd in two invitations not con- 
nected with the job that she could accept. 
She drank no cocktails, smoked no ciga- 
rettes (in order to conserve nervous ener- 
gy and stand the nerve-wracking pace). 




One of Miss Santry's favorite guests — Lupe Velez. In her arms is her 
adopted child, Joan Del Ville, whose mother is Lupe's sister. 



Peggy Hopkins Joyce was a colorful broadcaster, though 
she made the boys in the studio nervous. This picture 
was taken en route to Hollywood. She is featured in 
Paramount's, "International House." 

It's hard but it's fun. Miss Santry meets interesting 
people, and makes good friends. The job has its humor 
and its pathos. As for instance the crippled man who 
lived on Avenue A. Would Miss Santry bring 5 or 6 
celebrities? His hobby, he explained, is meeting cele- 
brities. Or the time Miss Santry was taken to task for 
sob stuff after Alma Gluck had broken down at the end 
of her appeal for musicians. Miss Gluck's tears came 
from the heart. Or, again, the time a society dowager 
sitting nervously in the studio waiting for her time to 
come to broadcast suddenly hauled a flask out of her be- 
diamonded hand bag and had a snifter of whiskey. 



48 



Radio Fan-Fare 



ED WYNN'S NEW CHAIN PLAN 

(Continued) 

ones not hitherto enjoyed by Mr. 
Radio Listener. 

Can sponsors be found who will be 
willing to gamble their advertising 
appropriation along the lines pro- 
posed by the Wynn plan ? To that 
question the Fire Chief replied he 
already has twenty-seven sponsors 
ready to make the experiment. He 
would not say whether he had signed 
contracts. If he has, and really goes 
through with his coast-to-coast chain 
he will give the two older chains 
something to take into account. 

Mr. Wynn has sold his idea to a 
number of other broadcasters who 
control regional groups of stations 
throughout the country. They say 
they believe the system will pay pro- 
fits, IF . . . 

And that "IF" is a fairly big one. 
They feel that Mr. Wynn is strongly 
in need of an executive right hand 
bower with sufficient force and busi- 
ness direction to put through all the 
plans according to established busi- 
ness methods. Ota Gygi, into whose 
hands have been placed many of the 
managerial details, is an artist, a show- 
man, and no doubt fully capable as 




NOW 

— a Set-tested 
AERIAL ELIMINATOR 

Goes Right Inside Your Receiver 

IAn F. & H. Capacity Aerial 
Eliminator equals average 
75-foot aerial, 50 feet high. 
Gives greater sensitivity and 
volume on both local and DX 
stations. Does away with out- 
door aerials, poles, guy wires, 
spoiled woodwork, lightning- 
hazards, etc. No light socket 
connection, or current used in 
operation. Chosen for U. S. 
Naval Hospital use. Installed 
Complete for any set by anyone in a 
Postpaid moment. Concealed inside — ■ 
permits moving set anywhere 
at will. Each tested on 1127-mile 
reception. At 8,000 dealers — or 
send coupon and $1.00 or mark for 
C. O. D. 



F. & H. RADIO LABORATORIES, 
Dept. 21, Fargo, N. D. 

Send one V. & IT. Capaeity Aerial for $1.00 en- 
Hosed. Cash. Check or Money Order (CO.D. if 
preferred). If after three days trial I am not 
satisfied you agree to refund my money. Check 
here if interested in our dealer proposition ( ) 



KAME 

ADDRESS - 

CITV STATE.. 



a program producer. Whether he 
will also have full charge of the busi- 
ness side remains to be seen, as it is 
certainly an extensive task for one 
man to undertake the double job of 
business manager and production 
manager. Mr. Wynn, at a dinner to 
the press on March 10, announced 
that Amalgamated would open within 
the next two weeks with nine studios 
going full blast in the Liggett Build- 
ing at Madison and Forty-second 
street. Subsequently engineers found 
that the space selected was impossible 
from an engineering point of view. 
To equip and install nine studios for 
chain broadcasting inside of two 
weeks proved another technical im- 
possibility. Now, however, steady 
progress is being made on the prac- 
tical phases. 

The chain, as it now stands, consists 
of the following stations : WCDA, 
New York; WCBM, Baltimore; 
WOL, Washington; WDEL, Wilm- 
ington, Del.; WOAX, Trenton, N. 
J., and WPEN, Philadelphia. "We 
have practically every independent 
station in the country ready to come 
in with us when we are ready," said 
Mr. Wynn. "There is one lineup that 
starts from the North at Utica and 
spreads down through the Central 
States to the South and New Orleans. 

"Another chain of twenty-two sta- 
tions has been offered to us which 
will carry programs from Chicago to 
the Pacific Coast. We do not intend 
to take advantage of these broader 
activities until we have tried out the 
Atlantic Coast group. We may get 
knocked down a couple of times but 
we'll get up smiling and go right 
ahead toward our objective, building 
slowly but firmly so that each time 
we take a set-back — if we must take 
set-backs — it will be only for a short 
distance. Then we will build back up 
from there." 

A statement as to finances seems 
hard to get. However, Mr. Gygi told 
the writer that the following well 
known business leaders were on the 
board of directors : 

George Fink, president of the Na- 
tional Steel Corporation; Fred 
Stearns, president of the Stearns 
Pharmaceutical Products; George 
Mason, president of the Kelvinator 
Company ; Standish Backus, presi- 
dent of the Burroughs Adding Ma- 
chine Company ; Charles Francis 
Adams, financier; Paul F. Herron, 
owner of WPEN, Philadelphia; 
George Trendle, Detroit radio 
owner; and Walter Whetstone, New 
York radio station owner and utili- 
ties magnate. There have been ru- 
mors that Herron and Whetstone 
were not entirely certain of their per- 
manent connection, and if Whetstone 



should withdraw with his station, 
WCDA, New York, it would mean 
that Amalgamated would have to ob- 
tain a new outlet in the metropolis. 
There was a time when WMCA 
had been considered as the outlet in 
New York for a third chain includ- 
ing the interests of some of the indi- 
viduals associated in the Ed Wynn 
enterprise. Now that the Federal 
Radio Commission has decided to 
give WMCA full time and broader 
privileges it is possible a new deal 
may be effected with that station by 
the time these lines appear in print. 

It will be noted that Detroit inter- 
ests are well represented on the 
Amalgamated board of directors. Mr. 
Wynn at the time of the announce- 
ment said : 

"While in Detroit I saw one of the 
world's wealthiest men, who has been 
outspoken in his unfriendly attitude 
toward the Jews. I want to say that 
he gave me a cordial reception and I 
am sure of his support in this enter- 
prise which means so much to me." 

Afterward he was asked if Henry 
Ford was going to give financial sup- 
port to Amalgamated, and Wynn re- 
plied that he did not think so. But 
when asked if Edsel Ford would be 
financially interested the question 
was obviously evaded, so that the in- 
ference was apparent that Mr. Wynn 
had promised to keep silent as to 
what kind of arrangements he had 
made with the younger Mr. Ford. 

An opening date for the first broad- 
cast according to Ed Wynn's new 
chain idea has not been set at this 
writing, although it had been an- 
nounced both for March and April. 
George M. King, a former associate 
of Mr. Gygi in Broadway enterprises, 
has been appointed program mana- 
ger. He says that he has 600 well- 
known stage stars available on his 
list. Schedules for each day of six- 
teen hours length have been arranged 
for six weeks in advance. There will 
be no transcriptions — only presenta- 
tions by artists in person. Some of 
those named as being available for 
programs are: Alice Brady, Queenie 
Smith, Howard Brothers, Crystal 
Hearne, Ada May, Bernard Granville, 
and Florence Reed. There are a 
number of orchestras who have 
promised to affiliate with the Wynn 
broadcasters. Ed Wynn expects to 
participate himself when he is freed 
from his present contracts with Tex- 
aco. 

This in general is the new chain 
plan outlined by Mr. Wynn. If 
Amalgamated (ABS) weathers the 
strain of early readjustments and 
finances hold out, as it seems evident 
they will, it stands a real chance to 
Wynn out. 



June 

IS RADIO RUINING YOUR CHILD? 

(Continued) 

cheap thrills, but no sign whatever that 
the mind of man scores of years hence 
has risen to any degree above its pres- 
ent moronic state. 

If the Buck Rogers sponsor cares to 
know, there is one boy of seven who 
cannot listen to this program any more. 
His parents will not let him. They are 
not namby-pamby parents who argue 
that juvenile programs should reek with 
goody-goody fables strong in moral tag- 
lines but weak as a rag in dramatic 
appeal. They are parents who believe 
that their son has a right to a full 
night's sleep. The Buck Rogers twad- 
dle can implant in that boy a hideous 
nightmare without half trying. His 
parents want that boy to visualize 
something finer in man — even a few 
hundreds of years from now — than the 
refinement of individual and mass kill- 
ing mechanisms. 

If one boy is "off" Buck Rogers, very 
likely others have dropped off for sim- 
ilar reasons. And the parents mentioned 
are sufficiently serious about the whole 
matter of juvenile programs to feel, by 
now, thoroughly unsold on the product 
Buck Rogers is selling. 

Then there's our old friend Skippy. 
The author of this program recently ran 
Skippy through a series of adventures 
as a boy detective, and unless this weary 
listener's ears are mistaken, the thing 
that started him out as an embryo Sher- 
lock Holmes was a murder. Pleasant 
stuff to spill carelessly into a child's 
mind — murder. Why doesn't some spon- 
sor cash in on the opportunity to rewrite 
for children the Eden Musee horrors, 
Fu Manc-hu stories, or The Shadow? It 
could be done. All the sponsor would 
need would be a script writer who was 
a bachelor, or one who, if he simply 
had to be married, was not a father, or 
one who, being unfortunately a father, 
left his children to grow up like Topsy. 

The rule in hiring a juvenile script 
writer seems to be that he must know 
as little as possible about children in 
general, and nothing whatever about 
child psychology in particular. 

As an example take the WINS Cow- 
boy Tom program. It's a good chil- 
dren's program on the whole. But it 
slips up just where a writer with a 
more sympathetic and a keener knowl- 
edge of the inside of children's minds 
would ring the bell. 

Cowboy Tom's crowd includes a com- 
edy character called Skookum. Now 
Skookum, in the script, is more or less 
of a boob, and the other characters kid 
the chaps off him. But the children 
like Skookum. They like him so well 
that some of them do not listen to this 
program any more. The writer asked 
one such child why. He answered, 
"They are too mean to my friend 
Skookum." 

The same program offends some chil- 



dren in another way. Children dote on 
writing letters to the station, and nobody 
would dare accuse any station of fail- 
ing to ask for such letters. When the 
child writes to the station he wants and 
deserves an answer promptly. One boy 
has written to Cowboy Tom three times 
and has never yet received a single re- 
ply. 

The juvenile program sponsor must 
play fair with his audience. It costs 
money to gear up correspondence-han- 
dling to the point that every child will 
receive a prompt reply. But it is worth 
the money. Children do not like to feel 
imposed upon. They go sour on a 
program whose promises are not kept. 

They go sour, too, on programs whose 
advertising plugs talk in superlatives. 
The most direct advertising plugger 
among the juvenile "entertainers" seems 
to be Uncle Don over WOR. He'll say 
almost anything to persuade the chil- 
dren to persuade their parents to buy 
something. He goes so far as to shame 
children, over the air, into eating their 
spinach. Mentally lazy parents who 
have never been sufficiently alert to 
learn how to manage their own children 
think nothing of "sicking" Uncle Don 
on them. Uncle Don thinks nothing of 
telling the whole world that little 
Georgie Jabbott of Astoria is not a nice 
little boy because he kicks his sister in 
the face, "and, Georgie, good little boys 
don't do that, really." 

In his advertising plugs Uncle Don 
used the superlative once too often and 
thereby lost a customer. One brace of 
parents circulated all over Manhattan 
hunting for a chocolate bar Uncle Don 
had boosted. The boy insisted he must 
have this bar and no other because 
Uncle Don had said it was the best. 
Finally the boy's mother found the 
darned candy away over in Brooklyn. 
The boy ate it, and did he find it the 
"best" ? Not according to his judgment. 

"Why does Uncle Don tell us this 
is the best chocolate bar when I think 
it's no good at all?" this boy asked his 
father. 

And did said father tell the boy, then 
and there, in words of not more than 
two syllables but without profanity, just 
how and why advertising makes Uncle 
Don and other juvenile program broad- 
casters "that way"? He did. 

Result : The boy ceased to be a daily 
customer of Uncle Don's. He listens 
now and then, but only for songs and 
stories. He says he doesn't care how 
many children refuse to eat their spin- 
ach. He says he doesn't want to be 
fooled by radio advertising any more. 

Now Don Carney is a fine chap do- 
ing a good job for his sponsors in terms 
of dollars and cents. The same can be 
said for the majority of juvenile script 
writers and broadcasters. But one of 
these days a sponsor will come along 
who is sufficiently cultured to realize 
that he can cash in more profitably with 






L^ 



Get Into 

IV* mo 

Joi- 

BIGGER PAY 



ManyMake*50to*IOO 
a Week- I'll Train You 
at Home in 
Spare Time 




Made $10,000 
More in Radio 

"I can safely say that 
I have made $10,000 
more in Radio than I 
would have made if 
1 had continued at 
my old job." 

Victor L. Osgood, 
St. Cloud Ave.. 

West Orange. N. J. 




From $10 to $50 

a week in spare 

time 

"Besides being em- 
ployed by the Power 
& Light Company to 
locate Radio interfer- 
ence in this district, 
which is a very good 
position. I have a 

my own that nets me 
from $10 to $50 a 
eek in 



I o» 



all 



to the National Radio 
Institute." 

H. L. Penie. 
S12 W. High Street 
Piaua. Ohio 




Owes a Lot to 
N.R.I. 

"After finishing my 
tenth lesson. I start- 
ed on my first job. 
After that, jobs came 
rolling in and I found 
myself with a surplus 
of money with which 
to continue paying 
for my course. My 
first year's record 
was 108 Radio jobs. 
I have cleared $.2,305 

JOHN HEARL.' 

66-53 Jary Ave.. 

Masneth. L. L, N. Y. 



Send for my book of information on 
the opportunities in Radio. It's FREE. 
Mail the coupon now. Get into a 
held with a future. N. R. I. train- 
ing fits you for manufacturing, selling, 
servicing sets, in business for yourself, 
operating on board ships, in a broad- 
casting or commercial land station, 
television, aircraft Radio, and many 
other branches. My FREE book gives 
you full information on Radio's many 
opportunities for success and how you 
can quickly learn at home to be a 
Radio Expert. 

Make $5, $10, $15, a 
Week in Spare Time 

Why struggle along in a dull job 
with low pay and no future? Start 
training now for the live-wire Radio 
field. I have doubled and tripled sal- 
aries. Many men holding key jobs in 
Radio got their start through N.R.I, 
training. 

Your Training Need Not 
Cost Yon a Cent 

Hold your job. I'll not only train you 
in a few hours of your spare time a 
week, but the day you enroll I'll send 
you material which you should master 
quickly for doing 28 Radio jobs com- 
mon in most every neighborhood. I 
give you Radio Equipment for conduct- 
ing experiments and making tests that 
teach you to build and service prac- 
tically every type of receiving set 
made. 

Act Now— Get Free Book 

My book has shown hundreds of fel- 
lows how to make more money and win 
success. It's FREE to all residents of 
the U. S. and Canada over 15 years of 
age. Investigate. Find out what Radio 
offers you. read what my Employment 
Department does to help you get into 
Radio after graduation, about my Mon- 
ey Back Agreement, and the many 
other N.R.I, features. Mail the cou- 
pon for your copy RIGHT NOW. 

J. E. SMITH, Pres. 
National Radio Institute 
Dept. 3FR 
Washington, O. C. 



UmTi 



J. E. SMITH. President 
National Radio Institute 
Dept. 3FR3 
Washington, D. O. 
Dear Mr. Smith: Send 
me your free book, ex- 
plaining your home-study 
training and Radio's op- 

fortunities for bigger pay. 
understand this places me under no obligation. 




NAME AGE. 



6 ADDRESS , 

' SIS™ ;«.m^^n«;.™M 



8 

* 

-.J 



50 



Radio Fan-Fare 



a program designed to make friends of 
all those parents and teachers who swear 
by modern child psychology. 

If one type of parent is called old- 
fashioned, the other perhaps should be 
called new-fangled. It is both types to 
which the sponsor should appeal in or- 
der to sell his product to the largest 
possible audience. Keen imagination, 
love of children for themselves alone, 
and appreciative knowledge of modern, 
progressive educational methods and the 
reasons therefore — these elements can 
be and should be translated into a type 
of juvenile program that will enrich the 
child's life, as well as fatten the adver- 
tiser's pocketbook. 

So long as juvenile programs are 
written in dollar signs alone the ques- 
tion "Is Radio Ruining Your Child?" 
will continue to be a subject for daily 
argument in the American home. 

But when thoughtful parents and 
teachers go to the mat for their 
youngsters and present their case to 
the powers that be, what happens? 
Let's take the recent case, when a 
group of mothers and parents of 
Scarsdale, N. Y., made a careful ana- 
lytical study of the situation and pre- 
sented the facts to the broadcasting 
stations. The result of their research 
was contained in the bald statement 
that "we think your juvenile pro- 
grams are unfit for our children." 
Now think this over for a moment. 
This was not the complaint of a ra- 
dio fan who objected to the way Kate 
Smith says "Hello Everybody," or the 
manner in which Russ Columbo 
wears his hair. This was a statement 
by a large group of intelligent people 
whose message was, "If you don't 
remedy the mistake, we will not al- 
low your audience to listen." That, 
my friends, is serious. 

What was the reaction to this ac- 
cusal? Well, the only material re- 
sponse was made by a Columbia an- 
nouncer, who went on the air a short 
while later and read a statement 
praising his own chain's juvenile pro- 
grams. 



WILL ROOSEVELT RULE BY RADIO? 

(Continued) 

both men. And, lo, a miracle hap- 
pened! The man who, four years be- 
fore, had so favorably impressed his 
microphone audience found himself 
being compared with a man not only 
possessing immeasurably greater ora- 
torical ability but also an air person- 
ality that has no peer. Diction, pho- 
netics, education, grammar — Franklin 
Delano Roosevelt rolls them all 
into a classical whole flavored with a 
touch of Harvard. But he goes much 
further than that. He sells his ideas. 
He convinces his radio public. 
Through the extraordinary qualities 
of his speaking voice, he makes peo- 



ple literally feel the warmth of his 
heart, the depth of his soul, the cour- 
age which surges through his blood, 
and the sincerity of his purpose. 

These may sound like somewhat 
sentimental, gushy words. They are 
not. In fact, if anything, they are in- 
adequate, because if we treat "Roose- 
velt on the Air" on a purely cold- 
blooded basis, and subject him to the 
critical technical analysis through 
which Gibbons, McNamee and other 
great voices of the air had to pass 
with high honors, no one of them ap- 
proaches the air showmanship of 
President Roosevelt. Small wonder, 
then, that he "stole" the air audience 
away from Mr. Hoover. Still less 
wonder that he added a myriad of 
votes for the Democratic slate. Per- 
haps, however, it is less widely recog- 
nized that his chief conquests through 
this relatively new medium for com- 
munication lay among the women 
voters. If you have any doubt about 
President Roosevelt's ability to "melt" 
women when he goes on the air, just 
inquire from the next ten you see 
what they think about "Roosevelt on 
the Air." 

Thus far, the new administration 
has kept control of the throttle of 
government. Congress, largely under 
pressure of emergency conditions, has 
sat back and more or less meekly. car- 
ried out the bidding of the White 
House. On the surface, all appears 
smooth and the Big Stick, or what- 
ever you choose to call it, has appar- 
ently been swung by experts. No one 
can tell, however, just how long this 
semi-dictatorship will last. Sooner or 
later most of the patronage will have 
been dispensed. Sooner or later — and 
we hope sooner — economic conditions 
will take a definite turn upward. No 
longer will extreme emergencies ex- 
ist. It is then that Congress, on both 
an individualistic and collective basis, 
will seek to reassert itself. It is then 
that political strategies of the oppo- 
nents, and worse, of the lobbies, will 
again break out. It is then that the 
President will run into the greatest 
difficulties and the largest obstruc- 
tions to the New Deal. Much by way 
of origination and follow-thru will 
still remain to be accomplished, and 
it is then that President Roosevelt 
may find it necessary to talk frequent- 
ly and intimately to the American 
people about the affairs of govern- 
ment. He may need lots of help from 
the voters at large to go on with his 
colossal program. 

Will he find the people ready to 
back him up — ready and willing to tell 
Congress and all others to lay off our 
new man of destiny? If his appeal is 
made in person, and via radio, it 
seems pretty much of a foregone con- 
clusion that he will win enthusiastic 
support for his ideas and his policies. 



Of course, as far as men are con- 
cerned, the old lobby system, the old 
patronage system, the old graft sys- 
tem will still be affecting millions of 
male voters. But the women are so 
comparatively free of petty political 
entanglements that they can rise to 
the occasion and exercise the real 
weight of their influence. That is why 
we ask "Will Roosevelt rule by 
radio ?" and then reply "The answer 
is yes if he wins the women via the 
air." Not that men are not also 
greatly influenced by radio in general 
and Roosevelt in particular, but sim- 
ply that the balance of power in help- 
ing Roosevelt to rule his way very 
probably lies in keeping the ladies ac- 
tively and wholeheartedly behind him. 




TUNEFUL TOPICS 

(Continued) 

Harry Woods, a Harvard boy, who 
has been penning hit songs for the 
past 8 years. Among his successes are, 
"I'm Going South," "A Little Kiss 
Each Morning," "When The Red 
Red Robin Comes Bob-bob-bobbin' 
Along," and "When the Moon Comes 
Over The Mountain." 

Harry probably feels that he can 
repeat himself occasionally — so he 
has taken the same thread and idea 
of "We Just Couldn't Say Goodbye" 
and used a little flower shop as the 
peace-maker. However, it is a catchy 
tune, and I enjoy singing it. Keit- 
Engle are the lucky publishers. I 
think it ought to be played in the 
Lombardo tempo. 
ANY TIME, ANYWHERE, ANY DAY 

Although there are three writers 
whose names are appended to this 
song, I most enjoy talking about 
Miss Lee Wiley, descendant of Cher- 
okee Indians — and a lovely person. 
I will never forget the impression she 
made on everyone the night we were 
honored to have her on our program. 

Tin Pan Alley would have you be- 
lieve that Miss Wiley has not con- 
tributed materially to the songs on 
which her name appears. I would 
certainly feel that she is more than 
capable of helping to create a good 
song. 

"Any Time, Anywhere, Any Day" j 
is a 16-measure, which means it has 
half the usual length chorus. It ends | 
almost before you know it. 

It is published by DeSylva, Brown I 
and Henderson, and I would play it| 
at a medium tempo. 




FLOYD GIBBONS 
Famous Radio Broadcaster 



w 



ould you, too, like a 



big pay BROADCASTING job? 



Men and women of talent get $3,000 to $15,000 and 
more a year. Amazing new Floyd Gibbons course 
trains you for highly paid Broadcasting position 



HAVE you a good speaking voice ? Can you 
sing, act, write, read, direct or sell ? If you 
can, then here is your chance to get into the 
newest, most glamorous, fastest growing pro- 
fession in the world. For now a remarkable 
new course in Broadcasting Technique pre- 
pares you — right in your own home — for the 
highly paid position you want. This fascinat- 
ing Course was developed by Floyd Gibbons, 
famous "Headline Hunter of the Air," to bring 
you the training necessary to fit your natural 
talents to the microphone. 

Think of it ! Now you can have the training 
in Broadcasting Technique that makes Radio 
Stars. In just a few short months you can 
capitalize your hidden talents for the micro- 
phone — cash in on your natural ability — pre- 
pare to earn many times your present salary. 
For no matter what branch of Broadcasting 
you are qualified for, the Floyd Gibbons School 
of Broadcasting will train you in the technique 
of Broadcasting and prepare you for the highly 
paid position you want. 

Opportunity for You in 
Broadcasting 

No other profession in the world today offers 
you as many opportunities for quick success 
and large pay as Broadcasting. For Broad- 
casting is forging ahead so rapidly that there 
is a never-ceasing demand for new talent. 

Millions are spent over the air every year. 
Last year advertisers alone spent more than 
$35,000,000, while Broadcasting companies 
spent many times that amount for talent. 
Staggering as this amount is, even more mil- 
lions will be spent this year than last — more 
talented and trained men and women will be 
needed at large pay. You, too, may be one of 
these — you, too, may be 
paid from $3,000 to $15,000 
and more a year — if you 
have talent and are thor- 
oughly trained in the tech- 
nique of Broadcasting. 

If you can act, if you can 
sing or talk interestingly, if 
you can write, if you have 
any hidden talent, you 
should get your share of the 
millions spent every year 
over the air. 



Train Like Radio 

Stars 

Any Broadcaster will tell 
you that talent alone is not 
enough for success over the 
air. You have to be trained 
thoroughly in every phase 
of Broadcasting technique. 



Jobs like these, often pay- 
ing from $3,000 to $15,000 
a year, are open to men 
and women of talent and 
training. 
Announcer 
Singer 
Actor 
Reader 
Writer 



Too many performers and writers who were 
successful in other fields have failed when con- 
fronted with the limitations of Broadcasting — 
simply because they were untrained to meet the 
conditions of the microphone. Yet others, un- 
known until they actually Broadcasted, have 
risen to quick fame — performed and written 
for millions of listeners — made their names a 
household word — earned almost unbelievably 
large pay — simply because their natural tal- 
ents were supplemented by practical training. 
Now, thanks to this new, fascinating home- 
study Course, you, too, may have the same 
kind of training that has made fortunes for 
the Graham MacNamees, the Olive Palmers, 
the Amos and Andys, and the Floyd Gibbonses. 
Now you can take advantage of Floyd Gib- 
bons' years of experience before the micro- 
phone. Right in your own home — in your spare 
time — without giving up your present job or 
making a single sacrifice of any kind — you can 
train for a big-paying Broadcasting position, 
and acquire the technique that makes Radio 
Stars. 

First Complete and Thorough 
Course in Broadcasting Technique 

The Floyd Gibbons School of Broadcasting 
offers the first complete and thorough home- 
study Course in Broadcasting Technique avail- 
able. It trains you in every phase of Broad- 
casting — qualifies you to step right into the 
studio and take your place among the highly 
paid Broadcasters. A few of the subjects 
covered are : The Station and Studio, Micro- 
phone Technique, How to Control the Voice, 
How to Make the Voice Expressive, How to 
Train a Singing Voice for Broadcasting, the 
Knack of Describing, How to Write Radio 
Plays, Radio Dialogue, Dra- 
matic Broadcasts, Making 
the Audience Laugh, How to 
Build a Radio Personality, 
How to arrange Daily Pro- 
grams, Money Making Op- 
portunities Inside and Out- 
side the Studio, and many 
of other vitally important 
subjects. 



Advertising 

Publicity 

Dramatist 

Musician 

Director 



Musical Director 

Script Writer 

Program Manager 

Sales Manager 

Excellent opportunities are 
open to talented men and 
women who have mastered 
the Technique of Broadcast- 
ing. Read how you, too, 
can prepare yourself for 
your share in Broadcasting. 



Send for FREE 
Booklet 

An interesting free booklet 
entitled "How to Find Your 
Place in Broadcasting" tells 
you the whole fascinating 
story of the Floyd Gibbons 
School of Broadcasting. It 
tells you how to prepare for 
a good position in Broad- 
casting. It tells you all 




about our Course and how to turn your undevel- 
oped talents into money. Here is your chance to 
fill an important role in one of the most glamor- 
ous, powerful professions in the world. Send 
today for your free copy of "How to Find Your 
Place in Broadcasting." See for yourself how 
complete and practical the Floyd 
Gibbons Course in Broadcasting 
is. Act now — send coupon be- 
low today. Floyd Gibbons 
School of Broadcasting. Dept. 
3F61, U. S. Savings Bank 
Building, 2000 14th Street, 
N. W., Washington, D. C. 




Floyd Gibbons School of Broadcasting, 
Dept. 3F61, U. S. Savings Bank Building, 
2000 14th Street, N. W., Washington, D. C. 

Without obligation send me your free booklet, 
"How to Find Your Place in Broadcasting," and 
full particulars of your home study course. 



Name Age 

(Please print or write name plainly) 

Address 

City State 



iXalom 




te 



uaramee 

Consistent ^ day in and day owL 

WORLD-WIDE RECEPTION 




%$ SCOTT 2)Sw RADIO 



There are no "ifs" "buts" "under favorable conditions" or 
other equivocations in the SCOTT guarantee. It says, simply 
and clearly, that the set I build for you will receive foreign 
broadcasts from stations as far as 10,000 miles away, with loud- 
speaker volume, consistently, at all seasons of the year. 

In addition, every part of the set (except tubes) is guaranteed 
against breakdown or service failure for a five-year period in- 
stead of the ordinary 90-day term. 

Beside bringing you dependable direct short wave reception of 
advertising-free foreign programs, this remarkable radio will re- 
ceive literally everything upon the North American continent 
on the regular broadcast band. Its rich, natural tone is a revela- 
tion — giving you reproduction of voice and music so exact that 
variation from actuality can be measured only with super-delicate 
instruments, being undetectable by the human ear. 

Such performance comes only from exacting laboratory con- 
struction, constantly checked and tested by extensive scientific 
equipment. Backing it is the SCOTT experience of more than 
eight years in building world's-record-breaking radio receivers. 

Claims are easily made — a Guarantee is something different! 
Which do you want — the hope that your receiver can deliver 
performance, or positive assurance that it will? 

Then send at once for all particulars about the radio known 
as "The World's Finest Receiver." 

E. H. SCOn RADIO LABORATORIES, Inc. 

4450 Ravenswood Ave., Dept. D-«, Chicago, III. 



Winning Praise Galore • 

Here are just a few extracts from 
hundreds of letters of praise on file 
in my laboratories, which may be in- 
spected by anyone. "Your claims of 
lOkilocycle selectivity 100% correct,"' 
SGP, Ala. . . "Regarding tone, noth- 
ing could be finer," FW, Calif. . . . 
"Stations all the way from Berlin to 
Tokio and Australia," JBT, Conn. 
. . . "VK3ME, Melbourne, 10,500 
miles from here, received each time 
on the air," CGB, Conn. . . . "Euro- 
pean stations as much 'at my finger 
tips' as ordinary locals," TPB, D. C. 
. . . "Listen to Madrid every night 
while eating dinner," WHB, Ind. . . 
"Seven year old son regularly receiv- 
ing RW59— VK2ME— VK3ME— 



Vindicating All Claims 

EAQ— DJA— 2RO— G5SW— Pon- 
toise and many more," CK, Maine. 
. . . "Madrid on short waves (direct) 
just as good as WAAB rebroadcasts 
it," JJO'C, Mass. . . "After so much 
untruthful advertising it is very grat- 
ifying to get a radio set that really 
does what is claimed for it," CEMcK, 
Mo. . . "First station tuned in was 
VK2ME Australia. Boy, what a set!" 
LGD, N. J. . . "Triumphant vindi- 
cation of all claims you make for it; 
performance convinces me you have 
been extremely conservative in out- 
lining its potentialities," RD, N. Y. 
. ."Simply too wonderful for words," 
HCVS, So Africa. . . "Performance 
really wonderful," MC, Paris, France. 



I 



These New Brochures Tell the 
"SCOTT SECRET" 



MAIL THIS COUPON HOW 



E. H. Scott Radio Laboratories, Inc. 

4450 Ravenswood Ave., Dept. D-43, Chicago, III. \ 

Send me complete details about the Scott All-Wave j 

DeLuxe Radio, explaining why this set Guarantees the ■ 

T^£S performance that others only claim. | 

^i Name • 

Address J 

Town State e 






SUMMER NUMBER 



OMBINING R A D I 



WHO IS RADIO'S MOST VERSATILE ACTOR? 



SEX FINALLY CRASHES THE NETWORKS 




TED HUSINC PICKS THE TEN BEST 



I SING AS I HAVE LIVED "-TITO CUIZAR 




Including P R G RAM F I N D E R Feature 




GLADYS 
SWARTHOUT 



Photographed for Radio Fan-Fare by Herbert Mitchell 

The lovely mezzo-soprano of the Metropolitan Opera Company nas broken (or at 
least cracked) two old traditions: An opera star does not have to be fat, nor 
must she be trained abroad. Born in Deep Water, Missouri, all of Miss Swarthout's 
training has been American. At the beginning of her career, opera company man- 
agers wouldn't believe she had enough experience to play big roles. She looked 
too young ... so she added a half dozen years to her age. Recently Miss Swarth- 
out gave a series of recitals over NBC stations. You will probably be able to hear 
her colorful singing again soon ... on a nationwide sponsored program. 



L 



SLIPPING «* GRIPPING 



THEY'RE ALL SLIPPING— The 

wraith who conducts this depart- 
ment is Tuna, a combination of 
The Jolly Scrapbook Philoso- 
pher, The Mystery Dream Prince 
of Song, The Magic Voice of 
Experience, and The Silver-Mask 
Poet of The Organ ... all rolled 
into one and tied with baby-blue 
ribbon. He is also a sort of 
conglomerate Socrates, Solomon, 
and George Bernard Shaw, re- 
taining the most venomous fea- 
tures of each. In other words, 
he is a master kibitzer. (To 
qualify for a job of this kind you 
have to remember only one thing. 
Don't say anything good about 
anybody if you can possibly help 
it.) 

And so for the next few 
months Tuna has a chance to im- 
prove his reputation as a critic 
by putting all the radio programs 
in the "Slipping" column — by 
performing daily tearing-down 
exercises with the old hammer. 
And, what's more, that destruc- 
tive attitude could be justified ac- 
cording to the broadcasters' own 
figures (and how these sponsors 
swear by their arithmetic ! ) . 

The reason so many programs 
will appear to be slipping is this : 

No matter what broadcasters 
do, the total radio audience falls 
off during the summer months. 
Almost no programs, except a 
few new ones, increase their lis- 
tener average. This department 
will, however, make the Supreme 
Sacrifice. It will consider condi- 
tions and continue to be as im- 
partial as a Congressional in- 
vestigation. 






WORLD'S BEST TEAM- 
WORK-One of the won- 
ders of a changing age is 
the way those old stand- 
bys, Amos V Andy, maintain 
their popularity 3^ear after year. 



The fact that they are not slip- 
ping is real news. You may 
have stopped tuning in long ago, 
but almost the day you stopped 
someone else must have started. 
The boys deserve every bit of 
success they've had, for they've 
worked hard and intelligently. 
And they've unquestionably given 
enjoyment to millions with their 
pleasantly satirical reflections on 
the pleasures and tribulations of 
the average man. 

Their formula has the aura of 
magic about it. It defeats analy- 
sis. To be sure, they have been 
smart enough to build their act 
up to tremendously exciting 
climaxes whenever interest y" 
seemed to be lagging. But 
usually it's just everyday stuff. 
Perhaps the only really great dis- 
tinctiveness lies in their brand of 
humor. It is as nearly indivi- 
dual as anything on the air, in 
spite of widespread attempts at 
imitation. Add to genuine humor 
several basically human charac- 
ters, just enough hokum, fine act- 
ing, expert story construction, 
good taste, and a clean point of 
view — and you should have an 
act that's good for some time to 
come. We hope we're right. 



tNO FAULT OF THEIR 
OWN— It is a reflection 
upon our whirlwind man- 
ner of living that the other 
Pepsodent program, The Rise Of 
The Goldbergs, has not attained 
wider popularity. The sketch was 
orginally intended to take the 
place of Amos 'n' Andy when 
they stopped gripping. It hasn't 
worked that way. The only fault 
of the slipping Goldberg show, 
to the "modern" mind, is that it 
packs no terrific wallops. But it 
certainly has everything else — 
great emotional power of the sen- 
timental sort ; kindly, well man- 



■ ol 



r<* 



\> 



Radio Fan-Fare, combining Radio Digest. Volume XXX, No. 4, .Tuly-August 1933. Subscription rates yearly. $1.50 in V. S. A.; Foreign. $3.00; Canada. $2.25 ; Single Copies Inc. 
Entered as second-class matter October 19, 1932. at the post office at Mt. Morris. Illinois, under the act of March 3, 1S79. Copyrighted. 1932. by Radio Digest Publishing 
Corporation. All rights reserved. Radio Fan-Fare, combining Radio Digest, is published monthly by Radio Digest Publishing Corporation. Publication Office: 104 North 
Wesley Avenue, Mount Morris, 111. Editorial and Advertising office: 420 Lexington Avenue, New York City. Not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts or art received by mail. 



nered characters (especially Gertrude Berg's 
Molly Goldberg, a beautifully written and 
acted part) ; and a broad vein of humor 
that is real, if mild. 

The Rise Of The Goldbergs and Amos 
'ri Andy have a far higher average of excel- 
lence that any other sketches that have been 
kept on the air for any length of time. Bill 
Hay, the announcer, also deserves a big 
hand. But the present dramatized advertis- 
ing plugs on both programs are a disgrace 
to the advertising business, and an insult to 
the intelligence of the listeners. 



* ADOLESCENT PHILOSOPHY— 
The venerable Cliquot Club program 
is nearing its 400th performance on 
the air and Harry Reser should have 
credit for keeping life in it for almost eight 
years. The feat is becoming more and 
more of a tour de force, however. Aside 
from the Eskimos' music and Jimmie 
Brierly's warbling (both good but undis- 
tinguished), the show offers little. There 
is, of course, Rosey Rowswell, who is sup- 
posed to be able to talk faster than anybody 
on the air (328 words a minute). If he 
could talk twice as fast, what of it? He 
wouldn't take up half as much time, would 
he? No, sir — he'd just tell himself twice 
as many dull jokes and gush twice as much 
sophomoric philosophy. Perhaps his maun- 
derings appeal to the same people who like 
Tony Wons, and surely his high speed de- 
livery should, for a time, interest those who 
were fascinated by marathon dancing and 
flag pole sitting. 

(Note to Mr. Reser: Can't you get some- 
body to laugh at those jokes of Mr. Row- 
swell's? What about the boys in the or- 
chestra? You could probably work it for 
an extra five bucks apiece.) 



t SIFTING THE FACTS OF LIFE — 
The news commentators are having 
their day now — especially those like 
Boake Carter and David Lawrence 
who try to segregate and interpret the many 
important but confusing influences in na- 
tional and international affairs. So mixed 
up is the average person by all he hears and 
reads, that the explainer serves a useful 
function — unless he becomes merely one 
more bewildering factor. 

Mr. Carter and Mr. Lawrence are able 
analysts. Mr. Lawrence's program has con- 
tained no advertising except a few unobjec- 
tionable mentions of his newspaper, The 
United States Daily (which is a weekly). 
Mr. Carter, we take it, is British, and oc- 
casionally his accent makes understanding 
of what he says a trifle difficult for the lis- 
tener. The Carter delivery is, however, an 




GERTRUDE BERG 
She packs no wallops 




AMOS 'N' ANDY 
They've got the magic 
touch 




HARRY RESER 
His Eskimos should laugh 




4ji*M»*fc«r> 






SINGIN' SAM 
He makes his basso quaver 



Radio Fan-Fare 

agreeable change from the usual type of 
radio announcing. 

In Mr. Carter's program an attempt is 
made to bring Philco Radios into the talk in 
a natural manner by connecting them with 
a news event. The attempt does not always 
quite come off, but at least there is the sur- 
prise of never knowing when the plug will 
be sprung on you. On the whole, the ad- 
vertising in this program is excellent. 



RUNNING THE MIDDLEMAN RAGGED 

— Have you noticed how many radio adver- 
tisers are again going after the good will of 
the doctor, the dentist, the grocer, and the 
baker? For four years, manufacturers have 
bedevilled and bulldozed the consumer with 
the decade's wildest advertising claims 
(euphemistically called "direct selling"). 
Now it may be that the advertising business 
will enter another phase . . . that it will 
spend less time wooing the consumer, the 
better to seduce the middleman. 



tWHAT EVERY PARENT SHOULD 
KNOW— Angelo Patri has gradually 
added to his small but loyal audience. 
Anyone who has youngsters or who is 
sincerely interested in them will do well to 
pay close attention to every word Mr. Patri 
says. He is established in an unassailable 
position as an authority on children. You 
may be sure that whatever he tells you has 
been carefully worked out- and thoroughly 
tested. He speaks with deep understanding 
of the problems of both children and parents. 
Mr. Patri is one of our truly great educa- 
tors, as powerful an influence for good, 
perhaps, as any single person in the country 
today — a cultured gentleman in everything 
that the best interpretation of the phrase 
implies. Be sure to hear him when he re- 
turns to the air after his summer vacation. 



] 



PURE HOKUM— OF Singin' Sam 
is slippin', 
Yet his formula's a pippin' 
For the folks who like their vocalizin' 

sad. 

Though he makes his basso quaver, 
And from hokum doesn't waver, 
Still he's slippin' just a little, 
It's too bad. 

The Barbasol radio formula is to mention 
names of listeners; to revive ("by request") 
all the old ditties that have a heart-tug in 
every line ; and to plug the product heavily 
with contests. It has been sure-fire stuff for 
years, and there's no denying that Singin' 
Sam has a warmly appealing personality. 
But the program needs the transfusion of a 
big new idea if it is to increase its following. 



July-August 




PRIZES 



How would you like to have Jeff Machamer send you his original drawing for this page of Radio-Grins? 
Here's your chance to get it: Write a four-line jingle on any subject at all. Make it as amusing as you 
can. It must include the names of at least two radio stars whose names appear above. The author of 
the best jingle gets the drawing. The next ten best verses will receive honorable mention, and an award 
of $1 apiece. Entries for this contest must be received before midnight of July 31st. Address Contest 
Editor, Radio Fan-Fare, 420 Lexington Avenue, New York. 



tTIP TO SPONSORS— Some adver- 
tiser would do well to sponsor Belle 
Baker. She's a good bet for reach- 
ing the folks who like their heaving 
hot and heavy . . . who love to have the last 
tear wrung out of a lyric. When Belle gets 
through working on emotional listeners they 
should be pushovers for even the average 
radio advertising. 



SYNTHETIC SUSPENSE— The last 
time we heard "The Magic Voice of 
1 w r Ex-Lax" the program included : ( 1 ) 
a phony villain from Zengovia who 
menaced the heroine by telephone — forget- 
ting her name at one point and using the 
hero's name instead; (2) speeches by the 
hero such as, "No, I must be stern," and, 
"That's not the real June. Show me the real 
June — the June I fell in love with"; (3) a 
thoroughly ham story; (4) a lot of tiresome 
and slightly offensive advertising. 



t PASSE- "Easy Aces," the con- 
tinued story about bridge, is now on 
the slide. The trouble is that con- 
tract bridge is not the big news it was 
a year ago. The skits have been intelligently 
written, and well played by Mr. and Mrs. 
Goodman Ace. The way each program 
starts (with an infectious chuckle breaking 
through the music and then the announcer 
saying "Easy Aces, ladies and gentlemen — 
Easy Aces") is one of the best send-offs a 
radio program ever had. If the Aces can 
get another idea as good as the one on bridge 
they should easily be able to repeat their first 
big radio success. (Editor's note: After 
this opinion was written "Easy Aces" went 
off the air — -which may indicate that Tuna 
knows his programs.) 



PRETTY GOOD TO THE LAST 
DROP — The Maxwell House Show- 
boat is drifting slowly toward a sand 
bar. The fault does not lie with the 
entertainers, except in the case of Molasses 
'n' January, two-outmoded blackface comics 
who never say anything especially funny 
(unless you count the cracks you used to hear 
in Coburn's and Fields' minstrels when you 
were very young). The others — Charles 
Winninger, Lanny Ross, Conrad Thibault, 
Muriel Wilson, Annette Hanshaw, Helen 
Oelheim, and Don Voorhees and his or- 
chestra — are all fine. They make the pro- 
gram musically and vocally pleasing, if not 
absorbing. 

The trouble with the hour is that it gets 
nowhere. It has a thin romantic story that 
bobs up occasionally as if by accident — be- 
tween variety numbers that are supposed to 
be part of a performance on a showboat. 




MARY McCOY 
She is better than her pro- 
gram 




BEN BERNIE 
You can't grasp him by 
the forelock 




The 

name 
Voice 



ELSIE HITZ 
villain forgot her 
in "The Magic 




MARY EASTMAN 
She need not be seen to 
be appreciated 



Radio Fan-Fare 

The show might just as well be in Madison 
Square Garden, for all the showboat atmo- 
sphere you get out of it. The whistles 
aren't enough. 

The program tries to include a bit of 
everything, and yet it definitely lacks the 
completeness and climax of the well planned 
vaudeville bill. Maxwell House should 
either go in stronger for the story, or stage 
a lively variety show. As it is, you don't 
get interested enough in the characters to 
keep from feeling slightly bored at finding 
the same ones on hand week after week. 

Compare the Maxwell House hour with 
Rudy Vallee's show. Fleischmann now has 
the least stereotyped of the regular air pro- 
grams. Why? Because it has new per- 
sonalities every week. Because it has 
enough contrasts in its different parts to 
create an illusion of wide variety. Because 
it is put on with a briskness that prevents it 
from ever taking itself too seriously. 

Our opinion is that Vallee's program is on 
top right now. The fact that he writes for 
this magazine does not prejudice us — either 
way. 

Another bad feature of the Maxwell 
House program is the attempt to insert bits 
of advertising here and there. A short blurb 
by an announcer (not a character) at the 
beginning and end of the show, and perhaps 
a long one in the middle, would be much 
more in keeping with the atmosphere of 
gracious hospitality Maxwell House has 
been trying to build up. After all, you don't 
keep springing a sales talk on your guests 
everv few minutes — not even if business is 
bad.' 

e • • 

\ BLUE RIBBON BANDSMAN— The 

THr high point in selective criticism will 
! be reached when someone can tell the 
different torch singers, crooners, and 
dance orchestras apart. Even in the case 
of a band as well known as Ben Bernie's 
there is not much about the music that is 
individual. It is made to seem a little 
unique, however, by the strongly individual 
personality of the Old Boy. Bernie is gain- 
ing in popularity and will continue going up 
as long as his material is good. At one time 
he seemed to be hard up for fresh stuff. He 
got off the same gags for weeks. Recently 
Ben's material has improved, but it's still 
distinctly his own brand of stuff. Ex- 
amples : Ben, the evening after the dis- 
closures in Washington, saying of one of his 
vocalists, "Few people know that Pat Ken- 
nedy is a partner of J. P. Morgan. Pat 
hasn't paid any income tax for three years 
either — too many bookmakers among his 
dependents." And again, the hardly hirsute 
Mr. Bernie introducing a song called "Goin', 
Goin', Gone," by observing, "You can grasp 
Time by the forelock, ladies and gentlemen, 

(Continued on page 41) 



July-August 



MAXWELL HOUSEHOLD 




PAT PADGETT and PICK MALONE 
— known as Molasses V January to 
folks who like their humor very mild. 



s 



Radio Fan-Fare 





TITO GUIZAR SINGS AS HE LIVES 



PARDON me," I said. "I must 
be in the wrong dressing room. 
I'm looking for a Mexican tenor." 
A young man dressed in a white 
linen suit stood up from before the 
makeup shelf. He was the dream 
of artists looking for a model of 
American athletic college youth. 
"I'm Tito Guizar," he said and held 
out his hand. 



By HOPE HALE 

formerly editor of "Love Mirror" 

Now I am what is known as 
counter-suggestible. The very fact 
that a man gets two or three thou- 
sand love letters every week from 
strange women who have palpitated 
over him prejudices me against him. 
I am hard to thrill by professional 
thrillers. I am not keen about the 
typical screen idol. Musical comedy 
tenors leave me slightly more than 



frigid. I can't help it for that's the 
contrary way I'm built. 

So when I say that Tito Guizar 
utterly and absolutely charmed me, 
you can believe that he has more 
than regular features. Let me tell 
you something of what he has. 

He has six-feet-two of height, 
and the breadth and thickness to 
pfo with it — all man and muscle. 



July-August 

Unlike other Mexican boys, who 
are mostly too indolent for active 
sport, he has lived for athletics all 
his life. He captained his baseball 
nine in military school, and was 
boxing champion. That was all he 
cared about in the world then, ex- 
cept swimming, at which he copped 
a flock of trophies. 

He has sparkling, eager eyes. 
They are surprisingly light in color 
— hazel. Under level brows and a 
fine forehead they meet your glance 
with bright, steady, open, tremen- 
dously appealing sincerity. 

He has a strong jaw, a mobile, 
sensitive mouth, a quick, responsive 
smile. The flush of sun and woods 
glows under the clear tan of his 
cheeks so that the flash of his teeth 
and eyes is dazzling. 

He is no sheik. There is nothing 
oily nor sleek nor practiced about 
his charm. The quality of spon- 
taneity bubbles up in everything he 
says. His manners are not merely 
good manners — they are perfect. 
They are the natural courtesy of a 
truly live and friendly personality. 

I think the captivating thing that 
Tito Guizar has is youth. 




Any room he happens to be in is 
charged with vitality, infectious and 
exciting. Call it zest or gusto or 
animal spirits or personal magne- 
tism — it all adds up to (excuse the 
phrase) sex appeal. And sex appeal 
of a completely devastating po- 
tency. 

MY first thought was that it is 
too bad television hasn't 
caught up with radio. What a waste 
of so much visual charm on a me- 
dium meant for the ear alone. But 
then, I thought, maybe it's just as 
well. Because apparently this at- 
traction of his goes over the ether 
waves in sufficiently high voltage 
as it is. His fan mail is proof of 
that. It might be just a little hard 
on Columbia's Hopeless Case De- 
partment if those girls all over the 
country who sigh over his songs 
could see their serenader while he 
sings to his guitar. 

Tito is not blase. He does not 
pretend to be indifferent to all that 
fan mail. He likes it. It delights 
him that he has pleased people, be- 
cause that is what he is trying to do. 
"But all those silly pash notes from 
people who've never seen 
you — don't they make you 
sick?" I asked. 

Tito shook his dark head 
and smiled that boyish 
smile. "No, I'm glad to have 
people like me," he said. 
"When I sing love songs, 
it is natural that women 
should be romantic about 
me. Myself, I am romantic. 
I believe in romance. I like 
very much to give more romance to 
the world these days." 

But his head is not turned by 
flattery. He is the most unspoiled 
person I have ever met. 

One day he was crossing New 
York from the broadcasting studio 
to the Capitol Theatre, where he 
was making a personal appearance. 
He was walking- because he had no 
time for getting snarled up in Times 
Square traffic. But he got caught in 
a traffic jam, all the same. It was 
his own traffic jam. A French- 
woman had recognized him and 
greeted him by a kiss on each cheek. 
She told him in no uncertain terms 
exactly what she thought of him, 
which was enough to melt the 
asphalt on the street. Other women 
saw the attraction and gathered 
round. Taxi drivers for two blocks 
were blowing their horns and 




His songs inspire thousands of romantic women 
— but are inspired by only one ... his wife. 



swearing. When Tito sang his first 
song at the theatre that day he was 
still a little breathless. Not from ex- 
citement. Oh, no. From the physi- 
cal exertion of extricating himself 
from his admirers. 

TITO reads every postcard and 
letter that comes to him from his 
spellbound audience, but guess who 
helps him answer them? Senora 
Guizar ! 

Tito, at twenty-seven, has been 
married two years. "And happily," 
he says with a smile that makes his 
words ring true. 

"Isn't she jealous?" I asked. 

"No, I am the jealous one," he 
answered. "For she is very beauti- 
ful as well as full of the sense to 
cause her to be above jealousy." 

"Is that good sense of hers a rea- 
son for your happiness?" I asked, 
because I wanted to know. It isn't 
often that you meet a man who not 
only is in luck but has the wit to 
realize and appreciate it. 

"Absolutely," Tito said earnestly. 
"I think a woman should be intel- 
ligent and should try to get an edu- 
cation, if she wants to make a suc- 
cessful marriage." 

"I thought brains scared men 
away," I objected. 

"But the intelligent woman would 
have brains sufficient to tell her 
when to appear not to have educa- 
tion," he said with a sly narrowing 
of the eyes. "My wife's education 
is a great help to me. For example, 
I was lazy in school, cared for noth- 
ing but sports, and consequently 
missed many things I should know. 
When my wife met me I knew no 
(Continued on page 41) 



10 



Radio Fan-Fare 



SEX 

finally crashes the 



NETWORKS 




WITH our newspapers, maga- 
zines and books fairly reeking 
with suggestive pictures and 
sloppily salacious text, and with our 
movies already stressing sex inter- 
est to a point where one literally has 
to hunt for a film that isn't filled 
with sex appeal, people have nat- 
urally wondered how soon radio 
would go in for sex in a big way. 

Well, sex has finally made the 
radio big time. But at least radio 
has succeeded in developing a new 
and more distinctive angle. Until 
television arrives on a widespread 
basis, radio cannot, of course, play 
up the pretty faces, intriguing gar- 
ments, and exposed limbs which 
dare and dazzle the followers of the 
press and movies. Even then, radio 
"may not be quite so reckless of hu- 
man consequences." Perhaps by that 
time radio will have seized upon its 
great opportunity to give the Amer- 
ican people a New Deal (or New 
Dial) in the matter of sex — a deal 
no less interesting from a human 
standpoint, but vastly more signif- 
icant when it comes to molding our 
lives. At least, radio's first great 
chain program which largely spe- 
cializes on sex, The Voice of Experi- 



ence, gives real hope in this direc- 
tion. 

Many may wrongly interpret The 
Voice of Experience as a radio 
adaptation of the advice-to-the-love- 
lorn columns which have appeared 
for years in the press. The concep- 
tion goes much deeper; it is more 
sophisticated. The Voice of Ex- 
perience concerns itself not only 
with the well of loneliness, the prac- 
tice of kissing, the affairs which 
only the French have good names 
for, and other such things — but it 
also covers the remainder of the 
field of human emotions. To under- 
stand this distinctive program prop- 
erly, one should first imagine all 
things divided into three types : 
things mental, things material, 
things emotional. Next, eliminate 
the first two and concentrate on 
things emotional. Then prepare 
yourself to discuss and ponder over 
the emotional side of the human being 
— meaning you, me, and the rest of 
the world. 

YOU ARE now in the proper 
frame of mind to listen to The 
Voice of Experience. But with one 
important reservation : Get all ideas 



of sex for sex's sake out of your 
mind — at least the superficial as- 
pects so continuously and lightly 
flicked in 'our faces in print and on 
the screen. Imagine yourself learn- 
ing about sex and other human 
emotions, not from the world's most 
seductive male or the world's most 
voluptuous vampire, but from one 
who really understands our emo- 
tional side and all that it means to 
us in making - life truly worth while. 
Picture your friend to whom you 
are listening as a great philosopher 
of emotion, just as you visualize an 
internationally great figure in the 
practice of law. Also picture him 
as a great scientist in the field of 
human emotion — a Doctor of Emo- 
tion, if you please. That is the big- 
idea behind The Voice of Experi- 
ence. You can realize why it is in- 
finitely more fascinating than the 
fictions of passion and the phan- 
tasies of romance. It is real life — 
human emotions as they are — 
brought before you and analyzed by 
one possessed not only of much ex- 
perience, but of a seasoned philos- 
ophy and a background of medical 
study. 

It is forbidden, of course, to print 



July-August 

or read over the radio many of the 
two million and more letters which 
have been written to The Voice of 
Experience. They are too intimate 
— and many of the words used 
could not be sent through the mails. 
But the letters are real and absolute- 
ly on the level. A few samples ac- 
company this article and, while they 
have been expurgated in part, they 
still give some idea of the nature 
of the work being carried on by 
Dr. M. Sayle Taylor, who conducts 
this unique program. 

BEFORE coming to the letters, 
however, you may be interested 
in a biographical sketch of the 
Voice, himself. His real name is 
not used on the air, in order that he 
may enjoy his private life with his 
family (yes, he is a family man) 
without the danger of being con- 
stantly harassed by men and women 
pressing for more and more advice. 
Dr. Taylor's father was an evan- 
gelist and his mother was a settle- 
ment worker. These occupations 
Avere their life work and thus the 
Voice received in boyhood the in- 
spiration to serve humanity. Trained 
first for the clergy, the Voice later 
turned to surgery and music and 
made rapid strides in both fields. 
His career as an organist (which in- 
cluded engagements at the World's 
Fair in St. Louis and at the Alaskan- 
Yukon-Pacific Exposition) came to 
an abrupt halt in Seattle when an 
automobile accident smashed both 
of his hands. While his hands were 
still in plaster casts he heard a lec- 
ture by the man who was then medical 



11 



head of Johns Hopkins University. 
The doctor emphasized how little 
research had been done in the field 
of human emotions. After talking 
at length to him, Sayle Taylor forsook 
surgery in order to train himself in 
this newer and more obscure field of 
emotional reactions. He has been at 
it ever since. 

THROUGH the help of an uncle, 
he devoted five years exclusive- 
ly to research — and what research ! 
It took him all over the world and 
even included serving a trumped-up 
prison sentence for the sake of ex- 
perience. The complete story of 
these five years is far too frank and 
indelicate to print here. The Voice 
was then, as he is now, absolutely 
serious and sincere about his work. / 
The facts he discovered about such I 
things as repression and suppres- 
sion are truly amazing and convinc- 
ing. One of these days it will all 
be published as a set of books en- 
titled "The Hidden Side of Life." 
The text will consist of several 
thousand actual biog-aphies (in- 
cluding many case histories of resi- 
dents of so-called red light dis- 
tricts). These volumes may well 
prove the most important contribu- 
tion of modern times in proving the 
ultimate consequences of sex ig- 
norance. 

Following the research period 
came the period of lectures on 
Chautauqua and Lyceum circuits. 
Over a period of years, this work 
brought the Voice before thousands 
(Continued on page 42) 




12 



Radio Fan-Fare 



vRE 



REVIEWING THE CURRENT PROGRAMS 



By DYAL TURNER 



CHESTERFIELD 
See front cover 

(NBC-WABC, Friday at 10:00 PM- 
EST) 

Cast — Lou Holtz, Grace Moore, 
Lenny Hayton's Orchestra, Norman 
Brokenshire, Benny Baker 

Comment — This review is based 
on the first broadcast of the pro- 
gram, so allowances are made for 
weaknesses that were the obvious 
result of the usual first-night ner- 
vousness, which is even more no- 
ticeable in radio work than in stage 
productions. And so it was that the 
veteran Lou Holtz, and his veteran 
stooge, Benny Baker, were a little 
fast with their stuff — repeated some 
of the build-up lines for their gags 
unnecessarily — and generally showed 
tension during the first part of the 
program. These faults became less 
apparent, however, as the show pro- 
gressed. With a few more broad- 
casts they will get all this out of their 
systems. Another thing: The Holtz 
and Baker voices as so much alike 
that it is often difficult to tell which 
is which, unless only one is doing 
dialect. 

Which brings us to their mate- 
rial : Most of it was familiar to 
those who have followed Lou's 
stage work closely. Not much was 
new. But one point was proven con- 
clusively. Mr. Holtz has got to keep 
hunting- humor, whether dialect- 
situation stuff (which he can cer- 
tainly put over with Baker) or 
straight gag and story material, 





THE MEN ABOUT TOWN 
. . . they rollic with Rolfe 



COUNTESS OLGA ALBANI 
... an antidote for over-contraltoed 
listeners 

which I believe he could do success- 
fully with his colorful delivery. 

Grace Moore, Metropolitan Opera 
star, has little to worry about. Her 
voice is gorgeous, and the mike is 
particularly kind to her high notes 
... a favor reserved for few sopra- 
nos. If she sticks to her singing 
she certainly can't go wrong. 

Lenny Hayton's band is always 
an asset. His accompaniment of 
Miss Moore's rendition of the Puc- 
cini aria, "My Name Is Mimi," may 
not have been everything - she has 
been accustomed to at the Metro- 
politan, but it was fifty percent bet- 
ter than anything most of the radio 
maestros could have provided. 

The Plug — The usual Chesterfield 
claim of a milder cigarette that 
tastes better. The idea department 
should go into a huddle and see if 
it can't come up with something- 
brighter, and more penetrating. 
And why does Mr. Brokenshire 
continue to talk like a necklace? I 
mean — to borrow from Mr. Holtz — 
that he sorter kinder strings his 
words together. Do the ladies, or 
somebody, like it? They must. For 
instance, when he says, "That's why 
it is," it sounds to me like, "Thad- 
szwi-i-dis." (Or am I, like my 
friend, Mr. Robert Benchley of The 
Nezv Yorker, suffering from faulty 
hearing ? ) 



Opinion — Should be a success . . . 
with good comedy material. 
• • • 
CHASE AND SANBORN 

(NBC-WEAF, Sunday at 8:00 
PM-EST) 

Cast — Bert Lahr, Dave Rubinoff 
and his orchestra, Lee Sims, Ilomay 
Bailey, and guest stars 

Comment — The sponsors are evi- 
dently groping for a program idea. 
Mr. Lahr is being used (or was) on 
a week-to-week arrangement, and 
the rest of the program is a sort of 
surprise (even to the sponsors some- 
times, perhaps). After Eddie Can- 
tor left the show, they tried a Louis 
Joseph Vance gangster sketch for a 




BERT LAHR 
... his sponsors are still groping 

couple of weeks and then discon- 
tinued it, which was smart. When 
this was written there were guest 
stars supporting Mr. Lahr. And it 
must be said, regretfully, that he 
needs support. As a stage comedian, 
Mr. Lahr has always relied a great 
deal on physical clowning to put 
over his lines — in fact he could al- 
ways get laughs without lines. As 
yet he has not adapted his stage 
technique to the air, and I doubt if 
it can be done with complete suc- 
cess. I hope my prediction is en- 
tirely wrong, as Mr. Lahr has al- 
ways been one of my favorite 
funnymen. 

Rubinoff, the violinist, should 



July-August 

have no trouble retaining the popu- 
larity he gained while he was on 
this program, with Eddie Cantor. 
Lee Sims, pianist, and Ilomay 
Bailey, vocal soloist, are also ca- 
pable entertainers. Therefore, the 
two things the program has lost by 
the departure of Mr. Cantor are a 
definite idea, and a consistent hu- 
morous pace. 

The Plug — Pretty reasonable, 
considering the amount of money 
the sponsors are spending to give 
you this hour show. 

Opinion — Uncertainty in the hu- 
mor and lack of showmanship in 
the guest-star feature are handicaps 
to the fine musical entertainment. 
• • • 
POND'S VANITY FAIR 
(NBC-WEAF, Friday at 9:30 PM- 
EST) 

Cast — Pond's Players (orchestra) 
under Victor Young, Ilka Chase, 
Hugh O'Connell, Lee Wiley, and 
Paul Small 

Comment — The title of this pro- 
gram is the tip-off that the sponsors 
want the show to have a class at- 
mosphere. In an effort to provide 
this air of good manners and taste- 
ful elegance, Mr. Young uses a mu- 
sical combination in which the 
strings predominate, with the brass 
keeping" modestly in the back- 
ground. The effect is a sort of virile 
chamber music, with a jazz threat — 
the kind of orchestra you might 
hear if a Harlem society matron 
was entertaining the Liberian am- 
bassador. The first few programs 



13 





JACQUES FRAY and MARIO BRAGGIOTTI 
their repertoire covers everything from lah-de-dah to hi-de-ho 



ILOMAY BAILEY 
she and Lee Sims survived shake- 
ups in their show 



probably left the average radio ear 
a bit confused. This was particu- 
larly true in the song accompani- 
ments, when Vic soft-pedalled the 
band until it almost sounded as if 
they were walking- out. As criti- 
cism, this cannot be seriously con- 
sidered, however, as Mr. Young is 
too smart a conductor to let details 
stand uncorrected. Nor is it quite 
fair for me to judge the vocalists, 
Paul Small and Lee Wiley. They are 
both pleasant performers and seem 
to satisfy the customers, but neither 
is a favorite of the writer. And if 
Miss Wiley (or anybody else on the 
air) is going to sing "Stormy 
Weather," she should hear Ethel 
Waters at the Cotton Club. (And, 
Lee, don't leave out the line, "Just 
can't pull my poor self together." 
You might also try singing two 
notes on the word "time" instead of 
one.) 

The Plug — Another of those little 
dramas of "real life," intended to 
mix a bit of fun and innocent amuse- 
ment with the advertising. Revers- 
ing the usual radio routine of the 
smart husband and the dumb wife, 
in this set-up Ilka Chase is the smart 
wife, and Hugh O'Connell is the 
dumb mate. At home, the theatre, 
or anywhere at all, the talk between 
them drifts to Pond's Cold Cream 
and the "outer and under skin." 
Hugh, being- a naive creature, has 
to have the details explained, and 
Ilka gives him the lowdown on how 



she preserves her physical allure 
after years of the wear and tear of 
married life. If this were the only 
plug, it would be fine, but the an- 
nouncer also has plenty to say, 
which runs the advertising into the 
usual error of overstatement. 

Opinion — Good musical show. 
And the commercial angle intro- 
duces, in Miss Chase, a personality 
who deserves serious consideration 
as an air comedienne. With proper 
material she should be as success- 
ful on the air as she has been on 
the stag^e. 



COUNTESS OLGA ALBANI 
Comment — One of the few sopra- 
nos on the air who doesn't make me 
grit my teeth when she clamps down 
on a top note. Apparently the radio 
technicians find it almost impossi- 
ble to transmit the ordinary trained 
soprano voice without getting noises 
like the scratching of a pin on a 
(Continued on page 43) 



USE FAN-FARES 
PROGRAM FINDER 

You will find it the most com- 
plete listing of artists, pro- 
grams, and stations in any 
magazine or newspaper. 



14 



Radio Fan-Fare 






Ted Husing picks 



THE TEN BEST 







PICK out the most energetic, quick 
witted, enthusiastically glib per- 
son you know — add six — multiply by 
two — and the answer is Ted Husing. 
I listened to him talk informally for a 
couple of hours the other afternoon 
and if I got a story out of what he 
said it's only because I was able to 
keep up with a jew of his mental 
gymnastics. 

Husing is a really great showman. 
He's only about thirty, yet he is one 
of radio's old men in the kind of ex- 
perience that comes from having to 
tell the world about hundreds of im- 
portant events, no two of which have 
been alike. He has learned to talk 
and, more important, when to let the 
other fellow talk. He has developed 
an amazing versatility, change of 
pace, or whatever your phrase for it 
is. What's more, he has acquired a 
news sense that is perhaps unsur- 
passed among radio men and journal- 
ists. 

My purpose in talking to Husing 
was to learn what he considered his 
"Ten Best Broadcasts." I hadn't been 
in his office three minutes before it 
became absolutely clear that his idea 
of "best broadcasts" was "toughest 
spots." 

Husing talks in headlines, and his 
first remark about his work summed 
up everything he has ever done in 
radio. "Ten percent of my radio 
broadcasts," he said, "have been rot- 
ten — sixty percent have been fair — 
and thirty percent have been good. 
And I'm the first to know whether 
I'm pfood or rotten. Don't ever let 



anybody tell you that any announcer 
is consistently good." 

"What makes you rotten one time 
out of ten?" I asked, taking him at 
his word. 

"Conditions we can't control, usu- 
ally," he replied. "Bad weather — un- 
avoidable delays — not enough notice 
to get all the facts I should have be- 
fore the event — too little time to make 
adequate technical preparations — 
lack of cooperation on the part of 
local people — and unexpected things 
that happen at the last minute, such 
as important people getting ideas of 
their own about how the broadcast 
should be handled. 

"Then I suppose you'd call your 
best broadcasts the ones in which you 
were able to get around some pretty 
appalling handicaps?" 

"That's right," Husing said quick- 
ly. "Some of the best work we've 
done probably sounded to the listen- 
ers like commonplace stuff. Take the 
Pitt- Army football game in 1931. 

" A I ^HE Army team was playing- in 
A Pittsburgh for the first time, 
and the Cadets were scheduled to 
parade through the streets- — starting 
at 9:15 in the morning. The whole 
town was out. There was such a 
mob that a parade was impossible. 
There were minor riots all along- the 
line of march. The cops were help- 
less. We went on the air at 9:15. 
At 10:30 we were still on, and the 
parade hadn't even started. I'd gone 
to Pittsburgh with the idea that the 
tough part of the program would be 




Ted is our premier 
sports announcer be- 
cause he knows his 
games. This shot was 
taken while he was 
warming up with the 
Army team last fall. 



By R. R. ENDICOTT 



the game. I'd worked weeks getting 
the facts together. And then, for an 
hour and a quarter, I had to keep 
talking about something that hadn't 
happened !" 

"What did you say?" I asked. 

"I stalled as much as I could. I 
described everything in sight. I 
talked about the weather, about Pitt, 
about West Point, about the long and 
glorious record of the Army, the 
Navy, and the Government ; about 
parades in general, about mobs in 
general — in fact, I said everything I 
could think of that had the remotest 
connection with that damned parade." 

"Why can't you go quietly off the 
air in cases like that, and give the 
audience a musical interlude — or 
something?" I asked. 

"You lose the people who want to 
hear about the event," Husing said. 
"It may start any minute, and if the 
announcers on other stations go on 
talking and you go into music, you 
never get your listeners back." 

I was about to ask why all the sta- 
tions couldn't go into their music, but 
Husin"- was too fast for me. 






T 



July- August 

HE end of the Democratic Na- 
tional Convention in Chicago 
last year was another tough spot," he 
continued, "Frederick William Wile, 
H. V. Kaltenborn, and I were cover- 
ing the show. I knew nothing about 
politics then and I know little more 
now. I was working there purely in 
the capacity of 'color man.' My post 
was high up in the convention hall 
where I had a bird's-eye view of the 
whole gathering. Kaltenborn was on 
the speaker's platform and Wile was 
on the floor. When anything excit- 
ing happened I was usually able to 
spot it first from my point of vantage. 
I'd give the listeners a short descrip- 
tion of what was going on and then 
I'd switch the mike to either Kalten- 
born or Wile and he'd talk about the 
political significance — if any. 

"That whole convention was a fas- 
cinating job because it took so much 
air sense ..." 



"What's air sense?" I interrupted. 

"Well, that's what any announcer- 
at -large has to have to do a good job," 
said Husing. "It's the ability to 
judge the news value of whatever 
happens the minute it takes place — 
so you can give it enough time, but 
not one bit more. And if you don't 
already know it, let me tell you that 
a political convention takes air sense. 
You're on the air almost continuous- 
ly for several days. Much of the time 
nothing important is happening — and 
yet you've got to sustain the listener's 
interest. Do you recall that inter- 
minable hour Governor Roosevelt 
was delayed in getting from the air- 
port to the convention hall last June ? 
Well, that was the toughest spot in 
the whole convention for us. We'd 
built up the broadcast to a big climax 
— which was to be set off by his en- 
trance. The people knew he'd arrived 
in the city. He was expected to come 




No wonder Mr. Hus- 
ing likes to broadcast 
the horse races in 
Florida. Standing near 
his feet are two of the 
reasons. Below he is 
interviewing "the man 
in the street" in Har- 
em — and, to the right, 
we see him in the 
plane he is now learn- 
ing to fly. 



15 

through the door of the hall any min- 
ute. The delegates were all set to 
give him a tremendous ovation. And 
then we all waited for one solid hour ! 
Just sat there and waited with abso- 
lutely nothing to say that we hadn't 
said a hundred times before that 
week." 

"TAOES it ever happen," I asked, 

-«->' "that, when you are so desper- 
ate for a subject to talk about, you 
say something offensive to a large 
part of your audience? That is, do 
you ever inadvertently get in such 
hot water that you only make it hotter 
if you try to get out?" 

"Well, that's never happened to 
me," said Husing, "and I think the 
experienced announcer comes to 
know instinctively what type of thing 
he must not say — no matter how hard 
he's pressed. You undoubtedly know 
all about that incident at Cambridge 
when, during the Harvard-Dart- 
mouth game of 1931, I described the 
playing of one of the Harvard fel- 
lows as 'putrid.' That wasn't be- 
cause I was hard up for words. It 
was because that word seemed to 
describe best what happened. 

"And, by the way, put that broad- 
cast down as one of my best ten — 
mostly because of the consequences 
of one word. The next day Colum- 
bia and I were front page news. And 
people haven't forgotten it yet, par- 
ticularly in Boston." 

"As a Harvard graduate," I put 
in, "I've always considered that the 
action of Harvard officials in barring 
you from the stadium was unfortun- 
ate. They were bound to get nothing 
but unfavorable publicity from it." 
(Continued on page 44) 




16 



POPULAR TUNES 

An Analysis and Opinion 



By RUDY VALLEE 



"STORMY WEATHER" 

By Harold Arlen and Ted Koehler. 

Published by Mills Music, Inc. 

It was not until the appearance of 
Walter Winchell and Ben Bernie at 
the Paramount Theatre in New York 
that I fully appreciated Harold Ar- 
len's genius as a song writer. I have 
admired him as a pianist and vocalist 
since he worked in Arnold Johnson's 




band, and when he wrote "Happy 
Feet" I knew he had the mark of 
cleverness. But the Paramount show 
made me realize what a truly great 
song writer Harold is. He had ar- 
ranged a medley of his popular songs, 
and as he went through the list I 
heard "Get Happy," "Hittin' The 
Bottle," "You Said It," "Sweet And 
Hot," "Kickin' The Gong Around," 
"The Devil And The Deep Blue Sea," 
"I've Got A Right To Sing The 
Blues," "I Love A Parade," and "I've 
Got The World On A String." 

Associated with Harold as lyricist 
is the very capable Ted Koehler, and 
many of their songs have been used 
by the torrid colored singers at Har- 
lem's Cotton Club. And after all the 
marvelous songs these two boys have 
turned out, they now top their work 
with "Stormy Weather." The first 
time you listen to it you may think it 
a bit disjointed and lacking in pat- 
tern, but the more you hear it, the 
more you will appreciate the true 
depth of the composition. As in oth- 
er Arlen songs, this one shows the in- 
fluence of Jewish religious melodies 
— in fact, Harold admits that his 
youthful days in the Synagogue left 
an indelible impression on his musical 
imagination. 



"Stormy Weather" is one of the 
most unusual song hits in years. It 
has already been given a magnificent 
stage presentation at the Radio City 
Music Hall, and will doubtless be fea- 
tured by amateur and professional 
showmen all over the world during 
the next year. It should be played 
slowly. 

"I LAY ME DOWN TO SLEEP" 

By Allie Wruble. Published by 

Shapiro Bernstein & Co. 

During my college days in New 
Haven I associated myself with 
Messrs. Bolton and Cipriano, two 
Yale graduates who had been han- 
dling dance orchestras since their col- 
lege days of 1913-1914. They, in 
turn, often worked for Ed Wittstein, 
who was the leading society dance or- 
chestra leader in that New England 
territory. One weekend Mr. Witt- 
stein brought down a young man 
from Wesleyan College named Allie 
Wrubel. My first impression of Al- 
lie was that he had a pointed chin and 
a rather humorous, eccentric disposi- 
tion. 

Wrubel's folks were wealthy fur- 
riers in Middletown, Connecticut, 
where Wesleyan is located. Allie not 
only played the saxophone well, but 
his chin seemed to have been designed 
to sustain the silver length of the 
flute. Crazy tricks on that instru- 
ment were his forte, and, while I 
made a specialty of tone, I also went 




in for some of the trick stuff. Thus 
Allie and I were always friendly ri- 
vals. Shortly after I was graduated 
I moved to New York. When Allie 
decided to write songs he also invaded 
the Big Town. 

That he had an unusual talent was 
demonstrated even before his college 



Radio Fan-Fare 

days. He composed a little risque 
song called, "You'll Do It Some Day, 
So Why Not Now?" Allie has al- 
ways leaned a bit toward the double 
entendre and I believe he has fur- 
nished Morton Downey with some 
unusually clever material suitable for 
drawing room and night club work. 

But Allie soon discovered that, in 
order to write good commercial mu- 
sic, the songs had to be tuneful and 
simple. As a result of his earnest ef- 
forts, we have "Now You're In My 
Arms," "Farewell To Arms," and 
"The Farmer's Daughter's Wedding 
Day." And now comes the lovely, 
almost concert type of melody, "I 
Lay Me Down To Sleep." 

This song will unquestionably make 
radio history, though, of course, Al- 
lie's best is still "Farewell To Arms." 
We play "I Lay Me Down To Sleep" 
quite slowly, taking about one minute 
to the chorus. 




• • • 

"WHAT HAVE WE GOT TO LOSE" 

By Lou Alter, Gus Kahn, and Charlotte 

Kent. Published by Robbins & Co. 

This is more a note of apology than 
an opinion, because you certainly 
know by now that "What Have We 
Got To Lose" is a hit song. Which 
just goes to show how wrong I can 
be. Jack Robbins mailed me a 
"ditto," or mimeographed copy, long 
before the song was published, but I 
couldn't see that it had any merit 
until Helen Morgan sang it on one of 
our programs. 

And so my belated congratulations, 
particularly to my good friend, Lou 
Alter. 

The tune should be given a breezy, 
lilting treatment. We take about fifty 
seconds to play one 32-measure 
chorus. 

"SHADOW WALTZ" AND "I'VE 
GOT TO SING A TORCH SONG" 
By Harry Warren and Al Dubin. Pub- 
lished by Remick Music 
Corporation 
These tunes are from the Warner 
picture, "Gold Diggers of 1933," and 
I mention them together because we 
recorded both of them for the Colum- 
bia Phonograph Company. 

(Continued on page 48) 



July-August 



17 







RADIOS RAREST ASSET-AN AMUSING WOMAN 

Ilka Chase, brilliant young stage comedienne, is one 
of the few women in the world who can be funny 
without costume and dialect. And her smart com- 
edy registers as definitely through the microphone 
as it does in person. The air needs amusing ladies, 
so congratulations to the man who cast Miss Chase 
in the Pond's "Vanity Fair" program. (Further com- 
ment under Reviews, page 13.) 



18 



Radio Fan-Fare 



LUCKY 

IN 

LOVE 



By JEAN CALVIN 




THE story behind the marriage 
of Morton Downey and Bar- 
bara Bennett is romantic, but it 
is seldom told because that popular 
young Irishman has always displayed 
an unusual reticence in discussing his 
wife. Ask him about himself, and 
Morton will discuss everything from 
his views on nudism and the budget, 
down to the color of his underwear. 
Yet when you mention Barbara it is 
strictly "keep-off-the-grass." 

It leaked out in the beginning of 
his radio fame (together with the 
fact that he had once sold magazines 
on trains as a "newsbutcher") that 
Mort referred to his wife as "Lover," 
that he sang all his romantic songs 
straight to her, that he talked to her 
continually on the telephone — even to 
putting through long distance calls to 
the Coast, and that after every per- 
sonal appearance in New York Thea- 
tres, there was always a telegram 
from Barbara waiting for him in the 
dressing room. People noticed that 
Mort occasionally slipped in small 
messages to Barbara over the radio, 
... an almost inaudible "Good- 
night, Lover" would often follow his 
last song. 

Everyone who has seen them to- 
gether wonders at the effect "Bab" 
Bennett has had upon her wise-crack- 
ing, rambunctious husband. When 
she is around he plavs a perfect Sir 



Walter Raleigh to her Queen Eliza- 
beth, and the "gags" take on another 
color. If you knew Mort well you 
would realize the import of this state- 
ment. He will go to any lengths for 
a laugh — loves a good joke better 
than almost anybody this writer has 
ever met — and doesn't mind if he has 
to be a bit risque to get his giggles. 
All of which makes him the more 
popular with men, but sometimes 
shocks the ladies (though they sel- 
dom fail to laugh after being 
shocked). 

So what? So this. When a girl 
can make a man pull his punches on 
his sense of humor, she has him 
pretty well under control. Not that 
Mort minds it, because he adores this 
girl, just as obviously as she adores 
him. And it's been like that since the 
day they married, four years ago. 

BARBARA is a real contrast to 
Mort. She is slender, dark, and 
elegant. She has the bearing of a 
Bennett, and though her hair is 
darker than Connie's or Joan's, the 
shape of the face and the hair-line 
are much the same. She is quiet, and 
looks sophisticated and naive at the 
same time — a special gift of all the 
Bennett sisters. 

It was about four years ago that 
Mort went out to the coast to take 
Hollywood by storm — at least, that's 



why he went out. He'd served his 
term with the Leviathan band and 
made a reputation in European night 
clubs — so he planned to conquer Hol- 
lywood. Unfortunately talking pic- 
tures weren't what they are now — 
neither was Mort a suave actor, and 
the result was very sad. 

The first picture was "Syncopa- 
tion," and his leading lady was Bar- 
bara Bennett. The hit song from 
that movie was "I'll Always Be In 
Love With You." When he sang it 
to his leading lady, he meant it. He 
did some madcap courting off the 
sets as well as before the camera, and 
they were married in two weeks. 
Mort decided to brave another pic- 
ture, and they starred him in "Moth- 
er's Boy." 

Barbara and Mort went to the 
opening night. They stood about 
twenty minutes of it, then Mort whis- 
pered in his wife's ear, "Lover, as an 
actor I'm a large order of ham," and 
he took her arm and walked out of 
the theatre. Nothing she could say 
consoled him much. But in a short 
while the movie magnates again 
tempted him with their bags of gold, 
and he made "Lucky in Love." The 
opening night of that one wasn't much 
better, and Mort was convinced that 
he was no actor. 

(Continued on page 47) 



July-August 



THE TRAGEDY THAT MADE 

CONRAD THIBAULT 

GREAT 

By GLADYS BAKER 



VARIOUS adjectives have been 
used to describe that "certain 
something" in Conrad Thibault's 
voice. Hundreds of women, young 
and not-so-young, run the gamut of 
their vocabularies to find a patly 
descriptive phrase. Poignant . . . 
poetic . . . wistful, some of the fair 
correspondents write. But all agree 
on one thing — -that Conrad's voice 
has a sympathetic depth that is 
strangely moving. 

And they are right, though they 
could never guess the story behind 
this unusual quality. It is not the 
result of years of training. Nor is 
it a studied trick of showmanship that 
projects this subtle something over 
the air with such effectiveness that 
women of all ages are immediately 
won to a Voice. 

Behind the deeply stirring, warmly 
colored tones lies a romance as beau- 
tiful, as appealing, as young as any 
fairy-book legend out of the pages of 
Hans Anderson or the Brothers 
Grimm. 

This story has not been told be- 
fore, because beneath the calm assur- 
ance, which is one of the most satis- 
fying assets of the Thibault vocal 
talent, is a shy, retiring personality 
and the innate sensitivity of an artist. 
There I found the answer to Conrad 
Thibault's peculiar ability to recreate 
romance for others, and there I came 
upon the reason for that unaffected 
pathos in his singing that goes 
straight to the listener's heart. 

IT was not without curiosity that I 
went to meet the celebrated bari- 
tone. Though I had been told that 
he was in his late twenties I was not 
prepared for his extreme youthful- 
ness. In spite of a lack of pose and 
a casual exterior, one knows that he 
is highstrung, temperamental. His 



face is thin (much less oval in shape 
than any photograph I have seen of 
him), his nose aquiline, his mouth 
sensitive; hair, eyes and complexion 
are of that light bronze tone which 
accentuates his youthful, almost boy- 
ish, appearance. 

We had tea late in the June after- 
noon in the baritone's apartment. 
The rain pattered monotonously 
against the windowpanes. The New 
York traffic rumbled dimly in the 
distance. The lamps were lighted 
against the drab grayness of the out- 
side world. Inside was an atmos- 
phere of quietness, relaxation, repose. 
Circumstances were in my favor. For 



19 
on that particularly dreary afternoon 
the popular radio star was just a 
tired, unhappy young man and the 
quiet setting was one to inspire con- 
fidences. On a sunshiny day, or in 
another mood, I felt certain that the 
doggedness with which he has 
guarded his private life from an in- 
quisitive public would have kept him 
formal and aloof. 

And there was another thing. The 
date on his calendar brought a vivid 
recollection of a tragedy which is 
ever with him. For on that same day 
of the month, just seven months be- 
fore, Conrad Thibault had lost his 
wife — and with her most of the joy 
and meaning of life. 

"I have only my memories now," 
he said, brown eyes gravely reminis- 
cent. 

Nor was it easy to disturb those 
memories. For a time it seemed as 
if our talk was to be over almost be- 
fore it had begun. But Mr. Thibault 
seemed to appreciate the difficulty of 
my assignment, and it is a testimony 
to his considerate nature that he con- 
sented to talk to me frankly. 

ONCE started, he talked readily — 
with something of the relief that 
comes from letting go of pent-up 
thoughts and emotions. 

(Continued on page 48) 





20 



Radio Fan-Fare 




If you think we are going to say "Hay, Hay!" you're 
crazy. It is simply a picture of Ruth Etting in overalls 
playing in the hay, because somebody wanted a pic- 
ture of Ruth in overalls playing in the hay. 




*%4 



When Paul Whiteman stated he lost weight 
eating grapefruit — the whole world started eat- 
ing grapefruit. Warner Brothers even used the 
angle in the film, "Hard To Handle." Citrus 
growers should endow Paul. 



Al Smith takes Clara, Lou and Em to the top of 
the Empire State Building and shows the famous 
Chicago visitors his city. "It's just a little 
place," says Al, "but I call it home." 



"Look out, Every- 
body!" When Kate 
swings she takes a 
mean cut at that 
apple. And the 
strange part of it, 
Mr. Ripley, is that 
the buxom Kather- 
ine really plays 
good tennis. 




Informal 

STAR-GAZING 



"WHEN THE MIKE'S AWAY THE CAST WILL PLAY" 

Old Radio Proverb 

For programs on which these stars appear see Artist Schedule 
on pages 39 and 40 




July-August 



21 



We were all set to talk about Norman Broken- 
shire, the Old Salt . . . when we noticed that 
conductor's hat he is wearing. Probably one of 
those "guest conductors", we've been hearing 
about. Norman is now one of the Big Four 
(the others being Grace Moore, Lou Holtz, and 
Lenny Hayton) on the Chesterfield program. 



Fred Waring, head man of Waring's Pennsyl- 
vanians. According to the announcer, Old 
Golds (Fred's tobacco backer) are "as smooth 
as Waring's music." If they are that good, 
we are certainly going to give up snuff. 





Alex Morrison, radio golf expert, instructs that Southern 
singer, Betty Barthell (howya honey chile?) by crooning his 
theme song — "It Don't Mean A Thing If You Ain't Got 
That Swing." Alex's talks (on the Richfield Country Club 
program) are recommended to all golfers. They really make 
sense. 





Somebody told Phil Baker that Ann Neil was a ventriloquist, 
so he thought he had located the phantom heckler on the 
Armour program. Harry McNaughton is saying, "Don't 
chap, her old chop." And Phil replies, "Why not? Every- 
body else has taken a cut." (Boy, you certainly hit the Neil 
on the head that time.) 



22 



Radio Fan-Fare 



WHEN STARS COME 



«yOU can't stop Winchell. He 
A knows all the answers." 

That sentiment has probably been 
expressed hundreds of times — and no 
wonder. This gossippy news trap- 
per has made an astounding success 
as a journalist and radio informant 
because he has a nose for headlines, 
and an ear for paragraphs that end 
in exclamation points. 

But when a friend made the re- 
mark the other day that Walter 
couldn't be stopped, I had the an- 
swer to that one, because I saw him 
stopped. It was the last time I met 
Walter before he left for Califor- 
nia. The occasion was a party that 
was given by Nancy Ryan of the 
recent Broadway show, "Forsaking 
All Others." So, of course, Tallulah 
Bankhead, who was the star of the 
piece, was there. 

When Tallulah Bankhead and 
Walter Winchell are present at the 
same time — that's news. All the 
guests were prepared for a duel of 
wits ... or at least a friendly ex- 
change of dynamic cracks. The 
stage was set when Walter seated 
himself on a sofa with Tallulah fac- 
ing him in a chair. Grouped about 
them were Ruth Cambridge (Wal- 
ter's Girl Friday), Mr. and Mrs. 
Alton Brodie (she's Irvin S. Cobb's 
daughter), Ilka Chase (in Tallulah's 
play, and also on the Pond's radio 
program), William Murray of NBC, 
and the writer. 

"Well, well," said Tallulah, open- 
ing the show. "Here I am sur- 
rounded by writers. Winchell and 
Evans both looking for news, and, 
like all journalists, they are push- 
overs. By the way, boys, did I ever 
tell you what I think of newspaper- 
men?" . . . and she was off. 

You may have heard a great many 
stories about Miss Bankhead. For 
instance there is the line she is sup- 
posed to have handed Winchell the 
first time she saw him : 

"Walter, you know those terrible 
things you've heard about me? Well, 
they're all true." 

There are other remarks — hun- 
dreds of them — credited to this un- 
usual girl. What Tallulah has said 
and done is a subject for conversa- 
tion anywhere you may go in New 
York. But one of the things that is 
not generally known is that she has 
one of the most amazing mental ma- 



chines ever installed in the bean of a 
human. I certainly found it out be- 
fore she got thru at this Ryan party. 

After she had told us all about 
newspapermen, she went right into 
a relevant line of anecdote about cer- 
tain of her experiences in England, 
and she kept us in stitches for over 
an hour. Every one of us, includ- 
ing the loquacious Winchell, sat 
there with mouths open, hanging onto 
every word and gesture. She is sim- 
ply amazing. Never have I met a 
person with such a flair for parlor 
showmanship. Nor have I known a 
comedienne with a finer sense of 
humorous values. Always the right 
word in the proper place to get a 
laugh . . . some of it risque, but all 
of it interesting. 

When we were leaving I went over 
to Walter and said, 

"What do you think of that Bank- 
head gal? Isn't she something?" 

"Never heard anything like her in 
my life," said Mrs. Winchell's bad 
boy, shaking his head. "She stops 
me." 

And so my contention that Win- 
chell can be stopped is based on his 
own confession. 

• • • 

THE mention of Mrs. Alton 
Brodie reminds me of another 
party. This one was given by her 
father, Irvin Cobb, in honor of some 
of the stars of the Ringling Brothers 
circus. In his past appearances on 
the air, Mr. Cobb has told several 
circus stories, all of which he has 
picked up from his friends of the Big 
Top. I hope he repeats some of them 
on his weekly broadcasts for Gulf 
Gasoline. 

Late in the evening of the Cobb 
soiree, one of the most interesting 
groups of people I have ever seen 
was gathered in one small room, and 
I was fortunate enough to be able to 
horn in and listen to the chatter. 
Seated in a circle were Mr. Cobb ; 
Gene Tunney ; Nancy Carroll ; Clyde 
Beatty, the world's greatest animal 
trainer ; Herbert, probably the great- 
est horsewoman the circus has ever 
known ; Colliano, the highest salaried 
tight-rope walker in the game ; Dex- 
ter Fellows, internationally known 
press agent of the Ringling show ; 
and the one and only O. O. Mclntyre, 
famous columnist on the New York 
American. 




TALLULAH 



with her hero — Dickie Moore. 




WINCHELL 



stopped by a woman's wit. 




BOBBE . . . named a radio star "Doc' 



July-August 



23 



DOWN TO EARTH 



By HARRY EVANS 






TUNNEY 



full of correct information 




MARY ALICE ... was visited by Ruth Etting. 





COBB 



r 



invited acrobats and lion tamers. 



You can imagine the different 
slants in the conversation. Beatty 
told about taming lions . . . Tunney 
gave us first-hand details about tam- 
ing men . . . Miss Herbert told about 
the years of training it had taken for 
her to learn to do the amazing tricks 
she performs in a side-saddle . . . 
Nancy Carroll inveigled Colliano into 
recounting interesting episodes in the 
life of a high-wire man (and did he 
react to the inveigling ! ) . . . while 
Messrs. Cobb, Mclntyre and Fel- 
lows had a story for every situation 
introduced. 

If Mr. Cobb has not already re- 
peated parts of this conversation in 
his radio work, I am sure he will. 
And inasmuch as it was his party, he 
has the right to the "material." I 
don't believe I ever had a more sat- 
isfactory evening. Every sentence 
was news. 



THE one thing, however, that 
impressed me most was the nat- 
ural charm and unassuming manner 
of Gene Tunney. I have met this 
big fellow a number of times, but 
this was the first time I had ever 
really heard him express his views 
on sports in general, and boxing in 
particular. It was the most intelli- 
gent commentary on the subject I 
have ever heard. 

It seems to me that some sponsor 
is overlooking a bet by not signing 
Gene up for a series of air chats. 
He would not have to confine him- 
self to the conversation of the ring. 
His ideas on politics, literature, or 
any other topic of general interest 
would make better listening than the 
ideas of many of the boys who are 
recognized as astute students (say 
that fast) of current events. I used 
to be one of the large group of peo- 
ple who thought Mr. Tunney's cul- 
tural manifestations were a lot of 
hooey, but now I realize that it is 
the same old story. You can't know 
the truth until you know the person. 



R 



• • 



ADIO seems to cover the entire 
field of advertising. I mean to 
say that there is hardly any article 
which can't be plugged over the ether. 
Hollywood proved this recently when 
the Hotel Knickerbocker went on the 
air and offered gigolos for hire. 



It seems that the hotel stages a tea 
dansant between 12 and 2PM 
called "The Woman's Hour" (prov- 
ing that their arithmetic is terrible). 
Present at these functions are a flock 
of hanthome danthing men and, in 
the radio announcement, lonely ladies 
(with a yearning to shake their feet 
and stuff) are told that these boys will 
be happy to teach them the tango or 
rumba (the first for their feet, the 
second . . . well, never mind). The 
price is $1 per whirl, and no holds 
barred. The announcer also in- 
forms you that the music is furnished 
by Don Cave's orchestra. 

There must be some crack there 
about "Cave Men." If you think of 
it, let me know. 



THE sweet things you hear about 
Ruth Etting are not the usual 
press agent imagination. I saw an 
incident recently that convinced me 
of this. When Miss Etting was star- 
ring in the late Flo Zeigfeld's "Hot 
Cha," there was a girl in the chorus 
named Mary Alice Rice. This girl, 
who is now doubling as a chorus girl 
and the principal understudy in "Mu- 
sic In The Air," was invited by Nick 
Kenny (New York Daily Mirror ra- 
dio critic) to appear on one of his 
"Radio Scandals" programs. Nick 
was so impressed with her singing 
voice that he signed her up to appear 
in the Roxy Theatre with a group of 
young artists he was sponsoring. 

One afternoon Miss Etting was in 
the audience. She had come there 
just to hear one of the performers, 
but after she recognized Mary Alice 
she waited until the girl had done her 
song. Then, instead of leaving, Miss 
Etting sat through the whole show, 
which took nearly two hours, and 
later went backstage. When the call 
boy knocked on Mary Alice's door 
and said, "Ruth Etting to see you," 
she thought it was a gag. You can 
imagine how she felt when the fa- 
mous Miss Etting walked in, kissed 
her, and told her how swell she was. 

Nor did she stop there. She gave 
the young girl several invaluable 
hints about singing over a micro- 
phone, and told her where she could 
go to get song arrangements that 
would suit her voice. 

All of which is the answer to the 
(Continued on page 50) 



24 



Radio Fan-Fare 



AA 



I HATE TO ACT 



says JOHN BATTLE 



Radio 's Most Versatile Actor 



By ROBERT RANTOUL 




IF John Battle really hates to act, 
as he claims, his life must be al- 
most all hatred — for he is probably 
the busiest actor on the air today. 
And in addition to acting he writes 
at least three programs every week 
and frequently more. 

When I talked with him he was 
living in a small hotel room. This 
was a bit surprising as I knew he had 
an apartment only a few blocks away. 
"When I want to rest I have to go 
to a hotel," he said. "Too many peo- 
ple know my apartment phone num- 
ber. What's more, I've got to move 
from this hotel tomorrow, because 
they're beginning to find out where I 
am. And by 'they' I don't mean 
creditors, either." 

Now this all sounded as if Battle 
might be trying to build himself up 
as a much sought after young suc- 
cess. But during the two hours we 
talked the telephone bell rang a dozen 
times. And after he gave me an out- 
line of a typical week, I was pre- 
pared to believe he had been modest 
in his complaint about people not 
leaving him alone. Flere's a synopsis 
of a recent seven-day schedule for 
Battle's radio work, as he described 
it to me : 



a T?ROM nine to eleven on Monday 

X I rehearsed Triple Bar X Days 
and Nights. I played three parts — 
Old Man Harris, who runs the dude 
ranch ; a young Mexican lover, and 
his father. For the next four hours 
I rehearsed Roses and Drums, which 
I had written on the preceding Satur- 
day and Sunday. I took the roles of 
a negro servant, a Tennessee moun- 
taineer, a Virginian army captain, and 
an Irish sentry from New York — all 
on this one program. From three to 
six there was the Bar X dress re- 
hearsal, and from six to seven-thirty 
the rehearsal of the Tydol Jubilee 
show, which I write three times a 
week. At seven-thirty I went on the 
air for Tydol and at eight we put on 
Bar X." ' 

"Just a minute," I interrupted. 
"That schedule went from nine in 
the morning till eight-thirty at night, 
without a break. How about food, 
and when did you write the Tydol 
script ?" 

"I got sandwiches and coffee sent 
into the studio," replied Battle, "and 
during rehearsals I was able to write 
parts of the Tydol show on the back 
of the scripts I was then rehearsing." 

"That clears that up," I said, "and 



on Tuesday what did you do?" 
"Well," continued Battle, "from 
nine till one I made some recorded 
programs . . . Sonny Baker and 
Pcnrod and Sam. In the first I was 
a Portuguese pirate, and in the other 
a cowpuncher named Forty Rod. 
From two until six I rehearsed Miss 
Lilla, a Tennessee mountain dialect 
sketch in which my character is Les- 
ter Orville Lipscomb. Before play- 
ing on that program at ten o'clock I 
got a call to go on the air in Eno 
Crime Clues at eight. In it, without 
rehearsal, I played Caesar, a negro 
stable boy, and one of the voices in 
a dramatized commercial announce- 
ment." 

AND that, dear reader, is what 
■ is known as being busier than 
a cow's tail in flytime. Mr. Battle 
should have been triplets. 

Returning to his last remark, I said 
to him, 

"What do you think of those dram- 
atized commercials ?" 

"I don't like them personally, but I 

think that if they are intelligently 

done they make effective advertising. 

You do whatever you're asked to do 

(Continued on page 49) 



July-August 



THE CIRCUIT JUDGE 

A Department of Radio Information 



Conducted by 
ZEH BOUCK 



25 



BARGAINS IN RADIOS 



TO drive an automobile, it is 
only necessary to demon- 
strate a moderate degree of skill 
in handling the steering wheel, 
clutch, brake, and gear shift. But 
the driver who knows something 
about the mechanics of his car — ■ 
the difference between summer 
and winter gasoline mixtures and 
oils, the theory of ignition — will 
derive greater pleasure and more 
service from his automobile than 



the owner who merely knows 
how to start, steer and stop it. 
The same is true of radio. A 
child can tune a receiver, but the 
utmost in satisfaction and eco- 
nomical operation is secured only 
when the operator knows a bit 
more about the function of the 
dials, the purpose and limitations 
of antenna and ground, and the 
miracle of the vacuum tube. 

— The Circuit Judge 



TONE AND TONE CONTROL 



NEW TUBES AND OLD SETS 



WHAT TO DO ABOUT STATIC 



BARGAIN COUNTER RADIOS 



JE 



"ET THE buyer beware" is a 
saying that started back in the 
old days of Rome, and was prob- 
ably addressed to prospective pur- 
chasers of real estate in the swamps 
along the Appian Way. It applies to 
real estate equally well today — and 
to second hand autos and marked 
down radio sets. M. E. B. of Port- 
land, Maine, brings up the subject : 

"Several of our sporting goods 
and department stores are selling 
new radios — some of well known 
makes — at prices often less than 
half their list value. I'd like to buy 
one of these, but I'm afraid of get- 
ting stuck. Are they good? If so, 
how can I tell a good one?" 

Marked down radios are being 
bargain-countered throughout the 
country. Thousands of these are 
sold at ridiculously low prices for 
reasons that in no way reflect upon 
the actual worth of the receiver. 
Unfortunately thousands also are 
clucks. 

If M. E. B. has a friend who is a 
radio expert in other than his own 
opinion, he should enlist his assist- 
ance in selecting a good receiver. If 
no such friend is on hand, his next 
best bet is to form his opinion with 
no prompting from the salesman. 

Select a receiver in the price class 
that interests you. Determine by in- 
spection whether it is a super- 
heterodyne or not. All good supers 
carry etched plates on the chassis 
declaring the receiver to be licensed 
under the superheterodyne patents. 



Count the number of tubes. A really 
satisfactory super should not have 
less than six tubes. Five tubes is 
the minimum for a first class tuned- 
radio-frequency job. 

The number of tubes is an index 
of sensitivity. If you are inter- 
ested in distant reception, you will 
hardly be satisfied with less than an 
eight tube superheterodyne. The 
number of tubes also has a bearing 
on selectivity, and if you are in a 
congested radio district, eight 
tubes again is the recommended 
minimum. If the receiver has eight 
or more tubes, automatic volume 
control should be among its fea- 
tures. Look for this in the litera- 
ture and direction sheet — don't take 
the salesman's word for it. 

Insist on new tubes of a nationally 
known make, and upon an adequate 
demonstration, preferably in your 
own home. Check the tone quality 
on low and high volume. Here you 
are the ultimate judge of the re- 
ceiver, and can determine better 
than any radio engineer just how 
it meets your requirements. 

A three months' service guarantee 
is an indication of confidence on the 
part of the dealer, and suggests a 
reliable receiver. 

A MATTER OF TONE 

THE tone control has several use- 
ful functions. It can be used to 
modify bad echoes when the re- 
ceiver is installed in a large room 
with few draperies. The effects of 
static and similar disturbances can 



be reduced by cutting down on the 
"highs" (adjusting for a muffled 
tone). And also, if the individual 
listener prefers the Philharmonic 
mellow, rather than sharp and bril- 
liant, he can have it as he wants it. 

However, H. A. D. of Schoharie, 
New York, ear atune to the highest 
treble of the woodwinds, asks — 
"How can I tell when my tone con- 
trol is adjusted so that I hear an 
orchestra exactly as it is being 
played ?" 

Almost invariably the most au- 
thentic reproduction is secured when 
the tone control is adjusted for 
"brilliant." If you are not certain 
just which extreme this is, make the 
adjustment when listening to the an- 
nouncer. At one end of the control 
the voice will be "mellow." (I'd 
call it muffled.) The other end will 
be the "brilliant" adjustment. It 
will also be the more noisy. 

TO JUNK OR NOT TO JUNK 

TUBES may come and tubes may 
go, and the question is how 
close to forever can the old set go 
on. R. O. T. of Rochester, New 
York, observes : 

"It seems that every month in 
the last two years has seen a new 
crop of radio tubes. I'm wondering 
if their use results in a real improve- 
ment. I mean, is my present set 
becoming antiquated? I have a 
Radiola 48, employing the familiar 
'24, '45 and '80 tubes." 

There are in existence some 
(Continued on page 50) 



26 



Radio Fan-Fare 



FAN-FARE'S 

HUMOR 

CAFETERIA 



(RADIO COMEDIANS 
HELP YOURSELVES) 



"I say, old fellow, why on earth are 
you washing your spoon in your finger- 
bowl ?" 

"Do you think I want to get egg all 
over my pocket?" — Awgwan 



Advertisement from Reading (Mass.) 
Chronicle : "Wanted — Small apartment 
by couple with no children until May 1." 

— Buccaneer 



"Pop, I need an encyclopedia for 
school." 

"Encyclopedia hell ; you can walk to 
school like I did!" — Cajoler 



In spite of all the publicity given 

propaganda for world peace, there were 

the usual number of weddings in June. 

— Atlanta Journal 

"Waiter, two orders of Spumoni 
Vermicelli, please." 

"Very sorry, sir, that's the proprietor, 
sir." — Tiger 



A young daughter of a radio an- 
nouncer who was called upon to say 
grace at a family dinner, bowed her 
head and announced in loud clear tones, 
"This food comes to us through the 
courtesy of Almighty God." 

— Christian Register 



"Eyes right!" thundered the negro 
lieutenant. 

"You is wrong!" came back from the 
depths of the black troops. 

— Yellow Jacket 



"What do you mean by coming in so 
late?" demanded the angry parent. 

A sudden thought came to the boy. 

"Oh, dad," he said, "I forgot to tell 
you — I knew you wouldn't mind — I was 
sitting up with the sick son of the sick 
man you are always telling mother you 
sat up with." — Answers 

And if Adolf ever has nightmares 
we'll bet he dreams of being stranded in 
the Bronx. — Judge 



"F-e-e-t. What does that spell?" 
asked the teacher. 

Johnny didn't know. 

"What is it that a cow has four of 
and I only have two of?" 

Johnny's answer was as surprising as 
it was unexpected. — Texas Battalion 



Of father dear, 

We are bereft — 

(It said "Turn Right," 

But he turned left.) 

— Buffalo Evening Ncz 



?ws 



"Nature is an original artist," we 
read. That is why she so often scorns 
to copy the pictures on flower seed 
packets. — Humorist 



Headline : "Husband Leaves In Midst 
Of Wife's Bridge Party; Disappears." 
Just a fugitive from the chin gang. 

— Atlanta Journal 



"Where did you learn to kiss like 
that?" 

"Oh, just clucking at horses." 

— Exchange 



"Why did you break your engagement 
to Tom?" 

"He deceived me. 'He told me he 
was a liver and kidney specialist, and 
then I found out that he only worked in 
a butcher's shop." — Boston Transcript 



The next war, according to Marconi, 
will be fought by radio. The crooners 
should be our first line of defense. 

— St. J^ouis Post-Dispatch 



Five thousand students marched in 
Berlin's bonfire parade, "singing Nazi 
songs and college melodies." Such as 
"Keep the Tome Fires Burning"? 

— New York Herald Tribune 




"It's nothing, mother. He always dresses like that for the Eno Crime Clues 
program." 

A little boy was saying his prayers in Customer (in drug store) — A mus- 

a very low voice. tard plaster. 

"I can't hear you, dear," his mother . Drug Clerk (from force of habit) — 

whispered. We're out of mustard; how about 

"Wasn't talking to you," said the mayonnaise? ' 

youngster, firmly. — Tit-Bits — The IV at eh man-Examiner 



"See if you can laugh that off," said The way to cure hiccoughs, we read, 

the fat man's wife as she wired a but- is to scare the afflicted person. But 

ton on his vest. — Boys' Life what about the fellow who has them 

continuously for ten or fifteen days? If 

"I thought that you had died." that in itself doesn't scare him, what 

"Why?" can? — Judge 

"I heard someone speak well of you 

this morning." — V. P. I. Skipper "If you print any more jokes about 

Scotchmen," writes a man from Aber- 



Inflationists' theme song — "Buy, baby, deen, "I shall cease borrowing your 
buy." ■ — Three River Falls Times paper." — Tit-Bits 



July-August 27 



RADIO F A N - F A R E PROGRAM FINDER 



RADIO FAN-FARE PROGRAM FINDER 

A Greater Service to Radio Listeners 



RADIO Fan-Fare Program Finder offers a service 
■ to discriminating listeners who want more from 
radio entertainment than a mere background for a 
game of bridge, an evening of reading or a cocktail 
party. Radio audiences today are not satisfied to 
listen to whatever happens to be on the air but are 
selecting their radio programs as they choose the 
movies they attend or the Broadway shows they want 
to see. 

THIS fast growing and discriminating audience can 
now, for the first time, select, by means of our 
Program Finder, programs which particularly appeal 
to them. All of the outstanding chain programs are 
grouped, in the Classified Schedule according to the 
type of program. If, for instance, you want to listen 
to organ music or to a humorous sketch, merely turn 
to that section of the Classified Schedule and you can 



select the program which best suits your tastes. If 
j'ou want to hear a particular artist or a special pro- 
gram turn to the Artist and Program Schedule, page 
39-40. The index number opposite each name will 
enable you to turn to the Classified Schedule where 
you will find complete information about any given 
artist or program. 

"\17"E have listed what we deem to be the better 
* » programs, bearing in mind that we must restrict 
our choice to programs which are continuous enough 
to warrant inclusion in a monthly magazine. We can- 
not of course be responsible for last minute changes 
in programs nor stations but we will do everything 
humanly possible to limit errors and to extend the 
service rendered. Our readers are invited to suggest 
improvements. 



CLASSIFIED SCHEDULE 



Index 



A 
B 
C 
D 

E 

F 



G 
H 

I 
J 
K 

L 

M 

N 

O 

P 

Q 

E, 

S 

T 

U 

V 

W 

X 

Y 

Z 

BB 

DD 



Page 



NOTE — Time zones are abbreviated as follows: ED — 
Eastern Daylight, ES-CD — Eastern Standard, Central Day- 
light, CS — Central Standard, M — Mountain, P — Pacific. 
The index number appearing at the left of each program 
title is the key for reference from the Artist and Program 
Schedule. Where no station listing is given, hook-up is 
variable; best results can be obtained by tuning in the 
nearest key station of the network indicated. Write Pan- 
Fare Program Editor, 420 Lexington Ave., New York City, 
for further information, enclosing return postage. 



CLASSIFICATIONS INCLUDED 

Type of Program 

Beauty 

Books and Literature 

Children's Program 

Comedians..— 

Food.. 

General 

(Political, Educational, Philosophers, 
etc.) 

Health 

Home and Garden 

Music — Band 

Music — Chamber 

Music — Choruses, Glee Clubs, Quartets 

etc.. - 

Music — Classical 

Music — Dance.. 

Music — Medley Programs.... 

Music — Novelty 

Music — Organ 

Music, Patter and Song 

Music — Popular 

Music — Religious 

Music — Standard and Folk Songs.... 

Music — Symphony. 

News Reports 

Religious Services 

Sketches — Dramatic 

Sketches — Detective and Mystery 

Sketches — Humorous 

Travel.. 

Variety Shows 



27 
27 
27 
28 
28 
28 



29 
29 
29 
30 

30 
30 
31 
32 
32 
32 
33 
33 
34 
34 
35 
35 
36 
36 
37 
37 
37 
37 



A— BEAUTY 



A1— BARBARA GOULD. 
10:45 AM— ED 

WABC WAAB 
WKBW WDRC 

WCAU WJAS 

WEAN 



Thursday. ] . t hour. 

9:45 AM ES-ED 8:45 AM 

WADC WCAO 

WBBM WKRC 

WHK CKOK 

WOWO WFBL 

WSPD WJSV 

WHEC WBT 

WTAR 



CS 

KMBC KMOX 
WGST WBRC 
WDSU KTRH 
KOMA WCCO 



M 

7:45 AM 

KLZ 

KSL 



A BEAUTY (Continued) 



A3— LADY ESTHER SERENADE 
Sunday. J ■> hour 
With Wayne King and Orchestra 



3:00 PM— ED 

WEAF WTAG 



WEEI 

WGY 

WCAE 

WJAR 
Tuesday. 14 hour 

8:30 PM— ED 

WEAF WTAG 

WCAE 

WBEN 

WFI 

WCSH 
Thursday. % hour 

9:30 PM— ED 

W.JZ WBZ 

WBZA 



WCSH 
WBEN 
WLIT 



WEEI 
WJAR 
WGY 



2:00 PM— ES-CD 

WLW WRC 
WTAM WWJ 
WJAX WFLA 
WWNC WIOD 
KYW 



1:00 PM— CS 

WJDX KSD 
WOC WHO 
WOW WDAF 
WTMJ KSTP 
KVOO WKY 
WOAI KPRC 
WFAA WMC 
WSMB WSM 
WSB 



M P 

12:00 PM 11:00 AM 

KOA KGW 

KDYL KHQ 
KGO 
KFI 
KOMO 



7:30 PM— ES-CD 

WRC WTAM 
WWJ WSAI 
WFBR WMAQ 



6:30 PM— CS 

WDAF 



8:30 PM— ES-CD 

WBAL WGAR 
WJR WHAM 
WENR 



7:30 PM— CS 

KWK KWCR 
KSO KOIL 

WREN 



B— BOOKS AND LITERATURE 



B1 AMERICA'S GRUB STREET SPEAKS 



5:45 PM— ED 

WABC WJAS 
WCAU WLBZ 
WDRC WOKO 
WEAN WORC 



WHP 
WICC 



CFRB 



4:45 PM— ES-CD 

WADC WJSV 
WBIG WKBN 
WBT WLBW 
WCAO WMBG 
WDAE WQAM 
WDB.J WSJS 
WDBO WSPD 
WFBL WWVA 
WFEA CKLW 
WHK WTAR 



Mon. 14 hour. 
3:45 PM— CS 

KFAB WGST 
KFH WHAS 
KLRA WIBW 
KMBC WLAC 
KOMA WMT 
KRLD WODX 



M 

2:45 PM 

KLZ 

KSL 



KTRH 
KTSA 
WACO 
WDSU 



WSFA 
WTAQ 
WREC 



B2 POET'S GOLD, POETIC READINGS 



Sunday. \i hour 
David Ross 

5:00 PM— ED 

WABC WOKO 
WNAC WGR 
WDRC WIP 
WJAS WEAN 
WLBZ WICC 
WHP WORC 
CFRB 



4:00 PM— ES-CD 

WCAO WHK 
CKOK WSPD 
WFEA WLBW 
WKBN WTAR 
WDBJ WTOC 
WQAM WDBO 
WSJS 



3:00 PM— CS 

KMBC WFBM 
WMBD WGST 
WBRC WDOD 
WREC WODX 
WSFA WLAC 
WDSU KRLD 
KTRH WIBW 
WTAQ WKBH 
KFAB WCCO 
WSBT WMT 



M 

2:00 PM 

KVOR 
KLZ 



P 
1:00 PM 

KHJ 

KOIN 

KGB 

KFRC 

KOL 

KFPY 



B3— GOLDEN TREASURY BREWSTER— Tuesday. 1/2 hou. John Brewster. 



4:00 PM ED 

WEAF WCSH 
WGY WTAG 
WJAR WCAE 



3:00 PM— ES-CD 

WFBR WTAM 
WWJ WDAF 
WCKY WSAI 
WRC WMAQ 



2:00 PM— CS 

WOW WOC 
WHO 



C— CHILDREN'S PROGRAM 



C1— ADVENTURE OF HELEN AND MARY— Saturday. 
11:00 AM— ED 10:00 AM— ES-CD 9:00 AM 



WABC WOKO 
WNAC WKBW 
WDRC WCAU 
WJAS WPG 
WLBZ WORC 
CFRB 



WADC WFBL 
CKOK WJSV 
WPSD WFEA 
WCAH WHEC 
WLBW WKBN 
WWVA WQAM 
WBIG WDAE 
WTOC 
WSJS 



V2 hour. 
CS 



KMBC WGST 
WODO WREC 
WODX WSFA 
WLAC WDSU 
KTRH KLRA 
WACO WTAQ 
WCCO WMT 



8:00 AM 

KVOR 
KLZ 



P 
7:00 AM 

KHJ 

KOIN 

KGB 

KFRC 

KOL 

KFPY 



* Notice of Copyright. Method of arrangement copyrighted. Infringment will be prosecuted. 



28 



Radio Fan-Fare 



RADIO FAN-FARE PROGRAM FINDER 



C — CHILDREN'S PROGRAMS (Continued) 



C2 - COLUMBIA JUNIOR BUGLE— Sunday. 



9:00 AM— ED 

WABC WOKO 
WNAC WGR 
WDRC WCAU 
WEAN WPG 
WLBZ WICC 
WHP WORC 



8:00 AM— ES-CD 

WADC WCAO 
WHK CKOK 
WFBL WSPD 
WJSV WCAH 
WLBW WHEC 
WWVA WKBN 
WBIG WDBJ 
WTOC WDBO 
WDAE 



3 /t hour. 
7:00 AM— CS 

KMBC WFBM 
WMBD WGST 
WDOD WREC 
WLAC KRLD 
KTRH KLRA 
KTSA WIBW 
KFH WTAQ 
WISN WCCO 
WMT 



C7 — LADY NEXT DOOR — Monday, Tuesday and Thursday. l i hour. 
Madge Tucker, Director 

4:45 PM— ED 3:45 PM— ES-CD 2:45 PM— CS 

WEAF WTAG WFBR WTAM KSD WDAF 
WJAR WCSH WSAI WRC 
WGY WENR 



C8 



LITTLE ORPHAN ANNIE 

Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday and Saturday. 

Shirley Bell, Allan Baruck, Henrietta Tedro, Harry Cansdale 



hour 



5:45 PM— ED 

WJZ WBZ 
WBZA KDKA 
CKGW 



4:45 PM— ES-CD 

WBAL WJR 

WGAR WIS 

WLW WWNC 

WRVA WJAX 

WHAM 

5:45 PM— ES-CD 

WENR 



4:45 PM— CS 

KSTP KOIL 
WREN WEBC 
WDAY KFYR 
WOAI WKY 
KPRC KTBS 
WBAP KWCR 
KWK 



C9-NBC CHILDREN'S HOUR— Sunday. 1 hour. Milton Cross. 
9:00 AM— ED 8:00 AM— ES-CD 7:00 AM— CS 

WJZ WBZ WBAL WGAR 

WBZA WLW WJR 

WHAM WSYR 

WMAL WENR 



WIBA KWK 
vVREN KSTP 
WEBC KFYR 
KDKA 



C10— NURSERY RHYMES 

Tuesday. M hour 

Lewis James, Milton Cross 



5:45 PM -ED 

WEAF WGY 



WLIT 
WEEI 
WCSH 



WTAG 

WJAR 
WBEN 



4:45 PM— ES-CD 

WFBR WRC 
WTAM WSAI 
WWJ WCKY 
WMAQ 



3:45 PM— CS 
KSD WOC 
WHO WOW 
WDAF WIBA 
KSTP WDAY 



KFYR 
WKY 
WOAI 



KTBS 
WFAA 



M P 

2:45 PM 1:45 PM 

KOA KGO 

KDYL KGW 
KOMO 
KHQ 



C11— PAUL WING THE STORY MAN— Monday, Wednesday and Friday. ! [ hour. 
5:45 PM— ED 4-45 PM— ES-CD 

WEAF WGY WWJ WTAM 
WBEN 

C13— THE SINGING LADY— Mon., Tues., Wed., Thurs. and Fri. M hour. 
5:30 PM— ED 4:30 PM— ES-CD 3:30 PM— CS 

WJZ WBZ WBAL WJR WSM 

WBZA KDKA WLW WHAM 
WGAR 

C14— SKIPPY— Mon., Tues. Wed. Thurs., Fri, and Sat. M hour. 
5:30 PM— ED 5:30 PM— ES-CD 

WCAO WKRC 
WHK CKOK 
WJSV WBBM 



WABC WEAN 
WNAC WGR 
WDRC WCAU 



C15— DON LANG, TRUE ANIMAL STORIES— Monday and Friday. 



5:00 PM ED 

WABC WOKO 
WGR WDRC 
WCAU WJAS 
WEAN WLBZ 
WHP WORC 
CFRB 



4:00 PM— ES-CD 

WADC WCAO 
WBBM WHK 
CKOK WFBL 
WSPD WFEA 
WLBW WHEC 
WWVA WBIG 
WDBJ WTOC 
WQAM WDBO 
WDAE WSJS 



3:00 PM— CS 

WGST WDOD 
WREC WSFA 
WLAC WDSU 
KTRH KLRA 
KTSA WIBW 
WACO KFH 
WTAQ KFAB 
WISN WCCO 
WSBT WMT 



M 

2:00 PM 

KVOR 

KLZ 

KSL 



hour. 



C16— STAMP ADVENTURER'S CLUB— Friday. H hour. 



5:00 PM— ED 
WABC WAAB 
WKBW WDRC 
WCAU WOKO 
WEAN WORC 



6:00 PM ES-CD 

WADC WHK 
WOWO WCAO 
WSPD WFBL 
WCAH WJSV 
WJAS WHEC 
WKRC 



D— COMEDIANS 



D1— PHIL BAKER, THE ARMOUR JESTER— Friday. V- hour. 

The Armour Jester, Harry McNaughton, Roy Shield, Merrie-Men, Neil Sisters. 



9:30 PM— ED 

WJZ WBZ 
WBZA KDKA 



8:30 PM— ES-CD 

WBAL WHAM 
WGAR WJR 
WRVA WWNC 
WJAX WIOD 
WMAQ 



7:30 PM— CS 

KWK WREN 



KOIL 
KSTP 
WSM 
WSB 



WTMJ 
WEBC 
WMC 
WAPI 



M 

6:30 PM 

KOA 
KDYL 



WSMB WFAA 
KPRC WOAI 
WKY KSO 



P 
5:30 PM 

KGW 

KOMO 

KHQ 

KGO 

KFI 



D— COMEDIANS (Continued) 



D2— BEN BERNIE'S BLUE RIBBON ORCHESTRA— Tuesday. V 2 hour. 



9:00 PM 

WEAF 

WEEI 

WCSH 

WGY 

WCAE 



ED 

WJAR 

WFI 

WBEN 



8:00 PM— ES-CD 

WRC WFBR 
WTAM WSAI 
WWJ WCKY 
WLS 



P 
8:30 PM 

KGO 

KFI 

KGW 

KOMO 

KHQ 



D3— PHIL COOK AND HIS INGRAM SHAVERS— Mon., Wed., Fri. M hour. 
8:45 PM— ED 7:45 PM— ES-CD 6:45 PM— CS 

WJZ WBZ WJR WBAL KWK KWCR 

WBZA KDKA WGAR WCKY 

WMAL WSYR 

WLS WHAM 



KSO WREN 
KOIL 



D5— GULF HEADLINERS— Sunday. % hour. 
9:00 PM— ED 8:00 PM ES-CD 



WJZ 
WBZ 



WBAL 
WBZA 



WGAR WJR 
WLW WSYR 
WMAL WRVA 
WPTF WWNC 
WIS WJAX 
WRDA 



D7— ED WYNN AND THE FIRE CHIEF BAND— Tuesday. V 2 



9:30 PM— ED 

WEAF WCSH 
WFI WGY 
WBEN WEEI 
WJAR WCAE 
WTAG CFCF 



8:30 PM— ES-CD 

WFBR WRC 
WTAM WWJ 
WLW WRVA 
WWNC WLS 
WJAX WIOD 
WFLA WMAQ 



7:30 PM— CS 

KSD WOW 



WHO 

WSM 

WIBA 

WEBC 

KFYR 

KVOO 

WSB 



WOC 

WDAF 

KSTP 

WDAY 

WTMJ 

WMC 

KTHS 



hour. 
M 

6:30 PM 

KDYL 
KOA 
KGIR 
KGHL 



P 
5:30 PM 

KFSD 

KTAR 

KGO 

KFI 

KGW 

KOMO 

KHQ 



WSMB WBAP 
KPRC WKY 
WOAI KTBS 
WJDX 



E— FOOD 



El— FRANCES LEE BARTON 



Tuesday and Thursday. 
11:15 AM— ED 

WEAF WTIC 
WTAG WEEI 
WJAR WCSH 
WLIT WGY 
WBEN WCAE 



X. hour WHO 

10:15 AM— ES-CD WMC 

WRC WFBR WAPI 
WTAM WWJ 
WLW WMAQ 



9:15 AM— CS 



KTHS 
KPRC 
WKY 
WOW 



WSM 

WSB 

WSMB 

KVOO 

WOAI 

KTBS 



E2— BETTY CROCKER— Wednesday and Friday. ]4 hour. 

10:45 AM— ED 9:45 AM— ES-CD 8:45 AM— CS 

WEAF WTAG WTAM WWJ KSD WOW 

WEEI WCSH WSAI WFBR WOAI KPRC 

WBAP WFI WRVA WPTF WKY WOC 

WBEN WGY WJAX WIOD WHO KVOO 

WJAR WCAE WFLA KYW KTHS WDAF 
WRC 



E3 FORECAST SCHOOL OF COOKERY— Saturday. U hour. Mrs. A. M. Goudiss, 
11 :00 AM— ED 10:00 AM— ES-CD 9:00 AM— CS 

WJZ WBZA WBAL WHAM KWK KOIL 
KDKA WBZ WGAR WJR WREN 

WCKY KYW 



E5— RADIO HOUSEHOLD INSTITUTE 
Wednesday and Saturday. ! i hour 



11:15 AM— ED 

WEAF WTAG 



WEEI 
WCSH 
WGY 
WCAE 



WJAR 
WLIT 
WBEN 
WTIC 



10:15 AM— ES-CD 

WRC WFBR 
WTAM WWJ 
WSAI KYW 



9:15 AM— CS 

KSD WOC 
WHO WDAF 
WTMJ KSTP 
WEBC KVOO 
KPRC WOAI 
WKY KTHS 
WSM WSB 
WSMB WAPI 
WMC WBAP 



M 

8:15 AM 

KOA 
KDYL 



E6— VISITING WITH IDA BAILEY ALLEN— Thursday. M hour. 



10:15 AM-ED 

WABC WOKO 
WAAB WKBW 



WJAS 
WHP 
CFRB 



WLBZ 
WORC 



9:15 AM— ES-CD 

WADC WCAO 
WHK CKOK 
WFBL WSPD 
WJSV WCAH 
WLBW WHEC 
WWVA WBIG 
WDBJ WQAM 
WDBO WDAE 
WSJS 



8:15 AM— CS 

KMBC KMOX 
WMBD WGST 
WDOD WREC 
WSFA WLAC 



7:15 AM 

KVOR 

KLZ 

KSL 



WDSU 
KLRA 
KFH 
WISN 



KTRH 
WIBW 
WTAQ 
WSBT 



F— GENERAL 



F1 AMERICAN LEGION PROGRAM 



Thursday. M hour 
4:45 PM— ED 

WABC WOKO 

WAAB WGR 

WIP 

WPG 

WORC 



WJAS 
WLBZ 



3:45 PM— ES-CD 

WCAO WHK 
WFBL WSPD 
WFEA WLBW 
WKBN WBIG 
WTAR WDBJ 
WMBG WTOC 
WQAM WDBO 
WSJS 



2:45 PM— CS 

KMBC WGST 
WBRC WDOD 
WODX WSFA 
WLAC WDSU 
KRLD KTRH 
WIBW WACO 
WTAQ WKBH 
WISN WSBT 
WMT WREC 



M 

1:45 PM 

KVOR 

KLZ 

KSL 



o c 



W H 



ABBREVIATIONS: 



ED — Eastern Daylight, ES-CD — Eastern Standard, Central Daylight, CS — Central Standard, M — Mountain, P — Pacific. 

SEE NOTE PAGE 27 



July-August 



RADIO 



29 



F A N - F A R E 



PROGRAM 



FINDER 



F— GENERAL (Continued) 



FS— COLUMBIA EDUCATIONAL FEATURES— Fri. M hour. 

2:45PM-ED 1:45PM-ES-CD 12:45 PM— CS 

WABC WOKO WADC WCAO KMBC WGST 

WKBW WIP WBBM CKOK WDOD WREC 

WJAS WEAN WFBL WSPO WODX WSFA 

WPG WLBZ WJSV WCAH WLAC WDSU 

WHP WORC WFEA WLBW KTRH WTAQ 

CFRB WHEC WWVA WISN WSBT 

WKBN WBIG WMT 

WTOC WQAM 

WDBO WDAE 

WSJS 



M 


P 


11:45 AM 


10:45 AM 


KVOR 


KHJ 


KLZ 


KOIN 




KGB 




KFRC 




KOL 




KFPY 



F4 COLUMBIA PUBLIC AFFAIRS INSTITUTE— Sat. >/ 2 hour. 

10:15 PM— ED 9:15 PM— ES-CD 8:15 PM—CS 

WABC WOKO WADC WCAO KMBC WMBD 

WAAB WKBW WBBM WHK WGST WDOD 

WCAU WJAS WFBL WSPD WREC WODX 

WEAN WPG WJSV WFEA WLAC WDSU 

WLBZ WICC WLBW WHEC KLRA KTSA 

WHP WORC WWVA WBIG WIBW KFH 

WDBJ WTOC WCCO WSBT 

WQAM WDBO 

WDAE WSJS 



M 

7:15 PM 

KVOR 
KLZ 



P 
6:15 PM 

KHJ 

KOIN 

KGB 

KFRC 

KOL 

KFPY 



F7— GULF PROGRAM— Wednesday and Friday. \i hour. Irvin S. Cobb. 



9:00 PM— ED 

WABC WOKO 
WNAC WKBW 
WDRC WCAU 
WEAN WORC 
WJAS WLBZ 



8:00 PM— ES-CD 7:00 PM— CS 

WCAO WKRC WGST WBRC 



WHK CKOK 
WFBL WSPD 
WJSV WCAH 
WBT WBIG 
WDBJ WMBG 
WQAM WDBO 
WDAE WOWO 
WTOC WFEA 



WREC WDSU 
WLAC KTRH 
KRLD KTSA 
KLRA WSFA 
WHAS 



F8— INTERNATIONAL RADIO FORUM 
Sunday. > 4 hour 

2:15 PM-ED 1:15 PM-ES-CD 

WJZ CFCF WBAL WMAL 
WSYR KDKA 
WRVA WPTF 
WWNC WIS 
WJAX WMAQ 



12:15 PM— CS 

KWK KWCR 



M P 

11:15 AM 10:15 AM 



KSO 
KOIL 
KFYR 
WAPI 



WREN 
WDAY 

WSM 
WMC 



WSMB WEBC 
WJDX WKY 
KVOO WFAA 
KTBS KTHS 
WOAI 



KOA 
KDYL 
KGIR 
KGHL 



KGO 
KFI 
KOMO 
KHQ 
KFSD 
KTAR 



F13— MAGIC OF SPEECH— Friday. V 2 hour. 



Vida Ravenscroft Sutton 
M 
2-00 PM— ED 1:00 PM— ES-CD 12:00 PM—CS 

WEAF WJAR WFBR WTAM KSD WIBA 
WSAI WCKY WEBC WSM 
WIS WWNC WSMB KVOO 
WIOD KTBS WOAI 



11:00 AM 10:00 AM 

KOA KPO 
KDYL 



F14— MEET THE ARTIST-Wed. \i hr. 



6:00 PM— ED 

WABC WJAS 
WAAB WKBW 
WDRC WLBZ 
WICC WOKO 
WIP CFRB 



5:00 PM— ES-CD 

WADC WHK 
WBIG WMBG 
WBT WQAM 
WCAO WSJS 
WDAE WSPD 
WDBJ WWVA 
WDBO CKLW 
WFBL WTAR 
WFEA WBBM 



Bob Taplinger Interviews. 
M 

4:00 PM—CS 3:00 PM 

KFAB WDSU KLZ 
KFH WGST KSL 
KLRA WHAS KVOR 
KMBC WISN 
KOMA WLAC 
KTRH WMT 
KTSA WODX 
WACO WSBT 
WBRC WSFA 
WCCO WTAQ 
WDOD WREC 



F17— TALKS BY PRESIDENT'S CABINET— Tuesday. i/ 2 hour. 
10:30 PM— ED 9:30 PM— ES-CD. .8:30 PM—CS 

WEAF WEFI WFBR WWJ WSMB WTAG 
WJAR WCSH WIS WFLA WIBA WEBC 
WDAF WRVA WTAM WRC WDAY WOC 
WWNC WBEN WJAX WSAI WHO WMC 
WJDX WLIT WIOD KYW KTBS WSB 
WGY WKY WFAA 

WTMJ 



F19— CHEERIO— Mon., Tue., Wed., Thurs., Fri., Sat. >/ 2 hour. J. Harrison Isles. 

9:30 AM— ED 8:30 AM— ES-CD 7:30 AM— CS 

WEAF WTAG WRC WTAM WOW WDAF 

WEEI WJAR WWJ WCKY KTBS WKY 

WCSH WFI WRVA WPTF WJDX KPRC 

WGY WBEN WWNC WFBR WOAI WSM 

WCAE CKGW WIS WJAX WSB WAPI 

CFCF WIOD WFLA WMC 

WSAI WCFL 



F20— THE POLITICAL 
7:00 PM— ED 

WABC WOKO 
WNAC WGR 
WDRC WCAU 
WJAS WEAN 
WLBZ WICC 
WHP WORC 



SITUATION— Saturday. M hour. Frederic Wile. 
6:00 PM— ES-CD 5:00 PM—CS 

WADC WCAO WFBM WGST 
WBBM WHK WDOD WREC 
WSPD WJSV WODX WSFA 
WCAH WFEA WDSU 
WLBW WHEC 
WWVA WBIG 
WDBJ WTOC 
WQAM WDBO 
WDAE 



F22— VOICE OF EXPERIENCE— Mon., Tues., Wed., Thurs., Fri. U hour 
11:00 AM— ED 10:00 AM— ES-CD 9:00 AM— CS 

WCAO WBBM KMBC WHAS 
WKRC WHK KMOX 
WJSV 



WABC WNAC 
WGR WDRC 

WCAU WJAS 
WEAN 



F — GENERAL (Continued) 



Wednesday. ]4 hour. 

8:00 PM— ED 7:00 PM— ES-CD 



WABC WGR 

WNAC WCAU 
WDRC WEAN 
WJAS 



WCAO WHK 

WKRC 

WBBM 

WJSV 



6:00 PM—CS 

KMBC 
KMOX 
WHAS 



F23— WOMEN'S RADIO REVIEW 
Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, 
Thursday, Friday. >/ 2 hour. 
Joseph Littan, Claudine MacDonald. 



3:30 PM— ED 

WEAF WJAR 
WGY WBEN 
WCAE WCSH 
WFI WTAG 



2:30 PM— ES-CD 

WFBR WTAM 



WWJ 
WIS 



WWNC 
WIOD 



WJAX WFLA 
WSAI WRC 
KYW 



1:30 PM 

KSD 

WSMB 

WOW 

KSTP 

WDAY 

WMC 

KPRC 

WAPI 

KFYR 



-CS 

WOC 

WHO 

WIBA 

WEBC 

WSM 

WKY 

KTBS 

WBAP 

WDAF 



F24— YOUR CHILD— Tuesday. % hour 



11:03 AM— ED 

WEAF WTAG 
WTIC WJAR 
WCSH WLIT 
WGY WBEN 
WCAE 



9:00 AM— CS 

WOC KFYR 
10:00 AM— ES-CD WHO WSM 

WFBR WRC WIBA WEBC 



WDAF WPTF 
WWNC WIOD 
WWJ WIS 
WRVA 



KTHS KVOO 
WOAI WKY 
WDAY WMC 
KTBS 



M P 

8:00 AM 7:00 AM 

KOA KFSD 

KDYL KGO 
KGIR KFI 
KGW 



F25— OUR AMERICAN SCHOOLS— Sun. >/ 2 hour. 6:30 PM— ED— WEAF Network 



G— HEALTH 



G1— ADVENTURES IN HEALTH— Tues. M hour. 



8:30 PM— ED 

WJZ WBZ 
WBZA KDKA 
CKGW 



7:30 PM— ES-CD 

WBAL WHAM 
WLW WGAR 
WLS 



Dr. Herman Bundeson. 
M 



Fri. M hour. 8:30 PM— ED— WJZ Network. 



6:30 PM—CS 


5:30 PM 


KSO 


KOA 


9:45 PM—CS 


KDYL 


KSO 


M 




8:45 PM 




KOA 




KDYL 



p 

4:30 PM 

KGO 

KGW 

KOMO 

KHQ 

KFI 

7:45 PM 

KGO 

KGW 

KOMO 

KHQ 



G3— MODERN LIVING HEALTH TALK— Mon., Tues., Wed., Thurs., Fri. M hour. 
9:30 AM— ED 8:30 AM— ES-CD 

WABC WNAC WJSV 
WCAU WEAN 



G4— TOWER HEALTH EXERCISES— Mon., Tues., Wed., Thurs., Fri., Sat. \\i hours 
Arthur Bagley. 

5:45 AM— ES-CD 
6:45 AM— ES-CD 



6:45 AM— ED 
7:45 AM— ED 

WEAF WEEI 
WFI WGY 
WBEN WCAE 
CKGW 



WRC 



G5— ACADEMY OF MEDICINE— Tuesday. U hour. 

11:30 AM— ED 10:30 AM— ES-CD 9:30 AM— CS M 

WABC WOKO WCAO CKOK WDOD WREC 8:30 AM 

WNAC WKBW WSPD WJSV WODX WSFA KVOR 

WDRC WJAS WFEA WLBW WLAC KRLD KLZ 

WEAN WPG WWVA WBIG KTRH KLRA 

WLBZ WHP WQAM WDBO WIBW WTAQ 

WORC CFRB WDAE WCCO 

H— HOME AND GARDEN 



H1 AMERICAN TAXPAYERS— Saturday. \i hour. M 

7:00 PM— ED 6:00 PM— ES-CD 5:00 PM—CS 4:00 PM 

WJZ KDKA WBAL WMAL KWCR KSO KOA 

WHAM WSYR WIBA WEBC KDYL 
W.IR WWNC WSB WMC 
WFLA WSMB KTBS 



P 
3:00 PM 

KPO 
KJR 
KEX 
KGA 
KFSD 



H2— BENJAMIN MOORE TRIANGLE CLUB— Fri. M hr. Lew White, Betty Moore 
4:15 PM— ED 3:15 PM— ES-CD 2:15 PM— CS 

WEAF WTIC WFBR WRC 
WEEI WGY WTAM WWJ 
WFI CKGW WLW WMAQ 
WCAE 



WOC WHO 
WDAF KSTP 
WEBC WDAY 
WKY WOW 
WFAA 



H5— NATIONAL FARM AND HOME HOUR— Mon., Tues., Wed., Thurs., Fri., Sat 



1 hour. 

1:30 PM— ED 

WJZ WBZ 
WBZA KDKA 



12:30 PM— ES-CD 11:30 AM— CS 



WBAL 

WLW 

WJR 

WPTF 

WIS 

WIOD 



WRC 

WCKY 

WRVA 

WWNC 

WJAX 

WELA 



WHAM WSYR 
KYW 



KOIL KPRC 
KWK WOC 
WREN WOW 
WHO KTBS 
WDAF WIBA 
WKY WEBC 
KTHS KFYR 
KSTP WSB 
WDAY WJDX 
WSM WFAA 
WAPI WOAI 



M 
10:30 AM 

KOA 



I— MUSIC— BAND 



11— MUSIC OF THE AMERICAS 

U. S. Army Band— CapL Win. J. Stannard, Bandmaster. 
Tuesday. V 2 hour. 



11:30 AM-ED 

WEAF WTAG 



WJAR 
WEEI 
CFCF 
WCSH 



WRC 
WTIC 
WGY 
CKGW 



10:30 AM— ES-CD 9:30 AM-CS 

WWJ WSAI WOW WOC 
KFBR WCKY WHO KSD 
WTAM WDAF 
KYW 



M 

8:30 AM 
KOA 



ABBREVIATIONS: ED — Eastern Daylight, ES-CD- 



-Eastern Standard, Central Daylight, CS Central Standard, M — Mountain, P — Pacific 

SEE NOTE PAGE 27 



30 



Radio Fan-Fare 



RADIO FAN -FARE PROGRAM FINDER 



I— MUSIC— BAND (Continued) 



Thursday. % hour. 
4:00 PM— ED 

WABC WOKO 
WNAC WGR 
WDRC WCAU 
WIP WJAS 
WEAN WPG 
WLBZ WICC 
WORC CFRB 



3:00 PM 

WCAO 

WHK 

WFBL 

WJSV 

WFEA 

WWVA 

WDBJ 

WQAM 

WDAE 



ES CD 

WBBM 
CKOK 
WSPD 
WCAH 
WHEC 
WKBN 
WTOC 
WDBO 
WSJS 



2:00 PM— CS 

KMBC KMOX 
WGST WDOD 
WREC WSFA 
WLAC WDSU 
KRLD KTRH 
KLRA KTSA 
WIBW WACO 
KFH WTAQ 



Friday, 



V 2 hour. 
4:30 PM— ED 

WABC WOKO 
WAAB WGR 
WDRC WIP 
WJAS WPG 
WLBZ WHP 
WORC CFRB 



KFAB 
WSBT 



WISN 
WMT 



3:30 PM 

WCAO 
CKOK 
WSPD 
WLBW 
WTAR 
WMBG 
WQAM 
WSJS 



ES-CD 

WHK 

WFBL 

WFEA 

WKBN 

WDBJ 

WTOC 

WDBO 



2:30 PM— CS 

KMBC WGST 
WBRC WDOD 
WREC WODX 
WSFA WLAC 
WDSU KRLD 
KTRH WIBW 
WACO WTAQ 
WKBH WISN 
WCCO WSBT 
WMT 



M 

1 :00 PM 

KVOR 

KLZ 

KSL 



M 

1:30 PM 

KVOR 

KLZ 

KSL 



P 
12:00 PM 

KHJ 

KOIN 

KGB 

KFRC 

KOL 

KFPY 



P 
12:30 PM 

KHJ 

KOIN 

KGB 

KFRC 

KOL 

KFPY 



12-U. S. NAVY BAND— Tuesday. »/ 2 hour. 



4:00 PM— ED 

WABC WJAS 
WAAB WOKO 
WCAU WORC 
WDRC WPG 
WGR CFRB 



3:00 PM— ES-CD 

WADC WJSV 

WBT WKBN 

WCAO WLBW 

WDAE WMBG 

WDBJ WQAM 

WDBO WSJS 

WFBL WSPD 

WFEA CKLW 

WHK WTAR 



2:00 PM— CS 

KFAB WFBM 
KLRA WGST 
KMBC WISN 
KOMA WLAC 
KRLD WMT 
KTRH WSBT 
WACO WSFA 
WBRC WTAQ 
WDOD WREC 
WDSU 



M 

1:00 PM 

KLZ 
KVOR 



13— GOLDMAN BAND CONCERT— Wed. 1 hour Edwin Franks Goldman. 
9:00 PM— ED 8:00 PM— ES-CD 7:00 PM— CS 

WBAL WLW KOIL WFAA 

WGAR WENR 

WHAM 



WJZ WBZ 
KDKA WBZA 



Sun. % hr. 9:30 PM— ED— WJZ Network. 



KPRC WJDX 

KSO WKY 

KSTP WMC 

KTBS WOAI 

KTHS WREN 

KVOO WSB 

KWCR WSMB 

KWK KWCB 



J— MUSIC— CHAMBER 



J1— COMPINSKY TRIO— Sunday. Vi hour. 



1:30 PM— ED 

WABC WOKO 
WAAB WORC 
WDRC WPG 
WGR CFRB 

WJAS 



12:30 PM— ES-CD 11:30 AM— CS 

WADC WLBW KFAB WISN 



WBT WQAM 
WCAO WSJS 
WDAE WSPD 
WDBJ CKLW 
WFBL WTAR 
WHEC 



KMOX WMBD 
KOMA WMT 
KTRH WODX 
WCCO WSBT 
WDOD WTAQ 
WDSU WREC 
WGST 



M 

10:30 AM 

KLZ 
KVOR 



J2 MADISON ENSEMBLE— Tues., Fri., and Sat, >/ 2 hour. 1:30 PM — ED — WABC 
Network. 

J3— MORNIN G MUSIC ALE— Sunday. 1 hour. 11:00 AM— ED— WJZ Network. 

J4 CHAMBER MUSIC— Sun. M hr. 1:15 PM— ED— WJZ Network. >/ 2 hr. 1:00 
PM— ED— WEAF Network. 



J5- BEETHOVEN CHAMBER OF MUSIC— Sun. V 2 hr. 6:00 PM— ED— WJZ Network 

K— MUSIC— CHORUSES, GLEE CLUBS, 
QUARTETS, ETC. 

K2— CONTENTED PROGRAM— Mon. V 2 hr. 10:00 PM— ED— NBC Network— Jean 
Arnold, Lullaby Lady, Morgan L. Eastman. 

K3— ETHEL HAYDEN AND ARTHUR LANG— Wed. M "'■ 



5:45 PM— ED 

WABC WLBZ 
WDRC WOKO 
WEAN CFRB 
WJAS WNAC 
WKBW 



4:45 PM— ES-CD 3:45 PM— CS 

WADC WKBN KFAB WDSU 



WBIG WLBW 
WBT WMBG 
WCAO WQAM 
WDAE WSJS 
WDBJ WSPD 
WDBO WWVA 
WFBL CKLW 
WFEA WTAR 
WJSV 



KFH WGST 
KLRA WHAS 
KMBC WLAC 
KOMA WMT 
KRLD WODX 
KTRH WSBT 
KTSA WSFA 
WACO WTAQ 
WBRC WREC 
WDOD 



M 
2:45 PM 

KLZ 
KSL 
KVOR 



K7— MANHATTAN MOODS— Sunday. V 2 hour. 
Do, Re, Mi; Mark Warnow's Orchestra 



2:30 PM— ED 

WABC WJAS 
WCAU WLBZ 
WDRC WOKO 
WEAN WORC 
WHP CFRB 
WICC WNAC 



1:30 PM— ES-CD 12:30 PM—CS 

WADC WHK KLRA WHAS 



WBIG WJSV 
WBT WLBW 
WCAH WMBG 
WDAE WQAM 
WDBJ WSJS 
WDBO WSPD 
WFBL WWVA 
WFEA CKLW 
WHEC WBBM 



KMBC WIBW 
KMOX WISN 
KOMA WLAC 
KTRH WMT 
KTSA WODX 
WCCO WSBT 
WDSU WSFA 
WGST WTAQ 



M 

11:30 AM 

KLZ 
KSL 



K— MUSIC— CHORUSES, GLEE CLUBS, QUARTETS, 
ETC. (Continued) 

K8-THE MASTER SINGERS— Tuesday. J^ hour. 11:30 PM— ED— WJZ Network 
Charles Baker. 



K10— ROUND TOWNERS QUARTET— Wed. 



4:15 PM— ED 

WABC WJAS 
WAAB WLBZ 
WDRC WOKO 
WGR WORC 
WIP CFRB 



3-15 PM— ES-CD 

WADC WJSV 
WBIG WKBN 
WBT WLBW 
WCAO WMBG 
WDAE WQAM 
WDBJ WSJS 
WDBO WSPD 
WFBL WWVA 
WFEA CKLW 
WHK WTAR 



H hr. 
2:15 PM— CS 

KFAB WFBM 
KLRA WGST 
KMBC WHAS 
KOMA WISN 
KRLD WLAC 
KTRH WMT 
KTSA WSBT 
WACO WSFA 
WBRC WTAQ 
WDOD WREC 
WDSU 



M 
1:15 PM 

KLZ 
KVOR 



K12— L'HEURE EX QUISE— Sunday. i/ 2 hour. 6:30 PM— ED— WJZ Network. 
George Dilworth, Director. 

K13— PILGRIM'S CHORUS Sunday. y 2 hour. 2:30 PM— ED— WEAF Network. 



K14— TEMPLE OF SONG— Sunday. y 2 hour. 4:30 PM— ED— WEAF Network. 
Noble Cain, Director. 



K15— MORNING GLEE CLUB— Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday am. 
Saturday. }[ hour. 8:30 AM— ED— WEAF Network. 



K16— THREE PEPPERS AND GEORGE WERDER— Sat. 
WABC Network; 



M hr. 2:15 PM— ED- 



K17— THE PIONEERS, MALE QUARTET— Thurs. M hr. 

Gene Albridge and Dick Fulton, Tenors; Reed Kennedy, Baritone; Russ Mitchell, 
Basso; Aneurin Bodycombe, Pianist. 

2:30 PM— ED 1:30 PM— ES-CD 12:30 PM—CS 

WJZ CKGW WBAL WMAL KSO KWK 
WCKY WSYR KWCR WREN 

K18— RUSSIAN SYMPHONIC CHOIR— Sunday. V, hour. 
7:30 PM— ED 

WEAF WTAG 
WCSH WTIC 
WJAR 

L— MUSIC— CLASSICAL 

(See also Band, Organ, Religious and Symphony Music) 

L3— GRANDE TRiO— Wednesday. V' 2 hour. 
3:00 PM— ED 2:00 PM— ES-CD 

WEAF WTAG 
WEEI WJAR 
WCSH WGY 
WBEN WCAE 
CKGW CFCF 



WFBR WRC 
WCKY WTAM 
WSAI WWJ 
WRVA WWNC 
WIS WIOD 
WMAQ 



1:00 PM— CS 

WSMB KSD 
WOW WDAF 
WIBA WDAY 
WKY 



L4— BEN GREENBLATT, PIANIST 



Tuesday. >i hour 
11:45 AM— ED 

WABC WOKO 
WNAC WKBW 
WDRC WCAU 
WJAS WEAN 
WPG WLBZ 
WHP WORC 
CFRB 



10:45 AM— ES-CD 

WCAO WBBM 

WHK CKOK 

WFBL WSPD 

WFEA WLBW 

WHEC WTAR 

WDBJ WMBG 

WTOC WQAM 

WDBO WSJS 



9:45 AM— CS 

KMBC WMBD 
WGST WBRC 
WDOD WREC 
WODX WSFA 
WLAC WDSU 
KRLD KTRH 
KTSA WIBW 
WACO WTAQ 
WKBH WCCO 
WMT 



M 

8:45 AM 

KVOR 

KSL 



P 
7:45 AM 
KHJ 
KOIN 
KGB 
KFRC 
KOL 
KFPY 



LS— IMPRESSIONS OF ITALY— Sunday. >i hour M 

4:00 PM— ES-CD 3:00 PM—CS 2:00 PM 

5:00PM-ED WRC WFBR WEBC KFYR KOA 

WEAF WJAR WTAM WWNC KSTP WMC KDYL 
WCSH WGY WIOD WJAX WSMB WKY 
WBEN WFLA WMAQ WFAA KTBS 

WOAI KPRC 
WTAQ 



L6— LA FORGE BERUMEN MUSICALE— Thursday. •/, hour. M P 

3:00 PM— ED 2:00 PM— ES-CD 1:00 PM— CS 12:00 PM 11:00 AM 

WABC WOKO WADC WCAO KMBC WFBM KVOR KHJ 

WNAC WGR WBBM WHK WMBD WGST KLZ KOIN 

WDRC WJAS CKOK WFBL WDOD WREC KSL KGB 

WEAN WIP WSPD WJSV WSFA WLAC KFRC 

WLBZ WPG WCAH WFEA WDSU KRLD KOL 

WHP WICC WLBW WHEC KTRH KLRA KFPY 

CFRB WORC WWVA WKBN WIBW WACO 

WBIG WDBJ WTAQ KFAB 

WTOC WQAM WISN WCCO 

WDBO WDAE WSBT WMT 
WSJS 



M 
7:45 PM 

KLZ 
KSL 
KVOR 



L9— MAUDE ROONEY, CONTRALTO— Thurs. i/ 2 hr. 
10:45 PM— ED 9:45 PM— ES-CD 8:45 PM—CS 

WABC WJAS WADC WJSV KFAB WDSU 

WAAB WKBW WBIG WKBN KFH WFBM 

WDRC WOKO WBT WLBW KLRA WGST 

WEAN WORC WCAO WMBG KMBC WHAS 

WICC WPG WDAE WQAM KMOX WLAC 

WIP WDBJ WSJS KTRH WMBD 

WDBO WSPD KTSA WMT 

WFBL CKLW WBRC WODX 

WFEA WTAR WCCO WSBT 

WHEC WDOD WREC 

L10— CHARLES GILBERT SPROSS— Friday. H hour. 

3:00 PM— ED .2:00 PM— ES-CD 1:00 PM— CS 

WEAF WGY WTAM WFBR WMC WSB 
WCSH CKGW WSAI WCKY 
WBEN WCAE ,WWJ WWNC 
WRVA WMAQ 
. WRC 



WAPI WSM 
WSMB 



ABBREVIATIONS: 



ED — Eastern Daylight, ES-CD — Eastern Standard, Central Daylight, CS — Central Standard, M — Mountain, P — Pacific. 

SEE NOTE PAGE 27 



July-August 



R A D O FA N •■- FARE PROG R AM F I N D E R 



31 



L— MUSIC — CLASSICAL (Continued) 

L11— PARK CENTRAL STRING ENSEMBLE— Friday Vi hour. 12:30 PM- 

Network. Esther Velas, Violinist 

L12— DINNER MUSIC. 

Monday, Wednesday, Thursday, 
Friday and Saturday. Vz hour. 
6:00 PM— ED 
WEAF WCSH 
WJAR WFI 
CKGW 



-ED— WEAF 



4:00 PM— CS 

KSD WIBA 



5:00 PM— ES-CD 

WCYK WWNC 
WLS WFBR 
WSAI WIOD 
WWJ WMAQ 



WSMB 

KVOO 

KTBS 

WMC 

WHO 



KPRC 

WOAI 

WSM 

WOC 

WDAY 



M P 

3:00 PM 2:00 PM 

KOA KPO 

KDYL KFSD 



WDAF WKY 
WAPI KFYR 



L13— CONCERT MEDLEY— Thurs. M hour. 
Rosanoff, Errily Mickunas Adolf Schmid. 



7:30 PM— ED— WJZ Network. Maria 



L14— MADAME BELLE FORBES CUTTER AND ORCHESTRA— Wed. Vz hour 



3:15 PM— ED 

WABC WOKO 
WNAC WGR 
WDRC WIP 
WJAS WEAN 
WPG WLBZ 
WICC WHP 
WORC CFRB 



2:15 PM— ES-CD 

WADC WCAO 
WBBM WHK 
CKOK WFBL 
WSPD WJSV 
WCAH WFEA 
WLBW WHEC 
WWVA WKBN 
WBIG WDBJ 
WTOC WQAM 
WDBO WDAE 
WSJS 



1:15 PM— CS 

WFBM WMBD 
WGST WDOD 
WREC WSFA 
WLAC WDSU 
KRLD KTRH 
KLRA WIBW 
WACO WTAQ 
KFAB WISN 
WSBT WMT 



12:15 PM 

KVOR 

KLZ 

KSL 



L15— ESSEX HOUSE ENSEMBLE— Tues. and Fri. y 2 hour. 1:30 PM— ED— WEAF 

Network. Richard Himber. 

L17— MEDLEY— Wed. y 2 hour. 4 PM— ED— WEAF Network. Christiaan Krier.s. 



L18 



-SAVITT STRING 
2:30 PM— ED 

WABC WOKO 
WNAC WGR 
WDRC WCAU 
WJAS WEAN 
WPG WLBZ 
WICC WHP 
WORC 



QUARTETTE— Sat 
1:30 PM— ES-CD 

WADC WCAO 
WBBM WHK 
CKOK WFBL 
WSPD WJSV 
WCAH WFEA 
WLBW WHEC 
WWVA WDBJ 
WTOC WQAM 
WDBO WDAE 
WSJS 



V 2 hr. 

12:30 PM— CS 

KMBC WFBM 
WMBD WGST 
WDOD WREC 
WODX WSFA 
WLAC WDSU 



M P 

11:30 AM 10:30 AM 



KVOR 

KLZ 

KSL 



KSCJ 
KLRA 



KTRH 
KTSA 



KHJ 

KOIN 

KGB 

KFRC 

KOL 

KFPY 



WIBW WACO 
WTAQ KFAB 



WISN 
WMT 



WSBT 



L19— ALEX SEMMLER— Friday. M hour. 



3:15 PM— ED 

WABC WOKO 



WGR 
WIP 
WPG 
WICC 



WDRC 
WJAS 
WLBZ 
WHP 



WORC CFRB 



2:15 PM— ES-CD 
CKOK WHK 
WSPD WFBL 
WLBW WFEA 
WTAR WHEC 
WMBG WDBJ 
WQAM WTOC 
WSJS WDBO 



1:15 PM— CS 

KMBC WFBM 
WDOD WBRC 
WLAC WDSU 
KRLD KTRH 
WIBW WACO 
KFH WTAQ 
WKBH KFAB 
WISN WCCO 
WSBT WMT 



M P 

12:15 PM 11:15 AM 

KVOR KHJ 



KLZ 
KSL 



KOIN 

KGB 

KFRC 

KOL 

KFPY 



L21— KATHLEEN STEWART- Thursday. % hour. 4:15 PM— ED— WEAF Network. 



L22— STRING SYMPHONY— Wed. 
Frank Black. 



y 2 hour. 7:30 PM— ED— WJZ Network. 



L23— INSTRUMENTAL MUSIC— Wed. M hour. 
Sylvia Altman, Julian Altman, Urban Intondi. 



10:30 AM— ED— WEAF Network. 



L25— MELODY HOUR— Sun. 1 hour. 8:00 AM— ED— WEAF Network. 

L26— NATIONAL OPERA CONCERT— Sun. 1 hr. 3:00 PM— ED— WJZ Network. 

L27— TIP BITS— Sunday. y. hour. 12:30 PM— ED— WEAF Network. 

L28— NINO MARTINI, TENOR, HOWARD BARLOW AND THE COLUMBIA SYM- 



PHONY ORCHESTRA— Tuesday. y 2 hour. 

9:30 PM— ED 8:30 PM— ES-CD 7:30 PM— CS 

WABC WOKO WCAO WBBM KMBC WFBM 
WNAC WKBW CKOK WSPD 
WDRC WJAS WJSV WFEA 
WEAN WLBZ WLBW WKBN 
WICC WHP WBIG WDBJ 
WORC CFRB WMBG WQAM 
WDBO WDAE 



Friday. V4 hour. 8:00 PM 



WDOD WREC 
WODX WSFA 
WLAC WDSU 
KTRH KLRA 
KTSA WIBW 
WTAQ KFH 
WISN WCCO 
WMT 
-ED— WABC Network 



M 

8:30 PM 

KVOR 

KLZ 

KSL 



L29— HOTEL PIERRE CONCERT ENSEMBLE— Monday. 
1:15 PM— ED— WEAF Network. 



]/i hour. 



L30— HOWARD BARLOW AND SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA— Monday, Wednesday, 
Thursday. V 2 hour. 10:45 PM— ED— WABC Network. 

M— MUSIC— DANCE 

Ml— HOTEL LEXINGTON DANCE ORCHESTRA— Sat. y 2 hr. 6 PM— ED— WJZ 
Network. Sat. V 2 hr. 1:00 PM— ED— WEAF Network. Thurs. K' hr. 12 Mid — 
ED— WJZ Network. FrL »/ 2 hr. 12:05 AM— ED— WEAF Network. Ernie Hobst. 



DON BESTORS ORCHESTRA 
Network. 



Tues., Thurs. M hour. 6:15 PM— ED— WABC 



M2— LEON BELASCO AND HIS ORCHESTRA 

Saturday. y 2 hour. 8:30 PM— ED— WABC Network 



M3— FRED BERRENS AND HIS ORCHESTRA 
WABC Network. 



Monday. K hour. 5:15 PM— ED- 



M4— HOTEL BILTMORE CONCERT ENSEMBLE— Saturday, i , hour. 1:30 PM— ED 
—WEAF Network. Friday. Saturday. y 2 hour. 11:30 PM— ED— WEAF Network. 
Harold Stern. 

M6— ART COOGAN'S ORCHESTRA— Monday. Ji hour. 6:15 PM— ED— WABC Net 



M7— COLLEGE INN ORCHESTRA— Wed. 
Ben Bernie. 



M hr. 12:05 AM— ED— WEAF Network. 



M8— COTTON CLUB ORCHESTRA— Tues. and Fri. V 2 hr. 12:00 AM— ED— WJZ 

Network. Thursday. V 2 hour. 12:05 AM— ED— WEAF Network. 

M9— DANCE MUSIC— SLtiday. 2 hours. 11:00 PM— ED— WABC Network. 



M10-DANCE MUSIC 
Leo Reisman. 



Sun. 1 hr. 12:00 Mid— ED— WJZ Network. Including 



M— MUSIC— DANCE (Continued) 



M11— DANCE MUSIC— Sun. 
Black, Charlie Kerr. 



1 hr. 12:00 Mid.— ED— WEAF Network. Including Ted 



M12— DANCE ORCHESTRAS— Mon. VA hrs. 11:30 PM— ED— WABC Network. 

Including Ted Lewi s, Leon Belasco. Oizie Nelson. 

M13— DANCE ORCHESTRA— Wed. H/ 2 hrs. 11:30 PM— ED— WABC Network. 



M14— DANCE ORCHESTRAS— Thurs. 
Including Ted Lewis, Glen Gray. 



1»/ 2 hrs. 11:30 PM— ED— WABC Network. 



M15 DANCING IN THE TWIN CITIES— Thurs. 
work. 



y 2 hr. 12:30 AM— ED— WJZ Net- 



M16— GUS ARNHEIM AND HIS ORCHESTRA From San Francisco. Sat. M> hour. 

M 
11:30 PM— ES-CD 10:30 PM— CS 



12:30 AM— ED 

WABC WKBW 
WCAU WOKO 
WEAN WNAC 
WICC 



WADC 

WBT 

WCAO 

WDAE 

WDBJ 



WHK 

WJSV 

WLBW 

WMBG 

WQAM 



WDBO WSJS 
WFBL WSPD 
WHEC WTAR 



KFAB WFBM 
KLRA WGST 
KMBC WHAS 
KOMA WISN 
KTRH WLAC 
KTSA WMBD 
WACO WMT 
WBRC WSBT 
WDOD WREC 
WDSU 



9:30 PM 

KLZ 
KSL 
KVOR 



M17— EDGEWATER BEACH HOTEL ORCHESTRA— Tues. y 2 hr. 12:30 AM— ED— 
WJZ Network. Wed. y 2 hr. 12:30 AM— ED— WEAF Network. Fri. y 2 hr. 11:30 
PM— ED— WEAF Network. Sat. y 2 hr. 12:00 AM— ED— WJZ Network. 

M18— PHIL HARRIS AND HIS ORCHESTRA— Phil Harris and Leah Ray. 

Friday. 9:00 PM— ED— V 2 hour. WJZ Network. 

M19— GEORGE HALL AND HIS ORCHESTRA— Wed. >/ 2 hr. 1:15 PM— ED— 
WABC Network. Thurs. >/ 2 hr. 5:00 PM ED-WABC Network. Sat. y 2 hr. 
1:00 PM— ED— WABC Network. Tues. U hr. 5:45 PM— ED— WABC Network. 



M20— BUDDY HARROD AND HIS ORCHESTRA— Thurs. 



12:00 N— ED 

WABC WOKO 
WGR WNAC 
WIP WDRC 
WEAN WJAS 
WLBZ WPG 



11:00 AM— ES-CD 10:00 AM— CS 

WCAO WBBM KMBC WFBM 



WORC 



WHP 
CFRB 



CKOK WSPD 
WFEA WLBW 
WKBN WTAR 
WDBJ WMBG 
WTOC WQAM 
WDBO WSJS 



WMBD WGST 
WBRC WDOD 



WREC 
WSFA 
WDSU 
KTRH 
WACO 



WODX 

WLAC 

KRLD 

KTSA 

KFH 



y 2 hour. 
M 

9:00 AM 

KVOR 

KLZ 

KSL 



P 
8:00 AM 

KHJ 

KOIN 

KGB 

KFRC 

KOL 

KFPY 



WTAQ WKBH 
WISN WSBT 
WMT 



M21— BILLY HAYS AND HIS ORCHESTRA— Mon. «/ 2 hr. 



1:00 PM— ED 

WABC WOKO 
WAAB WGR 
WDRC WCAU 
WEAN WLBZ 
WICC WHP 
WORC CFRB 



12:00 N— ES-CD 

WBBM WHK 
CKOK WFBL 
WSPD WFEA 
WLBW WHEC 
WKBN WTAR 
WDBJ WMBG 
WTOC WQAM 
WDBO WSJS 



11:00 AM— CS 

KMBC WGST 
WBRC WDOD 
WREC WODX 
WSFA WLAC 
WDSU KTRH 
KTSA WTAQ 
WKBH KFAB 
WISN WCCO 
WSBT WMT 



M P 

10:00 AM 9:00 AM 

KVOR KHJ 
KLZ KOIN 



3:45 PM— ED 

WABC WJAS 
WAAB WLBZ 
WDRC WOKO 
WGR WORC 



WHP 
WIP 



WPG 
CFRB 



1:45 PM— CS 

KFAB WDOD 
KFH WDSU 
KLRA WFBM 
KMBC WHAS 
KOMA WISN 
KRLD WMT 
KTRH WODX 
KTSA WSBT 
WACO WSFA 
WBRC WTAQ 
WCCO WREC 



12:45 PM 

KLZ 
KSL 
KVOR 



M23— CLAUDE HOPKINS' ROSELAND ORCHESTRA— Wednesday. >■> hour. 

M 
2:45 PM ES-CD 

WADC WLBW 
WBIG WMBG 
WCAO WQAM 
WDAE WSJS 
WDBJ WSPD 
WDBO WTOC 
WFBL WWVA 
WFEA CKLW 
WHK WTAR 
WJSV 



M25-DICK FIDDLER AND HIS LOTUS GARDENS ORCHESTRA— FrL H hr. 1:15 
PM— ED WEAF Network. Sat. V 2 hr. 12:30 PM— ED— WEAF Network. 



'/ 2 hour. Meyer Davis. 
-PM— CS 

KOIL KWCR 
KSO 



M27— ST. REGIS DANCE ORCHESTRA— Monday. 
12:00 Mid.— ED 11:00 PM— ES-CD 10:00 

WJZ KDKA WBAL WJR 
WCKY WSYR 
WGAR WENR 
WHAM 
WBZ WBZA WREN added at 12:15 AM ED 
Wed. Fri. >/ 2 hour. 11:00 PM— ED— WEAF Network. 
M28— VINCENT LOPEZ AND ORCHESTRA— Sunday. »/ 2 hour. (Starts July 9) 



6:30 PM— ED 

WJZ WBZ 
WBZA KDKA 



5:30 PM— ES-CD 

WBAL WJR 
WGAR WLW 
WHAM WMAQ 



4:30 PM— CS 

WMC KSO 
WJDX KWK 
WREN WTMJ 
WIBA KSTP 



M 
3:30 PM 

KOA 
KDYL 



WSM 
KPRC 
WSMB 
WBAP 



W8B 

WOAI 

WKY 



P 
2:30 PM 

KOMO 

KHQ 

KGW 

KGO 

KFI 



M29— HOTEL PIERRE DANCE ORCHESTRA 
12:30 AM— ED 11:30 PM— ES-CD 

WJZ WBZA WBAL WENR 
WBZ WCKY 

WGAR 
WHAM 
WLW 
WSYR 
Thursday 2:00 PM— ED. y 2 hour— WEAF Network 
Saturday. 12:05 Mid.— ED. y 2 hour— WEAF Network. 



—Wednesday. y 2 hour. 
10:30 PM— CS 

KOIL KWK 
KPRC WBAP 
KSO WKY 
KTBS WREN 
KWCR 



Irving Rose. 



M30— HOTEL SHOREHAM ORCHESTRA 
WJZ Network. Maxine Lowe. 



-Saturday. \' 2 hour. 12:30 AM— ED 



ABBREVIATIONS: ED — Eastern Daylight, ES-CD- 



-Eastern Standard, Central Daylight, 
SEE NOTE PAGE 27 



-Central Standard, M — Mountain, P — Pacific. 



Radio Fan-Fai 



RADIO FAN -FARE PROGRAM FINDER 



M— MUSIC— DANCE (Continued) 



M31— TED LEWIS AND HIS ORCHESTRA— Friday. y 2 hour. M 

11:30 PM— ED 10:30 PM—ES-CD 9:30 PM—CS 8:30 PM 

WABC WOKO WADC WCAO KMBC WFBM KVOR 
WAAB WKBW WHK CKOK KMOX WMBD KLZ 
WDRC WCAU WFBL WSPD WGST WDOD KSL 
WEAN WPG WJSV WCAH 
WLBZ WICC WLBW WHEC 
WHP WORC WDBJ WTOC 
CFRB WQAM WDBO 

WDAE WSJS 



KMOX WMBD 
WGST WDOD 
WREC WODX 
WLAC WDSU 
KTRH KLRA 
WIBW WACO 
KFH KFAB 
WISN WCCO 
WSBT WMT 



P 
7:30 PM 

KHJ 

KOIN 

KGB 

KFRC 

KOL 

KVT 

KFPY 

KOH 



M34— MERRY MADCAPS— Saturday. y 2 hour. 3:00 PM— ED— WEAF Network. 
Norman L. Cloutier Orchestra, Fred Wade. 

M35— HOTEL McALPIN ORCHESTRA— Wed. % hr. 11:30 PM— ED— WEAF Net- 
work. Thurs. 14 hr. 11:15 PM— ED— WEAF Network. Sam Robbing 



M40 PALAIS D'OR ORCHESTRA— Thurs. ' ,' hr. 
Wed. 1/2 hr. 2:00 PM— ED— WEAF Network. 



1:15 PM— ED— WEAF Network- 



M41— PALMER HOUSE ORCHESTRA— Wednesday. 1/2 hour. 11:30 PM— ED— WEAF 
Network. Richard Cole. 



M42— DANCE MUSIC HOTEL PENNSYLVANIA ROOF— Saturday. >/ 2 hour. 
Rudy Vallee. , 

11 :00 PM— ED 10:00 PM—ES-CD 9:00 PM—CS 

WEAF WFI WFBR WSAI WDAF WOC 

WCAE WGY WRC WTAM WHO 
WCSH 
Monday. ', hour— 11:15 PM— ED— WEAF Network. 12:00 Mid ED— WJI Network. 



M43— RADIO TROUBADOURS— Tues., Thurs. 1/2 hr. 3:15 PM— ED— WJZ Network. 
Sat. 1/2 hr. 3:00 PM— ED— WJZ Network. Mary Steele. 



M44— POND'S PROGRAM— Fri. >/ 2 hr. Victor Young, Lee Wiley, Paul Small. 
9:30 PM— ED 8:30 PM—ES-CD 7:30 PM—CS 

WEAF WTAG WWJ WFBR WDAF KSD 
WJAR WCSH WRC WTAM WOC WHO 
WLIT WGY WSAI WENR WOW 
WBEN WCAE 



M45— SATURDAY NIGHT DANCING PARTY— Sat 1 hr. B. A. Rolfe and Terraplane 



Orchestra. 

10:00 PM— ED 

WEAF WTAG 
WEEI WJAR 
WCSH WFI 
WGY WBEN 
CKGW CFCF 



9:00 PM— ES-CD 8:00 PM—CS 

WRC WFBR KSD WOW 

WTAM WLW WDAF KSTP 

WWJ WOC WSB WSMB 

WHO WCAE WBAP 
WMAQ 



M P 

7:00 PM 6:00 PM 

KOA KGO 

KDYL KFI 



M47— GENE QUAW HOTEL COSMOPOLITAN ORCHESTRA 
Friday. > /2 hour. 4:00 PM— ED— WJZ Network 



M48— PAUL WHITEMAN AND HIS ORCHESTRA— Monday 9:30 to 11:30 PM— ED 
over WEAF— 9:30 to 10:30 PM— ED. 

WCSH WEEI 
WJAR WTAG 
WTIC 

M49— VINCENT SOREY AND HIS ORCHESTRA— 

Tuesday. J t hour. 11:15 AM— ED— WABC Network 



M50— SYNCOPATORS— Tues., Wed. }. t hr. 2:30 PM— ED— WJZ Network. Harold 
Stokes, Dick Teela. 

M51— HAL THOMPSON'S ORCHESTRA— Saturday. Vz hour. 3:30 PM— ED— 
WABC Network. Shirley Howard. 

M55— VILLAGE BARN ORCHESTRA— Fri. y 2 hr. 12:30 AM— ED— WJZ Network. 
Ted Black. 



M56— WALDORF ASTORIA ORCHESTRA— Jack Denny. 

Monday. V2 hour. Thursday. '/ 2 hour. 

11:30 PM— ED 10:30 PM—ES-CD 11:30 PM— ED 10:30 PM—ES-CD 

WEAF WTAG WRC WFBR WEAF WJAR WFBR WWJ 

WJAR WTIC WBEN WTAG 

WCSH WFI 



M57— WEALTH OF HARMONY— Saturday. '/ 2 hour. 3:30 PM— ED— WJZ Network. 
Joseph Gallicchio, Edward Davies. 



M58— FRANK WESTPHAL'S DANCE ORCHESTRA— Mon. '/ 2 hr. 4:00 PM— ED— 
WABC Network. Tues. Thurs. y 2 hr. 3:30 PM— ED— WABC Network. 

M60— BREAKFAST CLUB— 

Mon., Tue., Wed.. Thur., Fri., Sat. }4 hour. 9:15 AM— ED— WJZ Network 

N— MUSIC-MEDLEY PROGRAMS 

N1— A. AND P. GYPSIES— Monday. U hour. Harry Horlick, Frank Parker. 
9:00 PM— ED 8:00 PM—ES-CD 



WEAF WTIC 
WTAG WEEI 
WJAR WCSH 
WLIT WGY 
WBEN WCAE 



WRC WTAM 
WWJ WSAI 
WMAQ 



N2— CITIES SERVICE CONCERT— Fri. 1 hr. Jessica Dragonette, The Cavaliers, 
Henry Shope, Frank Parker, John Seagle, Elliot Shaw, Lee Montgomery, Frank 
Banta, Rosarie Bourdon. 



8:00 PM— ED 

WEAF WTIC 
WCSH WCAE 
WLIT WGY 
WBEN WTAG 
CKGW WEEI 
WJAR 



o c 



7:00 PM—ES-CD 

WFBR WRC 
WTAM WWJ 
WSAI KYW 



6:00 PM—CS 

WDAF WOC 
WDAI WHO 
KSD WOW 
KTBS WKY 
WEBC KVOO 
WFAA KTBS 



M 

5:00 PM 

KOA 

KDYL 



M— MUSIC— MEDLEY PROGRAMS (Continued) 



N4— FRAY AND BRAGGIOTTI— Saturday. M hour. 

9:00 PM— ED ' \ 8:00 PM—ES-CD 7:00 PM—CS 

WABC WJAS WADC WJSV 
WCAU WOKO WBT WKBN 
WDRC WORC WCAO WLBW 
WGR WNAC WDBJ WQAM 

WDBO WSJS 

WFBL WSPD 

WFEA CKLW 

WHEC 



M 
6:00 PM 

KVOR 
KVOR 



Tuesday and Thursday. y 4 



KFH WDSU 
KMBC WFBM 
KMOX WGST 
KOMA WISN 
KTRH WLAC 
WACO WODX 
WBRC WSBT 
WCCO WSFA 
WDOD 
hour. 9:15 PM— ED— WABC Network. 



N6— JACK FROST MELODY MOMENTS— 


Mon. 1/2 hr. Josef Pasternack. 




9:30 PM— ED 


8:30 PM 


-ES-CD 








WJZ 


KDKA 


WBAL 
WGAR 
WJR 


WHAM 

WLW 

WENR 






N7- 


-RIESENFELDS VIENN 


-Sun. M hr. 




8:00 PM— ED 


7:00 PM 


—ES-CD 


6:00 PM 


-cs 




WJZ 


WBZ 


WBAL 


WSYR 


KWK 


KWCR 




WBZA 


KDKA 


WGAR 

WMAL 


WCKY 
WLS 


KSO 
KOIL 


WREN 



N9— MAJOR BOWES' CAPITOL FAMILY— Sunday. 1 hour. 
11:15 AM— ED 10:15 AM— ES-CD 9:15 AM— CS 



WEAF WJAR 
WTAG WLIT 
WGY 



WEBR WRC 
WTAM WFLA 
WWJ WSAI 
WIOD WWNC 
WMAQ 



WDAF KFYR 
WAPI WSMB 
KPRC WEBC 
WHO WIBA 



M 

8:15 AM 

KOA . 
KDYL- 



KSTP 
WKY 
KTBS 
WOC 



WMC 
WBAP 
WOAI 



P 
7:15 AM 

KFSD 

KGO 

KHQ 

KTAR 

KFI 

KGW 

KOMO 



N10— MERRIE MEN QUARTET— Mon., Wed., Fri. }{ hr. 12:30 PM— ED— WJZ 
Network. Wesley Summerfield, Elliot Stewart, Bob Geddes, Norman Gordon, 
Earl Lawrence. 
N14— THE SOUTHEASTERN REVUE— Thurs. »/ 2 hour. 4:30 PM— ED— WJZ Network- 
N15— THURSDAY SPECIAL— Thursday. y 2 hour. 4:00 PM— ED— WJZ Network. 
Ruth Lyon, Edward Davies, Josef Koestner. 



N16— TONE PICTURES— Sunday. 1 hour. 8:00 AM— ED— WJZ Network. 
George Blake, Mary Merker, Helen Janke, Richard Maxwell, Curt Peterson. 



N17— VOCAL ART QUARTET— Tuesday. >/ 2 hour. 

Alma Kitchell, Sclma Johanson, Chester Evers, Earl Waldo. 
8:00 PM— ED 2:00 PM—ES-CD 1:00 PM— CS 

WEAF WTAG WFBR WRC WSM WSB 
WEEI WJAR WIOD WWJ WAPI KSD 
WGY WCAE WCKY WDAF WOC WHO 
WFI WCSH WRVA WWNC WIBA WBAP 
CKGW WBEN WSAI WFLA KFYR KTBS 
WLS WTAM WDAY WOW 
KSMB WMC 



M 

12:00 PM 

KOA 



N20— MORNING PARADE— Saturday. 1 hour. 10:15 AM— ED— WEAF Network. 



N21— RADIO CITY CONCERT— Sunday. 1 hour. 12:16 PM— ED— WJZ Network. 
Erno Rapee, Director. 

0— MUSIC— NOVELTY 



01— CLYDE DOERR'S SAXOPHONE OCTET— Sunday. >/ 2 hour. 
5:30 PM— ED 4:30 PM—ES-CD 3:30 PM—CS 

WEAF WTAG WWJ WSAI WOW KSD 
WBEN WCAE WSM WAPI 

WGY CFCF WJDX WMC 

WJAR WCSH WSMB WFAA 

WOAI KTBS 
--KTHS 



04— THE HAPPY RAMBLER— Thursday and Friday, h hour. 10:30 AM— ED— WEAF 

Network. Irving Kaufman, Lucy Allen. 

06— BORRAH MINEVITCH AND HIS HARMONICA RASCALS. Sunday. % hour. 



7:00 PM— ED 

WJZ CFCF 



6:00 PM— ES-CD 5:00 PM—CS 

WBAL WCKY KSO KOIL 



WIS WRVA 
WWNC WIOD 
WFLA KFYR 

WLS 



WREN WIBA 
WEBC WDAY 
WSMB KVOO 
KPRC KTBS 
WOAI WKY 
KWK 



M 

4:00 PM 
KDYL 
KOA 



P— MUSIC— ORGAN 



P1— ANN LEAF AT THE ORGAN— Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday 
WABC Network, Monday at 3:00 PM— ED, 



2:00 PM— ED 

WABC WOKO 
WNAC WGR 
WDRC WCAU 
WJAS WLBC 
WICC WORC 
CFRB 



1:00 PM—ES-CD 12:00 PM—CS 

WCAO WBBM WGST WBRG 



CKOK WFBL 
WSPD WFEA 
WLBW WHEC 
WTAR WDBJ 
WMBG WTOC 
WQAM WSJS 



WDOD WREC 
WODX WSFA 
WLAC WDSU 
KTRH KFH 
WTAQ WKBH 
WISN WCCO 
WSBT 



y 2 hour. Also on 
M 
11:00 AM 

KVOR 

KLZ 

KSL 



P2— LARRY LARSEN— Saturday. M hour. 

9:45 AM— ES-CD 8:45 AM— CS 



10:45 AM— ED 

WJZ 



WBAL WJR 
WMAL KYW 



KWK KWCR 
WREN KOIL 
KSO 



P4— RADIO CITY ORGAN— Monday. Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday, Saturday 
y 2 hour. Dick LeiberL 
8:00 AM— ED 7:00 AM— ES-CD 6:00 AM— CS 

WDAF WFBR WOW 

WTAM WSAI 

WWJ 



WEAF WTAG 
WJAR CFCF 
WCAE WGY 
WFI WBEN 
WEEI WCSH 



W H 



ABBREVIATIONS: ED — Eastern Daylight, 



ES-CD — Eastern Standard, Central Daylight, CS — Central Standard, M — Mountain, P — Pacific. 
SEE NOTE PAGE 27 



July-August 



33 



R A D I O F A N - FAR E P R OCR AM FINDER 



P— MUSIC— ORGAN (Continued) 



PS— WALDORF ASTORIA ORGAN RECITAL— Sunday. >/ 2 hour. Irene Harding. 
10:30 AM— ED 9:30 AM— ES-CD 8:30 AM— CS 

WGAR WJR KWK WREN 

WHAM WMAL 
WSYR KDKA 
WLW WENR 



WJZ WBZ 
WBZA 



P6— FRANCES LANGFORD— Monday, Saturday. y 2 hour. 6:45 PM— ED— WEAF 
Network. Dick Leibert. Rollickers Quartet, 

P7 MATINEE GEMS— Sat. V 2 hour. 3:30 PM— ED— WEAF Network. Lew White- 
PS— QUIET HARMONIES— Sunday. V ( hour. 10:45 PM— ED— WABC Network. 



P9— FRED FEIBEL AT THE ORGAN— Sunday. i/-> hour. 


M 


1:00 PM— ED 


12:00 N— ES-CD 


11:00 AM— CS 


10:00 AM 


WABC WOKO 


WADC WHEC 


KFAB WISN 


KLZ 


WAAB WORC 


WBT WLBW 


KMOX WMBD 


KVOR 


WDRC WPG 


WCAO WQAM 


KOMA WMT 




WGR CFRB 


WDAE WSJS 


KTRH WODX 




WJAS 


WDBJ WSPD 


WCCO WSBT 






WDBO CKLW 


WDOD WTAQ 






WFBL WTAR 


WDSU WREC 
WGST 





P10— IRMA GLEN— Thursday. ' , hour. 10:45 AM— ED— WJZ Network. 

Q— MUSIC, PATTER AND SONG 



Q1 



-BLACKSTONE PLANTATION— Tuesday. '/> hour. Julia Sanderson, Frank CrumU 
Jack Shilkret. 

8:00 PM— ED 7:00 PM— ES-CD 

WEAF WTAG WRG WTAM 
WWJ 



WEEI 
WCSH 
WGY 
WCAE 



WJAR 

WFL 

WBEN 



Q2— FRANK CRUMIT AND JULIA SANDERSON— Sunday. V 2 hour. 



5:30 PM— ED 

WABC WOKO 
WAAB WGR 
WDRC WCAU 
WEAN WICC 
WORC 



4.30 PM— ES-CD 

WADC WCAO 
WHK CKOK 
WFBL WSPD 
WCAH WJSV 
WWVA WHEC 
WTAR 



3:30 PM— CS 

KMBC WFBM 
WHAS KMOX 
WDSU KOMA 
KFH KFAB 



Q4— THE OXOL FEATURE— Wednesday, Friday. H hour. Dave Grant, Gordon 
Graham and Bunny Coughlin. 

10:00 AM— ED 9:00 AM— ES-CD 

WABC WOKO WCAO WKRC 
WAAB WDRC WFBL 
WCAU WJAS 
WEAN 



Q5— LES REIS AND ARTY DUNN- 
Assisted by Novelty Orchestra. 



Monday, Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday J 4' hour. 



9:45 AM— ED 

WABC WJAS 
WDRC WLBZ 
WEAN WOKO 



WHP 
WICC 
WIP 



WORC 

WPG 

CFRB 



8:45 AM 

WADC 

WBIG 

WBT 

WCAH 

WDAE 

WDBJ 

WDBO 

WFEA 

WHEC 

WHK 

WJSV 



ES-CD 

WKBN 

WLBW 

WMBG 

WQAM 

WSJS 

WSPD 

WWVA 

CKLW 

WTAR 

WBBM 



7:45 AM— CS 

KFAB WHAS 
KFH WISN 
KLRA WLAC 
KMBC WMBD 
KMOX WMT 
KOMA WODX 
KRLD WSBT 
KTRH WSFA 
KTSA WTAQ 
WDSU WREC 
WGST 



M 



Also Monday. \i hour. 6:00 PM— ED— WABC Network. 



Q6-BILL AND GINGER— Mon., Wed., Fri. 
10:15 AM— ED 9:15 AM— ES-CD 

WABC WJAS WFBL WJSV 

WEAN WKBW 

WIP 



hour. 



Q7— TUNE DETECTIVE, SIGMUND SPAETH— Tuesday. \i hour. 
9:30 PM— ED 8:30 PM— ES-CD 7:30 PM— CS 

WJZ KDKA WBAL WCKY KWCR KWK 

CFCF WJR WSYR KOIL 

WMAQ 



Q8— MARION AND JIM JORDAN— Wed. % hour. 11:15 AM— ED— WJZ Network. 
Also Saturday and Tuesday. 12:00 N— ED— WJZ Network. 



Q10— SMILING ED McCONNELL— Sunday. % hour. P 

2:06 PM— ED 1:00 PM— ES-CD 12:00 PM—CS 11:00 PM 

WABC WNAC WBBM WKRC KMBC WHAS KSL 

WGR WJAS WFBL WOWO KMOX 

WCAU WEAN WJSV WCCO 

WOKO WHK 

Q11— MARTHA AND HAL— Mon., Wed., Fri. M hour. 8:00 AM— ED— WJZ 
Network. 

Q12— CLAIRE WILSON AND GRANT ALLEN— Thursday and Friday. ' , hour. 2:30 
PM— ED— WEAF Network. 

Q15— GOLDY AND DUSTY AND THE SILVER DUST TWINS— Mon., Tues., Wed., 



Thurs. and Fri. 
9:15 AM— ED " 

WABC WOKO 
WGR WDRC 
WCAU WJAS 
WHP WORC 



o c 



hour. 
8:15 AM— ES-CD 

WFBL WHEC 
WWVA 



R— MUSIC— POPULAR 



(See also Dance and Variety Music and Patter and Song) 

-MILDRED BAILEY— Wednesday and Friday. M hour. 
7:00 PM— ED 6:00 PM— ES-CD 5:00 PM—CS 

WABC WLBZ WBIG WLBW 
WBT WMBG 
WDBJ WQAM 
WDBO WSJS 
WFBL WSPD 
WFEA CKLW 
WKBN 



WDRC WOKO 
WEAN WORC 



WGR 
WJAS 



CFRB 
WNAC 



KFH WHAS 
KMBC WISN 
KOMA WLAC 
KTSA WMT 
WACO WODX 
WBRC WSFA 
WDOD WTAQ 
WDSU WREC 
WGST 



M 

4:00 PM 

KLZ 
KVOR 



R2— ALBERT BARTLETT, THE TANGO KING— Sunday. kf hour. 2:15 PM- 
WA3C Network. 



ED 



R3— BETTY BARTHELL, SONGS— Thursday. H hour. 

6:30 PM— ED 5:30 PM— ES-CD 4:30 PM—CS 

WABC WAAB WFBL WFEA WGST WODX 
WDRC WLBZ WSFA WLAC 

WORC WSBT 

R4— GENE ARNOLD AND THE COMMODORES— K hour. 
Monday and Thursday at 12 Noon. 

12:00 N— ED 11:00 AM— ES-CD 10:00 AM— CS 

WJZ WBZ WBAL WJR KSO WFAA 

KDKA WBZA WCKY WMAL KWCR WREN 
WGAR WSYR KWK 
WHAM 
Also M hour Sunday. 2:00 PM— ED— Wed. and Fri. 12:00 N— ED— WEAF Network. 

B5— THE CAPTIVATORS— Monday. M hour. 2:30 PM— ED— WABC Network. 



R6— CHARLES CARLILE— Tuesday. 



hour. 11:15 PM— ED— WABC Network. 



R7— WILL OSBORNE ORCHESTRA 
"The Friendly Philosopher" 



Mon., Wed., Fri. l /i hr. Pedro De Corboda, 



10:45 AM— ED 

WABC WOKO 
WNAC WGR 

WEAN 



10:45 AM ES-CD 

WCAO WHK 
WFBL WJSV 
WCAH WBT 
WTAR WMBG 
WBBM WOWO 



9:45 AM— CS 

KMBC WHAS 
KMOX WGST 
KRLD WCCO 



R9— EVAN EVANS, DO 
Thursday. 1/2 hour. 
8:00 PM— ED 

WABC WOKO 
WNAC WGR 
WDRC WCAU 
WJAS WEAN 
WPG WLBZ 
WHP CFRB 



RE Ml, FREDDIE RICH'S ORCHESTRA M 



7:00 PM— ES-CD 

WADC WCAO 
WHK CKOK 
WFBL WSPD 
WCAH WLBW 
WHEC WWVA 
WKBN WBIG 
WDBJ WTOC 
WQAM WDBO 
WDAE WSJS 



6:00 PM—CS 

WFBM WGST 
WDOD WREC 
WSFA WLAC 



5:00 PM 

KVOR 



WDSU 

KTRH 

KTSA 

KFH 

WISN 



KRLD 
KLRA 
WIBW 
WTAQ 
WMT 



R10— AN EVENING IN PARIS Monday. >/ 2 hour. Mary McCoy. M 



9:30 PM— ED 

WABC WNAC 
WCAU WJAS 
WEAN 



8:30 PM— ES-CD 

WCAO WGN 
WHK CKOK 
WJSV 



7:30 PM—CS 

KMBC KMOX 
WGST WDSU 
KOMA WCCO 



6:30 PM 

KLZ 
KSL 



P 
5:30 PM 

KHJ 

KOIN 

KGB 

KFRC 

KOL 

KFPY 



R14— HOT FROM HOLLYWOOD— Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday. 

8:45 PM— ED 7:45 PM— ES-CD 6:45 PM—CS 

WABC WOKO WADC WCAO KMBC WFBM 

WNAC WGR WGN WKRC WHAS KMOX 

WDRC WCAU WHK CKOK WCCO 
WJAS WEAN WFBL WSPD 
WJSV 



hour. 



WEAF WTAG 
WGY WBEN 



M P 

2:00 PM 1:00 PM 

KOA KGO 

KDYL KFI 
KGW 
KOMO 
KHQ 



R15— ARLENE JACKSON— Friday. > 4 hour. 

5:00 PM— ED 4:00 PM— ES-CD 3:00 PM—CS 

WTAM WSAI WIBA KSTP 
WIS WJAX WDAY WSM 
WIOD WAPI WSB 

WMC WSMB 

WKY KPRC 
KTBS WOAI 

R16— KEENAN AND PHILLIPS— Thursday, jj hour. 11:45 AM— ED— WABC Network 

R17— LA PALINA— Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, 'i hour. Kate Smith. 
8:30 PM— ED 7:30 PM ES-CD 6:30 PM— ES 

WADC WCAO KMBC WFBM 

WGN WKRC 

WHK CKLW 

WOWO WFBL 

WSPD WJSV 

WHEC WKBN 



WABC WOKO 
WGR WCAU 
WJAS 



WHAS KMOX 
WMT WCCO 
KFAB 



R18— LITTLE JACK LITTLE— Mon., Tues., Wed., Thurs., Fri., 

9:00 AM— ED 8:00 AM— ES-CD 7:00 AM— CS 

WABC WOKO WADC WCAO 

WAAB WGR WHK CKOK 

WDRC WIP WCAH WFEA 

WJAS WEAN WLBW WWVA 

WPG WLBZ WBIG WDBJ 

WHP WORC WTOC WSJS 
CFRB 



hour 



KMBC WFBM 
WMBD WGST 
WDOD WREC 
WSFA WLAC 
WDSU KRLD 
KTRH KLRA 
WTAQ WISN 
WSBT WMT 



Wednesday. 3i hour. 
11:15 PM— ED 

WABC WOKO 
WAAB WKBW 
WDRC WCAU 
WJAS WEAN 
WPG WLBZ 
WICC WHP 
WORC CFRB 



10:15 PM ES-CD 9:15 PM—CS 



WCAO WHK 
CKOK WFBL 
WSPD WFEA 
WLBW WTAR 
WMBG WQAM 
WDBO WSJS 



Friday. M hour. 10:30 PM— ED— Same network 



KMBC WFBM 
WMBD WGST 
WBRC WDOD 
WREC WODX 
WLAC WDSU 
KTRH WIBW 
WCCO WMT 



M 

8:15 PM 

KVOR 
KLZ 



P 

7:15 PM 

KHJ 

KOIN 

KGB 

KFRC 

KOL 

KFPY 



W H 



ABBREVIATIONS: ED— Eastern Daylight, 



ES-CD — Eastern Standard, Central Daylight, CS- 
SEE NOTE PAGE 27 



-Central Standard, M — Mountain, P — Pacific. 



34 



Radio Fan-Fare 



RADIO F A N - F A R E 


PROGRAM FINDER 


R— MUSIC— POPULAR (Continued) 


S— MUSIC— RELIGIOUS 

(See also Organ Music) 


R19— YEASTFOAMERS-Sunday. V 2 hour. 

Jan Garber and His Orchestra. M P 

2:30PM— ED 1:30PM— ES-CD 12:30 PM—CS 11:30 AM 10:30 AM 

WJZ WBZ WBAL WHAM KWK WREN KOA KTAR 
WBZA KDKA WGAR WJR KOIL WTMJ KGIR KFS 
WLW WRVA WIBA KSTP KDYL KGW 
WPTF WWNC WEBC WDAY KGHL KGO 
WIS WIOD KFYR WSM KFI 
WFLA WJAX WSB WAPI KOMO 
WSYR WMAL WJDX WSMB KHQ 
KYW KTHS KVOO 

KWCR WOAI 

WFAA WMC 

KSO KTBS 


SI— MID WEEK HYMN SING— Tuesday. M hour. 

6:30 PM— ED 5:30 PM— ES-CD ":30 PM—CS 
WEAF WTAG WIS WSAI WDAF KSD 
WGY WWJ WWNC KFYR WVOO 
WMAQ WSB WOAI 
WIBA KTBS 
KTHS WJDX 
WOW 


M P 
3:30 PM 2:30 PM 

KGIR KGO 
KGW 
KFSD 
KTAR 
KHQ 


S3— OLD SONGS OF THE CHURCH— Thursday. >., hour. 

Kathryn Palmer, Soprano; Joyce Allmand, Contralto; Richard Dennis, Tenor; Lowell 
Patton, Organist; Arthur Billings Hunt, Basso an J Director. 
6:30 PM— ED 5:30 PM— ES-CD 4:30 PM—CS 

WJZ WSYR KWK KWCR 

WREN 


R21— EVERETT MARSHALL— AL MITCHELL'S ORCHESTRA— Mon., Wed., 
Vi hour M P 
7:15 PM— ED 6:15 PM— ES-CD 9:15 PM—CS 8:15 PM 7:15 PM 

WJZ WBZ WBAL WMAL KWK KWCR KDYL KGO 
WBZA KDKA WJR WSYR KGO KOIL KFI 
WCKY WREN WIBA KGW 
10:15 PM KSTP WEBC KOMO 
KYW WMC WDAY KHQ 

KFYR WSB 

WJDX 'WSMB 

WKY KPRC 

KTHS WOAI 

WTMJ WFAA 


S5— SALT LAKE TABERNACLE CHOIR AND ORGAN— Sunday. 
11:30 AM— ED 10:30 AM— ES-CD 9:30 AM— CS 

WOKO WPG WCAO CKOK KMBC WMBD 
WLBZ WHP WFBL WSPD WGST WDOD 
WFEA WLBW WREC WLAC 
WKBN WDBJ WDSU KRLD 
WTOC WQAM KTRH WIBW 
WDBO WACO KFH 

WTAQ WKBH 
WABC added at 11.45 AM— ED— for K KFAB WCCO 
hour. WSBT WMT 


1 hour. 

M P 

8:30 AM 7:30 AM 

KVOR KHJ 
KLZ KOIN 
KSL KGB 
KFRC 
KOL 
KFPY 


R23— THE HAPPY WONDER BAKERS— Mon., Wed. and Fri. M I"""' 
6:30 PM— ED 5:30 PM— ES-CD 

WABC WDRC WHEC 
WAAB WORC 
WICC WKBW 
WMAS 


S6— CATHEDRAL HOUR— Sunday. 1 hour. 
Channon Collinge, Conductor. 

4:00 PM— ED 3:00 PM— ES-CD 2:00 PM—CS 

WABC WJAS WADC WJSV KFAB WDSU 
WCAU WOKO WBT WKBN KFH WFBM 
WDRC WORC WCAO WLBW KLRA WGST 
WEAN WPG WDAE WMBG KMBC WISN 
WGR CFRB WDBJ WQAM KMOX WLAC 
WICC WNAC WDBO WSJS KOMA WMBD 
WFBL WSPD KRLD WMT 
WFEA CKLW KTRH WODX 
WHEC WTAR WACO WSBT 
WHK WBRC WSFA 
WCCO WTAQ 
WDOD WREC 


M 

1:00 PM 

KLZ 


R24-THE MERRYMAKERS— Monday. M hour. 10:30 AM— ED— WABC Network. 
Fred Berrens, Conductor. 


R25— GERTRUDE NIESEN— Sunday. M hour. M 

7:45 PM— ED 6:45 PM— ES-CD 5:45 PM—CS 4:45 PM 

WABC WJAS WADC WHEC KFH WDSU KLZ 
WCAU WOKO WBT WJSV KMBC WFBM KVOR 
WDRC WORC WCAO WKBN KMOX WGST 
WGR WNAC WDAE WLBW KOMA WISN 
WDBJ WQAM KTRH WLAC 
WDBO WSJS WACO WODX 
WFBL WSPD WBRC WSBT 
WFEA CKLW WCCO WSFA 
WDOD WTAQ 
Saturday ' 4 ' hour 10:45 PM— ED— WABC Network 
Freddie Rich's Orchestra 


T— MUSIC— STANDARD & FOLK 


T1 AMERICAN ALBUM FAMILIAR MUSIC— Sunday. Vi hour. 
Munn, Elizabeth Lenox, Ohman and Arden, Bertrand Hirsch 
9:30 PM— ED »:30 PM— ES-CD 7:30 PM—CS 

WEAF WCSH WCKY WFBR KSD WOC 
WJAR WTAG WRC WTAM WHO WOW 
WFI WGY WWJ WSAI WSM WMC 
WBEN WCAE WIOD WFLA WSB WOAI 
WEEI WRVA WJAX WJDX KTHS 
WENR WPTF WFAA WKY 
KPRC WSMB 
WAPI WTMJ 
KSTP WDAF 


Gus Haenschen Frank 

M P 
6:30 PM 5:30 PM 

KOA KGO 
KDYL KOMO 
KFI 
KGW 
KHQ 


R27— WILLIAM O'NEAL— Monday. 34 hour. 11:15 PM— ED— WABC Network. 

R32— SINGIN' SAM THE BARBASOL MAN— Monday. H hour. 
8:00 PM— ED 7:00 PM— ES-CD 6:00 PM—CS 

WABC WOKO WADC WCAO KMBC WFBM 
WNAC WGR WGN WKRC KMOX WCCO 
WDRC WCAU WHK CKOK 
WJAS WEAN WFBL WSPD 
WJSV 


R33— THE STREET SINGER— Monday, Wednesday, Friday. ] 4 hour. 

Arthur Tracy. M P 
9:15 PM— ED 8:15 PM— ES-CD 7:15 PM—CS 6:15 PM 5:15 PM 

WABC WGR WADC WKRC KMBC WFBM KLZ KFPY 
WCAU WJAS WBT WSPD KMOX WHAS KSL KFRC 
WDRC WOKO WCAO CKLW KRLD KGB 
WEAN WNAC WFBL WGN KHJ 
WHK WOWO KOIN 
WJSV KOL 

KVI 


T2— ARCADIANS— Friday. V 2 hour. 4:30 PM— ED— WJZ Network. Ruth Kelly Bello. 

T3— RHODA ARNOLD AND CHARLES CARLILE DUETS— Sunday. V 2 hour. 11:00 
AM— ED— WABC Network. 


T4— FERDE GROFE'S ORCHESTRA WITH CONRAD THIEBA 
8:45 PM— ED 7:45 PM— ES-CD 6:45 PM—CS 

WEAF WTIC WRC WTAM WTMJ 
WTAG WEEI WWJ WLW 
WJAR WCSH 
WLIT WGY 
WREN WCAF, 


ULT— Mon. J 4 hour. 

M P 
6:00 PM 5:00 PM 

KSD WDAF 


R37— MARK WARNOW'S NOVELTY ORCHESTRA— Wednesday. »/ 2 hour. 

M 
2:45 PM— ED 1:45 PM— ES-CD 12:45 PM—CS 11:45 AM 

KFH 
WABC WLBZ WADC WHK KLRA WFBM KLZ 
WCAU WOKO WBIG WJSV KMBC WGST KSL 
WDRC WORC WBT WLBW KOMA WISN KVOR 
WEAN WPG WCAO WMBG KTRH WLAC 
WGR CFRB WDAE WQAM KTSA WODX 
WICC WNAC WDBJ WSJS WBRC WSBT 
WJAS WDBO WSPD WCCO WSFA 
WFBL WWVA WDOD WTAQ 
WFEA CKLW WDSU WREC 
WHEC WTAR 
Saturday. V 2 hour. 4:15 PM— ED— Same Stations. 


Wednesday, Saturday. H hour. 

9:00 PM— ED 8:00 PM— ES-CD 7:00 PM—CS 

WEAF WTAG WWJ WTAM WMAQ 
WJAR WCSH WRC WLW KSTP. 
WGY WFI WTMJ 
WCAE WEEI 
WBEN 


T5— CHASE ft SANBORN TEA PROGRAM— Wednesday. '/ 2 hour. Fanny Brice, 
George Olsen. 

8:00 PM— ED 7:00 PM— ES-CD 6:00 PM—CS 

WEAF WTIC WFBR WRC KSD WOW 
WTAG WEEI WTAM WWJ WDAF WOC 
WJAR WCSH WSAI WCKY WHO 
WLIT WGY WLS 
WBEN WCAE 


R39— JOHNNY MARVIN— Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday, Saturday 
\i hour. 12:00 N— ED— WEAF Network. 


R40— MANHATTAN MERRY-GO-ROUND— Sunday. >/ 2 hour. Jean Sargent, David 
Percy, Gene Rodemich. 

9:00 PM— ED 8:00 PM— ES-CD 7:00 PM—CS 

WEAF WJAR WFBR WWJ KSD WOW 
WGY WTIC WSAI WRC WDAF WOC 
WENR WHO 


T6— COLUMBIA ARTISTS, RECITAL— Tuesday. >/ 2 hour. 
3:00 PM— ED 2:00 PM— ES-CD 1:00 PM—CS 

WABC WOKO WADC WHK KFAB WDOD 
WCAU WORC WBT WJSV KFH WDSU 
WDRC WPG WCAO WLBW KLRA WFBM 
WGR CFRB WDAE WMBG KMBC WGST 
WJAS WDBJ WQAM KMOX WISN 
WDBO WSJS KOMA WLAC 
WFBL WSPD KRLD WODX 
WFEA CKLW KTRH WSBT 
WHEC WTAR WACO WSFA 
WBRC WTAQ 
WCCO WREC 
Monday. V 2 hour. 4:30 PM— ED— WABC Network. 
Wednesday. M hour. 2:30 PM— ED— WABC Network. 


M 

12:00 N 

KSL 
KVOR 


R41— DOLPH MARTIN'S ORCHESTRA— Mon., Wed., Fri. 34 hour. The Travelers 
Quartet. 

7:30 PM— ED 6:30 PM— ES-CD 

WABC WOKO WCAO WFBL 
WNAC WGR WJSV WFEA 
WDRC WCAU WHEC 
WJAS WEAN 
WLBZ WHP 
WORC 


R42-MELODY PARADE— Tuesday. M hour. 10:45 AM— ED— WABC Network. 
Vinr.ent Sorey Conductor 


T7— COLUMBIA SALON ORCHESTRA— Monday. »/ 2 hour. 3:30 PM— ED— WABC 
Network. Friday. M hour. 3:00 PM— ED— WABC Network. 


R43-PHIL REGAN, TENOR-Thursday. M hour. 11:15 PM— ED WABC Network. 


I*^H^*^^r^^ BJ^HiHfc 


W H - 


A T 


YOU LIKE B 




ABBREVIATIONS: ED— Eastern Da 


ylight, ES-CD — East 


ern Standat 
SEE NOTE 


d, Central Daylight, CS — Central Standard. M — Mountain, P — Pacific. 
PAGE 27 



July-August 



35 



RADIO F A N - F A R E PROGRAM FINDER 



T— MUSIC— STANDARD & FOLK (Continued) 
T8— CONCERT MINIATURES— Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday. >/ 2 



hour. Emery Deutsch. 

1 2:30 PM— ED 1 1 :30 AM— ES-CD 1 0:30 AM— CS 

WABC WOKO WADC WCAO KMBC KMOX 

WGR WIP WBBM CKOK WGST WDOD 

WJAS WEAN WFBL WSPD WREC WSFA 

WPG WLBZ WJSV WCAH WLAC WDSU 

WHP CFRB WFEA WLBW KTRH WIBW 

WHEC WWVA WACO KFH 

WBIG WTOC WTAQ WISN 

WQAM WDBO WSBT WMT 
WDAE WSJS 



Saturday. y 2 hour. 
11:30 AM— ED 



Same stations as above. 
10:30 AM— ES-CD 9:30 AM— CS 



M 

9:30 AM 

KVOR 

KLZ 

KSL 



M 

8:30 AM 



T9— DANCING ECHOES— Saturday. M hour. 2:00 PM— ED— WABC Network. 

T10— EMERY DEUTSCH AND HIS ORCHESTRA -Sunday. 1/2 hour. 12:30 PM— ED— 
WA BC Network. 

T1 1— PHIL DUEY AND HIS FIRESIDE SONGS— Sunday. Li hour. 
10:00 PM— ED— WJZ Network. 



T15— TITO GUIZAR— Saturday. H hour. 

ES-CD 

WHK 

WFBL 

WFEA 

WHEC 

WTAR 

WMBG 

WQAM 

WSJS 



5:45 PM— ED 

WABC WOKO 
WAAB WGR 
WDRC WCAU 
WJAS WEAN 
WLBZ WORC 
CFRB 



4:45 PM 

WCAO 
CKOK 
WSPD 
WLBW 
WKBN 
WDBJ 
WTOC 
WDBO 



3:45 PM— CS 

KMBC WGST 
WBRC WDOD 
WREC WSFA 



Monday. H hour. 9:45 PM ED 



WLAC 
KRLD 
KTSA 
KFH 

WKBH KFAB" 
WISN WMT 
WABC Network. 



WDSU 
KTRH 
WACO 
WTAQ 



2:45 PM 

KVOR 

KLZ 

KSL 



P 
1:45 PM 

KHJ 

KOIN 

KGB 

KFRC 

KOL 

KFPY 



hour. Eigar Guest, Josef 



T16— GYPSY MUSIC MAKERS— Tuesday. l/ 2 hour. 4:45 PM— ED— WABC Network. 

T17— HOUSEHOLD MUSICAL MEMORIES— Tuesday. 

Koestner, Alice Mock. 

10:00 PM— ED 9:00 PM— ES-CD 

WJZ WBZ WHAM WSYR 

WBZA KDKA WJR WBAL 
WMAQ 



T18— RAY HEATHERTON, BARITONE — Tuesday. J 4 hour. 7:45 PM — ED 
WJZ Network. 



T19— ITALIAN IDYLL— Saturday. y 2 hour. 
3:00 PM— ED 2:00 PM— ES-CD 

WABC WOKO WCAO WBBM 
WAAB WGR WHK CKOK 
WDRC WCAU WFBL WSPD 
WJAS WPG WFEA WLBW 
WLBZ WICC WHEC WTAR 
WHP WORC WDBJ WNBG 
CFRB WTOC WQAM 

WDBO WSJS 



1:00 PM— CS 

KMBC WFBM 
WGST WBRC 
WDOD WREC 
WSFA WLAC 
WDSU KRLD 
KTRH KTSA 
WACO KFH 
WTAQ WKBH 
KFAB WISN 
WSBT WMT 



M 

12:00 N 

KVOR 
KSL 



P 
11:00 AM 

KHJ 

KOIN 

KGB 

KFRC 

KOL 

KFPY 



T20— RALPH KIRBERY — Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday, Saturday. 
5 Minutes. 12:00 Mid.— ED— WEAF Network. 



T21 



-ANDRE KOSTELANETZ PRESENTS:— Sunday. > 2 hour. 
Mary Eastman, Soprano; Male Chorus 



9:30 PM— ED 

WABC WOKO 
WNAC WGR 
WDRC WJAS 
WEAN WLBZ 
WICC WHP 
WORC 



8:30 PM— ES-CD 

WADC WCAO 
WBBM WHK 
CKOK WFBL 
WSPD WJSV 
WCAH WFEA 
WLBW WHEC 
WKBN WDBJ 
WDBO WDAE 
WSJS 



7:30 PM— CS 

KMBC WFBM 
KMOX WGST 
WDOD WREC 
WSFA WLAC 



M 

6:30 PM 

KVOR 

KLZ 

KSL 



WDSU 
KTRH 
KTSA 
WISN 
WMT 



KRLD 
KLRA 
WIBW 
WCCO 



P 
5:30 PM 

KHJ 

KOIN 

KGB 

KFRC 

KOL 

KFPY 



T22— JAMES MELTON, 
7:00 PM— ED 

WEAF WTAG 
WJAR WBEN 

Tuesday. M hour. 
6:45 PM— ED 

WEAF WTAG 
WFI WJAR 

Thursday. \i hour. 
11:00 PM— ED 

WEAF CKGW 
WCAE WFI 



TENOR— Sunday. 
6:00 PM— ES-CD 

WWJ WFBR 
WSAI WTAM 
WMAQ 



'4 hour. 

5:00 PM— CS 

WDAF KSD 



5:45 PM— ES-CD 4:45 PM— CS 

WRC WIS WSM WSAI 

WFBR WSAI WOC WHO 

WMAQ WOW KSD 



M 

3:45 PM 

KOA 



10:00 PM— ES-CD 9:00 PM— CS 

WFBR WRC WOC WHO 
WWJ WCKY 

WTAM 



T23— MORNING MOODS— Monday and Thursday. > , hr. 11:15 AM— ED 
WABC Network. Vincent Sorey, Conductor. 



T24— OLGA, COUNTESS ALBANI— Monday. 



7:30 PM— ED 

WEAF WTAG 
WCAE WJAR 
WBEN 

Thursday. )i hour. 



6:30 PM— ES-CD 

WFBR WIS 

WSAI WWNC 

WRC WJAX 

WMAQ 

7:15 PM— ED— Same stations. 



J4 hour. 
5:30 PM— CS 

WOC WHO 
WSM WSB 
WMC WOW 



P 
3:30 PM 

KGO 
KFSD 
KGW 
KOMO 



T25— RHYTHMIC SERENADE— Monday, Wednesday, Friday. % hour. 12:45 PM— 
ED — WJZ Network. Josef Koestner's Orchestra, Mary Steele. 



T26— DONALD NOVIS, TENOR; LEW WHITE, ORGAN Sunday. > 4 hour. 
11:15 PM— ED 10:15 PM— ES-CD 9:15PM— CS 

WEAF WGY WCKY WTAM WDAF 
WCAE WTAG WFBR WWJ 
WCSH WTIC WRC WENR 
WFI WSAI 



T— MUSIC— STANDARD & FOLK (Continued) 



T28— GEORGE SCHERBAN'S RUSSIAN GYPSIES ORCHESTRA. Tuesday, 

M 

3:30 PM 

KVOR 

KLZ 

KSL 



hour. 



6:30 PM— ED 

WABC WOKO 
WAAB WGR 
WDRC WIP 
WJAS WPG 
WLBZ WORC 
CFRB 



5:30 PM— ES-CD 4:30 PM— CS 



WCAO WHK 
CKOK WFBL 
WSPD WFEA 
WLBW WHEC 
WKBN WTAR 
WMBG WTOC 
WQAM WSJS 



KMBC WGST 
WBRC WDOD 
WREC WODX 
WSFA WLAC 
WDSU KTRH 
WIBW WACO 
KFH WTAQ 
WKBH WISN 
WCCO WSBT 
WMT 



T29— SOUTHLAND SKETCHES— Sunday. V 2 hour. 10:00 AM— ED— WJZ Network. 
Southernaires, Homer Smith, Lowell Peters, Jay Toney, William Edmonson 



T31— VASS FAMILY— Sat; \i hour. 
9:15 AM— ED 

WEAF WEEI 
WJAR WTAG 
WGY WCAE 
WCSH WTIC 



Seven South Carolina Children Singing. 
7:15 AM— CS 

KFYR KSD 
WOW KSTP 



T32— THE BALLADEERS— Sunday. V 2 hour. 9:00 AM— ED— WEAF Network. 

T34— HIGHLIGHTS AND SHADOWS— Sunday. ~~y 2 hour. 10:15 PM— ED— WEAF 
Network. 

T35— HOUR GLASS— Monday. 1 hour. 10:00 PM— ED— WJZ Network. Harold Sanford. 



T36— MARY EASTMAN, SOPRANO 



Tuesday. J4 hour 
8:00 PM— ED 

WABC WOKO 
WNAC WGR 
WDRC WCAU 
WJAS WEAN 
WPG WLBZ 
WHP WORC 
CFRB 



7:00 PM— ES-CD 

WHK CKOK 
WFBL WSPD 
WFEA WLBW 
WHEC WKBN 
WTAR WDBJ 
WMBG WQAM 
WDBO WSJS 



6:00 PM— CS 

KMBC WFBM 
WGST WBRC 
WDOD WREC 
WSFA WLAC 
WDSU KRLD 
KTRH WACO 
KFH WTAQ 
WKBH KFAB 
WISN 



M 

5:00 PM 

KVOR 



4:00 PM 

KHJ 

KOIN 

KGB 

KFRC 

KOL 

KFPY 



T37— ORCHESTRAL GEMS— Sunday. \' 2 hour. 11:30 PM— ED— WEAF Network. 
T38— RADIO RUBES— Sunday. % hour. 11:00 AM— ED— WEAF Network. 

U— MUSIC— SYMPHONY 



U2— LIGHT OPERA GEMS— Tuesday. 
Channon Collinge, Conductor. 



10:45 PM ED 

WABC WOKO 
WAAB WGR 
WDRC WJAS 
WEAN WLBZ 
WICC WHP 
WORC CFRB 



9:45 PM— ES-CD 

WCAO WHK 
CKOK WFBL 
WSPD WFEA 
WLBW WHEC 
WTAR WDBJ 
WMBG WTOC 
WQAM WDBO 
WSJS 



y 2 hour. 

8:45 PM— CS 

KMBC WFBM 
WMBD WGST 
WBRC WDOD 
WREC WODX 
WLAC WDSU 
KTRH KTSA 
WIBW KFH 
WKBH WCCO 
WSBT WMT 



M 

7:45 PM 
KVOR 
KLZ 
KSL 



P 
6:45 PM 

KHJ 

KOIN 

KGB 

KFRC 

KOL 

KFPY 



U3— SYMPHONIC HOUR— Sunday. 1 hour. 3:00 PM— ED— WABC Network. 

U4—SYMPHONETTE— Sunday. \i hour. 4:15 PM— ED— WJZ Network. Cyril Pitts, 
Josef Koestner. 

V— NEWS REPORTS 

V1 — BOAKE CARTER — Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday. )i hour. 
7:45 PM— ED 6:45 PM— ES-CD 

WABC WNAC WCAO WBBM 
WGR WCAU WHK CKOK 
WJAS WJSV WBT 

V3 -FLO YD GIBBONS THE WORLD'S FAIR REPORTER— Sun., Tues., Thur. U hour. 



8:45 PM— ED 

WJZ WBZA 

KDKA 

WBZ 



7:45 PM— ES-CD 

WBAL WMAL 
WGAR WSYR 
WHAM WLS 
WOR 



V4— BACK OF NEWS IN WASHINGTON 



6:30 PM— ED 

WEAF WBEN 
WJAR 



5:30 PM— ES-CD 

WFBR WCKY 
WWNC WIS 
WMAQ 



Wednesday. J< 
4:30 PM— CS 

WJDX KSD 

WDAF KVOO 

WIBA KTHS 

WOAI 

KFYR 

WMC 

WSMB 



hour. 



M P 

3:30 PM 2:30 PM 
KOA KPO 



KTBS 
WEBC 
WAPI 



V5— EDWIN C. HILL— "Human Side of News" 
Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday. M hour. 



10:30 PM-ED 

WABC WOKO 
WAAB WKBW 
WDRC WJAS 
WEAN WPG 
WLBZ WICC 
WHP WORC 
CFRB 



9:30 PM— ES-CD 

WADC WBBM 
WHK CKOK 
WFBL WSPD 
WJSV WCAH 
WFEA WLBW 
WHEC WKBN 
WBIG WDBJ 
WTOC WQAM 
WDBO WDAE 
WSJS 



8:30 PM 

KMBC 

WMBD 

WDOD 

WLAC 

KTRH 

KTSA 

WISN 

WMT 



qo 

WFBM 
WGST 
WREC 
WDSU 
KLRA 
WIBW 
WCCO 



M 
7:30 PM 

KVOR 
KLZ 



P 
6:30 PM 

KHJ 

KOIN 

KGB 

KFRC 

KOL 

KFPY 



V6— JOHN B. KENNEDY— Thursday. 5 Minutes. 

6:30 PM— ED 5:30 PM— ES-CD 4:30 PM— CS 

WEAF WTAG WWJ WWNC WDAF WIBA 

WGY WIS WSAI KFYR KSD 

WCKY WMAQ KTBS WAPI 

WSMB WOAI 

KTHS WDAY 

WSB WOW 



M P 

3:30 PM 2:30 PM 

KOA KECA 

KPO 
KFSD 



ABBREVIATIONS: ED — Eastern Daylight, ES-CD- 



-Eastern Standard, Central Daylight, CS — Central Standard, M — Mountain, P — Pacific. 
SEE NOTE PAGE 27 



36 



Radio Fan-Fare 



RADIO FAN- FARE PROGRAM FINDER 



V— NEWS REPORTS (Continued) 



V8 LOWELL THOMAS, TODAY'S NEWS Mon., Tues., Wed., Thurs., Fri. 
6:45 PM ED 6:45 PM— ES-CD 

WJZ WBZ WLW WHAM 
CKGW KDKA WGAR WBAL 
WBZA WJR WSYR 



hour. 



V9— MERLE THORPE 
7:45 PM— ED 

WJZ KDKA 



-Thursday. ]4, hour. 
6:45 PM— ES-CD 

WBAL WMAL 
WSYR WHAM 
WGAR WWNC 
WIS WIOD 
KYW 



5:45 PM— CS 

KWK KWOR 
KSO KOIL 
WREN WSM 
WSB WAPI 
WMC WJDX 



M 

4:45 PM 

KOA 
KGIR 



P 
3:45 PM 

KGW 
KFSD 



V10— INTERVIEW ON NATIONAL AFFAIRS— Sunday. M hour. 
Col. Louis McHenry Howe and Walter Trumbull. 



10:00 PM— ED 

WEAF WGY 
WBEN WJAR 
WCAE WTAG 



WCSH 
WFI 



WTIC 



9:00 PM— ES-CD 

WFBR WTAM 
WRC WWJ 
WSAI WMAQ 



8:00 PM— CS 

KFYR WIBA 



KPRC 
KSD 
KSTP 
WDAF 



WKY 
WMC 
WOAI 
WOC 



M 
7:00 PM 

KDYL 
KGHL 
KGIR 
KOA 



WDAY WOW 
WEBC WSB 
WFAA WSMB 
WHO WTMJ 



P 
6:00 PM 
KFI 

KGO 
KGW 
KHQ 
KOMO 



V11— WORLD TODAY- 
7:45 PM ED 

WEAF WTAG 
WJAR WGY 
WBEN 



Saturday. \i hour. 
6:45 PM— ES-CD 

WFBR WWJ 
WSAI WTAM 
WDAF WWNC 
WIS WJAX 
WFLA WIOD 
WRC WPTF 
WENR 



James G. McDonald. 
5:45 PM— CS 

WHO WOC 
WKY 
KFYR 
WOAI 



W— RELIGIOUS SERVICES (Continued) 



W5— THE RADIO PULPIT— Sunday. >/ 2 hour. 
Or. Ralph W. Sockman 



3:30 PM— ED 

WEAF WEEI 
WCSH WBEN 
WLIT WGY 
WJAR WCAE 
WTAG 



2:30 PM— ES-CD 1:30 PM— CS 

WRC WFBR KTHS WOW 



M P 

12:30 PM 11:30 AM 



WWJ WRVA 
WIS WWNC 
WIOD WJAX 
WTAM WFLA 
WPTF WSAI 



WDAF WEBC 

KFYR KPRC 

KVOO WKY 

WOAI WHO 

WOC WMC 

WJDX WSMB 

WSM WSB 



KOA 

KDYL 

KGIR 



KGO 

KGW 

KHQ 

KFSD 

KOMO 

KFI 



W6 MORNING DEVOTIONS— Mon., Tues., Wed., Thurs., Fri., Sat. \i hour. 9:00 AM 
—ED— WJZ Network. Kathryn Palmer, Joyce Allmand, Richard Dennis, Lowell 
Patton, Arthur Billings Hunt. 



W7— THE WORLD OF RELIGION— Sunday. y 2 hour 
Dr. Stanley High 

5:00 PM— ED 4:00 PM— ES-CD 

WJZ WBZ WBAL WGAR 

WBZA 



WBAP 

WIS 

WIOD 

WJAX 



WPTF 
WWNC 
WFLA 
WRVA 



3:00 PM— CS 

WREN KFYR 

KWK WSM 

KWCR WSB 

WJDX KPRC 



M 

2:00 PM 

KOA 

KGHL 

KGIR 



WOW 
WIBA 
KTBS 



V12— WORLD ECONOMIC CONFERENCE FROM LONDON— Sunday. M hour. 
H. V. Kaltenborn. M 

6:30 PM— ES-CD 5:30 PM— CS 4:30 PM 

WADC WHEC KFH WFBM KLZ 

WBIG WJSV KLRA WGST KSL 

WBT 

WCAH 

WCAO 

WDAE 

WDBJ 



7:30 PM— ED 

WABC WJAS 
WCAU WLBZ 
WDRC WOKO 
WEAN WORC 
WHP WNAC 



WKBN 
WLBW 
WQAM 
WSJS 
WSPD 
WDBO WWVA 
WFBL CKLW 
WFEA 

Also Tuesday and Thursday M hour 6:00 PM— ED— WABC Network 
Program scheduled for duration of World Economic Conference only 



5:30 PM— CS 

KFH WFBM 
KLRA WGST 
KMBC WHAS 
KMOX WISN 
KOMA WLAC 
KTRH WODX 
KTSA WSBT 
WACO WSFA 
WCCO WTAQ 
WDSU WREC 



V13— ECONOMIC CONFERENCE FROM LONDON— Sunday. 
Wm. Hard. 



2:15 PM— ED 

WJZ WBZA 
WBZ CFCF 



1:15 PM— ES-CD 

WFLA WMAL 



WIOD 

WIS 
WJR 



WSYR 
WWNC 
WMAQ 



12:15 PM— CS 

KFYR WEBC 



M hour. 

M P 

11:15 AM 10:15 AM 



KOIL 

KSO 

KSTP 

KTBS 

KTHS 

KVOO 



WFAA 

WIBA 

WJDX 

WKY 

WMC 

WOAI 



KDYL 
KGHL 
KGIR 
KOA 



KFI 

KFSD 

KGO 

KHQ 

KOMO 

KTAR 



Also M hour Sunday. 7:15 PM— ED 



KWCR WREN 
KWK WSB 
WAPI WSM 
WDAY WSMB 
-and Friday 10:30 PM 



Wednesday. ' ; hour. 
9:15 PM— ED 

WEAF WGY 
WBEN WJAR 
WCAE WTAG 
WCSH WTIC 
WEEI 



8:15 PM— ES-CD 

WCKY WIS 
WFBR WRC 



7:15 PM— CS 

KFYR WDAF 



WFLA 
WIOD 



WSAI 

WWNC 

WMAQ 



KPRC 

KSD 

KSTP 

KTBS 

WAPI 



WDAY 
WEBC 
WIBA 
WKY 

WMC 



ED— WJZ Network. 

M P 

6:15 PM 5:15 PM 

KOA KPO 



WHAM WCKY 
WCFL 



WOAI 
KOIL 
KVOO 
KSTP 
WEBC 



KTBS 

WSMB 

WTMJ 

WKY 

WMC 



P 
1:00 PM 

KGW 

KGO 

KHQ 

KFSD 

KTAR 

KOMO 



W8 SABBATH REVERIES— Sunday. 
Dr. Charles L. Goodell 



M hour. 1 :30 PM— ED— WJZ Network 



X— SKETCHES— DRAMATIC 

X1 CAPTAIN DIAMOND'S ADVENTURES— Thursday. ',, hour. 
8:00 PM— ED 

WJZ WBZ 

WBZA KDKA ^ 

X2— DEATH VALLEY DAYS— Thursday. y 2 hour. Tim Frawley, Joseph Bell, Edwin 
W. Whitney, Joseph Bonime, Director. 

9:00 PM— ED 8:00 PM— ES-CD 7:00 PM— CS 

WJZ WBZ WLW WJR KOIL WREN 

WBZA KDKA WBAL WHAM KWK 
WGAR WLS 



X3 COLUMBIA DRAMATIC GUILD— Sunday. >/ 2 hour. 



8:00 PM— ED 

WABC WJAS 
WCAU WOKO 
WDRC WORC 
WEAN CFRB 
WICC WNAC 



7:00 PM— ES-CD 6:00 PM— CS 

WADC WJSV KFAB WDSU 



WBT WKBN 
WCAO WLBW 
WDAE WQAM 
WDBJ WSJS 
WDBO WSPD 
WFBL CKLW 
WFEA WTAR 
WHEC 



KLRA WFBM 
KMBC WGST 
KMOX WISN 
KOMA WLAC 
WACO WMT 
WBRC WSFA 
WCCO WTAQ 
WDOD WREC 



M 

5:00 PM 

KLZ 
KVOR 



X4 FAMOUS LOVES- 
3:15 PM— ED 

WEAF WTAG 
WEEI WGY 
WBEN WCAE 



Friday. J4 hour. Ulita Torgerson. M 

2:15 PM— ES-CD 1:15 PM— CS 12:15 PM 

WFBR WTAM KSD WIBA KOA 

WSAI WWJ WDAY WSMB 

WDAF WIS WSM WMC 

WRVA WWNC WKY KTBS 

WIOD WRC WOC WHO 



X5— THE FIRST NIGHTER Friday. \, Hour June Meredith, Don Ameche, Carlton 
Brickert, Cliff Soubier, Eric Sagerquist's Orchestra. 



10:00 PM— ED 

WJZ WBZA 
KDKA WBZ 



9:00 PM— ES-CD 

WBAL WHAM 
WGAR WCKY 
WJR 
WENR 



8:00 PM— CS 

KWK WREN 



KOIL 

WEBC 

WOAI 

WKY 

WAPI 

WSMB 



KSTP 

WSB 

KTBS 

WSM 

KPRC 



M 

7:00 PM 

KOA 
KDYL 



P 
6:00 PM 

KGO 

KFI 

KGW 

KOMO 

KHQ 






Also Monday. \i hour. 8:30 PM-ED— WEAF Network. 
Program scheduled for duration of World Economic Conference only 



W— RELIGIOUS SERVICES 



W1 



CATHOLIC HOUR 
6:00 PM— ED 

WEAF WTAG 



WEEI 
WCSH 
WGY 
WCAE 



WJAR 
WLIT 
WBEN 



-Sunday. V 2 hour. 
6:00 PM— ES-CD 

WFBR WRC 
WTAM WWJ 
WIOD WRVA 
WSAI WFLA 
WWNC WIS 
WJAX WMAQ 



4:00 PM— CS 

WEBC KFYR 
WOAI WOC 
WHO WOW 
WDAF WIBA 
WSM WMC 
WSMB WKY 
WJDX KVOO 
WBAP KPRC 
WAPI KSD 
WDAY WSB 
KTBS 



M 

3:00 PM 

KOA 
KGHL 
KDYL 
KGIR 



P 
2:00 PM 

KTAR 
KPO 



W4— ELDER MICHAUX AND CONGREGATION— Saturday. '/ 2 hour. 

10:00 AM— ED 9:00 AM— ES-CD 8:00 AM— CS 

WABC WOKO WBBM CKOK WGST WBRC 

WAAB WGR WFBL WSPD WDOD WREC 

WDRC WCAU WLBW WHEC WODX WLAC 

WEAN WPG WTAR WDBJ WDSU KRLD 

WLBZ WICC WMBG WTOC KTRH KTSA 

WHP WORC WQAM WDBO KFH WTAQ 

CFRB WSJS WSBT WMT 



X6— THE FOREIGN LEGION— Friday. '/ 2 hour. M P 

8:30 PM— ED 7:30 PM— ES-CD 6:30 PM— CS 5:30 PM 4:30 PM 
WABC WOKO WADC WCAO KMBC WFBM KLZ KHJ 
WAAB WKBW WBBM WHK WMBD WGST KOIN 
WDRC WCAU CKOK WFBL WDOD WREC KGB 
WJAS WEAN WSPD WJSV WLAC WDSU KFRC 
WLBZ WICC WCAH WFEA KTRH KLRA KOL 
WORC CFRB WLBW WHEC KTSA WIBW KFPY 
WHP WKBN WBIG WCCO WSBT 
WDBJ WTOC WMT 
WQAM WDBO 
WDAE WSJS 

X/ THE GOLDBERGS— Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday. H hour. 
Gertrude Berg, James Waters. 

7:45 PM— ED 6:45 PM— ES-CD 5:45 PM— CS 

WRC WTAM WKY WFAA 
WWJ WSAI 
WBFR WENR 



WEAF WTAG 
WEEI WJAR 
WCSH WLIT 
WGY WBEN 
WCAE 



WOAI WOW 
WDAF WTMJ 
KFYR KPRC 



X8— GREAT MOMENTS IN HISTORY— Sunday. >/ 2 hour. 
7:30 PM-ED 6:30 PM— ES-CD 5:30 PM— CS 

WJZ WBZ WGAR WBAL KWK WREN 

WBZA KDKA WHAM WJR WTMJ WIBA 

WLW WRVA WEBC WDAY 
WWNC WIOD KFYR WFAA 
WFLA WJAX WMC WSM 
WMAL WPTF KSTP WOAI 
WLS KOA WSB WJDX 

WSMB KVOO 
WKY KSO 
KOIL KPRC 



M P 

4:30 PM 3:30 PM 

KOA KGO 

KDYL KFI 
KGW 
KOMO 
KHQ 
KTAR 



ABBREVIATIONS: ED — Eastern Daylight, ES-CD- 



-Eastern Standard, Central Daylight, CS- 
SEE NOTE PAGE 27 



-Central Standard, M — Mountain, P — Pacific. 



July-August 



37 



RADIO FAN-FARE PROGRAM FINDER 


X — SKETCHES— DRAMATIC (Continued) 


X— SKETCHES— DRAMATIC (Continued) 


XS— JOHN HENRY— BLACK RIVER GIANT— Sunday and Thursday. M hour. 
10:00 PM— ED 9:00 PM— ES-CD 8:00 PM— CS M 

WABC WJAS WADC WHK KLRA WDSU 7:00 PM 
WAAB WKBW WBT WJSV KMBC WFBM KLZ 
WCAU WOKO WCAO WKBN KMOX WGST KVOR 
WDRC WORC WDAE WLBW KOMA WISN 
WICC WPG WDBJ WQAM KRLD WLAC 
WDBO WSJS KTRH WMT 
WFBL WSPD WBRC WODX 
WFEA CKLW WDOD WREC 
WHEC WTAR 
WBBM 


X23-VIC AND SADE -Mon., Tue., Wed., Thurs., Fri., Sat. M hr. 1:00 PM ED- 
WJZ Network. Van Harvey, Bernardine Flynn. 


Y— SKETCHES— Detective and Mystery 

Y2— ENO CRIME CLUES— Tues. and Wed. >/ 2 hour. Edward Reese, Georgia Backus. 
8:00 PM— E D 7:0: PM— ES-CD 

WJZ WBZ WHAM WGAR 
WBZA KDKA WBAL WLW 

WJR WMAL 

WMAQ 


X10— JUST PLAIN BILL— Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday. M hour 
6:45 PM— ED 5:45 PM— ES-CD 

WABC WAAB WCAO WHK 
WKBW WCAU CKOK WJSV 


Y5 ORANGE LANTERN— Sunday. >/ 2 hour. 

10:45 PM— ED 9:45 PM— ES-CD 8:45 PM-CS 

WJZ WBAL WHAM KWCR WREN 
WGAR WSYR KWK KSO 
WJR WMAL KOIL 
WMAQ 


X11— LIVES AT STAKE— Tuesday. Vz hour. 8:00 PM— CS M P 

10:00 PM— ED 9:00 PM— ES-CD WSB WJDX 7:00 PM 6:00 PM 

WEAF WEEI WFBR WENR WKY KPRC KDYL KFI 
WCSH WTAG WRC WTAM KTHS WHO KOA KOMO 
WJAR WFI WWJ WOAI WAPI KGO 
WBEN WGY WMC WBAP KGW 

KTBS WOC KHQ 

WDAF KSD 


Y6— "K-7"— Saturday. y 2 hour. 

9:30 PM— ED 8:30 PM— ES-CD 7:30 PM— CS 

WEAF WTAG WRC WFBR KSD WOC 
WEEI WCSH WTAM WSAI WHO WOW 
WJAR WFI WWJ WMAQ WDAF 
WGY WBEN 
WCAE 


X13— MARIE, THE LITTLE FRENCH PRINCESS— Tues., Wed., Thurs., Fri. H hr. 
Ruth Yorke and James Meighan. M P 
1:00 PM— ED 12:00 N— ES-CD 11:00 AM— CS 10:00 AM 9:00 AM 

WABC WGR WKRC WBBM KMBC WCCO KLZ KFPY 
WCAU WNAC CKLW KMOX KSL KFRC 

KGB 
KHJ 
KOIN 
KOL 
KVI 


Z— HUMOROUS SKETCHES 


ZI—AMOS'N' ANDY— Mon., Tues., Wed., Thurs., Fri. }4 hour. M P 

7:00 PM— ED 6:00 PM— ES-CD 9:00 PM— CS 8:00 PM 7:00 PM 

WJZ WBZ WLW WCKY KWK WREN KOA KHQ 
WBZA KDKA WMAL WRVA WDAF KOIL KDYL KGO 
CKGW WPTF WFLA WTMJ KSTP KFI 

WIOD WJR WSM WMC KGW 

WGAR WHAM WSB WSMB KOMO 
KTHS WBAP 

10:00 PM— CD KPRC WOAI 

WMAQ WENR WKY 


X15— SOCONYLAND SKETCHES— Monday. V 2 hour. 
8:00 PM— ED 

WEAF WTIC 
WTAG WEEI 
WJAR WCSH 
WGY WBEN 


Z2— BETTY AND BOB— Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday. \i hour. 
3:00 PM— ED 2:00 PM-ES-CD 1:00 PM— CS 

WJZ WBZ WBAL WGAR KWK KOIL 
WBZA KDKA WJR WLW 
WHAM WLS 


X16— SUNDAY AT SETH PARKERS 8:45 PM— CS M P 

Sunday. V, hour WOC WHO 7:45 PM 6:45 PM 
10:45 PM— ED 9:45 PM-ES-CD WOW WDAF KOA KGO 
WEAF WJAR WFBR WRC WTMJ WIBA KGHL KGW 
WCSH WFI WTAM WWJ KSTP WEBC KDYL KFSD 
WGY WBEN WSAI WRVA WDAY KFYR KHQ 
WCAE CFCF WIS WJAX WSM WMC KTAR 
CKGW WTAG WIOD WFLA WSB WAPI KOMO 
WEEI WWNC WCKY WJDX WOAI 
KYW KTBS KPRC 
KTHS WBAP 


Z5 — CLARA, LU 'N' EM— Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday, li hour. 
Louise Starky, Isabelle Carothers, Helen King. M 
10:15 AM— ED 9:15 AM— ES-CD 8:15 AM— CS 7:15 AM 

WJZ WBZ WBAL WGAR KWK WREN KDYL 
WBZA KDKA WJR WCKY KOIL WTMJ KOA 
WRVA WPTF WIBA WEBC 
WWNC WIS WDAY KFYR 
WJAX WIOD WSM WSB 
WFLA WHAM WAPI WSMB 
WGN WJDX KVOO 

KPRC WOAI 

WKY WBAP 

KSTP 


X17— ROSES AND DRUMS— Sunday. >/ 2 hour. M 

6:30 PM— ED 5:30 PM— ES-CD 4:30 PM— CS 3:30 PM 

WABC WGR WADC WJSV KFAB KTSA KLZ 

WAAB WJAS WBT WKRC KLRA WBRC 

WCAO CKLW KMBC WCCO 

WHK WBBM KMOX WDSU 

KOMA WGST 

KRLD WHAS 

KTRH WREC 


Z6— CUCKOO PROGRAM— Saturday. y 2 hour. Raymond Knight. Robert Armbruster. 
7:30 PM— ED 6:30 PM— ES-CD 

WJZ KDKA WBAL WHAM 
WGAR WCKY 
WIS WJAX 
WIOD WWNC 
WRVA WFLA 
WSYR KYW 


X18— WAYFARING MEN— Tues., Thurs. M hour. M 

9:00 PM— ED 8:C0 PM— ES-CD 7:00 PM— CS 6:00 PM 

WABC WKBW WADC WJSV KFAB WDOD KVOR 

WCAU WOKO WBT WKBN KFH WDSU 

WDRC WORC WCAO WLBW KLRA WFBM 

WEAN CFRB WDAE WMBG KMBC WGST 

WICC WNAC WDBO WQAM KMOX WISN 

WJAS WFBL WSJS KOMA WLAC 

WFEA WSPD KRLD WSFA 

WHEC CKLW WBRC WTAQ 

WHK WTAR WCCO WREC 


Z8— HORSE SENSE PHILOSOPHY— Sunday. ' ,' hour. Andrew F. Kelly. 
7:15 PM— ED 6:15 PM— ES-DC 5:15 PM— CS 

WEAF WEEI WRC WTAM WDAF WOC 
WJAR WLIT WWJ WMAQ WHO 
WGY 


Z14— POTASH AND PERLMUTTER— Monday and Wednesday. M, hour. 8:30 PM— 
ED— WJZ Network. 


X19— TRIPLE BAR X DAYS AND NIGHTS— Saturday. «/ 2 hour. 

Carson Robinson. M 
9:45 PM— ED 8:45 PM— ES-CD 7:45 PM— CS 6:45 PM 

WABC WICC WADC WHK KFAB WGST KLZ 
WAAB WJAS WBIG WJSV KFH WHAS KSL 
WCAU WLBZ WBT WLBW KLRA WIBW KVOR 
WDRC WOKO WCAH WMBG KMBC WISN 
WEAN WORC WCAO WQAM KMOX WLAC 
WHP CFRB WDAE WSJS KOMA WMBD 
WDBJ WSPD KRLD WMT 
WDBO WWVA KTRH WODX 
WFBL CKLW KTSA WSFA 
WFEA WTAR WCCO WTAQ 
WHEC WDSU WREC 
WFBM 


BB— TRAVEL 


BB3— SEEING THE OTHER AMERICAS— Sun. J.f hour. Edward Tomlinson. 
12:15 PM— ED 11:15 AM— ES-CD 10:15 AM— CS 

WEAF WCSH WSAI WTAM WOC WDAF 
WFI WTAG WWJ WCKY WHO 
WGY WJAR 


DD— VARIETY SHOWS 


DD1— BEST FOODS MUSICAL GROCERY STORE— Friday. P 
Vi hour. Tom Howard, Jeannie Lang, Herbert Polesie, 7:30 PM 
The Singing Clerks, Harry Salter's Orchestra. M KGO 
9:00 PM— ED 8:09 PM— ES-CD 7:00 PM— CS 8:30 PM KGW 

WEAF WTIC WFBR WRC KSD WDAF KDYL KHQ 
WTAG WEEI WTAM WWJ KOA KOMO 
WJAR WCSH WMAQ KFI 
WGY WBEN KFSD 
WLIT KTAR 


X20— JACK DEMPSEY'S GYMNASIUM— Tuesday, Thursday. Saturday. \L hour. 
7:30 PM— ED 6:30 PM— ES-CD 

WABC WKBW WCAO WKRC 
W r CAU CFRB WHK 


X21— BUCK ROGERS IN THE YEAR 2433— Mon., Tue., Wed., Thurs., Fri. } { hour. 
7:15 PM— ED 6:15 PM— ES-CD 5:15 PM— CS 

WABC WNAC WBBM WHK WHAS KMOX 
WGR WCAU CKOK WCCO 


DD2— CHASE & SANBORN HOUR 6:00 PM— CS M P 
Sunday. 1 hour KSD WOC 5:00 PM 4:00 PM 
Bert Lahr, Lee Sims, Ilomay WHO WDAF KDYL KGO 
Bailey, Rubinoff Orchestra. WSB WTMJ KOA KHQ 
8:00 PM— ED 7:00 PM— ES-CD KSTP WEBC KTAR 
WEAF WTIC WTAM WWJ WDAY KFYR KFI 
WTAG WBEN WLW WWNC WWNC KPRC KGW 
WCAE CFCF WIS WIOD WKY WMC KOMO 
CKGW WJAR WFLA WPTF WJDX WSMB 
WCSH WGY WFBR WRC KVOO WFAA 
WMAQ WOAI WSM 
WOW 


X22— THE MAGIC VOICE— Tuesday, Saturday. }. % hour. 
Elsie Hitz, Nick Dawson. 

8:15 PM— ED 7:15 PM— ES-CD 6:15 PM-CS 

WABC WOKO WADC WCAO KMBC WFBM 
WNAC WGR WGN WKRC WHAS KMOX 
WDRC WCAU WHK CKOK KRLD 
WJAS WEAN WFBL WSPD 
WJSV WBT 


LOCATES 


W H i 


V T YOU LIKE BEST 



ABBREVIATIONS: ED — Eastern Daylight, ES-CD- 



-Eastern Standard, Central Daylight, CS Central Standard, M — Mountain, P- 

SEE NOTE PAGE 27 



-Pacific. 



38 



Radio Fan-Fare 



RADIO FAN-FARE PROGRAM F N R 



DD— VARIETY SHOWS (Continued) 



DD3— CHEVROLET PROGRAM— Fri. y 2 hr. 
Jack Benny, Mary Livingstone, James 
Melton, Frank Black and his Orchestra 
10:00 PM— ED 9:00 PM— ES-CD 

WEAF WTIC WFBR WRC 
WTAG WLIT WWJ WTAM 
WGY WBEN WIS WRVA 
WCAE WCSH WWNC WIOD 
WEEI WJAR WFLA WJAX 
WLW WENR 



8:00 PM 

KSD 

WHO 

WDAF 

WIBA 

WMC 

WJDX 

KTBS 

WKY 

WFAA 

WOAI 



cs 

woe 
wow 

WTMJ 

WSM 

WSB 

WSMB 

KVOO 

KTHS 

KPRC 

WEBC 



M 
7:00 PM 

KOA 
KDYL 
KGIR 
KGHL 



P 
6:00 PM 

KGO 

KFI 

KGW 

KOMO 

KHQ 

KFSD 

KTAR 



WDAY KFYR 



DD4 CHICAGO VARIETY PROGRAM Sun. y 2 hr. 8:30 PM— ED— WABC Network. 



DD5— CLICQUOT CLUB ESKIMOS— Mon. 1/2 hr. 
8:00 PM— ED 7:00 PM— ES-CD 

WJZ WBZ WBAL WHAM 

WBZA KDKA WGAR WCKY 
WMAL WLS 



"Rosey" Rowswell and Harry Reser. 



DD6— COLUMBIA REVUE— Sunday. '/■> hour. M 

10:15 PM— ED 9:15 PM— ES-CD 8:15 PM— CS 7:15 PM 

WABC WJAS WADC WJSV KLRA WFBM KLZ 

WAAB WKBW WBT WKBN KMBC WGST KVOR 

WCAU WOKO WCAO WLBW KMOX WISN 

WDRC WORC WDAE WQAM KRLD WLAC 

WICC WPG WDBJ WSJS KTRH WMBD 

WDBO WSPD WBRC WMT 

WFBL CKLW WCCO WODX 

WFEA WTAR WDOD WREC 
WHEC WBBM 



Friday. V 2 hour. 9:30 PM— ED— Same Stations. 



DD8— HARRISBURG VARIETY SHOW— Sunday. V 2 hour. 

10:30 AM— ED 9:30 AM— ES-CD 8:30 PM— CS 

WABC WOKO WADC WHK KLRA WGST 

WCAU WORC WCAO WJSV KMBC WISN 

WDRC WPG WDAE WKBN KOMA WLAC 

WEAN CFRB WDBJ WLBW KRLD WMBD 

WJAS WDBO WSJS WCCO WMT 

WFBL WSPD WDOD WSFA 

WFEA CKLW WDSU WTAQ 

WHEC WBBM WFBM WREC 



DD9— THE GRAB BAG— Fri. y 2 hr. 
Freddy Rose, Westphal's Orchestra 



Helen Mors, Brooks and Ross, Billy W!iite, 



4:00 PM— ED 

WABC WOKO 
WNAC WGR 
WDRC WIP 
WJAS WEAN 



WPG 
WICC 
CFRB 



WLBZ 
WORC 



3:00 PM— ES-CD 

WADC WCAO 
WBBM CKOK 
WHK WJSV 
WSPD WFEA 
WCAH WWVA 
WLBW WBIG 
WKBN WTOC 
WDBJ WDBO 
WQAM WSJS 
WDAE 



2:00 PM— CS 

KMBC WGST 
WDOD WREC 
WSFA WLAC 



WDSU 
KTRH 
KTSA 
WACO 
WTAQ 
WISN 
WMT 



KRLD 

KLRA 

WIBW 

KFH 

KFAB 

WSBT 



M 
1:00 PM 

KVOR 

KLZ 

KSL 



P 
12:00 N 

KHJ 

KOIN 

KGB 

KFRC 

KOL 

KFPY 



DD10— KALTENMEYER'S KINDERGARTEN— Sat. >/> hr. Bruce Kamman, Marion 
and Jim Jordan, Song Fellows, Merrill Fugit, Johnny Wolf, Loretta Poynton, Don 
Mangano. 

7:30 PM— ES-CD 

WBAL WMAL 
WSYR WHAM 
WCKY 



8:30 PM— ED 

WJZ WBZ 
WBZA CKGW 
CFCF KDKA 



6:30 PM— CS 

KYW KWK 
KWCR KSO 
KOIL WREN 



DD11— FLEISCHMANN HOUR— Thurs. 
1 hr. Rudy Vallee, Connecticut Yankees. 



8:00 PM— ED 

WEAF WTAG 
WEEI WCSH 
WFI WGY 
WBEN WCAE 
CFCF WJAR 



7:00 PM— ES-CD 

WFBR WRC 
WTAM WWJ 
WIOD WJAX 
WFLA WRVA 
WSAI WCKY 
WLW WPTF 
WMAQ KDYL 
KOA 



6:00 PM 

KSD 

WHO 

WSB 

WEBC 

WDAF 

WAPI 



-CS 

woe 
wow 

KSTP 
WTMJ 
WMC 
WJDX 



WSMB WOAI 
WKY KFYR 
WDAY KPRC 
WSM WBAP 
KVOO 



M P 

5:00 PM 4:00 PM 

KDYL KFI 
KOA KGO 

KGW 
KOM 
KTA 
KHQ 



DP— VARIETY SHOWS (Continued) 

DD14— REVOLVING STAGE— Monday. 1 hour. 

2:00 PM— ED 1:00 PM— ES-CD 12:00 N—CS 

WEAF WTAG WRC WFBR WOC WHO 
WBEN WJAR WSAI WTAM WDAF 
WGY WCSH WWJ 
WCAE 

DD15— THE RICHFIELD COUNTRY CLUB— Mon. Vz hour. Alex Morrison, The 
Golden Orchestra, Betty Barthell. 

10:00 PM— ED 9:00 PM— ES-CD 

WABC WOKO WCAO WFBL 
WAAB WKBW WJSV WLBW 
WDRC WCAU WHEC 
WJAS WPG 
WICC WHP 
WEAN WMAS 

Friday. y 2 hour. 
10:30 PM— ED 

WEAF WEEI 
WTIC WJAR 
WLIT WGY 
WBEN WCAE 

DD16— WHITE OWL PROGRAM— Wed. V 2 hour. Guy Lombardo's Royal Canadians, 
Burns & Allen, Comedy, Phil Regan, Tenor. M P 

9:30 PM— ED 8:30 PM— ES-CD 7:30 PM— CS 6:30 PM 8:30 PM 

WABC WOKO WADC WCAO KMBC WFBM KLZ KHJ 

WNAC WKBW WGN WKRC KMOX KTRH KSL KOIN 

WDRC WCAU WHK CKOK KTSA KOMA KGB 

WJAS WEAN WOWO WFBL KRLD WCCO KFRC 

WORC WSPD WJSV KOL 

WBT KFPY 

KVI 



9:30 PM— ES-CD 

WFBR WRC 



DD18— SINCLAIR GREATER MINSTRELS— Mon. >/ 2 hr. Jean Arnold, Chauncoy 
Parsons, Joe Parsons, Bill Childs, Fritz Clark, Mac McCloud, Clifford Soubier, 
Harry Kogen. 

9:00 PM— ED 8:00 PM— ES-CD 

WJZ WBZ WHAM WGAR 

WBZA KDKA WBAL WWNC 

WIS WJAX 

WIOD WJR 

WFLA WLW 

WLS 



DD19— WEEK-END REVIEW— Saturday. 1 hour. 



4:00 PM ED 

WEAF WTAG 
WEEI WJAR 
WGY WCAE 
WBEN WFI 
CKGW 



3:00 PM— ES-CD 

WFBR WRC 
WWJ WTAM 
WSAI WDAF 
WCKY WRVA 
WWNC WIS 
WJAX WIOD 
WFLA WMAQ 



2:00 PM— CS 

WOC WHO 
WOW WIBA 
KSTP WEBC 
WDAY KFYR 
WSM WSB 



M 

1:00 PM 

KOA 
KDYL 



DD12— CAPT. HENRY'S MAXWELL HOUSE SHOW BOAT— Thurs. 1 hr 
Winninger, Lanny Ross, Annette Hanshaw, Muriel Wilson, Molasses 'n' 



Don Voorhees. 
9:00 PM— ED 

WEAF WEEI 

WTAG 

WCSH 

WGY 

WCAE 



WJAR 

WFI 

WBEN 



8:00 PM— ES-CD 

WFBR WRC 
WTAM WWJ 
WSAI WRVA 
WWNC WIS 
WJAX WIOD 
WELA WCKY 
WMAQ 



7:00 PM 

KSD 

WHO 

WDAF 

WJDX 

WSB 

WSMB 

WKY 

WOAI 

KSTP 



CS 

WOC 

wow 

WTMJ 

WMC 

WAPI 

KTBS 

KPRC 

WSM 

WBAP 



M 

10:00 PM 

KOA 
KDYL 



Charles 
January, 

P 
9:00 PM 

KGO 

KFI 

KGW 

KOMO 

KHQ 

KFSD 

KTAR 



DD13— OLD GOLD PROGRAM 
Mandy Lou. 

10:00 PM— ED 

WABC WKBW 
WCAU WLBZ 
WDRC WOKO 
WEAN WORC 
WHP WPG 
WICC WNAC 
WJAS 



-Wed. '/■> hr. Fred Waring's Pennsylvanians and 



9:00 PM 

WADC 

WBIG 

WBT 

WCAH 

WCAO 

WDAE 

WDBJ 

WDBO 

WFBL 

WFEA 

WHEC 



-ES-CD 

WJSV 

WKRC 

WLBW 

WMBG 

WQAM 

WSPD 

WTOC 

CKLW 

WTAR 

WGN 

WOWO 



8:00 PM— CS 

KFH WDSU 
KLRA WFBM 
KMBC WGST 
KMOX WHAS 
KOMA WIBW 
KRLD WISN 
KSCJ WLAC 
KTRH WMBD 
KTSA WMT 
WBRC WODX 
WCCO WREC 
WDOD 



M 

7:00 PM 

KLZ 
KSL 
KVOR 



P 
6:00 PM 

KFPY 

KFRC 

KGB 

KHJ 

KOH 

KOIN 

KOL 



WMC 
WKY 
KTBS 



WSMB 
KPRC 



DD20— RADIO GUILD 

Monday. 1 Hour. 4:00 PM 



ED— WJZ Network 






DD21— CALIFORNIA MELODIES— Tuesday. y 2 hour. 

10:00 PM— ED 9:00 PM— ES-CD 8:00 PM— CS 

WABC WJAS WBIG WFEA 

WCAU WKBW WBT WJSV 

WDRC WOKO WCAO WSJS 

WEAN WORC WFBL WTAR 
WHP WNAC 
WICC 



KLRA WLAC 
WDOD WREC 
WDSU 



DD22— WINDY CITY REVUE— Thursday. V 

10:15 PM-ED 9:15 PM— ES-CD 

WABC WJAS WADC WKBN 

WAAB WKBW WBIG WKRC 

WCAU WOKO WBT WLBW 

WDRC WORC WCAO WMBG 

WEAN WPG WDAE WQAM 

WICC WDBJ WSJS 



hour. 
8:15 PM— CS 

KFH WFBM 



KLRA 
KMBC 
KTRH 

KTSA 
WBRC 



WGST 

WISN 

WLAC 

WMBD 

WMT 



M 

7:15 PM 

KLZ 
KSL 
KVOR 



WDBO 

WFEA 
WHEC 
WHK 
WJSV 



WSPD 

WWVA 
CKLW 
WTAR 
WBBM 



WDOD WODX 
WDSU WREC 



DD23— CHESTERFIELD PROGRAM— Fri. l / 2 hr. Lou Holtz, Comedian; Grace 
Moore, Songs; Leonard Hayton's Orchestra. 



10:00 PM-ED 

WABC WKBW 

WAAB WLBZ 

WCAU WOKO 

WDRC WORC 

WEAN WPG 
WJAS 



9:00 PM— ES-CD 

WADC WJSV 
WBT WKRC 
WCAH WMBG 
WCAO WQAM 
WDAE WSPD 
WDBJ WTOC 
WDBO CKLW 
WFBL WTAR 
WHEC WGN 
WHK WOWO 



8:00 PM— CS 

KFH WCCO 
KLRA WDSU 
KMBC WFBM 
KMOX WGST 
KOMA WHAS 
KRLD WISN 
KTRH WLAC 
KTSA WMT 
WBRC WREC 



M 

7:00 PM 

KLZ 
KSL 



P 
6:00 PM 

KFPY 

KFRC 

KGB 

KHJ 

KOH 

KOIN 

KOL 

KVI 



DD25— COLONEL STOOPNAGLE AND BUDD. Thur. >/ 2 hr. 

9:30 PM— ED 8:30 PM— ES-CD 7:30 PM— CS 

WABC WOKO WADC WCAO KMBC WFBM 

WNAC WKBW WGN WKRC WHAS KMOX 

WDRC WCAU WHK CKOK WGST WREC 

WJAS WEAN WOWO WFBL WDSU WRR 

WSPD WJSV KOMA KTSA 

WHEC WBT KFH WCCO 

WCAH KRLD 



M 

6:30 PM 

KSL 



P 
5:30 PM 

KHJ 

KOIN 

KGB 

KFRC 

KOL 

KVI 

KFPY 



O C A T 



W H 



ABBREVIATIONS: ED — Eastern Daylight, ES-CD- 



-Eastern Standard, Central Daylight, 
SEE NOTE PAGE 27 



CS — -Central Standard, M — Mountain, P — Pacific. 



July- August 



RADIO 



39 



F A N - F A R E 



PROGRAM 



FINDER 



ARTIST AND PROGRAM SCHEDULE 



Oh Where Is My Favorite Star Tonight?" 



The days when it was a thrill just to hear a program 
over the air have passed. Mere reception is taken for 
granted now and listeners are picking and choosing the 
programs they want to hear. The movies went through 
the same stages. At first, all that was needed was a 
fairly clear image on the screen. Now movie fans have 
their favorite stars and wait for them to appear in a 
new film. Just so with radio. The listener of today 
wants to hear his favorite star or to select a particular 
program rather than merely turn in on whatever hap- 
pens to be on the air. 

Our Artist and Program Schedule makes this selec- 



tion possible. Program titles, individual artists and 
teams are listed alphabetically. Look down the list for 
your favorite radio personality or the program you want 
to hear and the index number at the left of that name 
will show you where, in the Classified Schedule (pages 
27-38) you can locate all the details regarding time of 
broadcast, stations included in the network, etc. Our 
readers are invited to send in comments on this new 
program service. We want to do everything we can to 
assist the discriminating listener in his search for pro- 
grams and personalities which fit his or her tastes. 



Index* 


Artist 


Index* 


Artist 


Index* 


Artist 


Index* 


Artist 


N 1 


A. & P. Gypsies 


Ql 


Blackstone Plantation 


Ql 


Crumit, Frank 


W 8 


Goodell, Dr. Charles 


G5 


Academy of Medicine 






Q2 


Crumit, Frank 


N 10 


Gordon, Norman 


G 1 


Adventures in Health 


N16 


Blake, George 


Z 6 


Cuckoo Program 






T 24 


Albani, Countess Olga 


D 2 


Blue Ribbon Orchestra 


L 14 


Cutter, Mme. Belle Forbes 


E3 


Goudiss, Mrs. A. M. 


K 17 


Albridge, Gene 


K 17 


Bodycombe, Aneurin 




and Orchestra 


A 1 


Gould, Barbara 






2 X 


Bonime, Joseph 






DD 9 


Grab Bag, The 


Q 12 


Allen, Grant 


N 2 


Bourdon, Rosario 


M 57 


Davies, Edward 


Q4 


Graham, Gordon 


E6 


Allen, Ida Bailey 






N 15 


Davies, Edward 


L3 


Grande Trio 


04 


Allen, Lucy 


N 9 


Bowes, Major 


M 27 


Davis, Meyer 






S3 


Allmand, Joyce 


M 60 


Breakfast Club 


X 22 


Dawson, Nick 


Q4 


Grant, Dave 


W6 


Allmand, Joyce 


B 3 


Brewster, John 


X2 


Death Valley Days 


M 14 


Gray, Glen 






T 5 


Brice, Fanny 






X 8 


Great Moments in History 


L23 


Altman, Julian 


X 5 


Brickert, Carlton 


R 7 


DeCordoba, Pedro 


Z 14 


Greenwald, Joseph 


L23 


Altraan, Sylvia 






X 20 


Dempsey, Jack 


L4 


Greenblatt, Ben 


X5 


Ameche, Don 


DD 9 


Brooks and Ross 


S3 


Dennis, Richard 






T 1 


American Album of Music 


G 1 


Bundeson, Dr. Herman 


W6 


Dennis, Richard 


T4 


Grofe, Ferde Orchestra 


F 1 


American Legion Program 


DD 16 


Burns & Allen 


M 56 


Denny, Jack 


T 17 


Guest, Edgar 






K 14 


Cain, Noble 






T 15 


Guizar, Tito 


B 1 


America's Grub Street 


C 8 


Cansdale, Harry 


T 8 


Deutsch, Emery 


D5 


Gulf Headliners (Rogers) 


Z 1 


Amos 'n' Andy 






T 10 


Deutsch, Emery 


F 7 


Gulf Program (Cobb) 


T 2 


Arcadians 


R5 


Captivators 


X 1 


Diamond's Adventures, Capt. 






Z6 


Armbruster, Robert 


R6 


Carlile, Charles 


K 12 


Dilworth, George 


T 1 


Haenschen, Gus 


D 1 


Armour Jester, The 


T 3 


Carlile, Charles 


O 1 


Doerr, Clyde 


M 19 


Hall, George 






ZS 


Carothers, Isabelle 






DD 12 


Hanshaw, Annette 


M 16 


Arnheim, Gus 


V 1 


Carter, Boake 


K7 


Do-Re-Mi (Trio) 


04 


Happy Rambler 


R4 


Arnold, Gene 






R9 


Do-Re-Mi (Trio) 


R 23 


Happy Wonder Bakers 


DD 18 


Arnold, Jean 


S6 


Cathedral Hour 


N 2 


Dragonette, Jessica 


V 13 


Hard, William 


K2 


Arnold, Jean 


W 1 


Catholic Hour 


T 11 


Duey, Phil 






T 3 


Arnold, Rhoda 


N 2 


Cavaliers, The 


T 36 


Eastman, Mary 


P 5 


Harding, Irene 






DD 2 


Chase & Sanborn Hour 






M 18 


Harris, Phil 


Y 2 


Backus, Georgia 


TS 


Chase & Sanborn Tea Pro- 


T 21 


Eastman, Mary 


DD 8 


Harrisburg Variety Show 


G4 


Bagley, Arthur 




gram 


K2 


Eastman, Morgan L. 


M 20 


Harrod, Buddy 


DD 2 


Bailey, Ilomay 






V 12 


Economic Conference from 


K 3 


Hayden, Ethel 


R 1 


Bailey, Mildred 


F 19 


Cheerio 




London, H . V. Haltenborn 






K 8 


Baker, Charles 


DD 23 


Chesterfield Program 


V 13 


Economic Conference from 


M 21 


Hays, Billy 






DD 3 


Chevrolet Program 




London, Wm. Hard 


DD 23 


Hayton, Leonard 


D 1 


Baker, Phil 


DD 18 


Childs, Bill 


M 17 


Edgewater Beach Orchestra 


T 18 


Heatherton, Ray 


T 32 


Balladeers, The 


N 2 


Cities Service Concert 






C 1 


Helen & Mary Adventure 


N 2 


Banta, Frank 






T 29 


Edmonson, William 


X 9 


Henry, John, Black River 


L30 


Barlow, Howard 


Z5 


Clara, Lu 'n' Em 


Y 2 


Enos Crime Clues 




Giant 


L28 


Barlow, Howard 


DD 18 


Clark, Fritz 


L 15 


Essex House Ensemble 










DD 5 


Clicquot Club Eskimos 


R9 


Evans, Evan 


W 7 


High, Dr. Stanley 


DD 15 


Barthell, Betty 


M 34 


Cloutier, Norman L. 


R 10 


Evening in Paris 


V 5 


Hill, Edwin C. 


R3 


Barthell, Betty 


F 7 


Cobb, Irvin S. 






L 15 


Himber, Richard 


R2 


Bartlett, Albert 






N 17 


Evers, Chester 


T 1 


Hirsch, Bertrand 


E 1 


Barton, Frances Lee 


M 41 


Cole, Richard 


X 4 


Famous Loves 


X 22 


Hitz, Elsie 


C8 


Baruck, Allan 


M 7 


College Inn Orchestra 


P9 


Feibel, Fred 










U2 


Collinge, Channon 


M 18 


Fiorito, Ted and His Orch. 


M 1 


Hobst, Ernie 


M 2 


Belasco, Leon 


S6 


Collinge, Channon 


M 25 


Fiddler, Dick 


DD 23 


Holtz, Lou 


M 12 


Belasco, Leon 


T 6 


Columbia Artist Recital 






M 23 


Hopkins, Claude 


X2 


Bell, Joseph 






X 5 


First Nighter 


N 1 


Horlick, Harry 


C 8 


Bell, Shirley 


C2 


Columbia Junior Bugle 


M 17 


Fisher, Mark 


Z 8 


Horse Sense Philosophy 


T 2 


Bello, Ruth Kelly 


DD6 


Columbia Revue 


DD 11 


Fleischmann Hour 










L28 


Columbia Symphony Orch. 


X 23 


Flynn, Bernardine 


R 14 


Hot from Hollywood 


DD3 


Benny, Jack 


R4 


Commodores, The 


X6 


Foreign Legion 


T 17 


Household Memories 


X 7 


Berg, Gertrude 


J 1 


Compinsky Trio 






M 51 


Howard, Shirley 


D2 


Bernie, Ben 






X 2 


Frawley, Tim 


DD 1 


Howard, Tom 


M 7 


Bernie, Ben 


T 8 


Concert Miniatures 


N4 


Fray and Braggiotti 


V 10 


Howe, Col. Louis McHenry 


M 3 


Berrens, Fred 


DD 11 


Connecticut Yankees 


R7 


Friendly Philosopher, The 










K 2 


Contented Program 


DD 10 


Fugit, Merrill 


DD 25 


Hulick, Budd 


R24 


Berrens, Fred 


M 6 


Coogan, Art, Orchestra 


K 17 


Fulton, Dick 


S3 


Hunt, Arthur Billings 


L6 


Berumen, LaForge 


D3 


Cook, Phil 






W6 


Hunt, Arthur Billings 


Z 2 


Betty & Bob 






M57 


Gallicchio, Joseph 


L5 


Impressions of Italy 


Q6 


Bill & Ginger 


M 47 


Cosmopolitan Hotel Orchestra 


R 19 


Garber, Jan 


D 3 


Ingram Shavers 


M 4 


Biltmore Hotel Ensemble 


M 8 


Cotton Club Orchestra 


N 10 


Geddes, Bob 










Q4 


Coughlin, Bunny 


V 3 


Gibbons, Floyd 


F8 


International Radio Forum 


DD3 


Black, Frank 


E2 


Crocker, Betty 


P 10 


Glen, Irma 


L23 


Intondi, Urban 


L22 


Black, Frank 


C9 


Cross, Milton 


X7 


Goldbergs, The 


F 19 


Isles. J. Harrison 


M 11 


Black, Ted 






I 3 


Goldman, Edwin Franko 


T 19 


Italian Idyll 


M 55 


Black, Ted 


C 10 


Cross, Milton 


Q 15 


Goldy & Dusty 


N 6 


Jack Frost Melody Moments 



NOTE: "INDEX NUMBER refers to programs in Classified Schedule pages 27 to 38. To secure complete information regarding a particular pro- 
gram or an individual artist, locate the index number appearing at the left of the name on this >age, in the Classified Schedule. Index numbers 
in the Classified Schedule are arranged alphabetically as to the letters which set off the different types of programs and numerically as regards the 
programs listed under each classification. See also, Note; page 27. 



L O W 



•Notice of copyright. Method of arrangement copyrighted. Infringement will be prosecuted. 



40 



Radio Fan-Fare 



RADIO FAN-FARE PROGRAM FINDER 



ARTIST AND PROGRAM SCHEDULE 



Index* 


Artist 


Index* 
F 14 


Artist 


Index* 


Artist 


Index* 


Artist 


R 15 


Jackson, Arlene 


Meet the Artist 


Y 2 


Reese, Edward 


R33 


Street Singer 


C 10 


James, Lewis 


X 13 


Meighan, James 


DD 16 


Regan, Phil 


L 22 


String Symphony 


N 16 


Janke, Helen 


DD 3 


Melton, James 


R43 


Regan, Phil 


N 10 


Summerneld, Wesley 


N 17 


Johanson, Selma 


T 22 


Melton, James 


Q5 


Reis & Dunn 






DD 10 


Jordan, Marion and Jim 


X5 


Meredith, June 






F 13 


Sutton, Vida Ravenscroft 










M 10 


Reisman, Leo 


U4 


Symphonette 


Q8 


Jordan, Marion and Jim 


N 16 


Merker, Mary 


DD 5 


Reser, Harry 


U3 


Symphonic Hour 


X 10 


Just Plain Bill 


D 1 


Merrie-Men (quartet) 


T 25 


Rhythmic Serenade 


M 50 


Syncopators 


Y 6 


"K-7" 


M 10 


Merrie-Men (quartet) 


DD 15 


Richfield Country Club 


M 19 


Taft Hotel Orchestra 


V 12 


Kaltenborn, H. V. 


M 34 


Merry Madcaps 


R9 


Rich, Freddie 






DD 10 


Kaltenmeyer's Kindergarten 


R 24 


Merry Makers 






F 14 


Taplinger, Bob 










R25 


Rich, Freddie, Orchestra 


DD 25 


Taylor, H. Chase 


DD 10 


Kamman, Bruce 


W4 


Michaux, Elder 


N 7 


Riesenfeld, Leo 


C8 


Tedro, Henrietta 


O 4 


Kaufman, Irving 


L 13 


Mickunas, Emily 


M 35 


Robbins, Sam 


M 50 


Teela, Dick 


R 16 


Keenan & Phillips 


M 8 


Mills Blue Rhythm Band 


X 19 


Robinson, Carson 


K14 


Temple of Song 


Z 8 


Kelly, Andrew F. 


O 6 


Minevitch, Borrah 


R40 


Rodemich, Gene 






V 6 


Kennedy, John B. 


R21 


Mitchell, Al, Orchestra 






M 45 


Terraplane, Orchestra 










X 21 


Rogers, Buck 


T 4 


Thiebault, Conrad 


K 17 


Kennedy, Reed 


K 17 


Mitchell, Russ 


M 45 


Rolfe, B. A. 


V8 


Thomas," Lowell 


M 11 


Kerr, Charlie 


T 17 


Mock, Alice 


P6 


Rollickers Quartet 


M 15 


Thompson, Hal, Orch. 


Z5 


King, Helen 


G3 


Modern Living Health Talk 


L9 


Rooney, Maude 


V9 


Thorpe, Merle 


A3 


King, Wayne 


DD 12 


Molasses 'n' January 


L 13 


Rosanoff, Maria 






T 20 


Kirbery, Ralph 


N 2 


Montgomery, Lee 






K 16 


Three Peppers 










DD 9 


Rose, Freddy 


BB 3 


Tomlinson, Edward 


N 17 


Kitchell, Alma 


H 2 


Moore, Betty 


M 29 


Rose, Irving 


N 16 


Tone Pictures 


Z 6 


Knight, Raymond 


DD 23 


Moore, Grace 


M 23 


Roseland Orchestra 


T 29 


Toney, Jay 


N 15 


Koestner, Josef 


H 2 


Moore's Triangle Club, Ben- 


X 17 


Roses and Drums 


X4 


Torgerson, Ulita 


T 17 


Koestner, Josef 




jamin 


B 2 


Ross, David 






T25 


Koestner, Josef 


W6 


Morning Devotions 






G4 


Tower Health Exercises 






T 23 


Morning Moods 


DD 12 


Ross, Lanny 


R33 


Tracy, Arthur 


U4 


Koestner, Josef 






K 10 


Round Towners, The 


R41 


Travelers Quartet, The 


DD 18 


Kogen, Harry 


N 20 


Morning Parade 


DD 5 


Rowswell, "Rosey" 


X 19 


Tripple Bar X Days & Nights 


T21 


Kostelanetz, Andre 


DD 15 


Morrison, Alex 


DD 2 


Rubinoff, Dave 


V 10 


Trumbull, Walter 


L 17 


Kriens, Christian 


DD 9 


Mors, Helen 


K 18 


Russian Symphonic Choir 






A3 


Lady Esther Serenade 


T 1 


Munn, Frank 






C 7 


Tucker, Madge 






DD 1 


Musical Grocery Store 


DD 13 


Ryan, Babs 


Q7 


Tune Detective 


C 7 


Lady Next Door 


H 5 


National Farm & Home Hour 


X 5 


Sagerquist, Eric 


I 1 


U. S. Army Band 


DD 2 


Lahr, Bert 


D 1 


Neil Sisters 


M 27 


St. Regis Hotel Orchestra 


I 2 


U. S. Navy Band 


DD 13 


Lane Sisters 


M 12 


Nelson, Ozzie 


S5 


Salt Lake Tabernacle Choir 


DD 11 


Vallee, Rudy 


K3 


Lang, Arthur 


R 25 


Niesen, Gertrude 


DD 1 


Salter, Harry 






C 15 


Lang, Don 


T 26 


Novis, Donald 






M 42 


Vallee, Rudy 










Qi 


Sanderson, Julia 


X23 


Van Harvey, Art 


DD 1 


Lang, Jeanne 


C 10 


Nursery Rhymes 


Q2 


Sanderson, Julia 


T 31 


Vass Family 


P6 


Langford, Frances 


T 1 


Ohman & Arden 


T 35 


Sanford, Harold 


L 11 


Velas, Esther 


R 17 


LaPalina Program 


DD 13 


Old Gold Program 


R40 


Sargent, Jean 


X 23 


Vic & Sade 


P 2 


Larsen, Larry 


T 5 


Olsen, George 


L 18 


Savitt String Quartet 






N 10 


Lawrence, Earl 


R27 


O'Neal, William 






M 55 


Village Barn Orchestra 










T 28 


Scherban, George 


F22 


Voice of Experience 


P 1 


Leaf, Ann 


Y 5 


Orange Lantern 


L 13 


Schmid, Adolf 


DD 12 


Voorhees, Don 


P 4 


Leibert, Dick 


R 7 


Osborne, Will 


N2 


Seagle, John 


M 34 


Wade, Fred 


P 6 


Leibert, Dick 


Q4 


Oxol Feature 


BB 3 


Seeing the Other Americas 


N 17 


Waldo, Earl 


T 1 


Lennox, Elizabeth 


M 41 


Palmer House Orchestra 


L 19 


Semmler, Alex 






M 12 


Lewis, Ted 


S3 


Palmer, Kathryn 






M 56 


Waldorf Astoria Orchestra 


M 31 


Lewis, Ted 






N 2 


Shaw, Elliot 


P 5 


Waldorf Astoria Organ 


M 1 


Lexington, Hotel Orch. 


W6 


Palmer, Kathryn 


D 1 


Shield, Roy 


DD 13 


Waring, Fred 






L 11 


Park Central Ensemble 


Ql 


Shilkret, Jack 


K 7 


Warnow, Mark 


K 12 


L'Heure Exquise 


N 1 


Parker, Frank 


N 2 


Shope, Henry 


R37 


Warnow, Mark 


U 2 


Light Opera Gems 


N 2 


Parker, Frank 


M 30 


Shoreham Hotel Orchestra 






F23 


Littan, Joseph 


X 16 


Parker's Sunday at Seth 






X 7 


Waters, James R. 


R 18 


Little Jack Little 






DD 2 


Sims, Lee 


X 18 


Wayfaring Men 


C 8 


Little Orphan Annie 


DD 18 


Parsons, Chauncey 


DD 18 


Sinclair Greater Minstrels 


M 57 


Wealth of Harmony 






DD 18 


Parsons, Joe 


C 13 


Singing Lady, The 


DD 19 


Week-end Review 


X 11 


Lives at Stake 


N 6 


Pasternack, Josef 


R 32 


Singin' Sam 


Z 14 


Welch, Lou 


DD 3 


Livingstone, Mary 


S3 


Patton, Lowell 


DD 1 


Singing Clerks, The 






DD 16 


Lombardo, Guy 


W6 


Patton, Lowell 






K 16 


Werder, George 


M 28 


Lopez, Vincent 






C 14 


Skippy 


DD 9 


Westphal's Orchestra 


M 25 


Lotus Gardens Orchestra 


M 42 


Pennsylvania Hotel Orch. 


M 44 


Small, Paul 


M 58 


Westphal, Frank 






R 40 


Percy, David 


T 29 


Smith, Homer 


DD 9 


White, Billy 


M 30 


Lowe, Maxine 


T 29 


Peters, Lowell 


R 17 


Smith, Kate 


H 2 


White, Lew 


K 2 


Lullaby Lady 


N 16 


Peterson, Curt 


W5 


Sockman, Dr. Ralph 






N 15 


Lyon, Ruth 


L 29 


Pierre Hotel Ensemble 






P7 


White, Lew 


M 35 


McAlpin Hotel Orchestra 






X 15 


Soconyland Sketches 


T 26 


White, Lew 


DD 18 


McCloud, Mac 


M 29 


Pierre Hotel Orchestra 


DD 10 


Song Fellows, The 


M 48 


Whiteman, Paul 






K 13 


Pilgrims Chorus 


T 23 


Sorey, Vincent 


X2 


Whitney, Edwin W. 


Q 10 


McConnell, "Smiling" Ed 


K 17 


Pioneers, The 


M 49 


Sorey, Vincent 


DD 16 


White Owl Program 


R 10 


McCoy, Mary 


U4 


Pitts, Cyril 


R42 


Sorey, Vincent 






V 11 


McDonald, James G. 


B 2 


Poet's Gold 






F20 


Wile, Frederic 


D 1 


McNaughton, Harry 






X 5 


Soubier, Clifford 


M 44 


Wiley, Lee 


F23 


MacDonald, Claudine 


DD 1 


Polesie, Herbert 


DD 18 


Soubier, Cliffrod 


Q 12 


Wilson, Claire 






M 44 


Pond's Program 


N 14 


Southeastern Review 


DD 12 


Wilson, Muriel 


J 2 


Madison Ensemble 


Z 14 


Potash and Perlmutter 


T 29 


Southernaires, The 


DD 22 


Windy City Revue 


F 13 


Magic of Speech 


DD 10 


Poynton, Loretta 


T 29 


Southland Sketches 






X 22 


Magic Voice 


F 17 


President's Cabinet, The 






C 11 


Wing, Paul 
Winninger, Charles 
Wolf, Johnny 
Women's Radio Review 
World of Religion 


DD 13 
DD 10 

R 40 


Mandy Lou 
Mangano, Don 

Manhattan Merry-Go-Round 


F4 
M 47 
N 21 


Public Affairs Institute 
Quaw, Gene 
Radio City Concert 


Q7 
L 10 
C 16 
I 1 


Spaeth, Sigmund 
Spross, Charles Gilbert 
Stamp Adventures Club 
Stannard, Capt. Wm. J. 


DD 12 
DD 10 
F23 
W7 


X 13 


Marie, French Princess 


P4 


Radio City Organ 


Z5 


Starky, Louise 


R21 
QH 
R41 


Marshall, Everett 
Martha and Hal 


DD 20 


Radio Guild 


M 43 


Steele, Mary 


V3 


World's Fair Reporter 


Martin, Dolph 


E5 
W5 


Radio Household Institute 
Radio Pulpit 


T25 
M 4 


Steele, Mary 
Stern, Harold 


D 7 
R 19 


Wynn, Ed. 

Yeast Foamers, with Jan 

Garber 
Yorke, Ruth 
Young, Victor 


L 28 


Martini, Nino 


T 38 


Radio Rubes 


N 10 


Stewart, Elliott 




R 39 


Marvin, John 


M 43 


Radio Troubadours 


L21 


Stewart, Kathleen 


X 13 


K 8 


Master Singers, The 


N 21 


Rapee, Erno 






M 44 


DD 12 


Maxwell House Show Boat 






M 50 


Stokes, Harold 






N 16 


Maxwell, Richard 


M 18 


Ray, Leah 


DD 25 


Stoopnagle and Budd, Col. 


F 24 


Your Child 



NOTE- *INDEX NUMBER refers to programs in Classified Schedule pages 27 to 38. To secure complete information regarding a particular pro- 
gram or an individual artist, locate the index number appearing at the left of the name on this page, in the Classified Schedule Index numbers 
in the Classified Schedule are arranged alphabetically , as to the letters which set off the different types of programs and numerically as regards the 
programs listed under each classification. See also, Note; page 27. 



"Notice of copyright. Method of arrangement copyrighted. Infringement will be prosecuted. 



July-August 

SLIPPING AND GRIPPING 

Continued 

but you can't grasp the Old Maestro 
by the forelock — because there ain't 
no forelock. 'Goin', Goin', Gone'." 



HIGHLY RECOMMENDED 

* : ' — "Roses and Drums" — well 
told Civil War stories, with 
prominent Broadway stars in 
leading roles. 

"Don Lang's Animal Stories" — a 
program that will interest youngsters 
without offending parents. 

Andre Kostelanetz — his grand or- 
chestra and choral group — Mary 
Eastman — and Evan Evans. These 
artists offer a program at 9 :30 EST 
every Sunday evening that is cer- 
tainly worth anyone's while. On 
each program an "Executive Mes- 
sage" from the Columbia Broadcast- 
ing System is read, and, in spite of 
the title, you'll find the message in- 
teresting. 

Theo Karle, different from most 
radio tenors. 

The Minneapolis Symphony Or- 
chestra, one of the country's leading 
musical organizations, which unfor- 
tunately does not broadcast regularly 
or frequently. 



* SWEET-SCENTED LOVE— 
Bourjois' Evening In Paris 
program fails to click as sus- 
tained entertainment in spite 
of some good talent. Nat Shilkret's 
orchestra is satisfactory (the drum- 
ming is something to hear), and the 
Woods Miller-Mary McCoy com- 
bination may please the customers 
who like a stiff shot of romance with 
their duets. The worst part of the 
show is the story, which is utterly 
pointless. 

Agnes Moorehead is the country- 
girl comic relief and she does as well 
as anyone could with the material. 
But why in the world have this type 
of character at all? 

The advertising, full of meaning- 
less superlatives, is another weak 
spot. On one of the programs the 
announcer said, "I have been prom- 
ised that this new perfume will thrill 
you." Uh-huh. We'll promise you 
that the program won't. (And we 
suggest one of those dramatized 
plugs: Gent — "Baby, why do you 
use Attar of Violets ... is it for 
witchery?" Baby — "You betcha, 
boy!" Gent — "Attar baby!") 



EARLY BIRD STUFF— Ever trying 
to give our public the best that's in us, 
we leapt sportively out of bed at 6 :30 
yesterday to cover the early morning 
radio offerings. We first heard the 
indoor athlete in charge of the Metro- 
politan Life Insurance Company's 
health program exhude synthetic 
good cheer. (You can't really be that 
cheerful that early.) He spoke of the 
"Happiness Day Drill" and asked his 
fans if they all had their exercise 
charts and their "coral pink exercise 
rugs." Turning the dials quickly, we 
got a big blast of gladsome organ 
music from several stations. Then 
two happy pianists, a glee club, a 
lark-like sister team, and a joyful 
trio. Next we found Jolly Bill. It 
was too much. Funlover though we 
are, we crept back to bed aching in 
every joint from our joust with 
jollity. 

TUNA 



41 

phasis and earnestness lie had not 
shown before. "A place where two 
professional people live is no home." 

"Yet you chose a wife from your 
own line?" 

"Ah, yes, but that is ideal. She 
knows the work, she can help me, 
can sympathize with my problems 
and understand my needs. She can 
give me the home I require. And 
she does. She is glad to do this for 
the love I bear her." 

Perhaps there is no way around 
it. Maybe a successful marriage 
must be built by the constant untir- 
ing creative effort of one of its part- 
ners. A woman must sacrifice her 
years of artistic achievement on the 
altar of the home, using it to keep 
the home fires burning. 

Yet I'm not sure it is not worth 
while. I think the whole question 
lies in whether or not the man is 
worth the sacrifice. In the case of 




TITO GUIZAR 

Continued 
English, even though I was singing 
in New York. She did not allow this 
to continue. She forced me to learn. 

BUT that is not all she teaches 
me," he said proudly. "She is 
a very intelligent critic. Herself, she 
was a very good dancer and sang 
also before we married. She helps 
me in my work." 

"Does she keep on with her ca- 
reer?" 

"Oh, no!" Tito's tone was horri- 
fied. "We are having a home." 

"And you don't think a woman 
can have both?" I asked. 

"No!" Tito's denial had an em- 



the Guizars, I got my answer when 
I went to see Tito broadcast. 

There before the microphone, tall 
and colorful in his Mexican cos- 
tume, stood Tito Guizar, his guitar 
in his hands and on his face the rapt 
look of concentration of the true 
artist. 

And there beside him, coming 
just to his shoulder, vivid and 
striking, breathtakingly attractive, 
stood Senora Guizar, purposeful, 
competent, intent. She, an artist of 
high rank in her own right, was 
turning the pages of her husband's 
music while he sang. 

A man must be good to deserve 
such devotion. And Tito Guizar, 
ladies and gentlemen, is good. 



42 



J. E. Smith 
President £» 



lam 
Doubling 

and 
Tripling 
Salaries 



National Radio 
Institute 



Many of 
My Men 
! Earn *50 
*75,*100 
a Week 



111 TvainYou 
atHometoFill 
aBIOPAYJob 

in Radio 



Send for my book of information 
on the opportunities in Radio. It's 
FREE. Mail the coupon below. Get 
into a field with a future. N.R.I. 
training fits you for manufacturing, 
selling, servicing sets, in business 
for yourself, operating on board 
ships, in a broadcasting or com- 
mercial land station, television, air- 
craft Radio, and many other 
branches. My FREE book gives 
you full information on Radio's 
many opportunities for success and 
how you can quickly learn at home 
to be a Radio Expert. 

Many Radio Experts Make 
$50 to $100 a Week 

Why struggle along in a dull job 
with low pay and no future? Start 
training now for the live-wire Radio 
field. I have doubled and tripled 
salaries. Many men holding key 
jobs in Radio got their start 
through N.R.I, training. 

Your Training Need Not 
Cost You a Cent 

Hold your job. I'll not only 
train you in a few hours of your 
spare time a week, but the day you 
enroll I'll send you instructions 
which you should master quickly 
for doing 28 Radio jobs common in 
most every neighborhood. I give 
you Radio equipment for conducting 
experiments and making tests that 
teach you to build and service prac- 
tically every type of receiving set 
made. Cleo T. Better, 30 W. Beech- 
wood Ave., Dayton, Ohio, wrote: 
"Working only in spare time, I 
made about $1,500 while taking the 
course." 

ACT NOW 
Get My Book — FREE 

My book has shown hundreds of 
fellows how to make more money 
and win success. It's FREE to all 
residents of the U. S. and Canada 
over 15 years of age. Investigate, 
Find out what Radio offers you, 
read what my Employment Depart- 
ment does to help you get into 
Radio after graduation, about my 
Money-Back Agreement, and the 
many other N.R.I, features. Mail 
the coupon for your copy RIGHT 
NOW. 

J. E. Smith, President 

Dept. 3GR3 

National Radio Institute 

Washington, D. C. 




Broadcasting Sta- 
tions employ trained 
men continually for 
3 obs paying up to 
S5.000 a year. 




Radio is making 
flying safer. Radio 
operators employed 
through Civil Service 
Commission earn 
SI, 620 to $2,800 a 
year. 




Spare- time setserv" 
icing pays N.R.I. 
menS200toSl,000a 
year. Full-time men 
makeas much as $65, 
S75, SlOOa week- 




Talking Movies — ■ 
an invention made 
possible by Radio — 
employs many well- 
trained Radio men, 
paying $75 to $200 a 
week. 



v/ / fREE PRO ° i ; 



J. E. SMITH, President 
National Radio Institute 
Dept. 3GR3 
Washington, D. C. 

Dear Mr. Smith: With- 
out obligating me, send 
free book about spare- 
time anil full-time Uadio 
opportunities ami how I 
can train for them at home. (Please print plainly.) 




NAME 




AOE. 




CITY 


STATE.. 









VOICE OF EXPERIENCE 

Continued 

of men and women from coast to 
coast. Next he began making radio 
talks to supplement his lectures. 
More than fifty individual broad- 
casting stations welcomed him as a 
sustaining feature, but not one dollar 
did he accept from them. Then, 
about a year ago, he started a regu- 
lar program on station WOR in 
Newark, N. J. It proved enough of 
a success so that a few weeks ago 
he was transferred by his sponsors 
to the chain network of the Colum- 
bia Broadcasting System. 

NOW The Voice of Experience, 
on a nationwide hook-tip, not 
only offers advice and counsel to 
those beset with emotional prob- 
lems, but also carries on a great 
charitable activity to assist people 
in dire need. Only the sponsor's 
retainer goes to Dr. Taylor. The con- 
tributions from his immense audi- 
ence is used to disseminate literature 
on the science of human emotions, 
and help defray the expense of 
charity to individuals. This service 
is characteristic 'of the Voice. Dur- 
ing his years as a social worker, he 
has contributed more than $500,000 
to charity. Out of four thousand 
cases recently investigated (and all 
of his charity cases are investigated) 
only twelve proved unworthy be- 
cause of misrepresentation of facts. 
The Voice evidently appeals prin- 
cipally to honest and serious-minded 
people, for in all the two million let- 
ters he has received, less than a 
hundred have been mash notes. 

Carefully kept statistical records 
show that confidants and corre- 
spondents come largely from the 
better residential districts, with very 
few communications from slums and 
other illiterate areas. Perhaps the 
more lowly group takes its emo- 
tional problems with less concern 
and, if this is so, it indicates the 
great field still to be served in the 
matter of sex and emotion educa- 
tion. The majority of the letters 
received by the Voice run several 
pages. Some are freakishly long, 
in fact there was one that ran 17,000 
words in length. 

HERE are extracts from some 
typical letters recently received 
by the Voice: 

"Dear Voice of Experience : 

"Personally I do not believe in giving 
men too much liberty, but it seems dif- 
ferent with the one you love. My sweet- 



Radio Fan-Fare 

heart knows I am a moral person, and he 
expects me to remain so. But at the 
same time he demands certain liberties. 
These liberties are increasing with time, 
so the question is, just how much liberty 
should a girl allow? Often I feel guilty 
about the liberties I have already al- 
lowed, and unconsciously remark about 
them — but he seems to take it all as a 
matter of course. I want to hold on to 
my man and at the same time keep his 
respect, so I want to be sure of my ac- 
tions. Please advise me." 

• • >• 
"Dear Voice of Experience: 

"After hearing some of your advice to 
others in your broadcast, I feel very 
anxious to have you solve my love prob- 
lems. I am a young girl 22 years old 
and I support my mother. Three years 
ago I became acquainted with a man 
25 years older than myself who works 
where I do. He is married, but tells me 
he does not love his wife and he goes 
his way and she goes hers. Soon after 
I became acquainted with him, he sud- 
denly took me in his arms one night and 
asked me to kiss him. I resented at first 
as I did not care for him then, but after 
a while I found myself beginning to like 
him very much. He is very nice looking 
and even-body likes him. 

"During the past two years I have been 
out with him alone quite regularly. He 
has tried hard to make me give myself 
to him and tells me that everybody in 
our age does what he wants me to do. 
I admit I let him go further than I should 
at times, but we never really did any- 
thing wrong. I really don't want to live 
an immoral life because I was raised 
very differently. Am I doing the wrong 
thing in keeping company with this man?'' 

• • • 

"Dear Voice of Experience : 

"My problem is of such an intimate na- 
ture I hesitated to write you before. I 
have been married 10 years. My hus- 
band is 37 and I am 36. Now, should a 
couple continue to live together without 
the intimate relations of marriage? Of 
course, it isn't his fault and I know there 
is no other woman. We have lived this 
way for several years. At times it has 
been almost unbearable for me. I have 
managed so far to suppress my desires 
but I am not happy by any means. He is 
very attentive and seems to think the 
world of me. All our friends think ours 
is an ideal marriage. 

"Sometimes it seems beyond human en- 
durance to live this way. He doesn't 
seem to mind. I have thought of leaving 
him and going to work, but jobs are so 
scarce these days and I doubt if he would 
let me go. I feel sorry for him, but what 
can I do ? It's getting so I can't trust 
myself to be faithful to him any longer 
under the circumstances. Now, Voice of 
Experience, am I being unnatural or im- 
moral in not wanting to live this way? 
Please help me." 

• • • 
"Dear Voice of Experience : 

"I am married eight years and have a 
little boy seven years old. I am twenty- 
five years old. For the last four years 
I have been in love with someone else. I 
have been honest with my husband and 
asked him to free me. He refuses. I 



July-August 

have tried to forget this other man but 
I can't seem to get him out of my mind, 
I love him dearly. I have never loved 
my husband. The other man has been 
out of work and has no way to support 
me. I have no money of my own. Of 
course, I could find work. Should I run 
away? The little boy will be well cared 
for. He loves his father too much to 
take him with me. Please help me de- 
cide what to do. I am making myself 
sick with worry." 

• • • 

"Dear Voice of Experience : 

"I am a young lady twenty-one years 
of age and considered above the average 
in looks and appearance, with a good 
education. My father, a ne'er-do-well, 
deserted my brother and myself some 
seven years ago and my aunt and uncle, 
the latter by marriage, took us into their 
comfortable home. They had no children 
of their own and were alone at the age 
of fifty or so. My brother and I were 
given all of the privileges of our age 
and were sent to schools to complete our 
educations. We were well clothed, did 
not have to earn our living, as my uncle 
is a good provider and is fairly wealthy. 
My brother married and left us some 
time ago and my beloved aunt passed 
away a year ago. 

"Uncle mourned his great loss ever 
since until a few weeks ago when he 
began to be affectionate towards me in 
more than the former fatherly manner 
which used to show. He is now almost 
sixty years old and I love' him dearly, 
in a fatherly way. I have tried vainly 
to secure employment so that I might be 
free and independent and my brother 
cannot take me as he is just able to sup- 
port his wife and child. I am very 
proud of my character and mean to re- 
tain my chastity at all costs, but should 
my uncle's attentions become more 
arduous to combat, I do not know where 
to turn. It is heartrending for me as 
we have all been so very happy until 
lately. I have been given everything that 
I wish, within reason, having nothing to 
do except enjoy myself. 

"I know my uncle is a good man for 
he helps all whom he possibly can, and 
he idolized his wife while she lived. He 
evidently misses the affection that she 
gave him and now has turned to me, thus 
far without the suggestions which I sense 
must soon come. I do not want to leave 
him and my wonderful home, but I must 
also retain my self respect. I know that 
many of the present day girls would 
submit to my uncle in order to have my 
present luxuries. I will not — but just 
don't know which way to turn." 



"Dear Voice of Experience : 

"I have a daughter seventeen years old 
who has always been a good respectable 
girl and a good help to me. One day 
last summer she and her younger brother 
went to a swimming pool. There she 
met a girl friend and two young men 
who seemed like two gentlemen. Her 
brother had to go to a scout meeting so 
he left the pool before his sister. These 
two young men offered to drive my 
daughter and her girl friend home, but 
instead they drove them out in a lone- 
some place, toward evening, and attacked 



them. Instead of coming home and tell- 
ing me about it, she had kept it a secret. 
And now she has told me too late. I 
cannot find the man as she only knows 
his first name." 

PROGRAM REVIEWS 

Continued 
pane of glass. (Or maybe I'm de- 
veloping" the fits-and-snits, a con- 
dition contracted by radio critics in 
which the nerves do a cross between 
a hiccup and a nip-up.) Countess 
Albani's singing" has warmth and 
color. Furthermore, she can step 
on the gas and climb to a high C 
without sounding like a locomotive 
calling to its mate. 

Opinion — You can't expect most 
sponsors to star sopranos. In fact, 
sponsors are so opposed to the high 
singers that they are now inclined 
to load the air with contraltos of 
the whispery, husky-voiced school. 
In my opinion, the Countess would 
give excellent support to any variety 
program. And she should make a 
swell antidote for listeners who are 
over-contraltoed. 

• e o 

JACQUES FRAY AND MARIO 
BRAGGIOTTI 

Comment — You never have to 
guess about this act. If you like 
double piano work (as I do), you 
look forward to the weekly appear- 
ances of these two talented lads. 
There is no more entertaining fea- 
ture of its kind on the air. The 
boys make their own arrangements, 
which are always unusual — and 
their repertoire covers everything 



43 

from the lah-de-dah to the hi-de-ho. 
Their arrangement of Gershwin's 
"Rhapsody In Blue" and "S'won- 
derful," played together, is one of 
the things you must hear if you 
haven't. They get a number of re- 
quests for it every week, so you may 
hear it on their next broadcast. 

Opinion — The last word in dou- 
ble piano teamwork. 



LADY ESTHER SERENADE 

(NBC-WEAF, Sunday at 3:00 PM, 

Tuesday at 8:30 PM; IV JZ, 

Thursday at 9:30 PM-EST) 

Cast — Wayne King's orchestra 
and Bess K. Johnson 

Comment — Mr. King's orchestra 
is always worth hearing. There is 
no need to discuss its merits, as the 
organization is well known to all 
regular listeners. 

The Plug — It seems to me that 
some wise man in the advertising 
business once said that a man can 
sell cosmetics to women better than 
a woman can sell them. At any rate, 
it is hard to believe that the lady 
who plugs Lady Esther face powder 
is really selling a lot of the stuff. 
Listeners are advised to bite the 
powder, test it with chemicals, and 
go through other motions. All this 
sounded pretty silly to me, so I 
asked several girls to listen to the 
program with me one night. They 
didn't think it was "silly." The 
word they agreed on was "asinine." 

Opinion — Enjoyable music. Very 
annoying" announcement. 




'Tune down th' radio, Lem — th' neighbors been a'kickin' ' 




44 

DISCARD YOUR AERIAL 

New Scientific $1.00 Invention 

DOES AWAY WITH AERIAL 

ENTIRELY 

Just place an F & H Capacity Aerial Eliminator within your set — forget outdoor aerial trou- 
bles — move your set freely, anywhere. 

BETTER TONE AND DISTANCE GUARANTEED 

Sensitivity, selectivity, tone and volume improved. After tests, the F & H Capacity Aerial 
Eliminator was chosen by the U. S. Government for use in Naval Hospital. 

TRY ONE 5 DAYS AT OUR 
RISK! SEND NO MONEY 

Mail coupon at once — pay postman $1.00 plus few pennies 
postage upon delivery: if not entirely satisfied return in 
5 days and your $1.00 will be refunded without question, 
or sent postpaid, it' you remit personal check, M-0 or 
dollar-hill. 

JUST MAIL THIS COUPON 1 

F. & H. RADIO LABORATORIES, 
Dept. 33, Fargo, N. D. 

Send F. & H. Capacity Aerial. Will pay postman 
$1 plus few cents postage. If not pleased will return 
within 5 days for $1 refund. 

Check here if sending $1 with order — thus 

saving postage cost — same refund guarantee. Check 
here if interested in dealer's proposition 

NAME 



WE PREDICT THIS TYPE OF AERIAL 
WILL BE USED PRACTICALLY ENTIRELY 
IN THE FUTURE. 

EACH TESTED ON ACTUAL 
1127-MILE RECEPTION 

Connected by anyone without tools in a moment. No 
light socket connection; no current used. Fully concealed 
(size l l &" x four inches). 

Satisfied Users Throughout The 
World 

Cape Town. S. Africa — Received Capacity Aerial Elimi- 
nator and find it a very remarkable instrument. Our 
nearest station 1000 miles away comes in with full loud- 
speaker volume. I have also listened on my loud speaker 
to six overseas stations 6000 miles away, among them be- 
ing London, Finland, etc. Kindly send us 72 more 
F. & H. Capacity Aerial Eliminators. Signed: Copper 
Slingsby Company. 

Schenectady, N. Y. — I take pleasure in expressing my 
real satisfaction with the Capacity Aerial Eliminator. I 
can get with loud speaker-volume. KFI. Los Angeles, 
3000 miles away. It is not only satisfactory — it is 
wonderful. Signed: Robert Woolley. 

F. & H. RADIO LABORATORIES 
Dept. 33 Fargo, N. Dakota 



ADDRESS 

TOWN STATE.. 



PHILIP MORRIS 

(NBC-WEAF, Monday at 8:45 PM, 

Wednesday and Saturday at 

9:00 PM-EST) 

Cast — Conrad Thibault and Ferde 
Grofe's orchestra 

Comment — With Mr. Grofe su- 
pervising the music, this part of the 
Philip Morris cigarette program is 
an assured success. Mr. Thibault's 
full-throated baritoning is also cer- 
tain to satisfy the majority 'of his 
audience . . . particularly the ladies. 
He is a marked improvement over 
Ranny Weeks, the singer who was 
first featured in this show. 

The Plug — It seems a futile thing 
to keep telling sponsors that their 
commercial announcements are too 
long and too flowery, but while 
there is breath in this old body, I 
will continue to take my feeble 
socks at the boys who mess up your 
radio entertainment with their over- 
stuffed adjectives. Here are a cou- 
ple of the little gems the word- 
weavers strung together for this 
cigarette plug : 

On one broadcast the announcer 
intimated that people everywhere 
were asking themselves the question, 
'What is the best cigarette in all 
the wide, wide world?" Then, of 
course, he answered the query — and 
these, my friends, are the exact 
words that came over the air — 

"That is the question in every- 
body's mouth — and in everybody's 
mouth you see the answer." Cute? 

In the second one, the announcer 



alluded to "The three great calls of 
history . . . The Call of Spring, The 
Call of Love, and The Call for Philip 
Morris." A program or two later 
the sponsors tried to kid themselves 
out of the spot by reading several 
substitute calls which they said had 
been suggested by listeners. The 
fun-pokers suggested "The Call of 
the Wild, Indian Love Call, Call 
Me 'Darling,' and The Last Call For 
Lunch, dining car forward." (They 
overlooked one important call . . . 
the one I made last week with four 
aces — against a small straight flush.) 
Opinion — You get very little with- 
out paying for it. So sit patiently 
through the announcements, and 
you'll be rewarded with some ex- 
cellent music. 

• • • 

TERRAPLANE'S SATURDAY NIGHT 
DANCING PARTY 

(NBC-WEAF, Sat., at 10:00 PM- 
EST) 

Cast — B. A. Rolfe and his orches- 
tra, Men About Town, Billy Repaid. 

Comment — The reason for calling 
this a Dancing Party is a bit hazy, 
as the speed, or tempo, which charac- 
terizes B. A. Rolfe's music makes 
dancing practically impossible. 
However, when the Rolfe musicians 
are not trying to establish new rec- 
ords for fast playing (and they ac- 
tually claim one based on playing a 
certain tune in a certain number of 
seconds) their music is easy enough 
to take. The Men About Town, one 
of the better known radio quartettes, 
are consistently entertaining. 



Radio Fan-Fare 

The Plug — It seems to us that 
most people would find Billy Re- 
paid's rapid-fire announcements an- 
noying. Perhaps Mr. Repaid is 
moved by the same incentive that 
prompts Mr. Rolfe's hurry. And 
maybe this business of trying to 
crowd a lot of words and music into 
a short space of time is supposed to 
give the listeners the suggestion of 
Terraplane speed and power. It does 
no such thing to this* department — 
in fact we seem to retain a child- 
hood animosity for fast-talking 
salesmen. "Look out for that fel- 
low. He's a fast talker." You prob- 
ably heard the same thing around 
your corner drugstore. If the big 
idea was for Mr. Repaid to say it 
quick, and get it over with, that 
would be one thing. But no. He 
takes up more time than he should 
— even if he talked slowly. 

Opinion — Slow down the music — 
"low down (and cut down) Mr. Re- 
paid, and there will be no kick com- 
ing. 

TED HUSING 

Continued 

"Well," Husing replied, "New 
Englanders are perhaps more highly 
sensitive to unfavorable comment. 
And some of them stay huffy a long 
time. Last year I was riding in a 
cab out to Cambridge, (where I've 
long since been reinstated, you know) 
to broadcast a game. It was raining 
and cabs were scarce, so I offered 
a ride to a fellow I didn't know who 
had to get out there in a hurry. Af- 
ter we started, we introduced our- 
selves to each other. He turned out 
to be a Harvard man and when he 
learned my name was Ted Husing, 
he graciously told me what he thought 
of me, asked the cab driver to stop, 
politely told me good-bye — and left." 

AT this point Husing's assistant, 
IX- Les Quailey, walked in the of- 
fice. "Here's the bird," Husing said, 
"who should get plenty of the credit 
for whatever I do that's good. He's 
been my researcher, observer, and 
traveling companion for the last four 
years and, believe me, any events an- 
nouncer is only about as good as the 
boys who help him with his material." 
"Thank you awfully, awfully, 
awfully, dear Mr. Husing," said Mr. 
Quailey. "Was that little speech for 
publicity purposes or from way 
deep down in The Great Husing's 
heart that's as big as a house, hey ! 
hey !" 



July-August 

"Only for publicity, Mr. Ouailey 
— and I'll remember that snappy 
comeback, never you fear, my fel- 
low," said Mr. Husing. "And now, 
Mr. Ouailey, perhaps you can tell 
Mr. Endicott when you have seen 
me at my best — on the air, that is." 

"Well," said Les, "there was the 
Southern California-Notre Dame 
game in 1932, and the Harvard-Yale 
boat race in 1931, and the first and 
only basketball game broadcast over 
Columbia, and the time you invited 
Knute Rockne to help you broad- 
cast the 1930 Army-Navy game, 
and . . ." 

"By the way," Husing interrupt- 
ed, "that broadcast with Rock had 
its points. It was the last time he 
spoke on a network before he was 
killed in the plane accident. He was 
so crippled with rheumatism that he 
couldn't walk, but he had promised 
me he'd cover the game and so he 
came. The score was nothing to 
nothing at the half, and between 
halves Rock predicted that the break 
in the game would come when 
Stecker of the Army would break 
through for at least a fifty yard run 
and score. That's exactly what hap- 
pened and it was the only score of 
the game." 

"Did Rockne ever tell you how he 
picked that play?" I asked. 

"Yes," answered Husing. "Rock 
said that Stecker was the only man 
On either team who seemed to be 
able to break through, and that 
sometime during the afternoon he 
was bound to get some interference 
and when he did he would get in the 
clear for a score." 

HAVE you told Mr. Endicott 
about your broadcast of the 
Floyd Bennett funeral?" Quailey 
asked. 

"No," replied Husing, "and I 
consider that the best work I ever 
did. Columbia was a new network 
then. Today we have about ninety 
stations, but in those days we had 
only sixteen. The competition was 
terrific and it seemed doubtful if we 
would survive. We were a mere six 
months old and the radio public 
hardly knew we were alive. 

"When Floyd Bennett became a 
great international hero because of 
his self-sacrificing attempt to carry 
medicine to three snowbound Ger- 
man flyers, it occurred to me that 
radio had a wonderful opportunity 
to render service to those who, 
though far away, wished to mourn 



45 



at his bier. We obtained permission 
from his widow and from govern- 
ment officials to broadcast the serv- 
ices. 

"All our arrangements had to be 
made at the last minute. It was the 
first time, so far as I know, that a 
funeral had been broadcast — cer- 
tainly the first time that there had 
been a broadcast from the national 
burial ground at Arlington. It was 
necessary to lay seventeen thousand 
feet of wire. The weather was mis- 
erable and we had to broadcast in 
a driving rain without protection 
for more than two hours. 

"Well, the next day that broad- 
cast was being talked about from 
coast to coast. Many people thought 
it was the greatest broadcast in the 
history of radio — many others 
thought it was in the worst possible 
taste. Other opinions were of 
every kind. But whether favorable 
or unfavorable, they got people 
talking about us. That single broad- 
cast did more than any other one 
thing - to put Columbia on the map. 



' A N 



minds me of a couple of other 
big broadcasts that we put on under 
difficult conditions," continued 
Husing, without any prompting 
from Ouailey or me. "One was the 
first arrival of the Graf Zeppelin in 
this country. The other was the big 
celebration in connection with the 
Diamond Jubilee of Light. I had 
Frank Knight with me on the Graf 
Zeppelin occasion and we stood on 
top of the hangar with long-range 
glasses, waiting for the ship. By 
good luck, we were the first to spot 
her and got a scoop on that. 

"Frank and I were hooked up to 
each other by short wave and, after 
I left the hangar and went tearing 
around the field picking up spot 
stuff, we could still talk back and 
forth and keep each other posted. I 
might be in the newspapermen's 
room, for instance, getting an inter- 
view with a prominent reporter. 
Frank, on the hangar, could tell me 
just what was going on outside. 
The radio public could listen in and 
hear every word we said. It was the 
first time a two-way conversation of 
that kind had been broadcast. 

"When the Graf Zeppelin was 
moored and we finally got to Dr. 
Hugo Eckener, the commander, I 
found I'd had another g-ood break. 
I was the only announcer there with 
a German backq-round. I was able 



SELECT 
THIS HOTEL 

FOR YOUR SUM- 
MER VISIT TO 
NEW YORK 

When you come to the "first city of 
the world" for a vacation of thrills 
and shopping, be sure to enjoy the 
added pleasure of living in the new, 
smart center of New York ... at the 
modern Hotel Montclair. The Mont- 
clair is adjacent to all the railroad 
and important bus terminals, the 
better shops and fhe glamorous the- 
atrical district. If offers you every 
comfort at rates that are surpris- 
ingly moderate. 




800 ROOMS . . . EACH WITH 
BATH, SHOWER, RADIO 

SINGLE 

from $2.50 to $5.00 per day 

Weekly from $15.00 

DOUBLE 

from $3.50 to $6.00 per day 

Weekly from $21.00 




Lexington Avenue at 49th St. 



N.Y.C. 



46 

to understand everything Eckener 
said and I asked him many ques- 
tions. He talked freely to me — 
under the misapprehension, I think, 
that I was a member of the German 
society that was officially welcoming 
him. At any rate, we were able to 
get several scoops on his state- 
ments." 

"TTOW about the Jubilee of 
JL A Light broadcast?" I asked. 
"That," answered Husing, "was 
one we weren't supposed to be able 
to broadcast at all. You'll remem- 
ber that the ceremony was really a 
publicity stunt. President Hoover, 
Thomas A. Edison, Henry Ford, 
and John D. Rockefeller, Jr., were 
there in Dearborn, Michigan. The 
whole place was crowded with 
celebrities. Everything was sup- 
posed to take place according to a 
script prepared by an advertising 
agency. We 'obtained' a copy of 
the script. Theoretically our prin- 
cipal competitor had the exclusive 
right to broadcast the event. We 
maintained that no one had an ex- 
clusive right to broadcast the public 
activities of the President. We won 
our point, but not until the day be- 



fore the ceremony. Then came the 
real work. We had to lay all our 
wires the night before. We used 
anything we could lay our hands 
on. We tore down some of the wires 
between our Detroit station and the 
local night clubs, and took them to 
Dearborn. We even used chicken 
wire for part of our line. Our com- 
petitors had been making their 
preparations for three weeks. We 
made all of ours overnight. 

"During the actual broadcast we 
also got some breaks. You'll recall 
that the climax of the evening was 
to come when Mr. Edison reenacted 
the lighting of the first electric 
lamp. When that happened, the whole 
of Mr. Ford's Early American Vil- 
lage was to be flooded with electric 
light. Until then only candles were 
to be used. Well, our competitors 
followed their printed script and 
things happened a little too fast for 
them. The lights all came on about 
five minutes before their announcer 
got to the place where the script 
said they should go on. I had been 
describing the electric lights for five 
minutes before he stopped talking 
about candles ! 



THE HEART OF NEW YORK 




TO STAY AT THE LINCOLN 
. . . IS A HAPPY REMEMBRANCE 

■ - An interesting cosmopolitan atmos- 
phere . . Cheerful Rooms . . Pleasant 
Service . . Fine Restaurant . . Moder- 
ately Priced . . Around the corner 
are theatres, clubs and glamorous 
Times Square . . 

Conveniently accessible to raihoad 
terminals, steamship piers, the busi- 
ness and shopping centers . . 

"A Perfect Hotel for The Visitor" 

ROOM with PRIVATE BATH, 
RADIO and SERVIDOR 

$ 3" 



Special suites and sample 

rooms for visiting sales 

representatives. 



5Q.50 single 
im per day 



|.50 double 
per day 



Special weekly and monthly rates. 



HOTEL LINCOLN 

JOHN T. WEST, Manager 

44th io 45th Sts — 8th Ave.— New York 

UNDER NEW MANAGEMENT "A RELIANCE HOTEL" 



Radio Fan-Fare 

" A^D another amusing thing 
ii. happened: Frederick William 
Wile was with us. During the pe- 
riod of candlelight, he read from 
our script and held a candle so he 
could see. The candle went out and 
he turned to someone behind him in 
the darkness and said, Would you 
mind lighting this candle and hold- 
ing it for me?' The man lit the can- 
dle, and in the excitement after the 
lights came on he neglected to blow 
it out. Finally one of the fellows 
with us, Herb Glover, who has 
charge of the news broadcasts for 
Columbia, noticed it and said, We 
don't need that candle any longer. 
Thanks for holding it. Here's my 
card. If you're ever in New York 
and would like to see us broadcast, 
come up to the studio and ask for 
me." The man thanked Glover and 
gave him his card in return. Glover 
put it in his pocket without looking 
at it. When we got back to our hotel 
that night we were discussing all 
that had happened. Someone said, 
'Say, who was that fellow who kept 
on holding the candle after all the 
lights went on?' 'I don't know,' said 
Glover, 'but I've got his card.' He 
pulled it from his pocket. Neatly 
engraved on it was 'John D. Rocke- 
feller, Jr.' " 

INSTEAD of asking why all 
those experts on celebrities 
hadn't recognized Mr. Rockefeller, 
I said, "What about big sports 
broadcasts. Some of them must 
have been hard to handle." 

"You're right," answered Husing. 
"The ones I recall most vividly are 
my first polo game, prizefight, 
World Series, and Kentucky Derby. 
When I first tackled a polo broad- 
cast I'd never even seen a polo game. 
England was playing the United 
States at Meadowbrook. The night 
before my broadcast I had a chance 
to see just one chukker of polo. 
Then I sat up all night with Her- 
bert Reed, the fellow who calls him- 
self 'Right Wing.' He knows more 
about polo than any man in the 
country and he talked to me for 
about eight hours straight. 

"By the time the game started I 
felt as if I'd cut my baby teeth on 
a polo mallet. All through the first 
half I talked like what I hoped was 
a ten-goal man. Part of the crowd 
went to the clubhouse for drinks 
during the intermission and many 
of them stayed there and listened 
to the broadcast instead of going 



July-August 

back to the game. That's how 
good Husing was that day — or how 
good the liquor was — or how bad 
the game was — or something." 

"But, anyway," said Quailey, "it 
was because of your broadcasting 
that the U. S. Polo Association made 
us the official broadcasters of its 
matches that year and the next." 

"TT7HAT about the first prize- 

VV fight?" I asked Husing. 

"That was several years ago, 
when all the newspapers and a good 
many radio fans were panning an- 
nouncers for their inaccuracies in de- 
scribing fights. Humbert Fugazy was 
putting on bouts every week at Eb- 
bets Field in Brooklyn. I was as- 
signed to the scrap between Kid Choc- 
olate and Fernandez. I made up my 
mind I was going to show them some- 
thing about fight announcing. 

"I got an expert to agree to sit be- 
hind me and check me on the blows 
as I called them. When I walked 
down to my ringside seat that night 
I had every sports reporter in town 
against me, except Dan Parker of 
the Mirror. But the next day every 
paper in town gave me a hand on 
the job I did. Chocolate must have 
hit Fernandez a thousand times in 
that bout and I didn't miss many of 
them. And if that sounds like over- 
statement, let me show you some- 
thing." 

He got out a couple of scrapbooks 
and showed me the clippings of the 
fight. Every clipping mentioned 
Ted, of course, or it wouldn't have 
been in the scrapbook — but most of 
them said more about him than they 
did about the fighters. 

"Listen," said Husing, suddenly, 
as I was looking through the books. 
"I'm on the air in ten minutes with 
a talk on learning to fly a plane. 
Come up to the studio and on the 
way I'll tell you about that first 
World Series broadcast and the 
Derby of 1928. Come on Les." 
He grabbed a script and we started. 



47 



iEFORE those World 
games," he continued 



Series 



B: 
games," he continued as we 
waited for the elevator, "I'd never 
broadcast any baseball except local 
games in Boston. The only two men 
who had broadcast a World Series 
over a network were Graham Mc- 
Namee and Andy White. So Husing 
was in another tough spot. I must 
have got away with it though, because 
I've broadcast the World Series every 
year since then." 



"You don't seem to have ever gone 
through any lengthy period of train- 
ing for these tough spots." 

"Well, just remember I'm telling 
you only about the difficult broadcasts 
that turned out all right. If you've 
got a good memory and keep your 
mind on your number, you're pretty 
likely to be O. K. And whether you 
get the breaks or not has a lot to do 
with how good you are. I got a swell 
break at my first Kentucky Derby, 
for instance. 

"The other announcer was a Ken- 
tuckian. The favorite in the race, 
Blue Larkspur, was a Kentucky 
horse. Everywhere around us were 
Kentucky people. They all had their 
minds on Kentucky. 

The race wasn't even close. Clyde 
Van Deusen won it and I said so. The 
other announcer, still thinking about 
Kentucky, gave it to Blue Larkspur !" 

We went into the studio where 
Husing was to talk about the flying 
lessons he's been taking at Roosevelt 
Field. It was the first time in months 
that he had broadcast from a studio 
and he seemed like an animal behind 
bars. He walked a-round, did tap 
steps, wisecracked with the engineers 
in the control room, took a voice test 
and kidded Quailey. From watching 
him those few minutes, I should say 
that although he's not at the studio 
often he is tremendously popular with 
the people there. And I should say, 
also, that if you put him in a cell for 
a week he'd burst from the pressure 
of nervous energy that had no out- 
let. It didn't seem to me quite in 
character for him to be doing any- 
thing so confining as sitting in the 
cockpit of a plane, learning to fly. 

He made his talk about the de- 
lights of aviation and then we went 
out of the studio. At the elevator, 
as I was about to leave him, I asked 
if he really did like flying. 

"Well," he replied, "I lie like hell 
about it." 



MORTON DOWNING 

Continued 
Then suddenly, one morning, Mort 
happened to see a copy of a New York 
paper, and read this item in the column 
of one of New York's famous wise 
guys . . . "poor Morton Downey, he's 
all washed up." Well, sir — was his face 
red ! A small tornado passed through 
his mind, and he moved quickly. He'd 
made a big hit in London night clubs 
before. He could do it again. He 
wired the "Kit Kat Club" that he was 
coming, and he quietly told Barbara that 
they were leaving for merry England. 



WINDS LIKE A WATCH 



Are you "gauge-minded?' 
Then write with the sackless 
Conklin Nozac (no sack) — 
the new deal in pens. Full 
visibility of ink supply. 
Filled by the positive me- 
chanical action of a new 
filling device tested by 
over two years of gen- 
eral use. $5.00 and 
more. Ask your dealer. 





Another new 
Conklin with 
visible ink sec- 
tion $3.50. You 
can buy a good 
Conklin (rubber 
sack) pen today for 
as little as $2.75. 
Pencils $1.00. 



THE CONKLIN PEN CO. 

Toledo, Ohio 
Chicago San Francisco 



Conklin 

NOZAC 

SATISFACTION GUARANTEED 



After he had scored with the British- 
ers, and was once again tasting success, 
he decided, as suddenly as he had de- 
cided before, that the next move was 
America — and radio. So he and Bar- 
bara bounded back — made connections 
with CBS — sang to the sponsors of 
"Camel Quarter Hour" over a long- 
distance telephone — signed a contract 
. . . and the rest is history. 

During her husband's whirlwind suc- 
cess, Barbara kept quietly but proudly 
in the background. She seldom appeared 
in the studios. Once, when his eyes 
were burned by a sunlamp, she escorted 
him to the microphone, and led him 
home again. 

Then Barbara's health failed, and she 
was obliged to stay in the country most 
of the time. During this period there 
were the usual rumors that the Downey 
romance was going on the rocks, but the 
truth of the matter was that Morton 
spent every spare moment at her side. 

A few days before this last Christ- 
mas, Morton, Jr., was born — and that 
night Mort sat up feverishly writing the 
song, "Welcome Home, Little Stranger." 

They have no plans for the son and 
heir. But Barbara has definitely given 
up professional life, and will devote all 
her time to her husband and baby. 

And they are as much in love as 
ever. The first song Morton sang to 
Barbara was "I'll Always Be In Love 
With You." He evidently meant it. 



48 

POPULAR TUNES 

Continued 

The writers, Harry Warren and Al 
Dubin, make an interesting team . . . 
Harry, a youthful, bright-eyed Ital- 
ian boy, teaming up with a corpulent 
gentleman, Al Dubin, who looks as if 
he might be a night club bouncer. I 
often wonder what happened to the 
Al Dubin-Joe Burke combination 
which wrote such tremendous hits as 
"Dancing With Tears In My Eyes," 
"Tiptoe Thru The Tulips," "Many 
Happy Returns of the Day," and 
"Kiss Waltz." 

Harry Warren is a melody man. 
Outstanding among his tunes have 
been "Crying For The Carolines," 
"Cheerful Little Earful," "Would 
You Like To Take A Walk," "Too 
Many Tears," and "Have A Little 
Faith In Me." With Joe Young, he 
wrote the songs for Ed Wynn's 
"Laugh Parade." Two of these, 
"Ooh That Kiss" and "You're My 
Everything," gave him the promi- 
nence he so richly deserved. 

The Warren melodies in the Warn- 
er film, "42nd Street" — especially 
"Shuffle Off To Buffalo"— have giv- 
en him yet greater prestige. In fact, 
I believe they are among the best 



things out today. "Shadow Waltz" 
strikes me more as the kind of tune 
that the old vaudeville pit orchestras 
would play for a typical dancing or 
juggling act — yet I may be wrong. It 
may turn out to be a very popular 
vocal selection. 

"I've Got To Sing a Torch Song," 
on the other hand, seems more 
like musical comedy material, as 
it probably is in the movie. Not 
having seen the songs in the picture — 
how they are executed or "spotted" — 
I should really not pass judgment on 
them too severely. I merely wish to 
give you my opinion of two songs 
about which publishers, phonograph 
recorders, and radio people are very 
much enthused. 



CONRAD THIBAULT 

Continued 
He began by telling me of his first 
meeting with Madeleine Gagne. They 
were both seventeen when they ap- 
peared together in an amateur theat- 
rical in their little home town of 
Northampton, Massachusetts. As the 
young girl sang in that performance, 
the footlights casting a radiance over 
her yellow hair and dark eyes, Conrad 




OTEL 



In Choosing Your 
New York Hotel 

REMEMBER THESE 
SPECIAL FEATURES 
of the NEW EDISON 

• Sun - Ray Health Lamps 

• New York's Newest Hotel 

• In the Heart of Times Square 

• Five Minutes to 50 Theatres 

• 1000 Rooms • 1000 Baths 
e 1000 Radios 

• Extra - Large - Sized Rooms 
Many Windows — Large Closets 

• Extremely moderate rates- 
Single from $2.50 day 
Double " $4.00 " 




47 ST. JUST WEST CF B WAY 



• N E >V 



O R K • 



Radio Fan-Fare 
thought she was the prettiest living 
thing he had ever seen. Madeleine 
was also immediately attracted to the 
young man with the serious eyes and 
quiet, retiring manner. 

THE romance really began that 
night and came to a dramatic 
climax the following afternoon when 
Conrad and Madeleine went for a 
walk. "I'll never forget that day as 
long as I live," he declared. "If 
you've never seen the Berkshire hills 
in autumn you can't imagine anything 
so beautiful. The maples and elms 
were scarlet and gold, and — well it 
was just one of those perfect days. 
So there we were — just two kids 
telling each other that it was love at 
first sight. And that's how we be- 
came engaged." 

But the marriage date had to be 
postponed for three years. Conrad, 
with his Latin impetuosity, was all 
for chucking his career and taking a 
job — any sort of job that would 
make it possible to support a wife. 
But Madeleine, ambitious and un- 
selfish, wouldn't hear of it. She be- 
lieved in her fiance's talent. She 
knew the vital part that self-expres- 
sion plays in the happiness of an 
artistic individual. She added her 
encouragement to that of other 
townspeople, including Calvin Cool- 
idge, and Conrad came to New York. 
He worked ten hours a day as 
floorwalker in a department store, 
taking singing lessons during his 
lunch hour. He practiced at night 
when he was too tired to see the 
music in front of him. 

BUT Madeleine's letters spurred 
him on. Finally he won a 
scholarship in the Curtis Institute of 
Music in Philadelphia and became 
the pupil of the great Emilio de 
Gogorza. There were odd jobs on 
the side. Singing engagements for 
funerals and weddings. Some phono- 
graph recording. And the day Con- 
rad was twenty he returned to North- 
ampton and brought Madeleine back 
to Philadelphia as his bride. 

"It was pretty tough going," he 
recalled, "but we were terribly 
happy." The eyes had lost their 
usual gravity and were shining as he 
re-lived those days. "She gave up 
all thought of her own career and 
threw herself, heart and soul, into 



mine. 



w 



HEN Conrad and Madeleine 
returned to Philadelphia they ! 



July-August 

found that the climb to artistic recog- 
nition was tedious and slow, as it 
always is with a young, unknown 
singer. "I'll never forget," the young 
baritone remarked, "how thrilled 
Madeleine was when I got my first 
role in the Philadelphia Opera Com- 
pany. It wasn't a big part, but she 
felt that it was a start. And she was 
equally excited when I began to sing- 
over the local radio station. But her 
chief ambition," he went on, "was 
to have me featured over one of the 
national networks. So her happiness 
was complete when I was called to 
New York for my first audition. The 
day I left she went to the hospital. 

"You see, we were both crazy 
about youngsters and we wanted to 
have a child. My wife had been told 
that she couldn't ever hope to have 
one unless she underwent a very seri- 
ous operation. Of course, I would 
never have given my consent." He 
made an effort to control the tremor 
that crept into the low, melodious 
voice. "And a week later — she was 
dead." He stopped and there was a 
long silence. 

"And your audition?" I said at 
last, hoping to turn his thoughts to 
another subject. 

"Oh, it went through. I signed the 
contract. But I can't help feeling 
that there was something cruel in 
Fate taking her away from me just 
at that time. You see," the voice 
faltered again, "she never knew." 

"But at least," I went on, "you've 
had seven years of happy married 
life." 

"Oh, yes, it was ideal," he replied, 
gravely, "we never lost our romance. 
But how could we with our compan- 
ionship, our mutual interests? And, 
you see, we both believed that ro- 
mance was the most important thing 
in life." 

AND so as I left Conrad Thibault's 
- apartment I realized the reason 
for that "certain something" in his 
voice. In his life there has been the 
rarest thing that life has to offer . . . 
a perfect romance. And if its pass- 
ing has left him sad, the knowledge 
of having possessed it has left a 
vision of beauty and an understand- 
ing that is reflected in every note he 
sings. 



JOHN BATTLE 

Continued 

in this business, whether you like it 
or not — unless, of course, you simply 



haven't the time. It's all turkey or 
feathers. Two years ago I nearly 
starved. Some weeks I didn't earn a 
penny. And I considered I was 
pretty lucky other weeks if I had a 
chance to earn five dollars as one of 
the crowd in a March of Time pro- 
gram." 

This statement was rather amazing 
in view of what Battle told me later 
— that within a year after the lean 
days he had made as much as $780 
in one week and had averaged be- 
tween $200 and $300 a week ever 
since. 

Of course, those figures are not 
startling" when compared with sal- 
aries you see quoted for radio stars. 
But remember, Battle is no great star 
so far as the radio public knows. He 
plays many comedy parts, but he's 
not a featured comedian. He is fre- 
quently a "love interest," but he is 
never played up as a radio "Dream 
Lover." And when he does serious 
dramatic work, he is never given the 
publicity which would be accorded 
without question to a guest star from 
Broadway. No — the most he gets in 
the way of personal publicity is a 
mention of his name at the end of a 
program — usually after the listener 
has started looking for Amos 'n' 
Andy. 

THERE is hardly a night in the 
year when you can't hear Battle 
on some program and, more often 
than not, he's on several. In fact, he 
is sometimes in direct competition 
with himself on the air! That is to 
say, he may be broadcasting in per- 
son from one station, while one of 
his "canned" programs (made on 
phonograph records) may be put on, 
at exactly the same time, over another 
station ! He has even been on the 
air three times simultaneously. 

"What's the explanation for this 
rush of work," I asked. 

"Well," Battle replied, "I could tell 
you that I'm a great actor, but even 
if that is so it wouldn't mean much. 
My guess is that people hire me be- 
cause they know that, in addition to 
the experience I've had, I have a 
faculty for living every part com- 
pletely while I am in it. I don't just 
stand before a microphone and read 
a script. If I'm supposed to be 
strangling I can actually make myself 
think I'm struggling for breath. If 
the part calls for crying — I can, be- 
lieve it or not, cry real tears." 

When I said that this flair for 
realism was a great gift, he replied, 
"Well, it has its advantages, but it 
is probably a very bad thing for me. 
I find myself absolutely done up at 
the end of the evening. Once I 
worked as a tool dresser in the Mex- 
ican oil fields, swinging a sledge 



49 

hammer all day — and at no time dur- 
ing that period did I suffer the phys- 
ical exhaustion I do from acting. My 
doctor says I've got to slow up or I 
may have a breakdown any day." 

THEN, reverting to our earlier 
conversation, I said, "Is the last 
part of that week you were describ- 
ing a while ago as difficult as the 
first two days ?" 

"Let's see, where were we? Oh, 
yes — Wednesday. Well, from ten to 
twelve I rehearsed Crime Clues and, 
from twelve to four, the Maxwell 
House Slwzvboat. Then I made a 
transcription, and in the evening 
played in Crime Clues and the Tydol 
Jubilee. 

"Thursday morning from nine to 
eleven I played a Greek customs 
agent and a Russian droshky driver 
for two transcriptions of the travel 
program, Happy Landings. 

"From one to five-thirty Thurs- 
day afternoon I hurried back and 
forth between rehearsals of Maxwell 
House Shozvboat and Death Valley 
Days. Both those programs were on 
at the same time that night and you 
should have seen me chase from one 
studio to another. 

"The studios were on different 
floors. Page boys were assigned to 
hold doors open and elevators were 
kept waiting. Sometimes I had only 
one minute between the end of a line 
in one studio and my cue in the other. 

"The next day — Friday — from nine 
to twelve I made records and from 
one to five, more records. That night 
the only show I had was Tydol. 

"Saturday morning I wrote scripts 
and all afternoon I rehearsed Roses 
and Drums. 

"Sunday I rehearsed Roses and 
Drums from one to three and Great 
Moments in History from three until 
five-thirty. That evening I played 
in both shows. That finished my 
week, so I didn't have anything else 
to do except go home and start writ- 
ing scripts for the next week." 

""TAO you get much fan mail?" I 
-4-^ asked him. 

"I got a good deal when I was 
playing young Southern lovers on the 
True Story Hour," he answered with 
a serious smile. "Spinsters in smail 
towns used to propose to me in let- 
ters." 

"They must have been amusing," I 
offered. 

"No," he declared, "My letters 
never struck me as being particularly 
funny, somehow. The average batch, 
of fan mail is about the most de- 
pressing reading you can find, I think. 
I have no great love for writing 
happy endings into my radio scripts, 
but I almost always do now, if I 



50 

possibly can. Reading fan mail has 
convinced me that, more often than 
you would believe, people look upon 
radio sketches as real life. The let- 
ters they write indicate that there is 
so much emptiness and loneliness in 
their existence that I see no point in 
adding to it with tragic climaxes to 
my stories." 

"T TOW many types of dialect can 
JL JL you do," I asked. 

"It all depends on what you mean 
by dialect," Battle replied. "Most 
people put all kinds of Negro dialect, 
for instance, in the same category. 
As a matter of fact, there are a dozen 
or more important Negro dialects. I 
can imitate the Gulla Negro, who 
comes from the sea islands off the 
Carolinas ; the Barbados and Jamaica 
Negro, who has a slight English ac- 
cent ; the Haitian-Creole Negro, who 
has a French accent ; the African 
Negro, whose dialect differs greatly 
according to what part of Africa he 
conies from ; the Porto Rican Negro, 
who has a Spanish accent ; the Har- 
lem Negro ; the drawly Negro from 
the Mississippi levees ; the educated 
Negro who hits his final g's ; and the 
blackface vaudeville type. 

"What dialects can't you do?" 

"I do Cockney very badly, but it 
would fool almost anyone but a 
Cockney. I can't do Welsh or 
French. I've tried French and I was 
terrible." 

"Can you tell by a person's speech 
where he's from?" 

"Almost always," he declared. 

"All right," I challenged, "where 
am I from ?" 

Battle thought several moments and 
then said : 

"Well, I'm not sure of your speech 
because it's a mixture. But I should 
say that it's the speech of the district 
around the Great Lakes overlaid with 
New England dialect." 

I gulped a big gulp. I had lived 
all my life in Michigan except for 
a few years in New Hampshire and 
Massachusetts ! 

"You win," I said, "and for that 
you deserve to be let off answering 
any more questions. But how about 
an explanation of why the most ver- 
satile actor in radio hates to act?" 

"O.K." said Battle. "I don't want 
to act because I want to write, and 
acting takes so much out of me that 
I can't write as well as I should. 
There's no great satisfaction in writ- 
ing or acting radio scripts. If you 
write a masterpiece and it goes on 
the air, within a few weeks at most 
it is entirely forgotten. Even the 
best radio acting is forgotten just as 
quickly. I want to start doing some- 
thing a little more enduring than 
that." 



WHEN STARS COME TO 
EARTH 

Continued 
sweet, human quality in Ruth Etting's 
radio voice. It is just an expression 
of her character. 

• • • 

ON a Chase and Sanborn show 
not long ago, the guest star was 
Leo Carillo, noted stage and screen 
star. In memory of the anniversary 
of the birth of the immortal Richard 
Wagner, Rubinoff and his orchestra 
were to play a medley of the great 
composer's works. Leo offered, as 
an introduction, a bit of verse : 

"Here's to your music, Richard 
Wagner, 

May it live a thousand years, 
And sorta keep things lively, 

In this vale of human tears." 

(The slight rumble recorded by ra- 
dios following this little gem was 
probably Mr. Wagner turning over 
in his grave.) 

• • o 

I ATE one evening three of us were 
-J sitting in Dave's Blue Room. 
My companions were Bobbe Arnst 
(the former Mrs. Johnny Weismul- 
ler) and Eddie Duchin, the popular 
young man whose Central Park Ca- 
sino orchestra is a feature on Co- 
lumbia stations. Bobbe and I had 
been dancing at the Cotton Club to 
Duke Ellington's torrid tunes, and 
she complained that she thought she 
had become overheated and was 
catching a cold. Eddie began giving 
medical advice, and did it with such 
a professional air that Bobbe said : 

"What do you know about reme- 
dies?" 

"Everything," was the comeback. 
"Do you happen to know that I was a 
pharmacist before I became a pianist?" 

And darned if he wasn't! We 
didn't believe it, so he took us up to 
his apartment in the St. Moritz Hotel 
and showed us his diploma from 
Pharmacy College, in Boston. He 
had taken piano lessons (because his 
parents made him) since he was 9 
years old, but never considered music 
as a career. Then, in his junior year 
in college, he won a Leo Reisman 
audition. This gave him the hunch, 
and after graduating he deserted his 
father's chain of drug stores, joined 
the musicians' union, and here he is. 

Bobbe was so impressed that she 
took the stuff he suggested, and it 
stopped the cold. So, just to show 
how ungrateful people can be, we 
started calling him "Doc," and I don't 
think he likes it. 



Radio Fan-Fare 

THE CIRCUIT JUDGE 

Continued 

seventy-five different types of re- 
ceiving tubes, half of which have 
probably come into being since R. 
O. T. bought his receiver. Any set 
which was a first class receiver in 
1930 is a very good set today. A 
1927 receiver was about 75% per- 
fect, a 1930 model about 95% per- 
fect, and a 1933 design is about 
97% all that can be desired. (I am 
speaking of the really best sets of 
those respective years.) The new 
tubes are a little more economical, 
too. Results for results, a 1933 
model receiver will cost about one 
dollar less per year to operate than 
a 1930 set. Perhaps, in another 
year or so, some radical develop- 
ment may antiquate a lot of good 
sets today — but until then, R. O. T., 
you might as well hang on to your 
R. C. A. 48! 

STATIC— A LOTTA NOISE 

TO THE engineer, static means 
only one thing — to the fan, it is 
just about everything outside of his 
desired station. So it is rather 
doubtful exactly what C. H. of New 
York City has in mind when he 
complains : 

"I am bothered by severe static 
noises, and have been told by an 
expert that nothing can be done 
about it." 

Maybe the expert is right — I 
don't know. When an engineer 
speaks of static, he refers to atmos- 
pheric electricity, such as lightning, 
which is picked up by the aerial in 
exactly the same manner as the sig- 
nal. Obviously (as far as the broad- 
cast fan is concerned) anything that 
is done to eliminate static, will also 
eliminate the signal. Static is worse 
in the summer than in winter, and 
is most violent during electrical 
storms. Many man-made electrical 
machines create a very good imita- 
tion of static, and if one is bothered 
by such sounds consistently, it is 
probable that a good bit of the dis- 
turbance is from artificial sources. 

Artificial disturbances can be 
eliminated. They are usually very 
feeble, as compared with real static 
— and are therefore picked up al- 
most altogether by the leadin, rather 
than by the antenna itself. Your 
serviceman can install a shielded or 
transposed leadin system which 
will reduce the effects 'of such inter- 
ference to a marked degree. 




HO ELSE 



urawfa. to a£t into 




BROADCASTING ? 



Let FLOYD GIBBONS, famous Radio 

Star, train you for a Broadcasting 

career. $3,000 to $15,000 a year 

and more paid to trained talent. 

T")0 YOU want to get into the most fasci- 
*-* nating, fastest-growing industry in the 
world today — Broadcasting? Do you want 
to perform for thousands and even mil- 
lions over the air? Do you want to earn 
from $3,000 to $15,000 and more a year? 
If you have natural talent — if you have 
a good speaking voice or can sing, act, 
write, direct, read or sell — Broadcasting 
needs you and you can now easily secure 
the important training that qualifies for a 
big pay job. 

For now, thanks to Floyd Gibbons, fam- 
ous "Headline Hunter of the 
Air," a remarkable new 
course in Broadcasting Tech- 
nique prepares you for the 
position you want — right in 
your own home. No matter 
how much natural ability you 
possess, Broadcasting is dif- 
ferent from any other me- 
dium and your own talents 
must be adapted to fit its 
special requirements. The 
Floyd Gibbons School of 
Broadcasting offers you a 
complete training in every 
phase of actual' Broadcasting. 
It gives you the benefit of 
Floyd Gibbons' years of ex- 
perience in Broadcasting. 
Under his guidance you can 
acquire, right at home in 
your spare time, the tech- 
nique that makes highly 
paid Broadcasting Stars. 



Positions like these, 
often paying from $3,000 
to $15,000 a year, are 
open to talented men 
and women who have 
mastered the technique 
of radio presentation: 
Announcer Advertising 
Singer Publicity 

Actor Dramatist 

Reader Musician 

Writer Director 

Musical Director 
Script Writer 

Program Manager 
Sales Manager 

Read how you, too, 
can prepare yourself 
for your share in 
Broadcasting. 




Biggest Opportunities in Broadcasting 

No other industry today offers you as 
many opportunities for quick success and 
high pay as Broadcasting. For no other in- 
dustry is growing at such an amazing rate 
of speed. Thousands of men and women of 
talent and training are needed — and are 
highly paid according to their ability and 
popularity. 

Last year advertisers alone spent more 
than $35,000,000 over the air. Broadcast- 
ing companies spent many more millions 
for talent. This year it is predicted that 
the amount spent for Broadcasting will be 
even more than this staggering total. Many 
more men and women will be employed. 

Think of what this means to you! Think 



FLOYD GIBBONS 
Famous Radio Broadcaster 

of the chance this gives 
you to get into this thrill- 
ing young industry. Think 
of the opportunities it of- 
fers you to get your share 
of these millions. 

New Talent Needed 

This year hundreds 
more talented men and 
women will make their 
bow over the "mike." New 
personalities will be heard 
— new stars will rise to 
the heights and sway mil- 
lions — new fortunes will 
be made for those who are fortunate enough 
to be trained in Broadcasting technique. 

You may be one of these — if you have 
talent and the necessary training. If your 
speaking or singing voice shows promise, if 
you can act, if you are good at thinking up 
ideas, if you have any hidden talent at all 
■ — then let the Floyd Gibbons Course show you 
how to train successfully for Broadcasting fame 
and fortune. 

Remember — talent alone is not enough. No 
matter how talented you are, that does not mean 
you will be successful in Broadcasting — unless 
you have a thorough knowledge of the technique 
of Broadcasting. Many a famous stage star or 
playwright has failed when brought face to face 
with the limitations of the microphone — while 
others, totally unheard of before, have sprung to 
fame almost overnight, because they grasped the 
technique. 



Until recently it was difficult for the average 
person to get this necessary training for Broad- 
casting success. The Floyd Gibbons School of 
Broadcasting has changed all that. It was 
founded to bring to every talented man or woman 
the type of training that has made fortunes for 
the Graham MacNamees, Amos and Andys, Olive 
Palmers and Floyd Gibbonses. 

Now, through this new, fascinating home-study 
Course you get a complete and thorough training 
in the technique of all branches of Broadcasting. 
In your spare time — right in your own homes — 
without giving up your present job or making a 
single sacrifice of any kind — through this re- 
markable Course you can train for the big-pay- 
ing Broadcasting position you have dreamed of. 

FLOYD GIBBONS Complete Course 
in Broadcasting Technique 

The new, easy Floyd Gibbons Course trains 
you thoroughly in every phase of Broadcasting 
technique. It prepares you to step right into 
the studio and qualify for a place among the 
highly paid Broadcasters. A few of the sub- 
jects covered are : The Station and Studio, 
Microphone Technique, How to Control the 
Voice, How to Make the Voice Expressive, How 
to Train a Singing Voice for Broadcasting, 
the Knack of Describing, How to Write Radio 
Plays, Radio Dialogue, Dramatic Broadcasts, 
Making the Audience Laugh, How to Arrange 
Daily Programs, Money Making Opportunities 
Inside and Outside the Studio, and dozens of 
other subjects. 

Send for FREE booklet 

An interesting free "booklet entitled "How to 
Find Your Place in Broadcasting" tells you the 
whole fascinating story of the Floyd Gibbons 
School of Broadcasting and describes fully the 
training offered by our Home Study Course. 
Here is your chance to enter a life-long richly 
paid profession — to qualify for an important 
role in one of the most glamorous, powerful 
industries in the world. Send today for your 
free copy of "How to Find Your Place in Broad- 
casting." See for yourself how complete and 
practical the Floyd Gibbons Course in Broad- 
casting is. No obligation on your part. Act 
now — send coupon below today. Floyd Gibbons 
School of Broadcasting. Dept. 3G61, U. S. Sav- 
ings Bank Building, 2000 14th Street, N. W., 
Washington, D. C. 



Floyd Gibbons School of Broadcasting, 
Dept. 3G61, U. S. Savings Bank Bldg., 
2000 14th St., N.W., Washington, D. C. 

Without obligation send me your free book- 
let, "How to Find Your Place in Broad- 
casting," and full' particulars of your home 
study course. 

Name Age 

(Please print or write name plainly) 



Address 
City 



State 




Mr. E. H. Scott is shown 
here aboard the R. M. S. 
Maunganui, en route to New 
Zealand. On this 20,000-mile 
cruise to the South Seas he 
made constant tests of broad- 
cast band reception under 
greatest difficulties. 



<£ ,*>> 





?v< 



IN FAR-AWAY SIAM 

From Lakon Lampang, Siam, Mr. 
George Wyga tells of natives who 
called priests to expel devils which 
they believed kept his SCOTT silent 
when it had two faulty tubes. He is 
"pleased with the set." 




A FAMOUS BAND LEADER 

Columbia Chain listeners all know 
Frank Westphal and his music from 
Chicago's WBBM. He says of his 
SCOTT, "Such marvelous tone qual- 
ity is a delightful revelation ... it 
not only rivals nature, it is nature." 



From All Over the World Comes 



MORE AND MORE PROOF 



oTSCDT I Superiority 

When a receiver consistently, day in and day out, year 
after year, receives the universal acclaim of owners scattered 
from one end of the globe to the other for the most startling 
spectacular performance in all radio history . . . THAT 
MEANS SOMETHING! 

Upon the world-wide, unassailable, documentary endorse- 
ment of the legion of written, verified reports of SCOTT 
ALL-WAVE Deluxe owners everywhere . . . this receiver 
rests its case. 

The few expressions reproduced here are typical of those 
which pour in upon us continuously. They give an inkling 
of how this laboratory-precision custom-built receiver stands 
with its owners. 

World-Wide Reception Guaranteed 

Because the SCOTT ALL-WAVE Deluxe is constructed by skilled 
engineers to give the very brand of performance reported . . . 
fidelity of reproduction, sensitivity almost beyond measurement, se- 
lectivity to conquer the congestion of broadcast the world around 
... it carries the strongest guarantee ever offered. It is guaranteed 
to receive daily, with loud speaker volume, short wave broadcasts 
from stations 10,000 miles or more distant . . . and its every part 
(except tubes) is warranted for five years. 

E. H. SCOTT RADIO LABORATORIES, Inc. 

4450 RAVENSWOOD AVE., Dcpt. D73, CHICAGO, ILL. 



Consistent, clear reception 
with loudspeaker volume of 
stations all over the U. S. A. 
is the definite, verified rec- 
ord of Mr. Scott's spectacu- 
lar test, which included ship- 
board operation under most 
trying circumstances. 




IN CENTRAL MEXICO 

Baron v. Turckheim reports daily 
reception of broadcasts from Ger- 
many, France, Spain and Australia. 
"The tone is faultless," he writes from 
Mexico City, and then adds, "This is 
my first great radio." 




N THE PHILIPPINES 

U. S. Army Sergeant Frank Sublette, 
Fort Mills, Cavite, P. I., says, "Rus- 
sia, England, France come in just won- 
derful. Will never buy any other re- 
ceiver but a SCOTT." . . . And 
tropic reception is "tough." 



SEND COUPON AT ONCE FOR COMPLETE INFORMATION 



The SCOTT ALL-WAVE Deluxe gives 
perfected performance on all wave bands 
from 15 to 550 meters. It incorporates every 
worthwhile development of radio engineer- 
ing, including Automatic Volume Control, 
Visual Tuning, Static Suppressor, etc. For 
all technical data, price quotations, and per- 
formance PROOFS, send coupon. 




E. H. Scott Radio Laboratories, Inc. 
4450 Ravenswood Ave., Dept.D7 3, Chicago, 111. 
Send me at once, without obligation, complete 
information regarding the SCOTT ALL- 
WAVE Deluxe, including performance 
PROOFS, technical data, etc. 

Name 

A ddress 

City 



.State. 



'! 




BINING RADIO DIGEST 



STOOPNAGLE'S SECRETS • by HOPE HALE 




RADIO UNCLE" • by DON HERALD 





Including PROGRAM FINDER Feature 




JESSICA DRACONETTE 



Born in mystic India, Jessica showed the foresight credited to the people of her 
native land when she deserted the stage five years ago at the height of a musical 
comedy career to join the staff of NBC. Because of the millions who now follow 
her work in the excellent Cities Service broadcasts, it is interesting to note that 
her first taste of success was also before an unseen audience. It was in Max 
Reinhardt's play, "The Miracle." She was "an angel's voice," and sang her role far 
up in the wings, hidden from sight. Characteristics: five feet two — light, wavy hair 
— eyes an unusual shade of blue (she calls it "plaid") — weighs only 100 pounds. 



©£1B 1983 



> 



THE TALK OF THE AIR 



By JACK FOSTER 

formerly Radio Editor and now Feature 
Editor, New York World-Telegram 



RECENTLY Budd Hulick, Col- 
- onel Stoopnagle's aide-de-cramp- 
in-your-side, was talking to WABC's 
pretty receptionist, Margaret Hol- 
land, who said, "Well, I'm going 
home to Troy this week-end to get 
away from you comedians. There'll 
be nothing funnier there than a 
church social." 

"Try and get away from us," re- 
plied Budd. 

A quick check-up by Margaret re- 
vealed that Budd and the Colonel 
were due there on the same date to 
appear at a church jubilee. "Well, 
would jubilee it?" asked Margie. 
"That church is just across the street 
from my house and a friend of mine 
has invited me to go to hear her sing 
in the choir. She said nothing about 
you though. How'd Hulick that?" 

• • • 

PHIL REGAN, the handsome Irish 
tenor, used to be a cop on the beat. 
The CBS page boys say Phil has 
lived from hoof to mouth. 

• • • 

WHEN the Boswell Sisters were 
in London a few weeks ago 
Connie thought she seemed to be get- 
ting a bit plump in the face and so 
she did some heavy dieting for a 
couple of days. Her face got plumper. 
It turned out that it wasn't obesity. 
It was mumps. 

• • • 

YOU'LL see Jimmie Melton in the 
movies soon. He has just dieted 
away twenty-eight pounds so that the 
camera will be kinder. 



BETWEEN performances at a 
Hartford theatre this week, 
Lanny Ross, not stopping to remove 
makeup, hurried over to the Hartford 
General Hospital to see the wife and 
brand new baby of a Hartford friend. 
Waiting in the reception room, he was 
pounced on by a staff physician who 
tried to hurry him into the clinic. In 
the uncertain light the doc took 
Lanny's makeup for an extreme case 
of jaundice. After explanations, 
both had a good laugh and it turned 
out the M.D. was the father of Kath- 
erine Hepburn, Radio Pictures star. 



IT'S about time these autograph 
hunters were exposed! If Babe 
Ruth would like to know where the 
fly ball is that he hit into the Yankee 
Stadium stands some while back, 
please call the CBS studios and ask 
for Charles Carlile, lyric tenor and 
rabid baseball fan. Charlie caught 
the ball and is carrying it around in 
his pocket until the Babe is booked 
to appear at the studios. 

He won't be content until he sees 
the handwriting on the ball. 



WHEN they gave a radio demon- 
stration of that famous "truth" 
serum (which is supposed to make 
you tell the truth in spite of anything 
you try to do) they wanted to get an 
extremely difficult subject for the ex- 
periment. Yes, they finally decided 
on a commercial announcer. 



LOCAL-BOY-MAKES-GOOD de- 
■J partment : Ben Bernie recalls 
that Jimmie Mattern, who flew to 
Siberia for the summer, once played 
the drums in the Old Maestro's band. 
Ben says there was nothing the mat- 
ter with Jimmie's drumming, either. 

• • • 

MILDRED BAILEY used to be 
one of Hollywood's ghost sing- 
ers. It was Mildred's voice you heard 
when you watched some of the best 
known movie stars go through the 
motions of warbling. Now Holly- 
wood is angling for Mildred in 
person. 

e • • 

MICROPHONE No. 13 in Co- 
lumbia's New York studios is 
apparently not jinxed. It has never 
"blown." The mike stands in the 
studio used by Alfred E. Smith, 
Charles A. Lindbergh, John W. 
Davis and most of the nation's celeb- 
rities. 



R 



USSELL JOHNS used to go to 
grammar school in Chillicothe, 
Ohio, with Clyde Beatty, now of 
"Beatty and the Beasts." Rus says 
he thinks it was their eighth grade 
teacher who drove Clyde into lion 
taming. 

• • • 

WILL ROGERS says the alarm 
clock he takes to broadcasts 
with him is used not only to tell him 
when to stop talking but also to wake 
the audience up. / 



Radio Fan-Fare, combining Radio Digest. Volume XXX^No. 5." September 1933. Subscription rates yearly $1.50 in U. S. A.; Foreign. $3.00; Canada, $2.25; Single Copies 15c. 
Entered as second-class matter October 19, 1932, at the post office at Mt. Morris, Illinois, under the act of March 3, 1879. Copyrighted. 1932, By Radio Digest Publishing- 
Corporation. \All rights reserved. Radio Fan-Fare, combining Radio Digest, is published monthly by Radio Digest Publishing Corporation. Publication Office: 404 North 
Wesley Avenue. Mount Morris, 111. Editorial and Advertising office: 420 Lexington Avenue, New York City. Not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts or art received by mail. 



IN New York's Carnegie Hall the 
other night Fred Waring conduc- 
ted Ravel's "Bolero" after his Old 
Gold broadcast. It was there that the 
great Toscanini introduced the "Bo- 
lero" to America several years be- 
fore. After the Toscanini interpre- 
tation the audience rose and spon- 
taneously cheered for a quarter hour. 
After the Waring rendition a radio 
fan near this open ear said : 

"The 'Bolero'? The 'Bolero'? Oh 
yes, I know — that's the tune from 
Earl Carroll's 'Vanities'." 



IT IS well known that Mayor John 
Patrick O'Brien is the patron 
saint of radio in New York. He 
once told Major Edward Bowes, of 
the Capitol Theatre, that he would 
do anything within his power to as- 
sist the workers in this marvelous 
art (a brave statement in view of 
the fact that he becomes more than 
a little confused before the micro- 
phone). But George Burns and 
Gracie Allen have to be shown. 

George and Gracie recently flew 
from Chicago with an official invi- 
tation to Mayor O'Brien to visit the 
World's Fair. Arrangements were 
made for the radio-minded mayor to 
meet them at the airport. But when 
they landed neither he nor a repre- 
sentative were on the horizon. So 
they took the letter home with them. 
Not knowing exactly what to do 
with an official invitation, they kept 
it for several days — first in a vase, 
then in a cupboard drawer, then un- 
der the family album. Finally Gracie 
disposed of it by using it as a pad 
for her corn. 



CAPTAIN FRANK HAWKS had 
flown from Atlanta to New 
York in five and a half hours, a 
thrilling flight sure enough for any 
of us. That same night Frank was 
found in the studio audience at the 
first Taylor Holmes broadcast for 
Texaco. 

"Things get so dull in my busi- 
ness," explained Captain Hawks. "I 
like to go to a broadcast for a little 
excitement." 



SPEAKING of this program, Tay- 
lor Holmes appeared in the NBC 
Times Square Studio in a crazy get- 
up similar to that of his predecessor, 
Ed Wynn. He wore a tight-fitting 
checked suit, embroidered shoes, and 
a fiery necktie. And he changed his 
outlandish hats at breathing points 
in the sketch. 

Mr. Holmes many years ago 
played vaudeville with Ed Wynn. 
In Kansas City one time, Mr. 
Holmes recalls, a critic scourged 
Wynn's act with particular vicious- 
ness. Wynn was so incensed that he 
wrote him a letter. He outlined in 
poetic language the beauties of the 
vaudeville tour that was ahead of 
him — the clear, blue sky of Denver, 
the magnificent tabernacle in Salt 
Lake City, the sapphire Lake Louise 
in Banff, the Far East, the ancient 
splendor of Europe, the wonder city 
of Manhattan. 

"But you," Wynn wound up con- 
temptuously, "you will always live 
in Kansas City !" 

Since Taylor Holmes cannot re- 
member the name of the critic, we 
prefer to believe that it was Good- 




Radio Fan-Fare 

man Ace, an old Kansas City 
scourger who moved to Chicago and 
made a mint of money with his Easy 
Aces radio act. 



SINCE the broadcasters have been 
deprived of information by the 
newspaper wire services, they have 
had to do a lot of scurrying around 
on their own to obtain news bulle- 
tins. The National Broadcasting 
Company has been especially ener- 
getic in this field. Frank Mason, vice- 
president in charge of publicity, has 
organized his American stations and 
foreign offices into a more or less 
general news service whose agents 
carefully read the local newspapers 
and check at the sources on the prin- 
cipal stories. Just to show you how 
it sometimes works, when the broad- 
casters read that Jimmie Mattern 
had reached Europe at the start of 
his recent flight, they promptly went 
through the motions of calling Ber- 
lin ($100) to find out whether the 
headlines were true! 

The NBC also has made consider- 
able use of bulletins from the 
Mackey international telephone sys- 
tem, particularly in reporting prog- 
ress of the Balbo planes to America. 
This, as you may well imagine, has 
caused them considerable embarrass- 
ment. For the NBC is associated 
with RCA Communications, a dead- 
ly rival of the Mackey outfit. And 
at the last huddle they could not 
seem to decide whether they should 
continue to mention the Mackey 
name on the air. 






.X)5)V 



"l+'s my life's ambition to eat a radio crooner" 



BEFORE summer's past the-trans- 
mitter tower of Columbia's key 
station, WABC, will have a new 
coat of orange and white paint. 
And silky-throated crooners, whose 
voices are bounced from its ribs, will 
never realize what a job that was. 
Twelve painting concerns turned it 
down at any price — and, if you ask 
us, for very good reasons. 

In the first place, since you can't 
paint a transmitter while the station 
is on the air, the only available work- 
ing hours are between 2 A. M. and 6 
A. M. The tower is 655 feet high. 
It is seven inches across at the base 
and, at 262 feet up, it is 28 feet 
across. With such a shape to shinny 
up, each of the four painters takes 
an hour to ascend and an hour to 
descend, limiting the daubing to two 
hours. 



September 



PAUL WHITEMAN'S 



// 



MIRACLE WHIP" SHOW 




THE WHITEMAN BAND ... in 
action. The closeup at the ex- 
treme right shows Paul bearing 
down in the clinches, and inci- 
dentally presents Mike Pingatore, 
the guitarist who has been with 
the maestro ever since he or- 
ganized his first band. 

RAMONA ... the tall (see Nellie 
Revell, page II), exotic lady who 
can massage a Baby Grand into 
a frenry, or waft a breath of 
romance with a sweet blue song. 



The painters work in bos'un chairs. 
No floodlights can be used because 
these might blind them and cause 
them to lose their balance and ap- 
petites. So each wears a searchlight 
attached to his cap, and looks like a 
firefly in the dark when it is not 
singing. 

The tower must be grounded by 
300 feet of copper wire every time 
the painters are hoisted. Sometime, 
it is pointed out by the alarmists, 
with sleepiness in the 2 A. M. air, 
someone may forget to attach the 



PRESIDENT ROOSEVELT'S 
frequent use of radio to talk to 
the people reminds us, by contrast, 
that his last Democratic predecessor, 
Woodrow Wilson, used the micro- 
phone only once. This occasion 
marked his first public utterance af- 
ter his collapse during the peace 
treaty ratification fight. 

Mr. Wilson was to go on the air 
on Armistice Day, November 11, 
1923, at 8 :30 P. M. from the library 
on the second floor of his S Street 
residence in Washing-ton. Precau- 




"But, Mr. Glotz — aren't you putting the cart before the horse?" 



Radio Fan-Fare 
was leaning on the arms of Mrs. 
Wilson and his secretary, John Ran- 
dolph Boiling, the only other per- 
sons present. 

Mrs. Wilson sat next to her hus- 
band as he faced the microphone on 
his desk. She read the speech into 
his right ear, and he repeated the 
lines after her in a weak, halting 
voice. For ten minutes he spoke, ex- 
pressing his bitter disappointment in 
the country's failure to endorse the 
League of Nations. Three months 
later he died. 

The newspapers noted at that time 
that Mr. Wilson was heard by the 
"greatest audience to date." Three 
station s— W CAP, Washington 
(which call letters have since been 
transferred to New Jersey) ; WEAF, 
New York ; and WJAR, Providence 
— formed the primitive network. 
This "greatest audience to date" 
could not have exceeded 20,000, 
whereas President Roosevelt's audi- 
ences possibly have been as large as 
20,000,000. 

THE Perfect Song," Amos 'n' 
Andy's theme song, as you 
must know by this time, is from 
that old movie spectacle, "The Birth 
of a Nation." 

"And why," we asked one of the 
backers of the film yesterday, "did 
you give it that name?" 

"Because," he replied, "we thought 
it was a perfect song." 

Presumably Amos 'n' Andy's spon- 
sors have the same notion. Played 
at the beginning and end of their 
two daily programs, the tune has 
been broadcast something over five 
thousand times in the four years 
they have been on a network. So, 
conservatively, nearly ten days have 
been consumed in playing it — or 
enough time to give Amos 'n' Andy 
a good and richly deserved vacation. 



ground wire. And you may just 
imagine what a shock this would be 
to The Four Painters, radio's newest 
quartet. 



WHAT is a radio announcer 
without his emotions? David 
Ross, Columbia's voice of the 
flowers, burst into bloom the other 
night. "I feel as if I am in Ha- 
waii today," he confessed to a studio 
audience. "So alohaoe — welcome — 
alohaoe." 

Mr. Ross was born in The Bronx. 



tions had been taken in setting up 
the equipment so as not to annoy the 
sick and weary leader. A truck had 
been backed into the driveway to 
carry a line into the house. 

The announcer, Paul Gascoigne, 
was stationed in a dimly lighted cor- 
ner of the library and shielded from 
view by a screen. Mr. Gascoigne in- 
troduced the speaker at the sched- 
uled hour, and then had to ad lib 
frantically for twenty awful minutes 
before Mr. Wilson arrived — thin, 
haggard, walking as if each step 
were agony. The former President 



THIS little story may show you 
what is wrong with so many 
radio programs. The program de- 
partment of one of the major broad- 
casting systems had got together to 
consider a half hour skit for a pros- 
pective sponsor. Everyone present 
agreed that the advertising ballyhoo 
was disgusting. Everyone, that is, 
except the chief executive whose 
opinion they awaited. He gave it. 
"I don't care what you say," he 
said, "as long as you don't cut the 



revenue. 



WO/\JP£R 
WHAT 9£CAtfE 



\ni1h pietfdovi 

\tfBA£lN<a?/\rf{S, HOW 

fRo/M (5AL-S.*? 
EASY/ -me 

vmilu ^ T^ 
a\am! 



-%, 






ttWWKf 



vtoW'DJA HAPP^M To KMOCK 
THAT P^D^S^IAM'DOWW^ 



=r^ 



I DiPN'T-'Z-JUST 
PUU-EP OP 16 L£T 
H/M "PAS'S' MP 
' VIE FAlNlfP// 

V 






1 



J wSS 



|OtfA$£j 

So£RX . 
$UT I HAVEMT 
-$E~TlM£ To 
SPAfc! 



,-* SY 



=$/< 



A R4PIO CbMED/AN 

\MAS TbU/MP 
£>oUND ANP 6A<5&£D 
IM A STuDiO ANP 
AS USUAL IT WAS 
SOfAZ&oW ZLS&S 
GAG! I 



m 






THE HUMOR SECRETS OF 
COL STOOPNAGLE 



Radio Fan-Fare 



By HOPE HALE 




IT SEEMS that so many people 
bought Pontiacs in order to tear 
the tops off and become Stoopnocrats 
in the first half of 1933 that the sales 
exceeded the company quota for the 
whole year. Hence Stoopnagle and 
Budd were asked to cut short their 
self-imposed vacation from Colum- 
bia and come back to sell more Pon- 
tiacs. 

The news came as an amazing 
coincidence, just as we three were 
sitting here in the woods of Virginia. 
But perhaps I'd better tell you how 
we happened to be here. 

When the editor of Fan-Fare 
wired me for a story on Stoopnagel 
and Budd, I wired back that it 
couldn't be done. Here I was vacation- 
ing in Cherrydale, Virginia, while the 
Colonel and Budd — well, only the 
Lord knew where they were, because 
they were also away on a holiday. If 
it had just been an ordinary assign- 
ment I might have written something 
from my past acquaintance with this 
swell team of comedians, but the 
boss wanted the story based on "an 
analysis of their radio humor." 

To do a job of this kind satisfac- 
torily three things are necessary. 
First — you've got to see the stars, 
personally. Second — you should get 
them as far away from a theatre or 
broadcasting station as possible. And 
third — you should make them relax. 

And then the gods smiled on me — 
in fact, they practically laughed 



right in my face. A notice in the 
Washington Star announced that 
Stoopnagel and Budd were making 
a special stage appearance in Wash- 
ington. I hopped in my Lizzie — 
buzzed into Washington — cornered 
my victims in their hotel — and be- 
fore they knew what had happened 
we were back in Cherrydale and 
everything was hunky dooley. There 
they were, personally, seated in the 
shade of a tree. Second, they were 
far from a stage or microphone. 
And third — they were sipping a tall 
glass of the swellest little relaxer 
the fair State of Virginia provides. 

WE HAD been talking only a 
few minutes when I said : 

"I thought your recent Pontiac 
programs were all right, but it cer- 
tainly would be nice if you could 
have a fifteen-minute show all to 
yourselves — like you used to." 

Now this may sound like a bit of 
fiction, but it's the truth. A few 
minutes after I spoke those words, 
the phone rang. It was for the boys, 
and the message said that Pontiac 
was offering them a fifteen-minute 
period, twice a week, come August ! 
Whereupon I threw my typewriter 
in the air and we had another long, 
tall, cool one (not a typewriter) all 
around. 

Thus it is, ladies and gentlemen 
of the radio audience, that when you 
have read this inside story of Stoop- 



nagle humor you can try a new game 
on your radio. 

For on that pleasant afternoon in 
Old Virginia, Colonel Stoopnagle re- 
vealed all. He took his unique brand 
of humor apart and showed us how 
the wheels go round. Tune in and 
try picking it to pieces for yourself 
and see if you can guess how it was 
put together. See if you can figure 
out why you laugh at it. Try to 
work out some Stoopnagle lines for 
your friends according to his recipes. 

Because their humor does not just 
happen. It is probably the most pre- 
cisely directed, consciously formu- 
lated comedy on the stage or on the 



air right now. 



IF YOU asked one hundred people 
this question, 'Why do you laugh 
at Stoopnagle and Budd?" ninety- 
nine would answer something like 
this : "They're so cockeyed. Crazy. 
Nuts. Loony. Gaga." And so on. 
The hundredth might say, "I don't." 

If you happen to be the unfortu- 
nate hundredth, mayhap you can fill 
this sorry void in your Enjoyment 
Department by studying the follow- 
ing lesson in Stoopnappreciation. 

But if you are one of the lucky 
millions of fans (from those who 
must hold to the sides of their kiddie- 
koops while they laugh, on up to the 
victims of the rocking chair) then 
here is how you got that way. What 
follows is from the gospel according 






September 

to Colonel Lemuel Q. Stoopnagle : 

The commonly held theory that 
Stoopnagle and Budd were born a 
little i n s a n e — not dangerous, of 
course, but more than slightly 
cuckoo — is erroneous. Both Stoop- 
nagle and Budd are normal human 
beings. 

Budd is the father of a two-year- 
old daughter whose brilliance is a 
constant source 'of awe to him. 

Colonel Stoopnagle is probably 
the most serious person I have ever 
met. If there is one thing that in- 
furiates him more than another — 
and there are many, many things 
that infuriate him — it is having 
some simple goop like you and me 
(who innocently thinks he is funny) 
recognize him and come up holding 
out a hand that shakes with mirth 
and say, "Well, ha ha, hello. So this, 
ha ha, is Colonel Stoopnagle, ha ha." 



M 



The Colonel regards his work 
more as a form of art than as a 
laughing matter. He even got into 
the profession of humor for very 
serious reasons. 

HE HAPPENED to be the son 
of one of Buffalo's most promi- 
nent businessmen, and though he 
had an extremely happy boyhood 
with a jolly home and a mother who 
could tell Irish dialect stories better 
than anybody he has ever heard 
since, it was just a little too happy 








HELLO 



tWJBST 



OfATrD 



exSTHER. 



OR 
. f KA ' 



#;x.5i 




i!KH2BJ 



"TfeeTcH^? 



'#¥ 




Here the Colonel lets you in on a simple solu- 
tion to his theories on Stoopnocracy. As you 
can see, he has it all reduced to a formula 
that a child can understand as well as a grown- 
up — maybe better. Above is Bud, whose smil- 
ing pan reflects the spirit of the sunny Cali- 
fornia shore — and at the top we have the 
Colonel, gone native in Hawaii. 



to prepare him for the normal adult 
mixture of trouble and difficulty. 
Always he had had before him the 
constant example of perfect married 
happiness. His mother had sat on 
his father's lap to tell the stories 
that made his friends chortle, and 
his father and mother had remained 
deeply in love until she died. So 
when his own draw in the marriage 
lottery turned out to be not quite the 
lucky number, it hit him much 
harder than it might have hit a man 
who had not set his marital ideal 
so high. 

That, and the stifling effect of 



having a wealthy, important citizen 
for a father, of being known as 
"Horace Taylor's son," drove him 
out of his father's lumber business 
and into work on his own — even- 
tually landing him in a Buffalo 
broadcasting station. By that time 
he had already been writing humor 
on the side, and when even a serious 
program became a joke on his lis- 
teners, he was started on his real 
career. 

That program was "Nona, who 

sees all and tells everything." Some 

woman sat with a crystal ball before 

(Continued on page 48) 



10 



RADIO REVELL-ATIONS 



By NELLIE REVELL 



B 1 



►ROADCASTING beauties won't 
appear in the public prints much 
longer clad only in a string of beads 
and little else . . . Women's clubs 
around the country have been pro- 
testing that singers don't sing in back- 
less bathing suits and actresses don't 
act in scanty shorts ... So the net- 
works have instructed the publicity 
boys to cut out the s.a. in photographs 
released to the press . . . Radio must 
be kept pure in thought and in deed 
. . . Yes, indeed ! 

SPEAKING of pictures, I suppose 
you have wondered why Irvin S. 
Cobb wears a smock when he broad- 
casts . . . It's an importation to the 
studio from Mr. Cobb's writing study 
. . . He's an old-fashioned author 
who uses a pen and scorns that new- 
fangled contrivance, the typewriter 



A 



NNOUNCERS on those 



pro- 
grams surfeited with advertis- 
ing blurbs are called "matadors" in 
the studios. Matadors, you know, 
are adept in throwing the bull. . . 
"Soconyland Sketches" is the oldest 
dramatic show on the airwaves. . . 
William Hall is the tallest male singer 
in the Columbia station and Charles 
Carlile is the shortest. . . Nine years 
ago Vaughn de Leath, the original 
crooner, operated her own one-lunged 
station in New York City — WDT. . . 
Edwin C. Hill, commentator, is the 
best dressed man at Columbia or in 
any other studio. . . H. V. Kalten- 
born, Ed's colleague, tutored Vincent 
Astor for Harvard. . . June Pursell, 
originally a soprano, became a con- 
tralto after an operation on her 
tonsils. 



Ink spills easily, you know, so TTTITH the way things are going, 

Vt Tom Howard, former Musical 



the sage of Paducah relies on an all 
embracing smock to protect his ample 
person from wayward drops . . . The 
humorist spills a lot of laughs when 
he etherizes, but none get on his vest 
. . . Rather, they get under the lis- 
tener's vest. 

XN his writing habit, Mr. Cobb is a 
picturesque figure before the mike 
. . . And a never-ending source of 
delight to studio audiences . . . He 
encourages self-expression from his 
guests . . . For instance, one night 
before he took to the air he said : 
"Folks, if you should feel a laugh 
coming on, don't force it — but for 
Heaven's sake, don't stifle it!" 

AN instrument so sensitive that it 
-L\- records the heat of a candle 
twenty miles away has been invented. 
It would be handy for measuring the 
warmth of affection of one radio 
songbird for another. 

DID you know that — Bing Cros- 
by, Kate Smith, and Morton 
Downey never took a singing lesson? 
. . . Mildred Bailey is on a milk diet? 
. . . Ida Bailey Allen really eats 
those menus she prescribes for listen- 
ers? .. . Arthur Brisbane, Lowell 
Thomas, and Colonel Louis McHenry 
Howe, the President's secretary, read 
scripts prepared on typewriters with 
letters about twice the size of these? 



he's 



Grocery Store comedian, figures it 
won't be long now before a man at a 
bank will conduct a colloquy some- 
thing like this : 

"Is the president in?" 

"Yes." 

"I'd like to see him." 

"You can't see him until 
liberty." 

"When will that be?" 

"In about four years." 

PRESIDENT MERLIN 
H. AYLESWORTH of 
NBC was escorting a group 
of distinguished visitors 
through the New York stu- 
dios . . . Unheralded, they 
came to the room where the 
announcers relax between 
assignments ... As Mr. 
Aylesworth opened the 
door, cries of "Come 
seven ! Come eleven ! < 
Baby needs new shoes!" 
and similar exhortations 1| 
greeted the surprised 
ears of the callers . . . The 
half-dozen mike-masters as- 
sembled about an improvised 
dice table were thrown into 
confusion . . . But not NBC's 
Head Man . . . "The gentle- 
men," he explained to his entourage, 
"are rehearsing sound effects for a 
southern plantation broadcast." . . . 



Radio Fan-Fare 

And Mr. Aylesworth's companions 
believed him! 

GRACIE ALLEN didn't always 
make the dumb cracks. . . 
Years ago, when she and George 
Burns opened in vaudeville, George 
was supposed to be the comedy end 
of the team. . . But audiences snick- 
ered at Grade and turned thumbs 
down on George's humor. . . So 
Burns, recognizing a law of human 
nature, rewrote the script to give 
Gracie all the funny answers, and 
they have lived happily ever after- 
wards. 

IT was a famous stage star (turned 
down after an audition) who first 
said there are a lot of people on the 
ether who should be under it. 







TOM HOWARD— who used to be the head 
man of the Best Foods Musical Grocery Store 
program — has his own idea of the dialogue 
that takes place in banks today. 



_ 



September 



11 



H. V. KALTENBORN ... one of 
the better news commentators, 
sailing for Europe on the Grip- 
sholm with his 2 1 -year-old daugh- 
ter, Anais. (And did you know he 
once tutored Vincent Astor?) 

KATE SMITH frolics at the 
Neponsit, Long Island, home of 
her manager, Ted Collins. Ted's 
huge police dog wants to get 
rough, but it looks like he has 
over-matched himself. 




CHARLES CARLILE'S mother 
came all the way from Central 
Falls, Rhode Island, to hear him 
broadcast — and he decorated her 
with carnations. Charles is the 
shortest tenor on the Columbia 
chain, in case you're interested— 
and why should you be? 



IF YOU SAW a man 
having his hair cut with 
his hat on you could be 
sure that the only per- 
son goofy enough to 
think it up would be 
Gracie Allen — and the 
only man patient 
enough to try it would 
Z,M'i be George Burns. 



"V7'OU look tired and sleepy, 
X Kate," said Ted Collins, her 
manager, to Kate Smith when she 
appeared at rehearsal one morning. 
"It's the new baby in the apartment 
next door," explained Kate. "He 
broadcasts all night long." 

BEN BERNIE reports everything 
on exhibition at the Chicago 
World Fair but a paid school teacher 
... A "sportrait" is what Ted 
Husing calls a word picture of an 



athletic event . . . The hardest thing 
to get on a radio is $10 in a pawn 
shop . . . Radio's youngest performer 
is two-year-old Ronald Liss, heard on 
NBC's Children Hour . . . John P. 
Medbury, one of the busiest radio 
gag writers, thrives on four hours' 
sleep a night . . . Ramona, on the 
Paul Whiteman shows is said to be 
the tallest woman in the studios. 

PANNING old gags heard on the 
air is the most popular pastime of 



radio commentators these days . . . 
But when they refer to an ancient 
joke as a "Joe Miller" they don't 
mean an individual but an institution 
. . . There was a Joe Miller, an Eng- 
lish actor born in 1684, but he was 
never known to have perpetrated so 
much as a pun . . . However, short- 
ly after his death a book called "Joe 
Miller's Joke Book" was published in 
London. . . Thus was created a leg- 
endary character, useful in implying 
the antiquity of a jest. 



12 



Radio Fan-Fare 



J\£* ijrdonfteroU 




e 



' JUNIOR, come right here 



stant and hang up your 



rag 



Mrs. Tottle was surveying the 
scene of Junior's recent bath, and 
uttering up a loud prayer into the 
four winds, rather than addressing 
Junior specifically, for Junior was 
now probably three blocks away at 
the Gooley's getting dirty again. 

Timothy Tottle, Sr., was in the 
bedroom next to the bath, yanking at 
an unwilling necktie. 

Mrs. Tottle continued, "That boy 
never hangs up his wash rag. He 
doesn't know what it is to hang up a 
wash rag. It's just as apt to be on 
the floor as anywhere." This to Mr. 
Tottle in the next room. 

"Well, you ought to be glad he will 
even go through the motions of using 
a wash rag. My parents used to have 
to use a shotgun to get me to take 
a bath. Shotgun baths are what I 
took." 

"I'm half in the notion of writing 
to Uncle Tom, at WQZ, about 
Junior's habit of throwing the wash 
rag in any old direction after his 
baths. Junior listens to Uncle Tom 
every evening, and fairly worships 
him. I believe he would pay some 
attention to Uncle Tom." 

"That lizard!" 

"Who? Junior?" 

"No. Uncle Tom. That male gig- 



gler ! That low-life, double-dealing, 
oily, self-delighted broadcasting mor- 
alizer. Entertains the so-called kid- 
dies, uncles them unctuously, and 
then socks them with moral precepts. 
It's funny that children can't have 
entertainment in this world without 
having to pay for it by listening to 
lessons. Uncle Tom ! I'll bet that 
guy robs birds' nests." 

"Why, I think he's a fine influ- 
ence." 

IN CASE you are still reading, 
Uncle Tom was perhaps the most 
popular of those self-elected radio 
uncles in one seacoast section of the 
country. He opened his half hour 
program with a laugh, played the 
piano, laughed, told bedtime stories, 
laughed in anticipation of the ending 
and laughed at the ending, sang inane 
nursery songs, oozed personality and 
lovability, and interspersed his enter- 
tainment with intimate lectures to in- 
dividual children about whose faults 
and misdemeanors desperate parents 
had written him. Thus : 

"Esther VanDyke, of Glenvale, 
Pennsylvania, you don't drink your 
milk or eat your vegetables. My, my, 
Esther, Uncle Tom is sorry to hear 
that. Don't you know that you can't 






ever be a fine, strong girl unless you 
drink plenty of good, rich milk, and 
eat a lot of wholesome, healthful 
vegetables. You won't get the vita- 
mins that you need, Esther. Now, I 
hope you'll do better from now on, 
Esther. 

"Now, let's see, ha, ha, ha, ha, ha, 
ha. Oh yes, Patricia Brinkerhoff, of 
New York City. You must quit bit- 
ing your fingernails, Patricia, or I 
really don't know what will happen. 

"Now Uncle Tom, ha, ha, ha, ha, 
ha, will tell you all the story about 
the little bear who found a bicycle in 
the woods, but who didn't have any 
bicycle pump with which to blow up 
the tires. Ha, ha, ha, ha, ha, ha!" 

And so on. 

Junior Tottle enjoyed Uncle Tom, 
or pretended to. It may have been 
because he liked to hear other "kid- 
dies" getting roasted, or it may have 
been because he liked to see and hear 
his father get hot and boil over every 
time Uncle Tom's voice or giggle 
emerged from the loud speaker. 

YOU may remember that Mr. Tot- 
tle was dressing, and now, having 
finally mastered his neckwear, he was 
transferring his knicknacks from one 
suit to another. 

"I'd rather have Junior go clear 
through this life a non-wash-rag- 
hanger-upper than to have you stoop 






September 

so low as to connive with that Uncle 
Tom. No sir, I was raised without 
the aid of radio uncles or cousins or 
aunts, and I may be a washout, but 
we'll get Junior up to the age of dis- 
cretion without the use of any ether 
uncles. Of course, Santa Claus is 
different. I think it's all right to get 
what virtue you can out of kids by 
holding Santa Claus over them a few 
months before Christmas. I'm not 
above a little skulduggery in this mat- 
ter of raising children, but I'll be 
darned if I'll let you write to Uncle 
Tom. I don't like that guy." 

Mr. Tottle took a last vicious 
swash at his hair with the brush, 
turned and faced his wife belliger- 
ently. 

"Here we have the miracle of 
radio. The marvelous human mind 
discovers a way to transmit sound 
through the ether and to capture it 
again a thousand miles away, millions 
of dollars are invested in broadcast- 
ing stations, the public invests its own 
millions of dollars in receiving sets 
. . . it's the greatest single discovery 
in the history of the human race . . . 
and what does it get us ? Uncle Tom ! 
That laughing hyena!" 

Mrs. Tottle had often been the one- 
woman audience to these one-man 
chautauquas, and she wasn't really 
listening, as Mr. Tottle half suspected 
she wasn't. Nor did he care, for all 
he wanted was a topic and the vibra- 
tion of his own voice. Mr. Tottle 



had something of the makings of a 
radio artist, himself. 

"Uncle Tom — a fine desecration of 
God-given ether, if you ask me !" con- 
cluded Mr. Tottle. 

"~VJOW, let's see. Ha, ha, ha, ha, 

-L ^ ha, ha ! Uncle Tom certainly 
does get a lot of mail these days. 
Now, let's see. Oh, yes. Stanley 
Brown, Washington, D. C. I hear you 
don't answer when your mamma calls, 
Stanley. Do you think that is nice? 
How much nicer it would be if you 
came running into the house or an- 
swered, 'Yes, Mother !' I hope to 
hear you are doing better about this 
from now on, Stanley. 

"Well, ha, ha, I guess Uncle Tom's 
time is about up. It certainly has been 
a jolly party today, and we'll all be 
back for another one tomorrow eve- 
ning at the same time. Ha, ha, ha, 
ha, ha ! Well, every good thing must 
come to an end.- Good night, kiddies." 

In the studio of WQZ, Uncle Tom 
mopped his brow, reached for a cig- 
arette, and said to himself, "Jeez, 
I'm glad that's over !" 

As he passed the switchboard girl 
in the hall on his way out, he said, 
"Good night, beautiful." 

As he left the elevator, he said to 
the elevator girl, "Good night, sweet- 
heart." 

As he passed the newsstand girl in 
the corridor of the building, he said, 
"Good night, dearest."' 




13 

"Fresh egg !" 

Fifteen minutes later, Uncle Tom 
entered the Wharf Pool Room on 
Water Street. 

"Hi, Charlie," he said to the man 
with a hat on, behind the cigar coun- 
ter. 

"Howdy, Uncle." 

"Are the boys in the back room?" 

"Yeh, Nails and Splinter and 
Sneerface are there. Waitin' for 
you." 

"Let's shake for a plug of Crow- 
bar." 

They shook. The house lost and 
Uncle Tom got his chewing tobacco 
for nothing. 

He then walked through the length 
of the poolroom, speaking to a few 
friends who paused with cues bal- 
anced as he passed. 

"Hello, Uncle Tom. Say, that's a 
fine bunch of bologna you hand those 
kids. Someday the Society for the 
Suppression of Kidding the Kiddies 
will get you !" 

" 'At's all' right, I get the jack, 
don't I ?" 

"Sure, go ahead — it's a great 
racket." 

Uncle Tom knocked four times on 
a door in the rear. It was unlocked 
and an un shaved face peeked 
through. A thick voice said, "Come 
in, Uncle." 

"Howdy, boys." 

"Hello, Uncle. Have a drink." A 
tall black bottle was pushed across a 
pine table. Uncle Tom poured him- 
self a big slug. 

"Not bad." 

"Don't burn up that radio throat 
of yours, Uncle. If you start gettin' 
husky, some of the parents may get 
on that you ain't as sweet as you let 
on to be." 

"Never mind. I'll take care of the 
sound box. Well, let's get down to 
business. I got a date to feed a dame 
chop suey after a while. Here's the 
list for next two weeks." 

Uncle Tom took a piece of paper 
from his inside coat pocket and 
handed it to Nails. Upon this paper 
was the following typewritten list : 

1. Freddie Johnson 

2. Sophie Mayer 

3. Spuddie Miller 

4. Timmie Tottle 

5. Bobbie Biggers 

6. Lucile Christie 

7. Leo Burnett 

8. Maggie Fishback 

9. Rosie Robinson 
10. Ada Tate 

(Continued on page 46) 



14 



Radio Fan-Fare 



REVIEWING THE CURRENT PROGRAMS 



BING CROSBY 
See front cover 

Cast — Bing (and that's plenty) 

Comment — When this was written 
I had just heard that Mr. Crosby 
was going back on the air with a 
sponsored show . . . sometime in 
September. I don't know when and, 
naturally, I haven't heard one of the 
programs. Nevertheless it is quite 
easy to write a review of his new 
show. Regardless of who sponsors 
Bing or what sort of spot he is 
given, he will still be just about the 
biggest single musical attraction on 
the air. And you don't have to take 
my word for it. Ever since Bing 
was one of Paul Whiteman's 
Rhythm Boys his radio popularity 
has increased every year. 

During the past summer he has 
not been on the air at all, yet the 
Columbia stations have continued to 
receive more fan mail addressed to 
Mr. Crosby than to the majority of 
headliners who have been working 
steadily. 

The Plug — No matter how long 
and sappy it may be, the Crosby fans 
will take it, and like it. 

Opinion — That's my story, and 
I'll stick to it. 

• • • 

THE KRAFT PROGRAM 
See front cover 

(NBC-WEAF, Thursday at 10:00- 
11:00 PM-DST) 



By DYAL TURNER 

Cast — Paul Whiteman's Orches- 
tra, Al Jolson, Deems Taylor, Ra- 
mona, Peggy Healy, The Rhythm 
Boys, Roy Bargy, Jack Fulton. 

Comment — This one-hour pro- 
gram, put on by the Kraft Phenix 
Cheese Corporation to exploit their 
new "Miracle Whip" salad dressing, 
is one of the most elaborate gestures 
that has been made by the big ad- 
vertisers. Despite the length of the 
show, the first programs had all the 
earmarks of successful entertain- 
ment. The Whiteman organization 
is, of course, fool-proof. Whether 
it's classical stuff or jazz — Paul's 
crowd handle the assignment equally 
well. 

Yes sir, it makes no difference to 
those lads. High or low, sweet or 
hot- — they've got what it takes. 
And Paul himself in his routines 
with Al Jolson, has proved that he 
is no mean straight man. 

Mr. Jolson's talents are not so 
well suited to radio as they are to 
the stage and movies, but undoubt- 
edly he'll appeal to the folks who do 
not object to Al's heavy hand on the 
tremolo stop. 

Ramona, Peg-gy Healy, Roy 
Bargy, and The Rhythm Boys — are 
all well known to radio fans. (And 
by the time you read this, Miss 
Healy should also be signed up for 
a Broadway show. Cute looking 
gal, and swell personality.) Ra- 




mona, who got her radio start with 
Don Bestor's Orchestra, has been 
one of Paul Whiteman's stellar pu- 
pils for some time. Her unique sing- 
ing and piano playing are always 
worth your time. 

Deems Taylor, noted music critic 
who handled the Metropolitan Opera 
broadcasts so capably, introduces 
the singers and announces the 
Whiteman selections with intelligent 
build-ups that are a pleasant con- 
trast to the far-fetched metaphor- 




HOWARD MARSH 
. ladies who like Herbert 
will like Howard 



JANE FROMAN 
with television she could 
break up homes 



TAYLOR HOLMES 

... he is Ed Wynn's but not Don 

Herold's radio uncle 

simile technique you usually hear 
from the regular announcers. 

Also, Mr. Taylor offers brief com- 
ments during the playing of the 
classical selections to explain the im- 
port of certain passages. And he 
sometimes describes the scenes of 
the musical plays or operas from 
which they are taken. Mr. Taylor's 
remarks are always in good taste 
and never give the impression that 
the speaker is being condescending. 
And in addition to all that, Mr. Tay- 
lor should be heard for his mock 
serious observations and for his 
utter lack of unctuousness. 

The Plug — At the start of these 
programs, listeners were given a 
"twice-your-money-back" guarantee 
if they bought "Miracle Whip" and 
did not think it was the best salad 
dressing they had ever used. (To 
cash in, you had to take the wrapper 
off the jar and send it back to the 



September 



15 




VERA VAN 
. . . Marion (Ohio) said "O-o-h!" 

company with a detailed explanation 
of your reasons — which made the 
offer a pretty safe one for the com- 
pany.) "Socially prominent" women 
were also brought in to "say a few 
words" about the product. These 
"yeses," together with the wordy 
plugs by the announcer, become 
pretty irksome after you've heard 
them for an hour. (But, after all, you 
couldn't expect the Kraft boys to 
spend all that money and not say 
a mouthful.) 

Opinion — Excellent, well handled 
musical entertainment — with a little 
too much dressing. 



THE FRIGIDAIRE PROGRAM 

(CBS-WABC, Wednesday and Fri- 
day at 10:30 PM-DST) 

Cast — Jane Froman (Friday), 
Howard Marsh (Wednesday), The 
Snow Queens, Jacques Renard's Or- 
chestra 

Comment — Substantial radio fare, 
with lovely Jane Froman as the 
piece de resistance. (If they ever 
put this gal on a big television net- 
work, there will be many a good 
home broken up. She's certainly an 
eyeful.) Miss Froman has already 
acquired an air following that as- 
sures a flock of listeners, and Mr. 
Marsh is a pleasant and capable ex- 
ponent of the light opera school. He 
will be particularly acceptable to the 
ladies who like the Victor Herbert, 
Rudolph Friml and Jerome Kern 
type of musical sentiment. The 
Snow Queens (who are referred to 
for no good reason as Economy, 



Beauty, Convenience, and Quality) 
don't do much but hum. Jacques 
Renard puts his orchestra through 
paces you'll like. 

The Plug — You are probably 
weary of hearing us say, "The com- 
mercial announcement is too long." 
We are certainly sick of writing it, 
but what the hell can you do about 
it when they all are. 

Opinion — First-class entertain- 
ment with a bit too much blurb. 
• • • 

"ED WYNN'S UNCLE" 

(NBC-WEAF, Tuesday at 9:30 
PM-DST) 

Cast — Taylor Holmes, Graham 
McNamee, Wamp Carlson, Larry 
Butler, Don Voorhees' Orchestra, 
The Fire Chief Quartet 

Comment — I notice that my old 
friend Don Herold has a story in 
this issue about uncles . . . the kind 
who sing chanteys to the kiddies 
and tell them to eat their spinach 
and whispy-crispies. Taylor Holmes, 
who is substituting for Ed Wynn 
on the Texaco program is not one of 
these uncles. He does play an uncle, 
however — Ed's uncle — thereby keep- 
ing the Wynn name green in the 
minds of his thousands of ardent 
fans (as though they'd forget him!). 

If you are a regular Wynn fan (as 
most listeners are) you will remem- 
ber that Ed kept saying, "All right, 
Graham. You can have your Tex- 
aco and your automobiles. I'll stick 
to my horse. But my uncle has a 
car . . ." after which there would 



be sundry cracks about his uncle. 
This gave some smart boy over at 
the Hanff-Metzger advertising 
agency the hunch to ring in the 
uncle while Ed was vacationing. Mr. 
Holmes is it. His character is that 
of an old-fashioned codger who 
wears trick clothes and stutters. 
Employing this stammering tech- 
nique for added laughs, he follows 
the humor tradition of the program 
by doing a gag routine with Graham 
McNamee— utilizing a line of wise- 
cracks that are neither newer nor 
older than the Wynn collection. 

Also appearing in these programs 
is Olaf (Wamp Carlson), the hired 
man who takes care of Chief Wynn's 
horse. Olaf manages to get his 
share of giggles with his dumb- 
Swede technique. Larry Butler, the 
Fire House mascot, is there to please 
the kiddies — which may be smart. 

The Plug — Same as usual, with 
Mr. Holmes interrupting the com- 
mercial announcement just as Mr. 
Wynn used to do. Many sponsors 
would swell up and burst at the idea 
of such irrelevancy during the im- 
pressive (they think) moments dedi- 
cated to the sacred "product." This 
very lack of importance has made it 
possible for Texaco to put in over- 
time on their plugs without causing 
a pain in the neck to the listener. 

Opinion — Competent enough as a 
substitute for Mr. Wynn, it isn't to 
be expected that Ed's uncle will be 
able to hold (Continued on page 45) 




"LUM AND ABNER" 
they're good at hick dia — never mind 



16 



POPULAR TUNES 

An Analysis and Opinion 



By RUDY VALLEE 



"WHEN THE SWEET MAGNOLIAS 

BLOOM AGAIN" 
By Joe Young and Dave Dreyer. Pub- 
lished by Irving Berlin, Inc. 

With our return to the Pennsyl- 
vania Roof, some of the publishers 
tried to find suitable opening and 
closing songs for our programs. 
While listening to the catalogue of 
Irving Berlin, Inc., I heard a number 
that seemed to have a soothing qual- 
ity of melody and I finally decided on 
"When The Sweet Magnolias Bloom 
Again" as the signature song for our 
Monday and Saturday dance broad- 
casts. 

The song has received a pleasing 
acceptance. The Victor people, for 
whom we made a Bluebird record of 
it, characterize the waltz as one of 
the best mixtures of the style of 
Wayne King and Paul Whiteman to 
which they have listened in a long 
time. The quality on the record itself 
was due in no small measure to the 
arrangement by Elliott Jacoby, and 
to the fact that we took it at the slow 
Wayne King tempo. 

"When The Sweet Magnolias 
Bloom Again" is extremely simple 
and may become quite popular. 




"I HAVE TO PASS YOUR HOUSE TO 

GET TO MY HOUSE" 

By Lew Brown. Published by De Sylva, 

Brown & Henderson, Inc. 

About two years ago, when I was 
in George White's "Scandals" I paid 
tribute in this department to Lew 
Brown and Ray Henderson, who 
wrote the "Scandals" music. They 
were then and still are two of Broad- 
way's cleverest collaborators not only 
on blackouts for musical comedy but 
especially on songs. As you may 



know, the team originally had three 
members — Brown, Henderson, and 
Buddy De Sylva. Then De Sylva 
left because he wanted to live on the 
Coast and write exclusively for pic- 
tures. And now it's rumored that 
Brown and Henderson have decided 
to go separate ways. I hope the 
rumor is unfounded, because I believe 
that together the boys are almost un- 
beatable and, even though each is ex- 
ceedingly gifted, I should dislike aw- 
fully to see them split. 

If "I Have To Pass Your House 
To Get To My House" is a sample 




of Lew Brown's work in both the 
melody and lyric fields, I would 
hesitate to say just what his capabili- 
ties as a songwriter may be. Lew 
wrote songs long before he met Hen- 
derson and De Sylva and perhaps I'm 
wrong in thinking that he is a better 
lyricist than melodist. By that I don't 
wish to imply that this song is not a 
good job — only that it is a most un- 
usual piece of work. 

In the first place, it is of unusual 
length, having 60 measures. This, in 
the minds of most publishers, puts 
two strikes against it right at the 
start. However, emboldened by the 
success of "Night and Day" (which 
was much more than the usual length 
of 32 measures), Brown probably 
conceived the idea of writing a long 
type of fox trot, and then went one 
step further in being unorthodox. He 
made his song almost completely in 
minor, giving it every quality of a 
Jewish synagogue composition. 

What's more, the story in the lyrics 
is sad, which is typical of Brown. 
The words were probably written 



Radio Fan-Fare 

quickly, yet upon analysis there is lit- 
tle in them that could be improved. 
Brown's lyrics are like that. 

"ISN'T THIS A NIGHT FOR LOVE" 
By Val Burton and Will Jason. Pub- 
lished by Sam Fox Publishing Co. 

Every now and then the West 
Coast produces an orchestral hero. 
First it was Art Hickman, then Paul 
Whiteman, Paul Ash, Abe Lyman, 
Earl Burtnett, Gus Arnheim . . . 



mm!" 




and now, Phil Harris. Harris was 
originally with the Harris-Lofner 
Orchestra of San Francisco. Or- 
chestras run by two men rarely do 
succeed, and Harris eventually broke 
away from the partnership, going to 
the Cocoanut Grove with his own 
combination. Although his former 
partner is doing well on his own, Har- 
ris has recently come into nationwide 
prominence through his radio work 
and the RKO movie, "Melody 
Cruise." Harris has now left the 
Cocoanut Grove and is playing in 
Chicago, where he intends to summer 
— -with the possibility of coming on 
to New York this fall. 

Of the several songs which Harris 
sings in "Melody Cruise," "Isn't This 
A Night For Love" is unquestion- 
ably the most tuneful. It is written 
by the two boys who wrote "Pent- 
house Serenade" and it proves that 
they are complete masters of the art 
of writing popular songs. 

"HOLD ME" 

By Little Jack Little, Dave Oppenheim, 

and Ira Schuster. Published by 

Robbins Music Corporation 

Well, I must admit I've made an- 
other mistake. Why was I unable 
to sense the popular appeal of "Hold 
Me"? Was it because it was badly 
played on the piano the first time I 
heard it, or what? I honestly felt 
that "Hold Me" was one of the worst 
tunes I had heard in a long time. It's 
true that a song should never be dem- 
onstrated on a piano unless the pianist 
has an unusual touch and style of 
presentation, but I can't claim that as 
a complete alibi for my opinion. 

I have frequently been able to 

sense the appeal of songs we've 

(Continued on page 46) 






_ 



SLIPPING «rf GRIPPING 



17 



t 



V 



W\ 



k 



THINKING MADE EASY— 

Arthur Brisbane, sooth- 
sayer-in-chief for Mr. 
Hearst's "People Who 
Think," will probably be off the 
Gulf Gasoline program by the 
time you hold this issue of Fan- 
Fare in your little hot hands. 
But, if he wishes, he's sure to be 
back on the air soon because he 
has been an increasingly popular 
radio attraction — and rightly so. 

His recent talks have been 
much like his "Today" column in 
the Hearst newspapers — with the 
same sweeping generalities, the 
same careful sidestepping to 
avoid giving serious offense, and 
the same non sequiturs. But, in 
addition to being able to turn out 
as nice a platitude as anyone 
writing today, Mr. Brisbane is 
undeniably an interesting radio 
speaker. He has a faculty for 
eliminating dead wood in his 
material (which many micro- 
phony thinkers might well copy), 
and he has the oracular knack of 
making a comment of little con- 
sequence seem like a profound 
pronouncement from On High. 
It is odd that no radio advertiser 
signed Mr. Brisbane before. 
Yars and yars ago the Brisbrain 
hit upon the writing formula that 
has proved to be the great com- 
mon denominator for the mental 
efforts of twenty million Amer- 
icans. This audience is by far 
the greatest held regularly by a 
single living person in the world 
today. (A statement for "People 
Who Think".) And it has long 
been apparent that Mr. Brisbane 
could take a goodly proportion of 
his newspaper audience to the 
radio whenever he wished. No 
sponsor, however, gave him a 
long term contract until radio 
went crazy over commentators, 
analysts, and problem solvers. 
Then the bandwagon was stopped 
long enough for Mr. Brisbane to 
be helped reverently aboard. 

We like Mr. Brisbane's radio 
talks best when he essays hu- 
mor. He has a mildly epigram- 
matic touch. Recently he re- 
marked that the radio, airplane, 
telephone, and telegraph have 



made it possible for all nations 
to have the same difficulties at the 
same time. This clarified the sig- 
nificance of Progress for us to 
such an extent that we called off 
our plan to push a Grape Nut 
with our ear all the way out to 
the big medicine show we're told 
they're putting on in Chicago. 



tTHE GOOD GULF HU- 
MOR I S T S— The Gulf 
Gasoline people have also 
done a big service for ra- 
dio listeners in hiring three hu- 
morists — Will Rogers, Irvin S. 
Cobb, and Walter F. Kelly — who 
afford a distinct relief from the 
gag comedians. Mr. Rogers will 
be back on the air soon and 
should be heard by all means, if 
you don't already know it. 

A critic has said that it is no 
less than effrontery for Will to 
take so much for his work and^ 
then refuse to prepare anything 
in advance for his broadcasts. 
Will has also been criticised for 
occasional "bad taste." We don't 
believe these criticisms are sound. 
In the first place, Will could not 
write his stuff and then delete the 
sharpest barbs without sacrificing 
most of the spontaneity and 
stingo which are so appealing in 
his talks. (And don't you sup- 
pose that he puts in a good many 
hours of mental preparation for 
each talk?) To be sure, we 
could do with less of the Rogers 
stammering and repetition. But 
Will is by all odds the most 
brightly original entertainer who 
goes on the air and both sponsor 
and listener can count on at least 
half a dozen hearty laughs in 
each of Will's broadcasts. What 
other comic can be counted on to 
offer so much in every program ? 
We wish we could be so en- 
thusiastic about the radio future 
of Mr. Cobb and Mr. Kelly. We 
enjoy them both, but we wonder 
if enough other people do to 
make up a sizeable audience. 
Messrs. Cobb and Kelly are 
among the few really finished 
raconteurs left on this planet, but 
the very subtlety of their wit may 



» 



18 

make them seem only tolerably amusing to 
the listeners who have come to expect wise- 
cracks with a wallop. Also, some of the 
material used by Mr. Cobb and Mr. Kelly 
is pretty familiar, and it is dangerous for 
them to try to get by with it, even on old 
sentimentalists like us. It may be, how- 
ever, that there are sufficient numbers of 
people who can't hear Mr. Cobb without 
thinking of Judge Priest, or Mr. Kelly 
without recalling The Virginia Judge, to 
make up a radio audience that will con- 
tinue to tempt advertisers. 

And, by the way, the advertising on the 
Gulf programs is fairly unobjectionable, the 
Brisbane-Rogers-Kelly show being the bet- 
ter of the two. The plugs on the Cobb pro- 
gram are often far fetched, but they're not 
so bad as they would be without the pleas- 
ing personality of Allan Joselyn, who plays 
the gas station attendant. 



tMEMO TO SPONSORS— Mildred 
Bailey and Gertrude Niesen are two 
good ones you've overlooked. Miss 
Bailey is an unusually good bet. Miss 
Niesen gets plenty of punch in her work 
(but would be better if she could eliminate 
some of the nasal quality in her delivery). 
Blubber Bergman, who went off the air 
when the Best Foods' Musical Grocery 
Store closed, should be brought back by 
some sponsor soon. He is one of the ex- 
tremely rare natural radio comedians who 
can be funny without straight gag stuff. His 
material should be written for him by orig- 
inal humorists like Norman Anthony (editor 
of Ballyhoo) and Bill Scott (editor of 
Pastime), who did some of the better 
sketches for The Musical Grocery Store. 



t"l APOLOGIZE"— That, you'll re- 
member, was the name of one of the 
songs that helped start Kate Smith 
on her way to fame and a husky bank 
account. The whole staff of Fan-Fare has 
been singing it ever since Kate told us about 
a mistake we made two issues ago. We said 
her program was gripping and then pointed 
an arrow under her picture down instead of 
np. Sorry, Kate, it was just one of those 
careless arrows — we mean errors. And lots 
of success with your new program. 



tNO FAULT TO FIND— The T y d o I 
Jubilee program is still going strong. 
It has some fairly fool-proof ele- 
ments — Dolph Martin's good music, 
the pleasing harmonizing of the Travelers 
Quartet, the likable Negro character, Mor- 
timer (played by John Battle, who also 
writes the show), and advertising that could 
be much worse. 




MILDRED BAILEY 
She should have a sponsor 




EDWIN C. HILL 
He'll never bore you 




JEAN SARGENT 
One of the better torchers 




BLUBBER BERGMAN 

He should have a great 

radio future 



Radio Fan-Fare 

■ THE WHIFFLEDINGLE AWARDS— 

H We announce the award of the 
^T Woofus W. Whifnedingle Memorial 
Moustache Cup for the most unbe- 
lievable, insincere, and generally obnoxious 
advertising during 1933 on any large radio 
program (that is, a program on which the 
sponsors should know better). The winner 
is Woodberry's Soap, whose program is now 
off the air. We feel absolutely safe in 
making this award for 1933 four months be- 
fore the end of the year. 

Runner-up for the award was the Non- 
Spi "how-to-get-your-man" program. The 
selling argument was that a girl would be 
popular if she used Non-Spi and smelled 
pretty, and the idea was put over about as 
bluntly as that. 



t BETTER THAN AVERAGE-Tk 
Happy Bakers . . . good musical en- 
tertainment, but heavy advertising 
with claims that strain our credulity. 

Little Jack Little . . . this one man show 
is as good as ever. 

K-7 Secret Service Stories . . . sup- 
posedly true tales of big league spying well 
written (by Burke Boyce, head of the NBC 
continuity department), smartly directed, 
and frequently exciting. As often as not 
the villain doesn't get his, which appeals 
to us. 

Lowell Thomas . . . not very exciting 
nor particularly interesting compared to Ed 
Hill, but still pleasant enough. Lowell's 
sponsor, the Sun Oil Company, goes light 
on the plugs, which makes the program 
seem better. 

Manhattan Merry-Go-Round . . . Jean 
Sargent, one of the better torchers, should 
appeal to pyrophiles. David Percy and the 
Men About Town do the usual singer-quar- 
tet stuff agreeably, and Gene Rodemich's 
band is one of radio's best. 

The Wildroot Institute . . . Good sing- 
ing by Johnny Seagle and Lee Lawnhurst, 
and facile piano work by the latter. The 
dramatized part of the plug is, however, 
dreadful. 

The Capitol Family . . . Major Bowes 
and his talented group are still offering fine 
entertainment every Sunday. The program 
has changed little through the years — which 
proves you don't have to hitch your radio 
budget to a fad to put on a good show. 
There has, of course, always been enough 
variety in the program itself to keep it from 
seeming like the same thing week after 
week. 

The Yeast Foamers . . . Light, amusing- 
music and singing, and advertising that is 
sincere and easy to take because it contains 
traces of understatement. Jan Garber's soft 
music is the best bet on the program, but the 
warbling of Virginia Hamilton, Rudy Rudi- 



September 



19 



GERTRUDE NIESEN 




—vibrant as a bell — blue as deep water 



. . . and that describes the voice of the 
lady we find here making up in her 
dressing room at Loew's State Theatre 
in New York, as she prepares to go out 
and stop the show. (Which she did at 
every performance.) Then, in the top 
three pictures on the right, we see her 
on the stage singing "Stormy Weath- 
er" — while in the bottom shot she goes 



to town as she gives her famous imita- 
tion of Lyda Roberti, and sings, "But 
de moosic hass got to be . . . Oh-ho-ho 
. . . Su-veet an' hu-u-aht!" Miss Niesen 
gets by so well in public that she 
doesn't have to worry about radio work 
. . . which probably makes CBS just 
that much more anxious to have her 
hanging around their microphones. 



f 



20 

sill, and Lee Bennett is nothing to be sniffy 
about. 

Borrah Minevitch and His Harmonica 
Rascals . . . Amazing stunt music plus Bor- 
rah's likeable personality. For all but har- 
monica haters. 

Eno Crime Clues . . . O. K. for those who 
can still get excited about radio murder mys- 
teries. Usually these Spencer Dean stories 
are ingeniously written, directed with re- 
straint, and well acted (Edward Reese who 
plays Dean and Jack McBryde who plays 
Dan Cassidy are especially good). If you 
should pick a night when the story bogs 
down into the pure, undisguised hokum-and- 
ham, try again and the chances are you'll 
be glad you did. Eno (in common with all 
laxative advertisers on the air) has not 
found a formula, however, for presenting 
the product without offense. 

California Melodies . . . fine variety pro- 
gram put on by California radio stars and 
broadcast nationally from the Don Lee sta- 
tion in Los Angeles. The performers in- 
clude Raymond Paige and his excellent 
orchestra, Sam Coslow, Hazel Waters, Nora 
Schiller, Ray Hendricks, and Eleanor 
Barnes. The latter is a newspaper reporter 
who entices movie stars into the studio and 
"interviews" them. To a cynic or sceptic 
these interviews are ridiculous, but prob- 
ably the confirmed movie fans enjoy hearing 
the stars spiel off a philosophy of life which 
has been cooked up for them by a press 
agent. The night Jean Harlow was inter- 
viewed she demonstrated that she has a radio 
singing voice good enough to rate an air job 
any time she wants to quit making pictures. 
She also denied a statement she said Walter 
Winchell had made about her (which prob- 
ably made a lot of people regret not having 
a chance to do the same thing — over a 
nationwide hookup.) 

John Henry, Black River Giant ... A 
grand show for those who like Negro folk 
lore. 

Triple Bar X Days And Nights . . . We 
should think everybody would like this one, 
particularly when the story is topnotch. 
Carson Robison and his buckaroos are al- 
ways first class. 

Burton Holmes ... A pleasant and mod- 
erately interesting radio speaker who is now 
off the air. He should be a good bet for a 
sponsored series of travel talks.' 

Malcolm La Prade, "The Man From 
Cook's" . . . Far and away the best travel 
speaker who has ever been on the air. Mr. 
McLeod can really make you want to go 
places. He writes all his own stuff and it's 
a beautiful job. He'll be back soon. Be 
sure to tune in. 

Silver Dust . . . Jack Denny and his 
orchestra, Scrappy Lambert, Jeannie Lang, 
and lots of fairly reasonable advertising. 



n 




GYPSY NINA 

Better than some who've 

found sponsors 




BORRAH MINEVITCH 

For all but harmonica 

haters 




JULIA SANDERSON 

May she and Frank Crumit 

never lack a contract 




PHIL COOK 

What more do advertisers 

want? 



Radio Fan-Fare 

Denny and Lambert are O. K. We've said 
before that Jeannie should get some new 
tricks, but she hasn't done anything about 
it. If she can only sing "cute" she won't be 
sponsored much longer. 
. Kathryn Newman . . . Good soprano with 
lots of the old coloratura. She should find 
a sponsor just as soon as the vogue for coon- 
shouters passes. 

The Road Reporter . . . Shell Gasoline's 
tolerably interesting program with bearable 
advertising and fairly well done dramatic 
sketches. The dullest part is the preliminary 
travel stuff by The Road Reporter (Paul 
Douglas) and his stooge. 

Light Opera Gems (Channon Collinge, 
Conductor) . . . Don't miss a single one of 
these programs, especially if they're putting 
on Gilbert and Sullivan operas. There 
hasn't been a bad spot on any of these shows 
we've heard. Grand cast throughout. The 
regulars are Theo Karle, Barbara Maurel, 
Rhoda Arnold, and Crane Calder. 

H or lick's Adventures In Health . . . Dr. 
Herman Bundesen is doing a great service 
by helping educate the average person to 
think straight in matters of health. The 
dramatized cases put on by Dr. Bundesen 
will seem pretty obvious and overdone to 
the intelligent listener, but everyone else 
(and that's 90% of the radio audience) will 
learn a lot from them. And, in justice to 
Dr. Bundesen, we don't know how such ail- 
ments as sinus, colds, and backache could be 
turned into interesting radio material unless 
the outward sufferings were laid on thick. 
(Who, by the way, is going to bring Dr. 
Howard W. Haggard back on the air? His 
recent talks for Sharpe and Dohme, the 
makers of ST37,were among the most inter- 
esting we've heard anywhere — and must 
have rendered a profitable service to his 
sponsors, to the medical profession, and to 
listeners in every walk of life.) 

Miss Lilla . . . Southern dialect sketch 
with mildly amusing touches of authentic 
native humor. Emmet Gowen is the author. 
He also plays Tead Griffith. Ann Elstner 
is Miss Lilla and other regulars are Jack 
Roseleigh and John Battle. 

America's Grub Street Speaks . . . Inter- 
views with writers who have something to 
say and who are usually refreshingly frank 
in saying it. There's a letting-down-the- 
back-hair spirit about these programs which 
we like, and Thomas L. Stix (head of the 
Book League of America,) should be ap- 
plauded not only for picking interesting peo- 
ple to interview, but also for keeping the 
programs free from the noisesome overtones 
of canned publicity. 

Sunday At Seth Parker's ... A fine 
program right up to the last broadcast, al- 
though perhaps it was slipping a little at the 
end — just as every program which is on the 
air so long is bound (Continued on page 50) 



September 



21 



SHORT WAVES I HAVE KNOWN 

A Department of Radio Information 



Conducted by ZEH BOUCK, The Circuit Judge 



THE radio enthusiast who employs 
his experience on the broadcast 
bands as a criterion in judging short 
wave results, is in for a rather dis- 
heartening jolt when he first dials 
around for an illusive and distant 
short wave signal. This is not the 
fault of the receiver — as the fan is 
likely to believe — nor of the short 
waves themselves. The unjustified 
basis of comparison is the real cause 
of his dissatisfaction and disappoint- 
ment. It is practically impossible, on 
the short waves, to duplicate certain 
effects which have contributed greatly 
to our enjoyment of the broadcast 
bands. On the other hand, things can 
be done with the short waves that are 
utterly beyond possibility on the 
waves with which we have long been 
familiar. An idea of short wave fare, 
and how it is dished up, is essential 
before one passes judgment on the 
merits of a short wave or all wave 
receiver and before one can derive 
maximum pleasure from its operation. 
Short waves, by the way, are waves 
below the conventional broadcast 
band (the lower end of which is 
about 200 meters) and above 10 me- 
ters, where the ultra short wave 
region begins. Considered in an ap- 
proximate order of shortness, these 
waves provide the following services 
of interest to the broadcast fan : 
Police broadcast (200 to 175 meters), 
aircraft telephone stations (90 me- 
ters), amateur stations (75 meters), 
short wave broadcasting (50 to 20 
meters), and commercial trans- 
oceanic telephony (30 to 15 meters). 
It is the entertainment value of these 
broadcasts in which the fan is inter- 
ested and which determines his de- 
gree of satisfaction. So let's rate 
your favorite long wave program at 
100% and then see how entertain- 
ment on the different short-wave 
services compares with it : 

A Police broadcasts to patrol and 
squad cars are relatively high in 
entertainment value. Police announc- 
ers have voices that would shrivel a 



crooner, and the real life dramas con- 
densed into prosaic announcements 
provide cooling etheric breezes after 
the hot air of commercial plugs on 
the broadcast band. Besides, we are 
not so many generations removed 
from Nero's amphitheater, and this 
second hand blood and gore, in the 
safety of our easy chairs, is piquant 
and delightful. Husbands derive 
vicarious satisfaction from the an- 
nouncement that a man is beating his 
wife on the fourth floor of 286 South 
La Salle Street. It is quaintly amus- 
ing to learn that the proprietor of a 
filling station at 23 Broome Avenue 
was murdered and robbed just two 
minutes ago, or that somebody else's 
automobile was stolen by a youth in 
a gray suit and blue cap. Unfortu- 
nately, the entertainment value has 
been curtailed in some localities by 
substituting code numbers for a de- 
tailed description of the crime. Con- 
gress should do something about it. 
However, there are still plenty of 
cities where they call a bashed-in 
head a bashed-in head. 

Entertainment value: 25% to 
100% — depending on whether, as a 
child, you pinned butterflies to a 
board and committed divers may- 
hem on flies and other insects. 
Q THE element of real life drama 
also contributes a bit to the pleas- 
urable possibilities of airplane broad- 
casts. Something romantic still clings 
to the idea of flight. But that is all. 
These stations flash on and off spo- 
radically, and the announcements of 
weather and position are dry and un- 
interesting. 

Entertainment value: 5%. 
O Amateur radio telephone conver- 
*" sations are highly intelligent and 
edifying — to the amateur. A sample 
runs as follows: "CQ CQ CQ CQ 
CQ calling CQ CQ CQ— Hello, old 
man — How are you getting me, old 
man? — You're coming in about R-5, 
old man — Well, old man, I'll be say- 
ing 73, old man. Glad to have met 
you, old man — See you again, old 
man — 73, old man." 



Entertainment value: To the 
normal person — y 2 of 1%. To 
those who like phonograph records 
with crossed grooves, or to those of 
the psychopathic type addicted to 
bridge post mortems, up to 75%. 
A Short wave broadcasting is the 

principal raison d'etre for short 
wave receivers in the home. Practic- 
ally all important programs, origin- 
ating in every part of the world, are 
broadcast simultaneously on long and 
short wave-lengths. The peculiar 
carrying power of these waves makes 
it possible to pick them up at dis- 
tances limited only by the half cir- 
cumference of the earth. But do not 
expect long wave results (in tone, 
quiet reception and steadiness) on the 
short waves. In ten years of short 
wave listening, I have never heard a 
program that was quite so good as a 
long wave presentation from a local 
station. The tendency to fade is 
more consistently a characteristic of 
short wave stations, and the function- 
ing of the automatic volume control, 
to compensate this fading, often in- 
troduce3 noticeable distortion of 
voice and music. With the exception 
of commercial installations in noise 
free areas, reception is always more 
noisy than on the longer wave bands. 
All this does not mean, however, that 
good quality short wave reception is 
an isolated phenomenon. On the 
contrary, highly enjoyable short 
wave results can be expected consis- 
tently on a good receiver. The short 
wave receiver also has a genuine pro- 
gram utility in instances where an 
important long wave program cannot 
be satisfactorily received. Almost in- 
variably it will be possible to locate a 
good signal from a short wave sta- 
tion carrying the same program. 

Entertainment Value: 75%. 
C Offhand, short wave trans-oceanic 

telephony seems to offer consider- 
able promise to those addicted to lis- 
tening in on party lines. These are 
the channels that carry the commer- 
cial telephone conversations between 
different (Continued on page 47) 



22 



Radio Fan-Fare 



RESTLESS RADIO ROMEOS 




JACK BENNY ... is not using the 
air, he's taking it — in this case at At- 
lantic City. His bored walk along the 
boardwalk has attracted two gents 
who are saying, "Look! That great 
comedian, Jack Benny!" (Maybe 



TONY WONS ... is probably exam- 
ining the price tag on his fish and 
wondering if the publicity is worth it. 
The little girl is learning to say, "It 
was this big," in case a photographer 
happens along when they haven't got 
the fish. 




WILL CUPPY . . . practises the title 
of his radio program — "Just Relax." 
He brought the Siamese kitty along 
because he knew she would enjoy a 
ride on his catboat. 



NINO MARTINI . . . says that he 
does most of his relaxing on a horse, 
which means that he almost never re- 
laxes. Or maybe he makes the horse 
pursue the even tenor of his way. 



JOHN SEAGLE . . . turns his holiday 
into a Collie-day. The two full grown 
dogs are named "Hallelujah" and 
"Glory Be," which explains why John 
calls their offspring "Amen." 







September 



23 



RELAX 





JIMMY MELTON . . . takes his ease 
on a yacht, no less. But when friends 
say he must be rich, Jimmy declares 
that he picked the boat up for a 
song. That's easy to believe, consid- 
ering what he gets for a song. 



BEN BERNIE AND GEORGE OLSEN 
. . . spend their spare time trying to 
prove which is the better golfer. (We 
won't take sides, but we would like to 
point out that Ben uses a mashie 
where George requires a brassie.) 



LAN NY ROSS . . . isn't really nuts 
about swimming, but how could we 
call these vacation pictures without 
showing somebody in the water? So 
Lanny, bless his heart, went in just to 
please us. 



HOWARD BARLOW 
eminent young maestro, is a 
simple fellow at heart. 
Give him a dog and a ball 
and a beach and some 
knickers and an old sweater, 
and you can have the rest 
of it. 




24 



VOICE OF THE 
LISTENER 



Roses and Razzes 

We are in a position to speak for hun- 
dreds of our customers in complimenting 
your magazine on criticizing some of the 
radio programs on the air. We all agree 
that some of the advertising connected 
with these programs is awful. Hoping 
your magazine has good success in clean- 
ing up some of these windjammers, we 
remain, Julius J. Cohen, Washington 
Electrical Supply Company, 24 Stuart 
Street, Boston, Massachusetts. 

o • • 

Tuna : 

As a critic your a great success ! But ! 
I wager that if you had to go one the air 
for six months as a comedian equal to 
Ed Wynn, as a Sherlock Holmes equal 
to Richard Gordon, or as a Fannie Brice, 
a Kate Smith, or a Rudy Vallee, you 
would in all probabilities be a good ex- 
ample of the perfect failer. It takes in- 
finite work to keep up as a comedian for 
2y 2 years at Ed Wynn's pace and still 
be as good as Ed is today. It takes time 
to become a Rudy Vallee. Rudy spent 
about 6 years before becoming famous. 
It took work. It hurts me to see you 
with a few words help to put the slides 
under a performer and make him a flop. 

It has taken Wynn 30 years to achieve 
what he now has. If possible to help 
fix the slides you'd be there with much 
desire to se 30 years work crumble to 
dust, to see a man's heart broken and 
all caused by a critics few words. War- 
ren Johnson, (no address given). 

• • • 

We have read two of the Radio Fan- 
Fare magazines and find them worth 
while, in fact the best radio magazine 
printed. 

Your articles are the fairest we have 
ever read in a radio magazine and, more 
than that, we agree with you that many 
of the so-called comedians are so bad 
that we are glad to be able to tune them 
out. 

You did not write anything of "The 
Ship Of Joy." Captain Dobbsie is a well 
beloved character in the West and we 
Californians are very loyal to his pro- 
grams. We have listened to him many 
years and have never been bored, and 
that's something. 

Please listen to him. This is one pro- 
gram that will win millions of new lis- 
teners even during the summer months. 
It is now on the NBC network. 

Thank you for the pleasure your ar- 
ticles gave us. Mrs. Charles F. Keene, 
Hotel Park Lane, Chicago, Illinois. 

• • • 

We've just gotten over a heat wave and 
now I'm cooled off enough to tackle a 
subject judiciously that has been seething 
within my bosom. 



First off, where do you folks get the 
idea we like the panning that you take 
upon yourself to give some of our radio 
favorites? I liked old Radio Digest for 
it never pretended to know more than 
God about these radio boys and girls 
who do their darndest to entertain us. So 
out goes Slipping and Gripping. Do you 
realize Buddy Rogers for instance is "not 
so hot" in NYC while he's the next sneeze 
in the mid-west? What Broadway likes 
isn't all castoria for us midwesterners ! 

Ed Wynn may seem prosaic to you boys 
of the Great White Way but someone's 
grandmother out in Gopher City likes 
him immensely. Are you so perfect your 
guesses never fail, your comments are al- 
ways correct? Of course, if you only in- 
tend to let a newsboy take an armful of 
your magazines out on Broadway, stick 
to your gags. But some of us from the 
"stix" subscribe hoping to catch a glimpse 
now and then of the man who thrills us, 
the girls who charm us. 
Dear Tuna (Fish) : 

At least you said yourself that Slipping 
and Gripping was written by "Tuna." 

In spite of the fact I think it is bad 
taste to allow your super criticisms space, 
I do read them just to find fault with 
them. Perhaps we are akin. 

Last edition's exceptions are that again 
you allow that universal urge of the 
pocket book to influence your syrupy 
coated love for the Fleischmann Hour. 
The Hour would be fine if Rudy never 
opened his mouth. Yes, I like the hour 
and would listen oftener in order to get 
the variety show if Rudy's presence could 
be erased at the same time. 

Another thing — you say, "The high 
point in selective criticism will be reached 
when someone can tell the different torch 
singers, crooners, and dance orchestras 
apart." Will you take me up on that? I'm 
game, for I CAN ! ! ! ! No foolin'! It 
takes time, concentration and keen 
senses, but I do just that. My friends 
have never stumped me. Not only friends 
but occasional strangers, curious as to 
my talent that way, find it truth. I make 
a study of the personalities with each 
voice and study them to find each one's 
individuality. On that hangs the dis- 
tinguishing factor. They may seem alike 
in all points but that makes it harder to 
find an individual characteristic, thus tak- 
ing more time to determine who is who. 
They turn on the radio and dial station 
after station. As an artist speaks, sings 
or plays an instrument, or leads a band 
I give the name and often the station. 
My examiner waits to find the correct 
answer and I may make one mistake in 
two dozen artists. Understand they do 
not even tell me the station. I thank 
you for the compliment in saying I have 



Radio Fan-Fare 

reached the high point in selective criti- 
cism. So let's trade jobs, huh? 

Thanking you for your time and pa- 
tience (if you displayed such), I am, 
Forever, Betty Jamieson, 635 Stibbs 
Street, Wooster, Ohio. 
• • • 

Well, I'M TELLING YOU, Radio 
Fan-Fare is, in my opinion, the best 
magazine for radio fans published today. 
There are other good ones, but from the 
title at the top of the front cover to the 
back of the book it is GOOD, and I don't 
mean maybe. The Program Finder is a 
real feature. W. H. Wilson, Box 1113, 
Timmins, Ontario. 

• # # 

I have just finished reading your last 

issue from cover to cover. I can honestly 
say that I think it is the most complete, 
most satisfactory magazine of its type. 
The articles are up to the minute and 
the Program Finder is unique. I espe- 
cially liked Hope Hale's article which 
dealt so cleverly with Nino Martini. 
Dorcas E. Coulter, Asbury, Warren 
County, New Jersey. 

• • e 

A good many of your articles are rip- 
ping commercial programs up the back, 
even to mentioning their names. I agree 
with you that some of the ideas back of 
these articles are true enough but this 
type of comment is not agreeable. Harold 
B. Bowers, 19 Hubbard Avenue, Concord, 
Massachusetts. 

• • • 

I purchased my first copy of Fan-Fare 
today and think it a very good piece of 
reading matter. I notice you asked for 
suggestions for other features to be added 
from time to time. I have a suggestion. 

It would be very nice to have a sched- 
ule showing the contests that are given 
over the air. This would be sought by 
a great number of radio fans who are in- 
terested in contests. 

May I mention the article, "Is Radio 
Ruining Your Child?" That article was 
simple and to the point. If my opposite 
opinion would be worth anything, how- 
ever, I would like to answer Mr. and 
Mrs. Leslie Allen with my thought that 
radio is the best entertainment for your 
child. Amos R. Peacock, 6075 Regent 
Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Discussing the Program Finder 

I am a new reader of Fan-Fare and 
I sure enjoy your Program Finder. I 
have at last found what I wanted in the 
way of finding programs . . . Do not 
make your magazine too much of the 
movie magazine type. We already have 
too much of that junk. Keep up your 
program space. Joe W. Swadley, Jr., Box 
103, Primrose, Nebraska. 

I like the lists of programs and the lists 
of artists who appear on the programs. 
That's what I've been wanting to see for 
a long time. Ruth George, Leon, Iowa. 

Having just purchased my first copy of 
Radio Fan-Fare I want to tell you that 
I think you have a great magazine; I 
enjoyed every bit of it. 

Your Program Finder is a real treat. 

To me it is something new and I like it. 

(Continued on page 47) 



September 



25 



FAN-FARE'S HUMOR 
CAFETERIA 

(RADIO COMEDIANS HELP YOURSELVES) 



Math. Prof.: Now, if I subtract 25 
from 37, what's the difference? 

Little Willie: You said it! I think 
it's a lot of hooey, too. 

Alabama Rammer- Jammer 



Mountaineer: You dirty skunk! 

You're a-goin' to marry my daughter ! 

Skunk: Y-y-y-yessir. Which one? 

—Penn Punch Bowl 



A negro woman was holding a baby 
on each arm and trying to get money 
from a pocketbook to buy a ticket. An 
old negro man seeing her plight agreed 
to hold one of the babies. Upon re- 
turning the baby he asked their names 
and was promptly told that one was 
named Roosevelt and the other Hoover. 
"Well," he said, "Ah'm positive Ah was 
holding Roosevelt." —V. P. I. Skipper 



Father now broadcasts from 
Heavenly stations — 
He was bumped off for razzing 
His wife's relations. 

— Buffalo Evening News 



He (as they drove along a lonely 
road) : You look lovelier to me every 
minute. Do you know what that's a 
sign of? 

She : Sure. You're about to run out 
of gas. — Indiana Bored Walk 



An American actress appeared in a 
new revue in a costume composed en- 
tirely of colored glass beads. 

Tinkle, tinkle, little star. — Punch 



Chauffeur : This, madam, is the hand 
brake — it's put on very quickly, in case 
of an emergency. 

Madam: I see — something like a 
kimono. — The Pointer 



If Mohammed went to the moun- 
tains, we suppose his wife went to the 
seashore. — Judge 



Indians on a Western reservation are 
reported to be showing symptoms of 
uneasiness. Maybe someone has been 
telling them that the whites want to give 
the country back to them. 

— Buffalo Evening News 



"Will we ever have a woman Presi- 
dent?" 

"Of course not. A President has to 
be over thirty-five years of age." 

— Phoenix 



This three-dot-two beer was legal- 
ized by Congress on. the theory that it 
is non-intoxicating, and many of our 
citizens feel that they have been de- 
ceived. Nobody believed that it was 
possible for Congressmen to be so dis- 
gustingly right. ■ — The Nezv Yorker 



I love the laughter of a child, 
The freedom of life in the wild — 
Perfume from a field of clover. 
(I also love my eggs turned over.) 

— Buffalo Evening News 



Neighbor-Lady : Willie, I need a 
dozen eggs from the store. Do you 
suppose you could go for me? 

Willie : No, but I heard Pa say that 
he could. — Annapolis Log 



A male-voice choir is to sing next 
month from five hundred feet below 
ground in Wookey Hole Cave, Somer- 
set. It is feared that they will be heard 
in spite of that. — Punch 




Hotel Clerk (knocking at guest's 
door) : You told me to call you at six 
o'clock, but I didn't wake up myself, 
so I just wanted to tell you that it's 
eight o'clock now, the train's gone, and 
you can sleep as long as you like. 

— Pathfinder 



"Get my broker, Miss Jones." Simple Circe's old man wants a radio 

"Yes, sir, stock or pawn?" to play at his funeral. He says it will 

— Everybody's De one time when he won't have to 

listen to it. — Judge 









p> 


1 








i E 




- 

OCT; 




The first woman was made from 
man's rib, but today she usually is made 
from something from his hip. 

— College Humor 




26 



Radio Fan-Farf. 



ALL IN THE SPIRIT OF GOOD 



THE lads over at Columbia tell 
me that Howard Marsh is look- 
ing for an appropriate theme song 
for his Frigidaire program. Why 
not, "Freeze A Jolly Good Fellow"? 

• • • 

EVERY time I hear Jimmy Mel- 
ton's voice over the air I remem- 
ber the first time I saw him. It was 
in St. Augustine, Florida. He was a 
member of the University of Florida 
orchestra, which we had hired to play 
for a dance at the Country Club. 
Came one of those moonlight waltzes 
(when they turn out most of the 



forth on my radio. "Pardon me," I 
said, and made a quick dive for the 
dial. There's one guy I will always 
respect. 

THE Richfield Oil program is fea- 
turing sport talks by Grantland 
Rice, and it is a privilege to say some- 
thing nice about this man. At least 
it may sound nice, though to tell the 
truth I don't believe there is anything 
nice enough that could be written 
about Grant. He's that sort of person. 
When I first came to New York, 
seven years ago, I went to a party 



to tell him about Grant he said, 
"Sure, I know. You think he's the 
greatest guy you ever met. Every- 
body thinks that about him." 

After such elaborations on Mr. 
Rice, you will naturally discount my 
opinion of him as a radio performer 
— and I don't blame you. But just 
listen to his talks on golf and other 
sports during the Richfield program, 
and you will get a pretty good im- 
pression of the man's character from 
his warm, friendly, unaffected voice. , 
Furthermore, anything he says about 
sports is the last word — and vou can 




TITO GUIZAR, popular tenor, and his wife present the very new Miss Nena Guizar. When 
she consented to pose for the Fan-Fare photographer, Nena was two weeks old, going on 
three. She was named for her mother, and looks like her father (he says). 



MILLIE JUNE — so versatile she plays most of j 
the female roles in the Carson Robison Triple 
Bar X shows. Mercy, Millie! 



lights, and all the dancers automati- 
cally shut their eyes and scrunch up 
a little closer). I was with my best 
gal, and we were going good. Then 
Jimmy suddenly started crooning 
"Girl Of My Dreams," whereupon 
the girl of my dreams practically 
walked off and left me by myself. I 
mean to say that at the first sound of 
Jimmy's voice she opened her eyes. 
Then she stopped scrunching. Then 
she stopped dancing and said, 
"O-o-o-o! Let's listen!" 

During the rest of the evening it 
was impossible to keep that girl mov- 
ing when Jimmy sang — and the other 
gents were having the same trouble 
with their sweet things. 

Not long ago I was sitting in my 
apartment entertaining (I hope) a 
lady when the Melton voice burst 



given by the Artists and Writers Golf 
Association. I had just arrived from 
a small town in the South, and had 
never hoped to see so many Big 
Names in one room in my whole life. 
"Meet James Montgomery Flagg . . . 
This is Rube Goldberg . . . Shake 
hands with Jefferson Machamer 
(page 7) . . . and this is Rex Beach 
. . . and Octavus Roy Cohen." Natu- 
rally I was completely awed. 

They were all very cordial, but 
when I met Grantland Rice — well — 
that was something else again. It is 
pretty hard to describe a perfect wel- 
come, but that's what Grant gave me. 
Never had anything make me feel 
better in my life. 

My host on that occasion was Fred 
G. Cooper (he drew the illustrations 
on pages 16 and 17) and when I tried 



bank on that because he probably has 
a finer general knowledge of the field 
than any other man alive. 



A 1 



ND here's a funny thing. When 



I wrote the paragraphs about 
Jimmy and Grant I didn't know they 
had ever met. Last night I ran into 
Grant in Reuben's Restaurant — we 
talked radio — and he said Jimmy had 
been his guest over the past week-end. 
And, as an added surprise, he said 
that he had just completed the lyrics 
to a tune by Oscar Fox — the title is 
"Singing To You" — and it was writ- 
ten especially for Jimmy. Small 
world — or something. 
• • • 

THIS may seem like a lot of con- 
versation about one man, but I 
think this story is worth the space. 



September 



CLEAN FUN 



By HARRY EVANS 



When I met Mr. Rice in Reuben's 
he was with Rex Cole (he is the New 
York City distributor for General 
Electric and puts on the Rex Cole 
Mountaineers program over WEAF). 
It seems that Grant and Rex had been 
over to the home of Merlin H. 
"Deke" Aylesworth. Besides being 
president of the National Broadcast- 
ing Company, Mr. Aylesworth is a 
director in a number of other organi- 
zations. 

"We were celebrating Deke's birth- 
day," Grant said, "and during the 
evening I played bridge with Rex 



neers of 81 radio stations press a 
button ; 81 technicians at 81 trans- 
mitters throw a switch ; and 81 an- 
nouncers give their local call letters. 
Because the Waring-Mandy Lou 
program is broadcast over the world's 
largest regular network, it serves as 
the best example of the intricacies 
that surround every link of a radio 
chain. Besides the 243 engineers and 
announcers, the telephone company 
over whose wires the programs are 
routed has engineers stationed along 
the line. They are on duty at the 
"repeaters," or line amplifiers, every 



27 

RAYMOND KNIGHT has found 
- a century plant in Chicago 
named Elmer. Ray says Elmer usu- 
ally blooms every hundred years, but 
doesn't know why. The Century of 
Progress authorities have told Ray 
that as a special favor they will let 
Elmer bloom this year, five years 
ahead of time. 

• • • 

MARIO COZZI, young opera 
' baritone on the NBC Concert 
Footlights programs, was secretary to 
Gatti-Casazza, Metropolitan Opera 
impresario, for several years, but 
never asked for an audition. Al- 
though on the inside literally and fig- 
uratively at the Metropolitan, he 
made no attempt to begin his oper- 
atic career there, but went to Italy 
and made his debut at La Scala, 
Europe's most famous opera house. 




CLAIRE WILLIS, who sings with Dolph Mar- GRANTLAND RICE, eminent sports author- SALLY ANN DAVIS (WCKY, Covington, Ky.) 
tin's orchestra over WABC, is also a skilled ity, will blush when he reads the article on whose vocalizing is welcomed in the old Ken- 
violinist and fashion designer. Clever Claire, the other page. Great guy. tuclcy homes. Tasty talent. 



here as my partner, against Deke 
and Bruce Barton. At the end of the 
game we owed them about five dol- 
lars apiece, so Rex said to Bruce, 
'I'll match you double or nothing.' 
Bruce agreed so they flipped a coin, 
and Rex won, making him all square. 
Then I turned to Deke and suggested 
the same thing. 'Nothing doing!' he 
said. T attended three receiver's 
meetings this morning, and I'm not 
accepting any more compromises to- 
day !' " 

• • • 

RADIO sounds much simpler than 
. it is. When David Ross says, 
"This is the Columbia Broadcasting 
System," at the end of the Old Gold 
programs with Fred Waring's Penn- 
sylvanians, 81 monitor-room engi- 



several hundred miles — with more 
than 15,000 miles of land wire used 
to collate the stations. Yet how easy 
it all seems when you are seated in 
a comfortable chair at home and a 
mere flick of the dials brings you 
Fred Waring's smooth music and the 
drawly comedy of Mandy Lou. 



OUT of town note : Herman Pol- 
Hack, RCA distributor from 
South Africa, says that in Johannes- 
burg, Cape Town, and Pretoria the 
high ranking radio favorites are Rudy 
Vallee and Amos 'n' Andy. KDKA, 
WGY, and WJZ are heard daily 
throughout Herman's sales territory 
which covers more than two hundred 
thousand square miles. 



A LADY who lives in Little Rock, 
Arkansas, sent a letter to Car- 
son Robison after the Triple Bar X 
broadcast of "The Fall of the 
Alamo." She said she had been par- 
ticularly interested in the radio ver- 
sion of the battle because her great- 
great-grandfather had played a rath- 
er important part in the original 
version. Man by the name of 
Crockett . . . Davy Crockett. The 
letter writer was Miss Beth Crockett, 
last to bear the famous name. 



JIM MEIGHAN, one of the busiest 
radio actors and nephew of the 
famous Tom, finds time to contribute 
thrillers regularly to the pulp detec- 



28 

BORRAH MINEVITCH calls his 
Harmonica Rascals his Philhar- 
monica Orchestra. 

• • • 

PEOPLE who watch B. A. Rolfe 
and his orchestra during his Sat- 
urday night programs are fascinated 
by the dexterity of Harry Barth, the 
slap-fiddle genius. Harry swings a 
mean bass viol and when he has a 
solo bit he grabs his dog house by 
the neck, hoists it into the air, thrusts 
it over the saxaphone, violin, and 
piano players and sets it down at the 
mike. When his solo is over Harry 
takes the bull fiddle in one hand and 
twirls it in front of him as he walks 
back to his seat. So far he hasn't 
hit anybody with the weapon, but the 
audience hopes that sometime one of 
the other players won't duck quite 
low enough. 



MYRTLE VAIL, author and lead 
of "Myrt and Marge," Bobby 
Brown, director of the sketches, and 
Mrs. Brown are in South America 
gathering material for the programs, 
which will be resumed this fall. 



MISCHA LEVITSKI, world re- 
nowned piano virtuoso, has his 
own reason for including in his pro- 
grams only selections from the finest 
music of recognized masters. The 
reason is his interest in the develop- 
ment of a new national music of and 
by Americans. "Before a country 
can produce music of its own and ap- 
preciate it," says Levitski, "it must 
know all music. That is the problem 
in America — to develop musical ap- 
preciation. That is what the artists 
who are in radio can do. If they only 



Radio Fan-Fare 

EDUCATION NOTE: The stu- 
dent body of the Sunset High 
School in Dallas, Texas, was gath- 
ered in the auditorium one afternoon 
to hear a radio lecture on "How To 
Increase Your Vocabulary." The dial 
twister evidently did not know his 
kilocycles for he tuned in on one of 
radio's best known sister acts — Ed 
East and Ralph Dumke, Sisters of 
the Skillet. The kids got such a kick 
out of the sketch that no one had the 
heart to turn to the vocabulary lesson. 
• • • 

JOHN S. YOUNG, thirty-year-old 
announcer, is one of the youngest 
LL.D.'s in the country. St. Bene- 
dict's College in Atchison, Kansas, 
has just honored John with the de- 
gree "in recognition of his endeavors 
toward the promotion of Catholic Ac- 
tion in the United States." 




NANCY TURNER gives WBAL (Baltimore) 
listeners the latest style hints from the salons 
of the leading designers. Is that why you see 
so many well dressed gals in Baltimore? 



CAPTAIN DOBBSIE (Hugh B. Dobbs) sailed 
his popular "Ship Of Joy" from the West 
Coast to the NBC studios in New York. 
Wholesome hokum. Smart show. 



GLADYS BAXTER sings operettas over WABC, 
owns a black chow dog with a good disposi- 
tion, and has lunch in the same drug store 
on 59th Street where the writer eats. 



ROSE McCLENDON who plays 
- opposite Juano Hernandez in 
"John Henry, Black River Giant" has 
just got over an attack of "Stormy 
Weather." While she was in bed by 
the doctor's orders in her Harlem 
apartment the neighbors had phono- 
graphs and radios going full tilt. Be- 
cause "Stormy Weather" originated 
in Harlem that seemed to be all the 
neighbors wanted to hear. When the 
doc told Rose she was well enough to 
get up he also suggested a sea trip. 
"Nothing doing," said Rose. "Ships' 
bands don't start playing tunes until 
a month or so after they become hits. 
They'll only be getting around to 
'Stormy Weather' about now. So if 
you don't mind I think I'll just go 
for a walk." 



knew it, their program-making may 
determine the future of music in 
America." 

Levitski is an interesting pianist to 
watch. He always gives his recitals 
in his shirt sleeves and the studio is 
usually crowded with NBC staff pian- 
ists who come around to try and learn 
a thing or two about virtuosoing. One 
day John Kahn, one of the better 
ivory ticklers, was determined to 
watch a Levitski recital from the con- 
trol room. He got into the room but 
was ejected by the engineer in charge 
for some reason we can't recall now. 
When the control man next saw Joe 
he was sitting with the orchestra, 
holding a piccolo — not playing, but 
just absorbed in watching Levitski 
massage beauty out of the classics. 



IRVIN S. COBB is probably the 
only radio artist who is a Cheva- 
lier of France's Legion of Honor. 

• • • 

IT IS rumored there will soon be a 
broadcast from a nudist camp . . . 
and we understand the job of an- 
nouncing the program will be 
awarded to the highest bidder. As an 
appropriate selection of musical num- 
bers may we suggest, "Look Who's 
Here" . . . "Where Have We Met 
Before?" . . . "O-o-o-o, I'm Think- 
in'!" . . . "If A Body Meet A 
Body" . . . "What Have We Got To 
Lose?" . . . "Put On Your Old 
Gray Bonnet" . . . "They Wouldn't 
Believe Me" . . . "When I Look In 
Your Eyes (If Ever)" . . . "Just 
Break The Nudes To Mother." 



September 



29 



RADIO FAN-FARE PROGRAM FINDER 



A Greater Service to Radio Listeners 



RADIO Fan-Fare Program Finder offers a service 
■ to discriminating listeners who want more from 
radio entertainment than a mere background for a 
game of bridge, an evening of reading or a cocktail 
party. 

THE outstanding chain programs are grouped, in 
the Classified Schedule according to the type of 
program. If, for instance, you want to listen to organ 
music or to a humorous sketch, merely turn to that 
section of the Classified Schedule and you can select 
the program which best suits your tastes. If you want 
to hear a particular artist or a special program turn 



to the Artist and Program Schedule, pages 42-43. The 
Time Schedule page 41 enables you to determine what 
is on the air at a given time. 

WE have listed what we deem to be the better 
programs, bearing in mind that we must restrict 
our choice to programs which are continuous enough 
to warrant inclusion in a monthly magazine. We can- 
not of course be responsible for last minute changes 
in programs nor stations but we will do everything 
humanly possible to limit errors and to extend the 
service rendered. Our readers are invited to suggest 
improvements. 



CLASSIFIED SCHEDULE 



Index 



A 

B 
C 
D 
E 
F 



G 

H 

I 

J 

K 

L 

M 

N 

O 

P 

Q 

R 

S 

T 

U 

V 

w 

X 

Y 

Z 

BB 

DD 



CLASSIFICATIONS INCLUDED 

Type of Program 

Beauty 

Books and Literature 

Children's Program 

Comedians 

Food... 

General 

(Political, Educational, Philosophers, 
Sports, etc.) 

Health 

Home and Garden 

Music — Band 

Music — Chamber.- 

Music — Choruses, Glee Clubs, Quartets 

etc._ 

Music — -Classical 

Music — -Dance 

Music — Medley Programs 

Music — Novelty 

Music — Organ 

Music, Patter and Song. 

Music — Popular 

Music — Religious 

Music — Standard and Folk Songs 

Music — Symphony 

News Reports.- 

Religious Services 

Sketches— -Dramatic. 

Sketches— Detective and Mystery 

Sketches — Humorous 

Travel 

Variety Shows 



Page 



29 
29 
29 
30 
30 
30 



31 
31 
31 

31 

31 
32 
32 
33 
34 
34 
34 
34 
36 
36 
37 
37 
38 
38 
39 
39 
39 
39 



NOTE — Time zones are abbreviated as follows: ED — 
Eastern Daylight, ES-CD — Eastern Standard, Central Day- 
light, CS — Central Standard, M — Mountain, P — Pacific. 
The index number appearing at the left of each program 
title is the key for reference from the Artist and Program 
Schedule and from the Time Schedule. Where no station list- 
ing is given, hook-up is variable ; best results can be obtained 
by tuning in the nearest key station of the network indicated. 
Write Fan-Fare Program Editor, 420 Lexington Ave., New 
York City, for further information, enclosing return postage. 



A — BEAUTY (Continued) 



Thursday. l i hour 
9:30 PM— ED 

WJZ WBZ 
WBZA 



8:30 PM— ES-CD 

WBAL WGAR 
WJR WHAM 
WENR 



7:30 PM— CS 

KWK KWCR 
KSO KOIL 
WREN 



A3— LADY ESTHER SERENADE 
Sunday. y 2 hour 
With Wayne King and Orchestra 



3:00 PM— ED 

WEAF WTAG 



WEEI 
WGY 



WCSH 
WBEN 



WCAE WLIT 
WJAR 
Tuesday. y 2 hour 
8:30 PM— ED 

WEAF WTAG 
WCAE WEEI 
WBEN WJAR 
WFI WGY 
WCSH 



2:00 PM— ES-CD 

WLW WRC 
WTAM WWJ 
WJAX WFLA 
WWNC WIOD 
KYW 



1:00 PM— CS 

WJDX KSD 
WOC WHO 
WOW WDAF 
WTMJ KSTP 
KVOO WKY 
WOAI KPRC 
WFAA WMC 
WSMB WSM 
WSB 



M P 

12:00 PM 11:00 AM 

KOA KGW 

KDYL KHQ 
KGO 
KFI 
KOMO 



7:30 PM— ES-CD 

WRC WTAM 
WWJ WSAI 
WFBR WMAQ 



6:30 PM— CS 

WDAF 



81— AMERICA'S GRUB STREET SPEAKS 


Mon. \i hour. 


M 




5:45 PM— ED 


4:45 PM— ES-CD 


3:45 PM— CS 


2:45 PM 




WABC WJAS 


WADC WJSV 


KFAB WGST 


KLZ 




WCAU WLBZ 


WBIG WKBN 


KFH WHAS 


KSL 




WDRC WOKO 


WBT WLBW 


KLRA WIBW 






WEAN WORC 


WCAO WMBG 


KMBC WLAC 






WHP CFRB 


WDAE WQAM 


KOMA WMT 






WICC 


WDBJ WSJS 
WDBO WSPD 
WFBL WWVA 
WFEA CKLW 
WHK WTAR 


KRLD WODX 
KTRH WSFA 
KTSA WTAQ 
WACO WREC 
WDSU 






B2— POET'S GOLD, POETI 


6:15 PM— CS 






Tuesday. — ]4, hour 




KMBC WFBM 






David Ross 




WMBD WGST 


M 


P 


8:15 PM— ED 


7:15 PM— ES-CD 


WBRC WDOD 


5:15 PM 


4:15 PM 


WABC WOKO 


WCAO WHK 


WREC WODX 


KVOR 


KHJ 


WNAC WGR 


CKOK WSPD 


WSFA WLAC 


KLZ 


KOIN 


WDRC WIP 


WFEA WLBW 


WDSU KRLD 




KGB 


WJAS WEAN 


WKBN WTAR 


KTRH WIBW 




KFRC 


WLBZ WICC 


WDBJ WTOC 


WTAQ WKBH 




KOL 


WHP WORC 


WQAM WDBO 


KFAB WCCO 




KFPY 


CFRB 


WSJS 


WSBT WMT 






B3— GOLDEN TREASURY BREWSTER— Tuesday. V? hour. 


John Brewster. 


4:00 PM— ED «- 


3:00 PM— ES-CD 


2:00 PM— CS 






WEAF WCSH 


WFBR WTAM 


WOW WOC 






WGY WTAG 


WWJ WDAF 


WHO 






WJAR WCAE 


WCKY WSAI. 
WRC WMAQ 









C— CHILDREN'S PROGRAM 



CI— ADVENTURE OF HELEN AND MARY— Saturday. Vz hour. 



11:00 AM— ED 

WABC WOKO 
WNAC WKBW 
WDRC WCAU 
WJAS WPG 
WLBZ WORC 
CFRB 



10:00 AM— ES-CD 9:00 AM— CS" 

WADC WFBL KMBC WGST 



CKOK WJSV 
WPSD WFEA 
WCAH WHEC 
WLBW WKBN 
WWVA WQAM 
WBIG WDAE 
WTOC 
WSJS 



WODO WREC 
WODX WSFA 
WLAC WDSU 
KTRH KLRA 
WACO WTAQ 
WCCO WMT 



8:00 AM 

KVOR 
KLZ 



P 
7:00 AM 

KHJ 

KOIN 

KGB 

KFRC 

KOL 

KFPY 



C2— COLUMBIA JUNIOR BUGLE— Sunday. 



9:00 AM— ED 

WABC WOKO 
WNAC WGR 
WDRC WCAU 
WEAN WPG 
WLBZ WICC 
WHP WORC 



8:00 AM— ES-CD 

WADC WCAO 
WHK CKOK 
WFBL WSPD 
WJSV WCAH 
WLBW WHEC 
WWVA WKBN 
WBIG WDBJ 
WTOC WDBO 
WDAE 



1 hour. 
7:00 AM— CS 

KMBC WFBM 
WMBD WGST 
WDOD WREC 
WLAC KRLD 
KTRH KLRA 
KTSA WIBW 



KFH 

WISN 
WMT 



WTAQ 
WCCO 



C3— H-BAR-0 RANGERS— Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday. V, hour. 
5:00 PM— ED— WABC Network (Starts Sept. 18.) 



C4— JACK ARMSTRONG— ALL AMERICAN BOY 

Thursday, Friday, Saturday. ' , hour. 

5:30 PM— ED 5:30 PM— ES-CD 

WABC WEAN WCAO WKRC 
WCAU WGR WHK CKLW 
WDRC WNAC WJSV WBBM 



Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, 



♦Notice of Copyright. Method of arrangement copyrighted. Infringment will be prosecuted 



30 



Radio Fan-Fare 



RADIO FAN-FARE PROGRAM FINDER 



C— CHILDREN'S PROGRAMS (Continued) 



C7— LADY NEXT DOOR— Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday. H hour. 
Madge Tucker, Director 

4:45 PM— ED 3:45 PM— ES-CD 2:45 PM— CS 

WEAF WTAG WFBR WTAM KSD WDAF 
WJAR WCSH WSAI WRC 
WGY WENR 



C8 LITTLE ORPHAN ANNIE 

Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday and Saturday. 
Shirley Bell, Allan Baruck, Henrietta Tedro, Harry Cansdale 



hour 



5:45 PM— ED 

WJZ WBZ 
WBZA KDKA 
CKGW 



4:45 PM— ES-CD 4:45 PM— CS 



WBAL WJR 

WGAR WIS 

WLW WWNC 

WRVA WJAX 

WHAM 

5:45 PM— ES-CD 

WENR 



KSTP KOIL 
WREN WEBC 
WDAY KFYR 
WOAI WKY 
KPRC KTBS 
WBAP KWCR 
KWK 



C9— NBC CHILDREN'S HOUR— Sunday. 1 hour. Milton Cross. 



9:00 AM— ED 

WJZ WBZ 
WBZA 



8:00 AM— ES-CD 

WBAL WGAR 
WLW WJR 
WHAM WSYR 
WMAL WENR 



7:00 AM— CS 

WIBA KWK 
WREN KSTP 
WEBC KFYR 
KDKA 



C10— NURSERY RHYMES 
Tuesday. ]i hour 
Lewis James, Milton Cross 



5:45 PM— ED 

WEAF WGY 



WLIT 

WEEI 
WCSH 



WTAG 
WJAR 

WBEN 



4:45 PM— ES-CD 

WFBR WRC 
WTAM WSAI 
WWJ WCKY 
WMAQ 



3:45 PM— CS 

KSD WOC 
WHO WOW 
WDAF WIBA 
KSTP WDAY 



M 
2:45 PM 

KOA 
KDYL 



KFYR 
WKY 
WOAI 



KTBS 
WFAA 



P 
1:45 PM 

KGO 

KGW 
KOMO 



C11— PAUL WING THE STORY MAN— Monday, Wednesday and Friday. 
5:45 PM— ED 4:45 PM— ES-CD 

WEAF WGY WWJ WTAM 
WBEN 

C13— THE SINGING LADY— Mon., Tues., Wed., Thurs. and Frl. M hour. 

(Suspended until Sept. 4) 

5:30 PM— ED 4:30 PM— ES-CD 3:30 PM— CS 

WJZ WBZ WBAL WJR WSM 

WBZA KDKA WLW WHAM 
WGAR 

C14— SKIPPY— Mon., Tues., Wed., Thurs. and Fri. M hour. 
5:00 PM— ED 5:00 PM— ES-CD 

WABC WEAN WCAO WKRC 
WNAC WGR WHK CKOK 
WDRC WCAU WJSV WBBM 
Starting Sept. 18, this time taken by "H-Bar-0 Rangers, See C3. 



hour. 






El— FRANCES LEE BARTON 



9:15 AM— CS 



Tuesday and Thursday. % hour WHO WSM 

11:15 AM— ED 10:15 AM— ES-CD WMC WSB 

WRC WFBR WAPI WSMB 
WTAM WWJ 
WLW WMAQ 



WEAF WTIC 

WTAG WEEI 

WJAR WCSH 

WLIT WGY 

WBEN WCAE 



KTHS KVOO 

KPRC WOAI 

WKY KTBS 
WOW 



E2— BETTY CROCKER— Wednesday and Friday. \i hour. 
10:45 AM— ED 9:45 AM-ES-CD 8:45 AM— CS 

WTAM WWJ KSD WOW 

WSAI WFBR 

WRVA WPTF 

WJAX WIOD 

WFLA KYW 

WRC 



WEAF WTAG 
WEEI WCSH 
WBAP WFI 
WBEN WGY 
WJAR WCAE 



WOAI KPRC 

WKY WOC 

WHO KVOO 

KTHS WDAF 



E5— RADIO HOUSEHOLD INSTITUTE 
Wednesday and Saturday. 14 hour 



11:15 AM— ED 

WEAF WTAG 
WEEI WJAR 
WCSH WLIT 
WGY WBEN 
WCAE WTIC 



9:15 AM— CS 

KSD WOC 



10:15 AM— ES-CD WHO 

WRC WFBR WTMJ 
WTAM WWJ 
WSAI KYW 



WEBC 
KPRC 
WKY 

WSM 



WDAF 
KSTP 
KVOO 
WOAI 
KTHS 
WSB 



M 
8:15 AM 

KOA 
KDYL 



WSMB WAPI 
WMC WBAP 



E6— VISITING WITH IDA BAILEY ALLEN— Thursday. }i hour. M 



10:15 AM— ED 

WABC WOKO 



WAAB 
WJAS 
WHP 
CFRB 



WKBW 

WLBZ 

WORC 



C16— STAMP ADVENTURER'S CLUB— Friday. M hour. 
6:00 PM— ED 5:00 PM— ES-CD 

WABC WAAB WBBM WHK 
WKBW WDRC WOWO WCAO 
WCAU WOKO WSPD WFBL 
WEAN WORC WCAH WJSV 

WJAS WHEC 

WKRC 



■ - '"^rK.-j^, 



D1-PHIL BAKER, THE ARMOUR JESTER— Friday. y 2 hour. 

The Armour Jester, Harry McNaughton, Roy Shield, Merrie-Men, Neil Sisters. 

M P 

9:30 PM— ED 8:30 PM— ES-CD 7:30 PM— CS 

WJZ WBZ WBAL WHAM KWK WREN 

WBZA KDKA WGAR WJR KOIL 

WRVA WWNC KSTP 

WJAX WIOD WSM 

WMAQ WSB 



WTMJ 
WEBC 
WMC 
WAPI 



6:30 PM 

KOA 
KDYL 



WSMB WFAA 
KPRC WOAI 
WKY KSO 



5:30 PM 

KGW 

KOMO 

KHQ 

KGO 

KFI 



DZ— BEN BERNIE'S BLUE RIBBON ORCHESTRA— Tuesday. >/ 2 hour. 
9:00 PM— ED 8:00 PM— ES-CD 



WEAF 

WEEI 

WCSH 

WGY 

WCAE 



WJAR 

WFI 

WBEN 



WRC WFBR 
WTAM WSAI 
WWJ WCKY 

WLS 



P 
8:30 PM 

KGO 

KFI 

KGW 

KOMO 

KHQ 



9:15 AM— ES-CD 

WADC WCAO 
WHK CKOK 
WFBL WSPD 
WJSV WCAH 
WLBW WHEC 
WWVA WBIG 
WDBJ WQAM 
WDBO WDAE 
WSJS 



8:15 AM— CS 

KMBC KMOX 
WMBD WGST 
WDOD WREC 
WSFA WLAC 



7:15 AM 

KVOR 
KLZ 

KSL 



WDSU 
KLRA 
KFH 
WISN 



KTRH 
WIBW 
WTAQ 
WSBT 






D7— THE FIRE CHIEF BAND— Tuesday. 
Orchestra and Graham McNamee 



8:30 PM— ES-CD 

WFBR WRC 
WTAM WWJ 
WLW WRVA 
WWNC WLS 
WJAX WIOD 
WFLA WMAQ 



hour. Taylor Holmes, Don Voorhees' 



9:30 PM— ED 


WEAF 


WCSH 


WFI 


WGY 


WBEN 


WEEI 


WJAR 


WCAE 


WTAG 


CFCF 


L O 


c 



7:30 PM 

KSD 

WHO 

WSM 

WIBA 

WEBC 

KFYR 

KVOO 

WSB 

WSMB 

KPRC 

WOAI 

WJDX 



Q© 

WOW 

WOC 

WDAF 

KSTP 

WDAY 

WTMJ 

WMC 

KTHS 

WBAP 

WKY 

KTBS 



M 

6:30 PM 

KDYL 
KOA 
KGIR 
KGHL 



P 
5:30 PM 

KFSD 

KTAR 

KGO 

KFI 

KGW 

KOMO 

KHQ 



F1— AMERICAN LEGION PROGRAM 
Thursday. M hour 3:45 PM— ES-CD 
4:45 PM— ED 

WABC WOKO 
WGR 
WJAS 
WLBZ 



WAAB 
WIP 
WPG 
WORC 



WCAO WHK 
WFBL WSPD 
WFEA WLBW 
WKBN WBIG 
WTAR WDBJ 
WMBG WTOC 
WQAM WDBO 
WSJS 



2:45 PM— CS 

KMBC WGST 
WBRC WDOD 
WODX WSFA 
WLAC WDSU 



KRLD 

WIBW 



KTRH 
WACO 



M 

1:45 PM 

KVOR 

KLZ 
KSL 



WTAQ WKBH 
WISN WSBT 
WMT WREC 



F3— COLUMBIA EDUCATIONAL FEATURES— Fri. \i hour. 


M 


P 


2:45 PM— ED 


1:45 PM— ES-CD 


12:45 PM— CS 


11:45 AM 


10:45 AM 


WABC WOKO 


WADC WCAO 


KMBC WGST 


KVOR 


KHJ 


WKBW WIP 


WBBM CKOK 


WDOD WREC 


KLZ 


KOIN 


WJAS WEAN 


WFBL WSPD 


WODX WSFA 




KGB 


WPG WLBZ 


WJSV WCAH 


WLAC WDSU 




KFRC 


WHP WORC 


WFEA WLBW 


KTRH WTAQ 




KOL 


CFRB 


WHEC WWVA 
WKBN WBIG 
WTOC WQAM 
WDBO WDAE 

WSJS 


WISN WSBT 

WMT 




KFPY 



F7— GULF PROGRAM— Wednesday and Friday. ? 4 ' hour. Irvin S. Cobb. 



9:00 PM— ED 

WABC WOKO 
WNAC WKBW 
WDRC WCAU 
WEAN WORC 
WJAS WLBZ 



8:00 PM— ES-CD 7:00 PM— CS 

WCAO WKRC WGST WBRC 



WHK CKOK 
WFBL WSPD 
WJSV WCAH 
WBT WBIG 
WDBJ WMBG 
WQAM WDBO 
WDAE WOWO 
WTOC WFEA 
WADC 



WREC WDSU 
"WLAC KTRH 
KRLD KTSA 
KLRA WSFA 
WHAS 









F8 INTERNATIONAL RADIO FORUM 12:15 PM— CS 

Sunday. Vi. hour KWK KWCR 

2:15PM-ED 1:15PM-ES-CD 

WJZ CFCF WBAL WMAL 
WSYR KDKA 
WRVA WPTF 
WWNC WIS 
WJAX WMAQ 



KSO 
KOIL 
KFYR 
WAPI 



WREN 
WDAY 
WSM 
WMC 



M P 

11:15 AM 10:15 AM 



WSMB WEBC 
WJDX WKY 



KOA 
KDYL 
KGIR 
KGHL 



KVOO 
KTBS 
WOAI 



WFAA 
KTHS 



KGO 
KFI 
KOMO 
KHQ 
KFSD 
KTAR 



F9— GULFHEADLINERS — Sunday. J ■> hour. Revelers Quartet, Al Goodman's Orchestra 



9:00 PM— ED 

WJZ WBAL 
WBZ WBZA 



8:00 PM— ES-CD 

WGAR WJR 
WLW WSYR 
WMAL WRVA 
WPTF WWNC 
WIS WJAX 
WRDA 



ABBREVIATIONS: ED — Eastern Daylight, ES-CR- 



-Eastern Standard, Central Daylight, CS- 
SEE NOTE PAGE 29 



-Central Standard, M — Mountain, P — Pacific. 



September 



31 






RADIO F A N - F 


ARE 


PROGRAM Fl 


N D 




F — GENERAL (Continued) 


F— HOME AND GARDEN (Conti 


nued) 




F13— LITTLE KNOWN FACTS OF WELL-KNOWN PEOPLE- 
Dale Carnegie. (Starts Aug. 20.) 

6:30 PM— ED 4:30 PM— ES-CD 

WEAF WFI WTAM WWJ 
WBEN WGY 
WCSH WJAR 
WEEI WTAG 


Sunday. y 2 hour. 


45— NATIONAL FARM AND HOME HOUR— Mon., Tues., V 

1 hour. 12:30 PM— ES-CD 11:30 AM— CS 

1:30 PM— ED WBAL WRC KOIL KPRC 

WJZ WBZ WLW WCKY KWK WOC 

WBZA KDKA WJR WRVA WREN WOW 

WPTF WWNC WHO KTBS 

WIS WJAX WDAF WIBA 

WIOD WELA WKY WEBC 


Ved., Thurs 
M 

10:30 AM 

KOA 


, Fri., Sat. 


WDAY WJDX 
WSM WFAA 
WAPI WOAI 

M 

8:30 AM 

KOA 


F17— NATIONAL RADIO FORUM— Tuesday. Y 2 hour. 

10:30 PM— ED 9:30 PM— ES-CD. .8:30 PM— CS 

WEAF WEFI WFBR WWJ WSMB WTAG 
WJAR WCSH WIS WFLA WIBA WEBC 
WDAF WRVA WTAM WRC WDAY WOC 

WWNC WBEN WJAX WSAI WHO WMC ■ 
WJDX WLIT WIOD KYW KTBS WSB 
WGY WKY WFAA 

WTMJ 


WHAM WSYR KTHS KFYR 
KYW KSTP WSB 


1— MUSIC- 


tij/fZEl 


1— MUSIC OF THE AMERICAS 

U. S. Army Band — Capt. Wm. J. Stannard, Bandmaster. 

Tuesday. V 2 hour. 

11:30 AM— ED 10:30 AM-ES-CD 9:30 AM— CS 

WEAF WTAG WWJ WSAI WOW WOC 
WJAR WRC KFBR WCKY WHO KSD 
WEEI WTIC WTAM WDAF 
CFCF WGY KYW 
WCSH CKGW 


F19— CHEERIO— Moil., Tue., Wed., Thurs., Fri., Sat V 2 hour. 
9:30 AM— ED 8:30 AM— ES-CD 7:30 AM— CS 

WEAF WTAG WRC WTAM WOW WDAF 
WEEI WJAR WWJ WCKY KTBS WKY 
WCSH WFI WRVA WPTF WJDX KPRC 
WGY WBEN WWNC WFBR WOAI WSM 
WCAE CKGW WIS WJAX WSB WAPI 
CFCF * WIOD WFLA WMC 
* WSAI WCFL 


J. Harrison Isles. 

1 


rhursday. ' 2 hour. 

4:00 PM— ED 3:00 PM— ES-CD 2:00 PM— CS 

WABC WOKO WCAO WBBM KMBC KMOX 
WNAC WGR WHK CKOK WGST WDOD 
WDRC WCAU WFBL WSPD WREC WSFA 
WIP WJAS WJSV WCAH WLAC WDSU 
WEAN WPG WFEA WHEC KRLD KTRH 
WLBZ WICC WWVA WKBN KLRA KTSA 
WORC CFRB WDBJ WTOC WIBW WACO 
WQAM WDBO KFH WTAQ 
WDAE WSJS KFAB WISN 
WSBT WMT 
'riday. \' 2 hour. 

4:30 PM— ED 3:30 PM— ES-CD 2:30 PM— CS 
WABC WOKO WCAO WHK KMBC WGST 
WAAB WGR CKOK WFBL WBRC WDOD 
WDRC WIP WSPD WFEA WREC WODX 
WJAS WPG WLBW WKBN WSFA WLAC 
WLBZ WHP WTAR WDBJ WDSU KRLD 
WORC CFRB WMBG WTOC KTRH WIBW 
WQAM WDBO WACO WTAQ 
WSJS WKBH WISN 
WCCO WSBT 
WMT 


M 

1:00 PM 

KVOR 
KLZ 

KSL 

M 

1:30 PM 

KVOR 

KLZ 

KSL 


P 
12:00 PM 

KHJ 

KOIN 

KGB 

KFRC 

KOL 

KFPY 

P 
12:30 PM 

KHJ 

KOIN 

KGB 

KFRC 

KOL 

KFPY 


F20— TED HUSING— Wednesday. H hour. (Sports) 

6:45 PM— ED 6:45 PM— ES-CD 4:45 PM— CS 

WABC WICC WBIG WMBG KFH WISN 
WAAB WKBW WBT WQAM KLRA WLAC 
WCAU WLBZ WCAO WSJS KMBC WMT 
WDRC WOKO WDBJ WSPD KTRH WODX 
WEAN WORC WFBL WTOC KTSA WSFA 
WFEA WWVA WBRC WTAQ 
WLBW CKLW WDOD WREC 
WGST 


M 
3:45 PM 

KLZ 
KSL 
KVOR 

1 


F22— VOICE OF EXPERIENCE. 

(Discontinued — will return Sept. 11 — WABC Network.) 


F23— WOMEN'S RADIO REVIEW 1:30 PM— CS 
Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, KSD WOC 
Thursday, Friday. >/ 2 hour. WSMB WHO 

Joseph Littau, Claudine MacDonald. WOW WIBA , 
3:30 PM— ED 2:30 PM— ES-CD KSTP WEBC ■ 
WEAF WJAR WFBR WTAM WDAY WSM 
WGY WBEN WWJ WWNC WMC WKY 
WCAE WCSH WIS WIOD KPRC KTBS 
WFI WTAG WJAX WFLA WAPI WBAP 
WSAI WRC KFYR WDAF 
KYW 


2— U. S. NAVY BAND— Tuesday. >/ 2 hour. 

4:00 PM— ED 3:00 PM— ES-CD 2:00 PM— CS 

WABC WJAS WADC WJSV KFAB WFBM 
WAAB WOKO WBT WKBN KLRA WGST 
WCAU WORC WCAO WLBW KMBC WISN 
WDRC WPG WDAE WMBG KOMA WLAC 
WGR CFRB WDBJ WQAM KRLD WMT 
WDBO WSJS KTRH WSBT 


M 

1:00 PM 

KLZ 
KVOR 




F25— OUR AMERICAN SCHOOLS— Sun. »/ 2 hour. 6:30 PM— ED— WEAF N etwork 

G1— ADVENTURES IN HEALTH— Tues. M hour. Dr. Herman Bundeson. P 

M 4*30 PM 
8:30 PM— ED 7:30 PM— ES-CD 6:30 PM— CS 6:30 PM KGO 

WJZ WBZ WBAL WHAM KSO KOA KGW 
WBZA KDKA WLW WGAR 9.45 pu-CS KDYL KOMO 
CKGW WLS fcSO M £££ 

8:45 PM KFI 
KOA 7:45 PM 
KDYL KGO 
Starting Sept 8— Friday. 8:30 PM— ED— WJZ Network. KGW 

KOMO 
KHQ 


Wi BL WoPD W 

WFEA CKLW W 

WHK WTAR W 

W 


BRC WTAQ 
DOD WREC 
DSU 


11— COMPINSKY TRIO— Sunday. V 2 hour. 

1:30 PM— ED 12:30 PM— ES-CD 11 

WABC WOKO WADC WLBW K 

WAAB WORC WBT WQAM K 

WDRC WPG WCAO WSJS K 

WGR CFRB WDAE WSPD K 

WJAS WDBJ CKLW W 

WFBL WTAR W 

WHEC W 

W 


:30 AM— CS 

FAB WISN 
MOX WMBD 
OMA WMT 
TRH WODX 
CCO WSBT 
DOD WTAQ 
DSU WREC 
'GST 


M 

10:30 AM 

KLZ 
KVOR 




12— MADISON ENSEMBLE— Mon., Wed., Fri., and Sat. } 2 
WABC Network. 


hour. 1 :30 


PM— ED— 


G4— TOWER HEALTH EXERCISES— Mon., Tues., Wed., Thurs 
Arthur Bagley. 

6:45 AM— ED 5:45 AM— ES-CD 
7:45 AM— ED 6:45 AM— ES-CD 

WEAF WEEI WRC 
WFI WGY 
WBEN WCAE 
CKGW 


., Fri., Sat. Vi hours 


J3 MORNING MUSIC ALE— Sunday. J 2 hour. 11:00 AM 


-ED— WJZ 


Network. 


14— CHAMBER MUSIC— Sun. J£ hr. 1:15 PM— ED— WJZ 
PM— ED— WEAF Network. 


Network. 1 


>'z hr. 1:00 


G5— ACADEMY OF MEDICINE— Thursday. ' , hour 

11:45 AM— ED 10:45 AM— ES-CD 9:45 AM— CS 

WABC WOKO WCAO CKOK WDOD WREC 
WNAC WKBW WSPD WJSV WODX WSFA 
WDRG WJAS WFEA WLBW WLAC KRLD 
WEAN WPG WWVA WBIG KTRH KLRA 
WLBZ WHP WQAM WDBO WIBW WTAQ 
WORC CFRB WDAE WCCO 

HI -BETTY MOORE— INTERIOR DECORATING— Wednesday. 
Betty Moore; Lew White, Organ. 

11:30 AM— ED 10:30 AM— ES-CD 9:30 AM— CS 

WEAF WGY WFBR WTAM KSD WEBC 
WCAE WLIT WLW WWJ WBAP WOAI 
WEEI WTAG WRC WDAY WOW 


M 

8:45 AM 

KVOR 
KLZ 

IHHi 
\i hour. 


K2— CONTENTED PROGRAM— Monday. J 2 hour. 
Jean Arnold, Lullaby Lady, Morgan L. Eastman. 

10:00 PM— ED 9:00 PM— ES-CD 8:00 PM— CS 

WBEN WGY WLW WWJ KSD WOC 
WCAE WTAM WENR WDAF WTMJ 

WHO 


K3— ETHEL HAYDEN AND ARTHUR LANG— Wed. K hr. 
5:45 PM— ED 4:45 PM— ES-CD 3:45 PM— CS 

WABC WLBZ WADC WKBN KFAB WDSU 

WDRC WOKO WBIG WLBW KFH WGST 

WEAN CFRB WBT WMBG KLRA WHAS 

WJAS WNAC WCAO WQAM KMBC WLAC 

WKBW WDAE WSJS KOMA WMT 

WDBJ WSPD KRLD WODX 

WDBO WWVA KTRH WSBT 

WFBL CKLW KTSA WSFA 

WFEA WTAR WACO WTAQ 

WJSV WBRC WREC 

WDOD 


M 
2:45 PM 

KLZ 
KSL 
KVOR 




LOCATES 


W 


H . 


A T 


YOU LIKE E 


1 E 


» T 



ABBREVIATIONS: 



ED — Eastern Daylight, ES-CD — Eastern Standard, Central Daylight, CS — Central Standard, M — Mountain, P — Pacific. 

SEE NOTE PAGE 29 



32 



Radio Fan-Fare 



RADIO F A N - F 


A 


RE PROGRAM 


J 


: 1 N D E R 


K— MUSIC— CHORUSES, GLEE CLUBS, QUA 
ETC. (Continued) 


RTETS, L— MUSIC— CLASSICAL (Continued) 


L12— DINNER MUSIC. 4:00 PM—CS 11 P 


K7— MANHATTAN MOODS— Sunday. V 2 hour. 
Do, Re, Mi; Mark Warnow's Orchestra. 

2:30 PM— ED 1:30 PM— ES-CD 12:30 PM—CS 

WABC WJAS WADC WHK KLRA WHAS 
WCAU WLBZ WBIG WJSV KMBC WIBW 
WDRC WOKO WBT WLBW KMOX WISN 
WEAN WORC WCAH WMBG KOMA WLAC 
WHP CFRB WDAE WQAM KTRH WMT 
WICC WNAC WDBJ WSJS KTSA WODX 
WDBO WSPD WCCO WSBT 
WFBL WWVA WDSU WSFA 
WFEA CKLW WGST WTAQ 
WHEC WBBM 


M 

11:30 A 

KLZ 
KSL 


Mon., Tues., Wed., Thurs., Fri. and KSD 

Sat V 2 hour. WSME 

„ 6:00 PM— ED 5:00 PM— ES-CD KVOO 

™ WEAF WCSH WCYK WWNC KTBS 

WJAR WFI WLS WFBR WMC 

CKGW WSAI WIOD WHO 

WWJ WMAQ WDAF 

WAPI 


WIBA 3:00 PM 2:00 PM 

KPRC KOA KPO 

WOAI KDYL KFSD 1 

WSM 

WOC 

WDAY 

WKY 

KFYR 


L13— CONCERT FOOTLIGHTS— Thurs. ]/ 2 hr. 7:15 PM— ED— WJZ Network 
Mario Cozzi, Baritone; Orchestra Direction Joseph Littau. 


L14— MADAME BELLE FORBES CUTTER AND ORCHESTRA— Wed. V, hour. 
3:15 PM-ED 2:15 PM ES-CD 1:15PM-CS 12:15 PM 


K10— ROUND TOWNERS QUARTET-Mon. M hour. 

2:00 PM— ED 1:00 PM— ES-CD 12:00 N—CS 

WABC WJAS WADC WJSV KFAB WFBM 
WAAB WLBZ WBIG WKBN KLRA WGST 
WDRC WOKO WBT WLBW KMBC WHAS 
WGR WORC WCAO WMBG KOMA WISN 
WIP CFRB WDAE WQAM KRLD WLAC 
WDBJ WSJS KTRH WMT 
WDBO WSPD KTSA WSBT 
WFBL WWVA WACO WSFA 
WFEA CKLW WBRC WTAQ 
WHK WTAR WDOD WREC 
., _ WDSU 
Also Tuesday, 4:30 PM— ED— WABC Network. 


M 
11:00 A 

KLZ 
KVOR 


WNAC WGR WBBM WHK WGST WDOD KLZ 
H WDRC WIP CKOK WFBL WREC WSFA KSL 
WJAS WEAN WSPD WJSV WLAC WDSU 
WPG WLBZ WCAH WFEA KRLD KTRH 
WICC WHP WLBW WHEC KLRA WIBW 
WORC CFRB WWVA WKBN WACO WTAQ 

WBIG WDBJ KFAB WISN 

WTOC WQAM WSBT WMT 

WDBO WDAE 

WSJS 


L15-ESSEX HOUSE ENSEMBLE-Tues. and Fri. y 2 hour. 1:30 PM-ED-WEAF 
Network. Richard Himber. 


L16— GLADYS RICE— Thursday. y 2 hour. 


M 


K12-L'HEURE EXQUISE-Sunday. >/ 2 hour. 1:30 PM-ED- 
George Ddworth, Director. 


-WEAF l» 


10:45 PM— ED 9:45 PM— ES-CD 8:45 PM—CS 7:45 PM 

letwork. WABC WIP WADC WJSV KFAB WDSU KLZ 
WAAB WJAS WBIG WKBN KFH WFBM KSL 
WDRC WOKO WBT WLBW KMBC wnsT wno 


K14— TEMPLE OF SONG— Sunday. y 2 hour. 4:30 PM— ED- 
Noble Cain, Director. 


-WEAF 1 


..,„„,„ WEAN WORC WCAO WMBG KOMA 

,e, " ork - WHP WPG WDAE WQAM KTRH 

WICC CFRB WDBJ WSJS KTSA 


WHAS 
WIBW 
WLAC 


K15— MORNING GLEE CLUB— Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, 
Saturday. % hour. 8:39 AM— ED— WEAF Network. 


Thursday 


WDBO WSPD WACO 
, Friday and WFBL WTOC WBRC 

WFEA CKLW WCCO 
WHEC WDOE 


WMBD 
WMT 
WODX 
WREC 


K17— THE PIONEERS, MALE QUARTET— Thurs. M hr. 

Gene Albridge and Dick Fulton, Tenors; Reed Kennedy, Baritone; R 
Basso; Aneurin Bodycombe, Pianist. 

2:30 PM— ED 1:30 PM— ES-CD 12:30 PM—CS 

WJZ CKGW WBAL WMAL KSO KWK 
WCKY WSYR KWCR WREN 


L17— MEDLEY— Wed. ' .i hour. 4 PM— ED— WEAF Network. Chrlstiaan Kriens. 


iss Mitchell, L18 _SAVITT STRING QUARTETTE— Sat. V 2 hr. 

2:30 PM— ED 1:30 PM— ES-CD 12:30 PM—CS M P 

WABC WOKO WADC WCAO KMBC WFBM 11:30 AM 10:30 AM 
WNAC WGR WBBM WHK WMBD WGST KVOR KHJ 
WDRC WCAU CKOK WFBL WDOD WREC KLZ KOIN 


K18— RUSSIAN SYMPHONIC CHOIR— Sunday. >/ 2 hour. 
7:30 PM— ED 

WEAF WTAG 
WCSH WTIC 
WJAR 




WJAS WEAN WorD WJbv WODX Wbl'A KbL KGB 
WPG WLBZ WCAH WFEA WLAC WDSU KFRC 
WICC WHP WLBW WHEC KSCJ KTRH KOL 
WORC WWVA WDBJ KLRA KTSA KFPY 

WTOC WQAM WIBW WACO 

WDBO WDAE WTAQ KFAB 

WSJS WISN WSBT 




usic) 


__,....„. ...., WMT 




> and Symphony M 


L19-ALEX SEMMLER— Friday. ^4 hour. 1:15 PM— CS M P 

KMBC WFBM 12:15 PM 11:15 AM 


(See also Band, Organ, Religious 


^ mmsmmm 3:15 PM— ED 2:15 PM— ES-CD WDOD 
WABC WOKO CKOK WHK WLAC 
WGR WDRC WSPD WFBL KRLD 


WBKU KVOJK. KHJ 
WDSU KLZ KOIN 
KTRH KSL KGB 


L3— G R AN D E TR 1 0— Wednesday. V, hour. 

3:00 PM— ED 2:00 PM— ES-CD 1:00 PM— CS 

WEAF WTAG WFBR WRC WSMB KSD 
WEEI WJAR WCKY WTAM WOW WDAF 
WCSH WGY WSAI WWJ WIBA WDAY 
WBEN WCAE WRVA WWNC WKY 
CKGW CFCF WIS WIOD 
WMAQ 




WIP WJAS WLBW WFEA WIBW 
WPG WLBZ WTAR WHEC KFH 
WICC WHP WMBGWDBJ WKBH 
WORC CFRB WQAM WTOC WISN 
WSJS WDBO WSBT 


WACO KFRC 
WTAQ KOL 
KFAB KFPY 
WCCO 
WMT 


L20— TROUBADOR OF THE VIOLIN— Sun. } ■-> hour. 7:00 PM— ED— WJZ Network. 
Jules Lande. 


L21— KATHLEEN STEWART— Monday. M hour. 4:15 PM— ED— WEAF Network 






L23 INSTRUMENTAL MUSIC — Wed J i hour 1(-isam Fn WFir M.i»«rir 


L5— IMPRESSIONS OF ITALY— Sunday. y 2 hour 

9:15 PM— ES-CD 8:15 PM—CS 

10:15 PM-ED WRC WFBR WEBC KFYR 

WEAF WJAR WTAM WWNC KSTP WMC 

WCSH WGY WIOD WJAX WSMB WKY 

WBEN WFLA WMAQ WFAA KTBS 

WOAI KPRC 
WTAQ 


M 
7:15 PM 

KOA 
KDYL 


Sylvia Altman, Julian Altman, Urban Intondi. 




L25— MELODY HOUR— Sun. 1 hour. 8:00 AM— ED— WEAF Network. 

L26— NATIONAL OPERA CONCERT— Sun. 1 hr. 3:00 PM— ED— WJZ Network. 

L27— TID BITS— Sunday. J4 hour. 12:30 PM— ED— WEAF Network. 

L28— NINO MARTINI, TENOR, HOWARD BARLOW AND THE COLUMBIA SYM- 
PHONY ORCHESTRA— Tuesday. V2 hour. M 
9:30 PM-ED 8:30 PM— ES-CD 7:30 PM—CS 6:30 PM 
WABC WOKO WCAO WBBM KMBC WFBM KVOR 


L6-LA FORGE BERUMEN MUSICALE— Thursday. >/, hour. 
3:00 PM— ED 2:00 PM— ES-CD 1:00 PM— CS 

WABC WOKO WADC WCAO KMBC WFBM 

WNAC WGR WBBM WHK WMBD WGST 

WDRG WJAS CKOK WFBL WDOD WREC 

WEAN WIP WSPD WJSV WSFA WLAC 

WLBZ WPG WCAH WFEA WDSU KRLD 

WHP WICC WLBW WHEC KTRH KLRA 

CFRB WORC WWVA WKBN WIBW WACO 

WBIG WDBJ WTAQ KFAB 

WTOC WQAM WISN WCCO 

WDBO WDAE WSBT WMT 

WSJS 


M 

12:00 PI 

KVOR 

KLZ 

KSL 


WNAC WKBW CKOK WSPD WDOD WREC KLZ 
P WDRC WJAS WJSV WFEA WODX WSFA KSL I 
A 11:00 AM WEAN WLBZ WLBW WKBN WLAC WDSU 
KHJ WICC WHP WBIG WDBJ KTRH KLRA 
KOIN WORC CFRB WMBG WQAM KTSA WIBW 
KGB WDBO W r DAE WTAQ KFH 
KFRC WISN WCCO 
KOL WMT 
KFPY ^^—^—^—p^-^p-——:-^ S^I^M 

Ml— HOTEL LEXINGTON DANCE ORCHESTRA— Sat y 2 hr. 6 PM— ED— WJZ 
Network. Sat. V, hr. 1:00 PM— ED— WEAF Network. Thurs. ) 2 hr. 1 2 Mid. - 
ED— WJZ Network. Ernie Hoist. 


L10— CHARLES GILBERT SPROSS— Friday. % hour. 

3:00 PM— ED 2:00 PM— ES-CD 1:00 PM— CS 

WEAF WGY WTAM WFBR WMC WSB 
WCSH CKGW WSAI WCKY WAPI WSM 
WBEN WCAE WWJ WWNC WSMB 

WRVA WMAQ 

WRC 


M2— ANTOBAL'S CUBANS WITH ANTONIO AND DANIEL— Saturday. )- 2 hour. 
8:30 PM— ED 7:30 PM— ES-CD 6:30 PM—CS M P 
WEAF WGY WFBR WTAM KSD WHO 5:30 PM 4:30 PM 

WCSH WJAR WFLA WWNC KVOO WIBA KDYL KPO 
WEEI WTAG WIOD WMAQ WDAY WOAI KOA 
WFI WRC WEBC WOC 

WFAA WOW 
Also Sunday. ' ,. hour. 11:45 AM— ED— WJZ Network. 


L11— ON WINGS OF SONG, STRING ENSEMBLE— Monday, 
and Friday. ]/ 2 hour. 12:30 PM— ED— WEAF Network. 


Wednesda 


y, Thursday, M4— HOTEL BILTMORE CONCERT ENSEMBLE— Friday. ' ■, hour. 11:30 PM- 
ED. Saturday. H hour. 12:05 AM— ED— WEAF Network. Harold Stern. 


LOCATES 


w 


H . 


A T YOU LIKE BEST 









ABBREVIATIONS: 



ED — Eastern Daylight, ES-CD — Eastern Standard, Central Daylight, CS — Central Standard, M — Mountain, P — Pacific. 

SEE NOTE PAGE 29 



bEPTEMBER 



R A D I O 



33 



F A N - F A R E 



M— MUSIC— DANCE (Continued) 



M7 COLLEGE INN ORCHESTRA— Wed. 
Ben Bernie. 



hr. 12:05 AM— ED— WEAF Network 



MS— COTTON CLUB ORCHESTRA— Tues. and Fri. »/ 2 hr. 12:00 Mid.— ED— WJZ 
Network. Thursday. V 2 hour. 12:05 AM— ED— WEAF Net work. 

M10— DANCE MUSIC— Sun. 1 hr. 12:30 AM— ED— WJZ Network. Including 
Carlos Molina 

Mil— DANCE MUSIC— Sunday. 1 hr. 12:00 Mid.— ED— WEAF Network. Including 
William Scotti and Bud Shay. 

M12— DANCE ORCHESTRAS— Mon. 2 hrs. 11:30 PM — ED— WABC Network. 

MIS— DANCE ORCHESTRA— Wed. 2 hrs. 11:30 PM — ED— WABC Network. 



M14— DANCE ORCHESTRAS— Thurs. 2 hrs. 11:30 PM — ED— WABC Network. 

M15-DANCING IN THE TWIN CITIES— Thurs. »/ 2 hr. 12:30 AM— ED— WJZ Net- 
work. 

M16— GUS ARNHEIM AND HIS ORCHESTRA From San Francisco. Sat. Vx hour. 

12:30 AM— ED 11:30 PM— ES-CD 10:30 PM— CS 9:30 PM 

WABC WKBW WADC WHK KFAB WFBM KLZ 
WCAU WOKO WBT WJSV KLRA WGST KSL 
WEAN WNAC WCAO WLBW KMBC WHAS KVOR 
WICC WDAE WMBG 

WDBJ WQAM 

WDBO WSJS 

WFBL WSPD 

WHEC WTAR 



KLRA WGST 
KMBC WHAS 
KOMA WISN 
KTRH WLAC 
KTSA WMBD 
WACO WMT 
WBRC WSBT 
WDOD WREC 
WDSU 



M17— EDGEWATER BEACH HOTEL ORCHESTRA— Tues. y 2 hr. 12:30 AM-ED- 
WJZ Network. Wed. Y 2 hr. 12:30 AM— ED— WEAF Network. Sat. y 2 hr. 
12:00 AM— ED— WJZ Network. 

M18-PHIL HARRIS AND HIS ORCHESTRA— Friday. H hr. 9:00 PM— ED— 
WJZ Network. Phil Harris and Leah Ray. 

M19 GEORGE HALL AND HIS ORCHESTRA— Mon. y 2 hr. 12:00 Noon— ED. Tues. 
V. hr. 5:45 PM— ED. Wed. M hr. 1:15 PM— ED. Thurs. ]4 hr. 5:15 PM— 
ED. Fri. Yi hr. 6:15 PM— ED. Sat. y 2 hr. 1:00 PM— ED.— WABC Network. 



MZ0— DANCE ORCHESTRA— Thursday. } 2 hour. 



12:00 N— ED 

WABC WOKO 
WGR WNAC 
WIP WDRC 
WEAN WJAS 
WLBZ WPG 
WORC WHP 
CFRB 



11:00 AM— ES-CD 

WCAO WBBM 
CKOK WSPD 
WFEA WLBW 
WKBN WTAR 
WDBJ WMBG 
WTOC WQAM 
WDBO WSJS 



10:00 AM— CS 

KMBC WFBM 
WMBD WGST 
WBRC WDOD 
WREC WODX 
WSFA WLAC 
WDSU KRLD 
KTRH KT&A 
WACO KFH 
WTAQ WKBH 
WISN WSBT 
WMT 



M P 

9:00 AM 8:00 AM 

KVOR KHJ 

KLZ KOIN 



KSL 



KGB 
KFRC 
KOL 
KFPY 



M21— DANCE ORCHESTRA— Monday. y 2 hour. 



1:00 PM— ED 

WABC WOKO 
WAAB WGR 
WDRC WCAU 
WEAN WLBZ 
WICC WHP 
WORC CFRB 



12:00 N— ES-CD 

WBBM WHK 
CKOK WFBL 
WSPD WFEA 
WLBW WHEC 
WKBN WTAR 
WDBJ WMBG 
WTOC WQAM 
WDBO WSJS 



11:00 AM— CS 

KMBC WGST 
WBRC WDOD 
WREC WODX 
WSFA WLAC 
WDSU KTRH 
KTSA WTAQ 
WKBH KFAB 
WISN WCCO 
WSBT WMT 



M P 

10:00 AM 9:00 AM 

KVOR KHJ 

KLZ KOIN 



M23— DANCE ORCHESTRA— Wednesday. y 2 hour. 



3:45 PM— ED 

WABC WJAS 
WAAB WLBZ 
WDRC WOKO 
WGR WORC 
WHP WPG 
WIP CFRB 



2:45 PM ES-CD 

WADC WLBW 

WBIG WMBG 

WCAO WQAM 

WDAE WSJS 

WDBJ WSPD 

WDBO WTOC 

WFBL WWVA 

WFEA CKLW 

WHK WTAR 
WJSV 



1:45 PM— CS 

KFAB WDOD 
KFH WDSU 
KLRA WFBM 
KMBC WHAS 
KOMA WISN 
KRLD WMT 
KTRH WODX 
KTSA WSBT 
WACO WSFA 
WBRC WTAQ 
WCCO WREC 



M 

12:45 PM 

KLZ 
KSL 
KVOR 



M25-DICK FIDDLER AND HIS LOTUS GARDENS ORCHESTRA -Fri. K hr. 
1:15 PM— ED— WEAF Network. 

M27— PENNSYLVANIA DANCE ORCHESTRA— Mon. y 2 hr. Phil Harris. 
12:00 Mid— ED 11:00 PM— ES-CD 10:00— PM—CS 

WJZ KDKA WBAL WJR KOIL KWCR 

WCKY WSYR KSO 
WGAR WENR 
WHAM 
WBZ WBZA WREN added at 12:15 AM ED 



M29— HOTEL PIERRE DANCE ORCHESTRA— Wed. y 2 hr. 
12:30 AM— ED 11:30 PM— ES-CD 10:30PM— CS 

WJZ WBZA WBAL WENR KOIL KWK 
WBZ WCKY KPRC WBAP 

WGAR KSO WKY 

WHAM KTBS WREN 

WLW KWCR 

WSYR 
Saturday. 12:05 Mid— ED. >/ 2 hour— WEAF Network. 



Henry King. 



PROGRAM 



FINDER 



M— MUSIC— DANCE (Continued) 



M31— GUY LOMBARDO 


AND HIS ROYAL CANADIANS— Fri. y 2 hour 


P 
7:30 PM 


11:30 PM— ED 


10:30 PM— ES-CD 9:30 PM—CS 


8:30 PM 


WABC WOKO 


WADC WCAO 


KMBC WFBM 


KVOR 


KHJ 


WAAB WKBW 


WHK CKOK 


KMOX WMBD 


KLZ 


KOIN 


WDRC WCAU 


WFBL WSPD 


WGST WDOD 


KSL 


KGB 


WEAN WPG 


WJSV WCAH 


WREC WODX 




KFRC 


WLBZ WICC 


WLBW WHEC 


WLAC WDSU 




KOL 


WHP WORC 


WDBJ WTOC 


KTRH KLRA 




KVI 


CFRB 


WQAM WDBO 


WIBW WACO 




KFPY 




WDAE WSJS 


KFH KFAB 
WISN WCCO 
WSBT WMT 




KOH 


Sunday. y 2 hour. 11:00 PM— ED— WABC Network. 






M34— BLUE ROOM ECHOES— Saturday. 


y 2 hr. 3:00 PM- 


-ED— WEAF Network. 


Norman L. Cloutier Orchestra, Fred Wade. 






M41— PALMER HOUSE ORCHESTRA— Wednesday. % hour. 


11:30 PM— ED— WEAF 


Network. Richard Cole. 









M42— DANCE MUSIC HOTEL PENNSYLVANIA ROOF— Saturday. V 2 hour. 
Phil Harris. 

11:00 PM— ED 10:00 PM— ES-CD 9:00 PM—CS 

WEAF WFI WFBR WSAI WDAF WOC 

WCAE WGY WRC WTAM WHO 
WCSH 

Monday. '., hour. 11:15 PM— ED— WEAF Network. 

M44— POND'S PROGRAM— Fri. Y 2 hr. Ilka Chase, Hugh O'Connell, Victor Young, 
Lee Wiley, Paul Small. 

9:30 PM— ED 8:30 PM— ES-CD 7:30 PM—CS 

WEAF WTAG WWJ WFBR WDAF KSD 

WJAR WCSH WRC WTAM WOC WHO 

WLIT WGY WSAI WENR WOW 
WBEN WCAE 

M45— SATURDAY NIGHT DANCING PARTY— Sat. 1 hr. B. A. Rolfe and Terraplane 



Orchestra. 

10:00 PM— ED 

WEAF WTAG 
WEEI WJAR 
WCSH WFI 
WGY WBEN 
CKGW CFCF 



9:00 PM— ES-CD 8:00 PM—CS 

WRC WFBR KSD WOW 

WTAM WLW WDAF KSTP 

WWJ WOC WSB WSMB 

WHO WCAE WBAP 
WMAQ 



M P 

7:00 PM 6:00 PM 

KOA KGO 

KDYL KFI 



M47— GENE QUAW HOTEL COSMOPOLITAN ORCHESTRA— 
Friday. y 2 hour. 4:00 PM— ED— WJZ Network 



M50-SYNCOPATORS— Tues., Wed. 
Stokes, Dick Teela. 



M hr. 2:30 PM— ED— WJZ Network. Harold 



M56— WALDORF ASTORIA ORCHESTRA— Jack Denny. 

Monday. Vi hour. Thursday. V 2 hour. 

11:30 PM— ED 10:30 PM— ES-CD 11:30 PM— ED 10:30 PM— ES-CD 

WEAF WTAG WRC WFBR WEAF WJAR WFBR WWJ 

WJAR WTIC WBEN WTAG 

WCSH WFI 

M57— WEALTH OF HARMONY— Saturday. »/ 2 hour. 3:30 PM— ED— WJZ Network. 
Joseph Gallicchio, Edward Davies. 

M60-BREAKFAST CLUB— 

Mon., Tue., Wed., Thur., Fri., Sat. K hour. 9:15 AM— ED— WJZ Network 



N1— A. AND P. GYPSIES— Monday. \ 2 hour. Harry Horlick, Frank Parker. 

9:00 PM— ED 8:00 PM— ES-CD 

WEAF WTIC WRC WTAM 

WTAG WEEI WWJ WSAI 

WJAR WCSH WMAQ 
WLIT WGY 
WBEN WCAE 

N2— CITIES SERVICE CONCERT [Fri. 1 hr. Jessica Dragonette, The Cavaliers, 
Henry Shope, Fred Hufsmith, John Seagle, Elliot Shaw, Lee Montgomery, Fra.ik 
Banta, Rosarie Bourdon. 

8:00 PM— ED 7:00 PM— ES-CD 6:00 PM—CS 

WFBR WRC WDAF WOC 



WEAF WTIC 
WCSH WCAE 
WLIT WGY 
WBEN WTAG 
CKGW WEEI 
WJAR 



WTAM WWJ 
WSAI KYW 



WDAI WHO 
KSD WOW 
KTBS WKY 
WEBC KVOO 
WFAA KTBS 



M 

5:00 PM 

KOA 
KDYL 



N6— JACK FROST MELODY MOMENTS— Mon. V 2 hr. Josef Pasternack. 
9:30 PM— ED 8:30 PM— ES-CD 

WJZ KDKA WBAL WHAM 
WGAR WLW 
WJR WENR 



N9-MAJOR BOWES' CAPITOL FAMILY— Sunday. 1 hour. 
11:15 AM— ED 10:15 AM— ES-CD 9:15 AM— CS 

WEAF WJAR WEBR WRC WDAF KFYR 

WTAG WLIT WTAM WFLA WAPI WSMB 

WGY WWJ WSAI KPRC WEBC 

WIOD WWNC WHO WIBA 

WMAQ KSTP WMC 

WKY WBAP 

KTBS WOAI 

WOC 



M 
8:15 AM 

KOA 
KDYL 



P 
7:15 AM 

KFSD 

KGO 

KHQ 

KTAR 

KFI 

KGW 

KOMO 



N10— MERRIE MEN QUARTET— Mon., Wed., Fri. M hr. 12:30 PM— ED— WJZ 
Network. Wesley Summerfield, Elliot Stewart, Bob Geddes, Norman Gordon, 
Earl Lawrence. 



ABBREVIATIONS: 



ED — Eastern Daylight, ES-CD — Eastern Standard, Central Daylight, CS- 

SEE NOTE PAGE 29 



Central Standard, M — Mountain, P— Pacific. 



34 



Radio Fan-Fare 



RADIO FAN-FA RE PROGRAM FINDER 



N — Music — Medley Programs (Continued) 

N15-THURSDAY SPECIAL— Thursday. 1 hour. 4:00 PM— ED— WJZ Network. 
Ruth Lyon, Edward Davies, Josef Koestner. 

N16— TONE PICTURES— Sunday. 1 hour. 8:00 AM— ED— WJZ Network. 
George Blake, Mary Merker, Helen Janke, Richard Maxwell, Curt Peterson. 

N17— VOCAL ART QUARTET— Tuesday. >/z hour. 

Alma Kitchell, Selma Johanson, Chester Evers, Earl Waldo. 



3:00 PM— ED 


2:00 PM— ES-CD 


1 :00 PM— CS 


12:00 


WEAF 


WTAG 


WFBR 


WRC 


WSM 


WSB 


KOA 


WEEI 


WJAR 


WIOD 


WWJ 


WAPI 


KSD 




WGY 


WCAE 


WCKY 


WDAF 


woe 


WHO 




WFI 


WCSH 


WRVA 


WWNC 


WIBA 


WBAP 




CKGW 


WBEN 


WSAI 


WFLA 


KFYR 


KTBS 








WLS 


WTAM 


WDAY 

KSMB 


WOW 
WMC 





N20— MORNING PARADE— Saturday. 1 hour. 10:15 AM— ED— WEAF Network. 

N21— RADIO CITY CONCERT— Sunday. 1 hour. 12:15 PM— ED— WJZ Network. 
Erno Rapee, Director. 



02— THE PLAYBOYS— "Six Hands on Two Pianos"— Sunday, J- 
Also Wednesday. J4 hour. 11:30 AM— ED— Same Stations. 
Felix Bernard, Walter Samuels, and Leonard Whitcup. 



hour. 



2:15 PM— ED 


1:15 PM— ES-CD 


12:15 PM— CS 


M 

11:15 AM 


WABC WICC 


WADC 


WQAM 


KFAB WHAS 


KLZ 


WCAU WJAS 


WBT 


WSJS 


KFH WIBW 


KVOR 


WDRC WOKO 


WCAO 


WSPD 


KLRA WISN 




WEAN WORC 


WDBJ 


WTOC 


KMBC WLAC 




WGR WNAC 


WFBL 


WWVA 


KTRH WMT 






WFEA 


CKLW 


KTSA WODX 






WLBW 




WBRC WSBT 
WOOD WSFA 
WFBivI WTAQ 
WGST 




day. V, hour. 11:45 AM- 


ED— WABC Network. 





04— THE HAPPY RAMBLER— Thursday and Friday. J4 hour. 10:30 AM— ED— WEAF 
Network. Irving Kaufman, Lucy Allen. 



PI— ANN LEAF AT THE ORGAN— Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday. }', hour. 

M 
1:00 PM— ES-CD 12:00 PM—CS 

WCAO WBBM WGST WBRC 



2:00 PM— ED 

WABC WOKO 
WNAC WGR 
WDRC WCAU 
WJAS WLBC 
WICC WORC 
CFRB 



CKOK WFBL 
WSPD WFEA 
WLBW WHEC 
WTAR WDBJ 
WMBG WTOC 
WQAM WSJS 



Also Monday at 2:45 PM— ED— WABC Network. 



WDOD WREC 
WODX WSFA 
WLAC WDSU 
KTRH KFH 
WTAQ WKBH 
WISN WCCO 
WSBT 



11:00 AM 

KVOR 

KLZ 

KSL 



P2— LARRY LARSEN— Saturday. M hour. 

10:45 AM— ED 9:45 AM— ES-CD 8:45 AM— CS 

WJZ WBAL WJR KWK KWCR 

WMAL KYW WREN KOIL 
KSO 

P4— RADIO CITY ORGAN— Monday. Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday, Saturday 
J > hour. Richard LeiberL 

8:00 AM— ED 7:00 AM— ES-CD 6:00 AM— CS 

WDAF WFBR WOW 
WTAM WSAI 



WEAF WTAG 
WJAR CFCF 
WCAE WGY 
WFI WBEN 
WEEI WCSH 



WWJ 



P7 -MATINEE GEMS— Sat >/ 2 hour. 3:30 PM— ED— WEAF Network. Lew White. 



P9— FRED FEIBEL AT THE ORGAN— Sunday. Vz hour. 


M 


1:00 PM— ED 


12:00 N— ES-CD 


11:00 AM— CS 


10:00 AM 


WABC WOKO 


WADC WHEC 


KFAB WISN 


KLZ 


WAAB WORC 


WBT WLBW 


KMOX WMBD 


KVOR 


WDRC WPG 


WCAO WQAM 


KOMA WMT 




WGR CFRB 


WDAE WSJS 


KTRH WODX 




WJAS 


WDBJ WSPD 


WCCO WSBT 






WDBO CKLW 


WDOD WTAQ 






WFBL WTAR 


WDSU WREC 
WGST 





P10— IRMA GLEN— Thursday. J4 hour. 10:45 AM— ED— WJZ Network. 



Q1— BLACKSTONE PLANTATION— Tuesday. >/ 2 hour. Julia Sanderson, Frank Crumlt, 
Jack Shilkret, Parker Fennelly 

8:00 PM— ED 7:00 PM— ES-CD 

WRC WTAM 
WWJ 



WEAF WTAG 
WEEI WJAR 
WCSH WFL 
WGY WBEN 
WCAE 



Q — Music, Patter and Song (Continued) 
Q2— FRANK CRUMIT AND JULIA SANDERSON— Sunday. '/ 2 hour. 



5:30 PM— ED 

WABC WOKO 
WAAB WGR 
WDRC WCAU 
WEAN WICC 
WORC 



4:30 PM— ES-CD 3:30 PM—CS 

WADC WCAO KMBC WFBM 



WHK CKOK 
WFBL WSPD 
WCAH WJSV 
WWVA WHEC 
WTAR 



WHAS KMOX 
WDSU KOMA 
KFH KFAB 



QS— KANE AND KANNER— Friday. % hour. 



8:45 PM— ED 

WJZ WBZ 
KDKA WBZA 



7:45 PM— ES-CD 

WBAL WMAL 
WCKY WSYR 
WHAM WLS 
WJR WFLA 
WIS 



6:45 PM—CS 

KOIL KWK 
KSO WREN 
KWCR WJDX 
WSB WSM 
WSMB 



0,4— THE OXOL FEATURE— Wednesday, Friday. 
Graham and Bunny Coughlin. 

10:00 AM— ED 9:00 AM— ES-CD 



Ji hour. Dave Grant, Gordon 



WABC WOKO 
WAAB WDRC 
WCAU WJAS 
WEAN 



WCAO WKRC 
WFBL 



Q5--LES REIS AND ARTY DUNN— Monday, Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday H hour. 
Assisted by Novelty Orchestra. M 



9:45 AM— ED 

WABC WJAS 
WDRC WLBZ 
WEAN WOKO 
WHP WORC 
WICC WPG 
WIP CFRB 



8:45 AM— ES-CD 7:45 AM— CS 

WADC WKBN KFAB WHAS 



WBIG WLBW 
WBT WMBG 
WCAH WQAM 
WDAE WSJS 
WDBJ WSPD 
WDBO WWVA 
WFEA CKLW 
WHEC WTAR 
WHK WBBM 
WJSV 



KFH WISN 
KLRA WLAC 
KMBC WMBD 
KMOX WMT 
KOMA WODX 
KRLD WSBT 
KTRH WSFA 
KTSA WTAQ 
WDSU WREC 
WGST 



Also Monday. }.[ hour. 6:00 PM— ED— WABC Network. 

Q6— BILL AND GINGER— Mon., Wed., Fri. % hour. 
10:15 AM— ED 9:15 AM— ES-CD 

WABC WJAS WFBL WJSV 
WEAN WKBW 
WIP 
Also Tues. and Thurs. '., hr. 10:30 AM— ED— WABC Network. 

Q7— TUNE DETECTIVE, SIGMUND SPAETH— Thursday. J4 hour. 
7:45 PM— ED 6:45 PM— ES-CD 5:45 PM—CS 

WJZ KDKA WBAL WCKY KWCR KWK 

CFCF WJR WSYR KOIL 

WMAQ 

QS— MARION AND JIM JORDAN— Wed. > , hour. 11:15 AM— ED— WJZ Network. 
Also Saturday and Tuesday. 12:00 N— ED— WJZ Network. 

Q9— SMILING ED McCONNELL— Sun. U hr 6:00 PM— ED— WABC Network 
(Starting Sept. 10;. 

Q11— MARTHA AND HAL— Mon., Wed., Fri. J| hour. 8:00 AM-ED— WJZ 
Network. 

012— CLAIRE WILSON AND GRANT ALLEN— Thursday and Friday. M hour. 2:30 
PM— ED— WEAF Network. 

Q15— GOLDY AND DUSTY AND THE SILVER DUST TWINS— Mon., Tues., Wed., 
Thurs. and Fri. J,, hour. 

9:15 AM— ED 8:15 AM— ES-CD 

WABC WOKO WFBL WHEC 
WGR WDRC WWVA 
WCAU WJAS 
WHP WORC 









016— SALT AND PEANUTS— Mon., Tues., Thurs., and Sat. !,{ hour. 
12 Noon— ED 11:00 AM— ES-CD 10:00 AM— CS 

WFBR WSAI KSD WHO 

WFLA WTAM 

WIOD WWJ 

WIS WWNC 

WRC WMAQ 

WRVA 



WEAF WLIT 
WBEN WTAG 
WCAE WTIC 
WEEI CFCF 
WJAR CKGW 



KSTP WJDX 
WAPI WMC 
WDAF WOC 
WDAY WSM 
WEBC WSMB 



I 



(See also Dance and Variety Music and Patter and Song) 



R1— MILDRED BAILEY-Monday and Saturday. J., hour. 
7:15 PM— ED 6:15 PM— ES-CD 5:15 PM—CS 

WABC WLBZ WBIG WLBW KFH WHAS 
WDRC WOKO WBT WMBG 
WEAN WORC WDBJ WQAM 
WGR CFRB WDBO WSJS 
WJAS WNAC WFBL WSPD 

WFEA CKLW 

WKBN 



KMBC WISN 

KOMA WLAC 

KTSA WMT 

WACO WODX 

WBRC WSFA 

WDOD WTaQ 

WDSCJ WREC 
WGST 



M 

4:15 PM 

KLZ 
KVOR 



Thursday. 



hour. 6:30 PM-ED— WABC Network. 



ABBREVIATIONS: ED — Eastern Daylight, ES-CD — Eastern Standard, Central Daylight, CS — Central Standard, M — Mountain, P — Pacific. 

SEE NOTE PAGE 29 



September 



35 



RADIO F A N - F A R E 


PROGRAM 


FINDER 


R— MUSIC— POPULAR (Continued) 


R— MUSIC— POPULAR (Coetinued) 


R3— BETTY BARTH ELL— Tuesday. M hour. M 

6:15 PM— ED 5:15 PM— ES-CD 4:15 PM— CS 3:15 PM 

WABC WKBW WBIG WMBG KFH WHAS KLZ 
WAAB WLBZ WBT WQAM KLRA WISN KSL 
WCAU WOKO WCAO WSJS KMBC WLAC KVOR 
WDRC WORC WDBJ WSPD KTRH WMT 
WEAN WFBL WTOC KTSA WODX 
WFEA WWVA WBRC WSFA 
WLBW CKLW WDOD WTAQ 
WGST WREC 


Monday. M hour. 

10:30 PM— ED 9:30 PM— ES-CD 

WABC WOKO WCAO WHK 
WAAB WKBW CKOK WFBL 
WDRC WCAU WSPD WFEA 
WJAS WEAN WLBW WTAR 
WPG WLBZ WMBG WQAM 
WICC WHP WDBO WSJS 
WORC CFRB 


8:30 PM—CS 

KMBC WFBM 
WMBD WGST 
WBRC WDOD 
WREC WODX 
WLAC WDSU 
KTRH WIBW 
WCCO WMT 


M P 

7:30 PM 6:30 PM 

KVOR KHJ 
KLZ KOIN 
KGB 
KFRC 
KOL 
KFPY 


R19— YEASTFOAMERS— Sunday. >/ 2 hour. 
Jan Garber and His Orchestra. 

2:30 PM— ED 1 :30 PM— ES-CD 

WJZ WBZ WBAL WHAM 
WBZA KDKA WGAR WJR 
WLW WRVA 
WPTF WWNC 
WIS WIOD 
WFLA WJAX 
WSYR WMAL 
KYW 


12:30 PM—CS 

KWK WREN 
KOIL WTMJ 
WIBA KSTP 
WEBC WDAY 
KFYR WSM 
WSB WAPI 
WJDX WSMB 
KTHS KVOO 
KWCR WOAI 
WFAA WMC 
KSO KTBS 


M P 

11:30 AM 10:30 AM 

KOA KTAR 
KGIR KFS 
KDYL KGW 
KGHL KGO 
KFI 
KOMO 
KHQ 


R4— GENE ARNOLD AND THE COMMODORES— Mon. and Thurs. M hour. 
12:00 N— ED 11:00 AM— ES-CD 10:00 AM— CS 

WJZ WBZ WBAL WJR KSO WFAA 
KDKA WBZA WCKY WMAL KWCR WREN 

WGAR WSYR KWK 

WHAM 
Also \i hour Sunday. 2:00 PM— ED— Wed. and Fri. 12:00 N— ED— WEAF Network 


R5— CURTAIN CALLS— Wed. U hr. Mark Warnow's Orchestra; Charles Carlile; 
Rhoda Arnold; and Four Clubmen Quartet M 
8:15 PM— ED 7:15 PM— ES-CD 6:15 PM— CS 5:15 PM 

WABC WJAS WADC WHK KFAB WGST KVOR 
WCAU WOKO WBIG WLBW KFH WLAC 
WDRC WORC WBT WMBG KLRA WODX 
WEAN WPG WCAO WQAM KMBC WSBT 
WGR CFRB WDBJ WSJS KTRH WSFA 
WICC WNAC WDBO WSPD KTSA WTAQ 

WFBL WWVA WDOD WREC 

WFEA CKLW 

WHEC WTAR 


R21— JACK MILLER, BARITONE— Friday. 
5:45 PM— ED 4:45 PM— ES-CD 

WABC WJAS WADC WLBW 

WDRC WKBW WBIG WMBG 

WEAN WLBZ WBT WQAM 

WHP WOKO WCAO WSJS 

WIP WORC WDBJ WSPD 

WFBL WWVA 

WFEA CKLW 

WHEC 


,' 4 hour. 
3:45 PM—CS 

KFAB WIBW 
KFH WISN 
KLRA WLAC 
KMBC WMT 
KRLD WODX 
KTSA WSBT 
WBRC WSFA 
WDOD WTAQ 
WGST WREC 
WHAS 


M 
2:45 PM 

KLZ 
KSL 
KVOR 


R6— MORTON DOWNEY— Wed., Thurs., and Fri. M hr. M 

7:00 PM— ED 6:00 PM— ES-CD 5:00 PM— CS 4:00 PM 

WABC WICC WADC WMBG KFAB WGST KLZ 
WCAU WJAS WBIG WQAM KFH WISN KSL 
WDRC WLBZ WBT WSJS KLRA WLAC KVOR 
WEAN WOKO WDBJ WSPD KTRH WMT 
WGR WNAC WFBL WTOC KTSA WODX 
WHP WFEA WWVA WBRC WSFA 
WHEC CKLW WCCO WTAQ 
WLBW WTAR WDOD WREC 


R22— BILLY WHITE, TENOR, AND ORCHESTRA— Tues. and Thurs. V 2 hr. 

M 

3:30 PM— ED 2:30 PM— ES-CD 1:30 PM— CS 12:30 PM 

WABC WHP WADC WLBW KFAB WHAS KLZ 
WAAB WJAS WBIG WMBG KFH WIBW KVOR 
WCAU WLBZ WBT WQAM KLRA WISN 
WDRC WOKO WCAO WSJS KMBC WLAC 
WGR WORC WDBJ WSPD KRLD WMT 
WFBL WTOC KTSA WODX 
WFEA WWVA WBRC WSBT 
WHK CKLW WCCO WSFA 
WDOD! WTAQ 
WFBM WREC 
WGST 
Also Monday. H hour. 4:00 PM — ED — Same Stations. 


R7— WILL OSBORNE ORCHESTRA— Mon., Wed., Fri. )i hr. Pedro Dc Cordoba, 
"The Friendly Philosopher" 

10:45 AM— ED 10:45 AM— ES-CD 9:45 AM— CS 

WABC WOKO WCAO WHK KMBC WHAS 
WNAC WGR WFBL WJSV KMOX WGST 
WEAN WCAU WCAH WBT KRLD WCCO 

WTAR WMBG 

WBBM WOWO 
CKLW 


R2S— THE HAPPY WONDER BAKERS— Mon., Wed. and Fri. M hour 
8:00 PM— ED 7:00 PM— ES-CD 

WABC WDRC WHEC 
WAAB WORC 
WICC WKBW 

WMAS 


RS— "AT KENNEDY— Mon., Wed., and Fri. % hr. 

12:45 PM— ED 11:45 AM^ES-CD 10:45 AM— CS 

WJZ KDKA WBAL WSYR KSO KWK 
WCKY KWCR WREN 


R24— THE MERRYMAKERS— Mon. M hr. 10:30 -AM— ED. Tues. M hr. 11:45 
AM— ED. Wed. H hr. 11:00 AM— ED— WABC Network. Fred Berrens, Con- 
ductor. 


R10— FRIGIDAIRE PROGRAM— Wed. and Fri. }i hr. Howard Marsh and Snow 
Queens — Wed. Jane Froman and Snow Queens — Fri M P 
10:30 PM— ED 9:30 PM— ES-CD 8:30 PM— CS 7:30 PM 6:30 PM 

WABC WKBW WADC WKRC KFH WDOD KLZ KFPY 
WCAU WOKO WCAO WQAM KMOX WDSU KSL KFRC 
WDRC CFRB WDAE WSPD KOMA WGST KGB 
WEAN CKAC WDBJ CKLW KSCJ WHAS KHJ 
WJAS WNAC WDBO WTAR KTRH WMBD KOIN 
WFBL WBBM KTSA WREC KOL 
WHK WOWO WCCO KVI 


R25— GERTRUDE NIESEN— Saturday. ' 4 hour. 

10:45 PM— ED 9:45 PM— ES-CD 8:45 PM— CS 

WABC WJAS WADC WHEC KFH WDSU 

WCAU WOKO WBT WJSV KMBC WFBM 

WDRC WORC WCAO WKBN KMOX WGST 

WGR WNAC WDAE WLBW KOMA WISN 

WDBJ WQAM KTRH WLAC 

WDBO WSJS WACO WODX 

WFBL WSPD WBRC WSBT 

WFEA CKLW WCCO WSFA 

WDOD WTAQ 


M 
7:45 PM 

KLZ 
KVOR 


R15— ARLENE JACKSON— Saturday. M hour. M P 

5:30 PM— ED 4:30 PM— ES-CD 3:30 PM— CS 2:30 PM 1:30 PM 

WEAF WTAG WTAM WSAI WIBA KSTP KOA KGO 
WGY WBEN WIS WJAX WDAY WSM KDYL KFI 
WIOD WAPI WSB KGW 
WMC WSMB KOMO 
WKY KPRC KHQ 
KTBS WOAI 


R26— WILDROOT INSTITUTE— Sun. \i hr. Vee Lawnhurst and Johnny Seagle. 

M P 
4:15 PM— ED S:irPM— ES-CD 2:15]PM— CS 1:15 PM 12:15 PM 

WEAF WJAR WSAI WWJ KFYR WHO KDYL KFI 
WCAE WLIT WTAM WLS KPRC WIBA KOA KGO 
WCSH WTAG KSTP WKY KGW 
WEEI KTBS WOAI KHQ 

KVOO WOC . KOMO 

WDAF WOW 

WDAY WTMJ 

WFAA 


R16— VINCENT LOPEZ AND HIS ORCHESTRA; ALICE JOY, GUEST ARTIST— 
Sunday. } 2 hour. 

9:15 PM— ES-CD 8:15 PM— CS 

WGAR WLW KSO WREN 
WJR WMAQ KWK 


R31— DON ROSS, SONGS— Tues. and Thurs. ' 4 hr. 

2:30 PM— ED 1:30 PM— ES-CD 12:30 PM—CS 

WABC WJAS WBT WKRC KFAB WBRC 
WCAU WLBZ WFBL WMBG KFH WCCO 
WGR WFEA WTOC KLRA WDSU 
WHK CKLW KMBC WFBM 
WJSV WBBM KMOX WGST 
KOMA WHAS 
KSCJ WISN 
KTRH WMT 
KTSA 


M 

1:00 PM 

KLZ 

KSL 

KERN 

KMJ 

KFBK 

KDB 

KWG 


R17— LA PALINA— Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday. \i hour. Kate Smith. 
8:30 PM— ED 7:30 PM— ES-CD 6:30 PM— ES 

WABC WOKO WADC WCAO KMBC WFBM 
WGR WCAU WGN WKRC WHAS KMOX 
WJAS WHK CKLW WMT WCCO 

WOWO WFBL KFAB 

WSPD WJSV 

WHEC WKBN 


R18— LITTLE JACK LITTLE— Mon., Tues., Wed., Thurs., FrL, M hour 
9:00 AM— ED 8:00 AM— ES-CD 7:00 AM— CS 

WABC WOKO WADC WCAO KMBC WFBM 
WAAB WGR WHK CKOK WMBD WGST 
WDRC WIP WCAH WFEA WDOD WREC 
WJAS WEAN WLBW WWVA WSFA WLAC 
WPG WLBZ WBIG WDBJ WDSU KRLD 
WHP WORC WTOC WSJS KTRH KLRA 
CFRB WTAQ WISN 

WSBT WMT 


R32— SINGIN' SAM THE BARBASOL MAN 
8:15 PM— ED 7:15 PM— ES-CD 

WABC WOKO WADC WCAO 
WNAC WGR WGN WKRC 
WDRC WCAU WHK CKLW 
WJAS WEAN WFBL WSPD 
WJSV 
After Sept 11, Tuesday and Thursday also 


—Monday. 14 hour. 
6:15 PM— CS 

KMBC WFBM 
KMOX WCCO 


LOCATES 


W H , 


A T 


YOU L 1 K 


E B 


EST 



ABBREVIATIONS: 



ED — Eastern Daylight, ES-CD — Eastern Standard, Central Daylight, CS — Central Standard, M — Mountain, P — Pacific. 

SEE NOTE PAGE 29 



36 



Radio Fan-Fare 



RADIO 



F A N - F A R E 



PROGRAM 



N D E R 



R— MUSIC— POPULAR (Continued) 



R33— VERA VAN, CONTRALTO— Wednesday and Friday. 
9:15 PM— ED 8:15 PM— ES-CD 7:15 PM— CS 

WADC WMBG KFH WHAS 

WBIG WQAM 

WBT WSJS 

WDBJ WSPD 

WFBL WTOC 

WFEA WWVA 

WHK CKLW 

WLBW WTAR 



WABC WICC 
WCAU WJAS 
WDRC WLBZ 
WEAN WOKO 
WGR WORC 
WHP WNAC 



KLRA WIBW 
KMBC WISN 
KRLD WLAC 
KTRH WMBD 
KTSA WMT 
WBRC WODX 
WCCO WSBT 
WDOD WSFA 
WFBM WTAQ 
WGST WREC 
Also Sunday. H hour. 5:15 PM— ED— Same Stations. 

R37— MARK WARNOW'S NOVELTY ORCHESTRA— Thursday. 



hour. M 

6:15 PM 

KLZ 

KVOR 



9:15 PM— ED 

WABC WLBZ 
WCAU WOKO 
WDRC WORC 
WEAN WPG 
WGR CFRB 
WICC WNAC 
WJAS 



8:15 PM— ES-CD 7:15 PM— CS 

WADC WHK KFH WFBM 



WBIG WJSV 
WBT WLBW 
WCAO WMBG 
WDAE WQAM 
WDBJ WSJS 
WDBO WSPD 
WFBL WWVA 
WFEA CKLW 
WHEC WTAR 



KLRA WGST 
KMBC WISN 
KOMA WLAC 
KTRH WODX 
KTSA WSBT 
WBRC WSFA 
WCCO WTAQ 
WDOD WREC 
WDSU 



Yi hour. 

M 
6:15 PM 

KLZ 
KSL 
KVOR 



R40— MANHATTAN MERRY-GO-ROUND— Sunday. y 2 hour. Tamara, David Percy, 
Gene Rodemich. 

8:00 PM— ES-CD 7:00 PM— CS 

WFBR WWJ KSD WOW 
WSAI WRC WDAF WOC 
WENR WHO 



5:00 PM— ED 

WEAF WJAR 
WGY WTIC 



R41— DOLPH MARTIN'S ORCHESTRA— Mon., Wed., Fri. H hour. The Travelers 
Quartet. 

6:30 PM— ES-CD 

WCAO WFBL 
WJSV WFEA 
WHEC 



7:30 PM— ED 

WABC WOKO 
WNAC WGR 
WDRC WCAU 
WJAS WEAN 
WLBZ WHP 
WORC WICC 



R42— MELODY PARADE— Tuesday. M hr. 10:45 AM— ED. Wed. M hr. 11:45 
AM— ED. Fri. '., hr. 11:00 AM— ED— WABC Network. 
Vincent Sorey, Conductor 

R43— PHIL REGAN, TENOR— Mon. and Thurs. M hr. 11:15 PM— ED— WADC 
Network. 



(See also Organ Music) 



$1 MID WEEK HYMN SING— Tuesday. «.,' hour. 



6:30 PM— ED 

WEAF WTAG 
WGY 



5:30 PM— ES-CD 

WIS WSAI 
WWJ WWNC 
WMAQ 



4:30 PM— CS 

WDAF KSD 
KFYR WVOO 



M 

3:30 PM 
KGIR 



WSB 
WIBA 

KTHS 
WOW 



WOAI 
KTBS 
WJDX 



P 
2:30 PM 
KGO 
KGW 
KFSD 
XTAR 
KHQ 



S3— OLD SONGS OF THE CHURCH— Thursday. \i hour. 

Kathryn Palmer, Soprano; Joyce Allmand, Contralto; Sidney Smith, Tenor; Lowell 
Patton, Organist; Earl Styers, Baritone. 

6:30 PM— ED 5:30 PM— ES-CD 4:30 PM— CS 

WJZ WSYR KWK KWCR 

WREN 



S5— SALT LAKE TABERNACLE CHOIR AND ORGAN— Sunday. 
11:30 AM -ED 10:30 AM— ES-CD 9:30 AM— CS 



WOKO WPG 
WLBZ WHP 



WCAO CKOK 
WFBL WSPD 
WFEA WLBW 
WKBN WDBJ 
WTOC WQAM 
WDBO 



WABC added at 11.45 AM— ED— for ?i 
hour. 



KMBC WMBD 
WGST WDOD 
WREC WLAC 
WDSU KRLD 
KTRH WIBW 
WACO KFH 
WTAQ WKBH 
KFAB WCCO 
WSBT WMT 



1 hour. 
M 

8:30 AM 

KVOR 

KLZ 

KSL 



P 
7:30 AM 

KHJ 

KOIN 

KGB 

KFRC 

KOL 

KFPY 



S6— CATHEDRAL HOUR— Sunday. 
Channon Collinge, Conductor. 



4:00 PM— ED 

WABC WJAS 
WCAU WOKO 
WDRC WORC 
WEAN WPG 
WGR CFRB 
WICC WNAC 



3:00 PM 

WADC 

WBT 

WCAO 

WDAE 

WDBJ 

WDBO 

WFBL 

WFEA 

WHEC 

WHK 



1 hour. 

-ES-CD 

WJSV 

WKBN 

WLBW 

WMBG 

WQAM 

WSJS 

WSPD 

CKLW 

WTAR 



2:00 PM— CS 

KFAB WDSU 
KFH WFBM 
KLRA WGST 
KMBC WISN 
KMOX WLAC 
KOMA WMBD 
KRLD WMT 
KTRH WODX 
WACO WSBT 
WBRC WSFA 
WCCO WTAQ 
WDOD WREC 



M 

1:00 PM 

KLZ 



T1— AMERICAN ALBUM FAMILIAR MUSIC— Sunday. 1/2 hour. Gus Haenschen, Frank 
Munn, Elizabeth Lenox, Oilman and Arden, Bertrand Hirsch. M P 



9:30 PM— ED 

WEAF WCSH 
WJAR WTAG 
WFI WGY 
WBEN WCAE 
WEEI 



8:30 PM— ES-CD 7:30 PM— CS 

WCKY WFBR KSD WOC 



WRC WTAM 
WWJ WSAI 
WIOD WFLA 
WRVA WJAX 
WENR WPTF 



WHO WOW 
WSM WMC 
WSB WOAI 
WJDX KTHS 
WFAA WKY 
KPRC WSMB 
WAPI WTMJ 
KSTP WDAF 



6:30 PM 5:30 PM 

KOA KGO 

KDYL KOMO 
KFI 
KGW 
KHQ 



T2— ARCADIANS— Friday. y 2 hour. 4:30 PM— ED— WJZ Network. Ruth Kelly Bello. 

T3— RHODA ARNOLD AND CHARLES CARLILE DUETS-Sunday. V, hour. 11:00 
AM-ED-WABC Network. ' /2 

T4— FERDE GROFE'S ORCHESTRA WITH CONRAD THIBAULT— Mon. V. hour. 
8:45 PM— ED 7:45 PM— ES-CD 6:45 PM— CS 

WRC WTAM WTMJ 
WWJ WLW 



WEAF WTIC 
WTAG WEEI 
WJAR WCSH 
WLIT WGY 
WBEN WCAE 
Wednesday, \i hour. 
9:00 PM— ED 
WEAF WTAG 
WJAR WCSH 
WGY WFI 
WCAE WEEI 
WBEN 



8:00 PM— ES-CD 7:00 PM— CS 

WWJ WTAM WMAQ 
WRC WLW KSTP 
WTMJ 



M P 

6:00 PM 5:00 PM 

KSD WDAF 



T5— CHASE & SANBORN TEA PROGRAM— Wednesday. '/■> hour. Fanny Brice, 
George Olsen. 

7:00 PM— ES-CD 6:00 PM— CS 

WFBR WRC KSD WOW 

WTAM WWJ WDAF WOC 

WSAI WCKY WHO 
WLS 



8:00 PM— ED 

WEAF WTIC 
WTAG WEEI 
WJAR WCSH 
WLIT WGY 
WBEN WCAE 



T6— COLUMBIA ARTISTS, RECITAL— Tuesday. 1/2 hour. 



3:00 PM— ED 

WABC WOKO 
WCAU WORC 
WDRC WPG 
WGR CFRB 
WJAS 



2:00 PM— ES-CD 1:00 PM— CS 

WADC WHK KFAB WDOD 



12:00 N 

KSL 
KVOR 



WBT WJSV KFH WDSU 

WCAO WLBW KLRA WFBM 

WDAE WMBG KMBC WGST 

WDBJ WQAM KMOX WISN 

WDBO WSJS KOMA WLAC 

WFBL WSPD KRLD WODX 

WFEA CKLW KTRH WSBT 

WHEC WTAR WACO WSFA 
WBRC WTAQ 
WCCO WREC 
Monday. >/ 2 hour. 4:30 PM— ED— WABC Network. 
Wednesday. \i hour. 4:15 PM— ED— WABC Network. 
Friday. M hour. 2:30 PM— ED— WABC Network. 

T7— NEW WORLD SALON ORCHESTRA— Sun. ] •> hr. 12:30 PM— ED. 

Mon. i 2 hr. 3:30 PM— ED. Fri. % hr. 3:00 PM— ED— WABC Network. 

T8— CONCERT MINIATURES— Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday. V2 



hour. Emery Deutsch. 

12:30 PM— ED 11:30 AM— ES-CD 10:30 AM— CS 

WABC WOKO WADC WCAO KMBC KMOX 

WGR WIP WBBM CKOK WGST WDOD 

WJAS WEAN WFBL WSPD WREC WSFA 

WPG WLBZ WJSV WCAH WLAC WDSU 

WHP CFRB WFEA WLBW KTRH WIBW 

WHEC WWVA WACO KFH 

WBIG WTOC WTAQ WISN 

WQAM WDBO WSBT WMT 
WDAE WSJS 



M 

9:30 AM 

KVOR 

KLZ 

KSL 



Saturday. J ^ hour. 11:30 AM— ED. Same stations as above. 

T9— DANCING ECHOES— Saturday. }i hour. 2:00 PM— ED— WABC Network. 

T11— PHIL DUEY AND HIS FIRESIDE SONGS— Sunday. \i hour. 
10:45 PM— ED— WJZ Network. 



T13— GYPSY NINA— Tuesday. M hour. 



7:00 PM— ED 

WABC WHP 
WAAB WICC 
WCAU WJAS 
WDRC WOKO 
WEAN WORC 
WGR 



6:00 PM— ES-CD 

WBIG WMBG 
WQAM 
WSJS 
WSPD 



WBT 

WDBJ 

WFBL 



WFEA WTOC 
WHK CKLW 
WLBW WTAR 



Also Saturday. M hour. 6:30 PM— ED 



5:00 PM— CS 

KFAB WGST 
KFH WHAS 
KLRA WISN 
KTRH WLAC 
KTSA WODX 
WBRC WSFA 
WCCO WTAQ 
WDOD WREC 
-WABC Network. 



M 

4:00 PM 

KLZ 
KSL 
KVOR 



T15— TITO GUIZAR— Saturday. % hour. M P 

5:45 PM— ED 4:45 PM— ES-CD 3:45 PM— CS 2:45 PM 1:45 PM 

WCAO WHK KMBC WGST KVOR KHJ 

CKOK WFBL WBRC WDOD KLZ KOIN 

WSPD WFEA WREC WSFA KSL KGB 

WLBW WHEC WLAC WDSU KFRC 

WKBN WTAR KRLD KTRH KOL 

WDBJ WMBG KTSA WACO KFPY 

WTOC WQAM 
WDBO WSJS 



WABC WOKO 
WAAB WGR 
WDRC WCAU 
WJAS WEAN 
WLBZ WORC 
CFRB 



WBRC WDOD 
WREC WSFA 
WLAC WDSU 
KRLD KTRH 
KTSA WACO 
KFH WTAQ 
WKBH KFAB 
WISN WMT 
Wednesday. M hour. 8:45 PM— ED— WABC Network. 



ABBREVIATIONS: ED — Eastern Daylight, ES-CR — Eastern Standard, Central Daylight, CS — Central Standard, M — Mountain, P — Pacific. 

SEE NOTE PAGE 29 



September 



37 



RADIO FAN-FARE PROGRAM FINDER 



T— MUSIC— STANDARD & FOLK (Continued) 



T17— HOUSEHOLD MUSICAL MEMORIES— Tuesday. 
Koestner, Alice Mock. 

10:00 PM— ED 9:00 PM— ES-CD 

WJZ WBZ WHAM WSYR 
WBZA KDKA WJR WBAL 
WMAQ 



11 hour. Edgar Guest, Josef 



T18— RAY HEATHERTON, BARITONE — Tuesday. 
WJZ Network. 



hour. 7:45 PM — ED- 



T19— ITALIAN I DYLL- 
8:00 PM— ED 

WABC WOKO 
WAAB WGR 
WDRG WCAU 
WJAS WPG 
WLBZ WICC 
WHP WORC 
CFRB 



Saturday. y 2 hour. 
2:00 PM— ES-CD 

WCAO WBBM 
WHK CKOK 
WFBL WSPD 
WFEA WLBW 
WHEC WTAR 
WDBJ WNBG 
WTOC WQAM 
WDBO WSJS 



1:00 PM— CS 

KMBC WFBM 
WGST WBRC 
WDOD WREC 
WSFA WLAG 
WDSU KRLD 
KTRH KTSA 
WACO KFH 
WTAQ WKBH 
KFAB WISN 
WSBT WMT 



M 

12:00 N 

KVOR 
KSL 



P 
11:00 AM 

KHJ 

KOIN 

KGB 

KFRC 

KOL 

KFPY 



T20— RALPH KIRBERY— Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday, Saturday. 
5 Minutes; 12:00 Mid— ED— WEAF Network. 



T21— ANDRE KOSTELANETZ PRESENTS— Monday. ' 2 hour. 
Evan Evans, Baritone; Mixed Chorus and Orchestra. 



10:00 PM— ED 

WABC WOKO 
WNAC WGR 
WDRC WJAS 
WEAN WLBZ 
WICC WHP 
WORC 



9:00 PM— ES-CD 

WADC WCAO 
WBBM WHK 
CKOK WFBL 
WSPD WJSV 
WCAH WFEA 
WLBW WHEC 
WKBN WDBJ 
WDBO WDAE 
WSJS 



8:00 PM— CS 

KMBC WFBM 
KMOX WGST 
WDOD WREC 
WSFA WLAC 
WDSU KRLD 
KTRH KLRA 
KTSA WIBW 
WISN WCCO 
WMT 



Gladys Rice 
M 

7:00 PM 

KVOR 

KLZ 

KSL 



, Soprano; 

P 
6:00 PM 

KHJ 

KOIN 

KGB 

KFRC 

KOL 

KFPY 



T22— JOHN KELVIN, TENOR— Thursday. 
5:45 PM— ED 4:45 PM— ES-CD 

WABC WJAS WADC WLBW 
WDRC WLBZ WBIG WMBG 
WEAN WOKO WBT WQAM 
WGR WORC WCAO WSJS 
WHP WNAC WDBJ WSPD 
WIP WDBO WTOC 

WFBL WWVA 
WFEA CKLW 
WHK 
Also \i hr. Sunday 2:00 PM— ED— and 



h hour. M 

3:45 PM— CS 2:45 PM 

KFAB WHAS KLZ 
KFH WIBW KSL 
KLRA WLAC KVOR 
KMBC WMT 
KRLD WODX 
KTSA WSBT 
WBRC WSFA 
WDOD WTAQ 
WGST WREC 
Fri. 5:15 PM — ED — Same Stations. 



T24— OLGA, COUNTESS ALBANI— Sunday. M hour. 

7:00 PM— ED 6:00 PM— ES-CD 5:00 PM— CS 

WFBR WIS WOO WHO 

WSAI WWNC WSM WSB 

WRC WJAX WMC WOW 
WMAQ 
hour. 7:15 PM— ED— Same stations. 



WEAF WTAG 
WCAE WJAR 
WBEN 



Thursday. 



P 
3:00 PM 

KGO 

KFSD 
KGW 
KOMO 



T27— FRANCES! PAPERTE, MEZZO-SOPRANO— Thurs. H hr. 12:15 PM— ED- 
WEAF Network. 



T28— GEORGE SCHERBAN'S RUSSIAN GYPSIES ORCHESTRA. 
Monday, Tuesday and Thursday. > -> hour. 

1:30 PM— ED 12:30 PM— ES-CD 11:30 AM— CS 

WCAO WHK KMBC WODX 

CKOK WFBL 

WSPD WFEA 

WLBW WHEC 

WMBG WTAR 

WQAM WTOC 

WADC WSJS 

WWVA WBT 



WABC WOKO 
WAAB WGR 
WDRC WPG 
WJAS WORC 
WLBZ WCAU 
WEAN 
WBIG 
WHP 



10:30 AM 

KVOR 
KLZ 

KSL 



WBRC WLAC 
WREC KTRH 
WSFA WTAQ 
WIBW WISN 
KFH WSBT 
WCCO WHAS 
WMT KLRA 
WGST KTSA 
WDOD 
Also Wednesday. \i hour. 6:30 PM— ED— WABC Network. 

T29— SOUTHLAND SKETCHES— Sunday. 1/2 hour. 10:00 AM— ED— WJZ Network. 
Southernaires, Homer Smith, Lowell Peters, Jay Toney, William Edmonson 

T31— VASS FAMILY— Sat. } 4 hour. Seven South Carolina Children Singing. 
11:00 AM— ED 9:00 AM— CS 

WEAF WEEI KFYR KSD 

WJAR WTAG WOW KSTP 

WGY WCAE 
WCSH WTIC 

T32— THE BALLADEERS— Sunday. V 2 hour. 9:00 AM— ED— WEAF Network. 
T33— WILLARD ROBISON, EVANGELIST OF RHYTHM— Sunday. j 4 hour. 



5:00 PM— ED 


4:00 PM— ES-CD 


3:00 PM— CS 


M 


WABC 


WICC 


WADC 


WMBG 


KFH WHAS 


2:00 PM 


WCAU 


WJAS 


WBIG 


WQAM 


KLRA WIBW 


KLZ 


WDRC 


WLBZ 


WBT 


WSJS 


KMBC WISN 


KVOR 


WEAN 


WOKO 


WCAO 


WSPD 


KRLD WLAC 




WGR 


WORC 


WDBJ 


WTOC 


KTRH WMBD 




WHP 


WNAC 


WFBL 


WWVA 


KTSA WMT 








WFEA 


CKLW 


WBRC WODX 








WHK 


WTAR 


WCCO WSBT 








WLBW 




WDOD WSFA 
WFBM WTAQ ] 
WGST WREC 





Also Thursday. M hour. 10:00 PM— ED— Same Stations. 



T34— YESTERDAY AND TODAY— Monday. \i hour. 8:00 PM— ED— WJZ Network. 
Frank Tours and his Orchestra; Henry M. Neely, Narrator. 



T— MUSIC— STANDARD & FOLK (Continued) 
T35— HOUR GLASS— Monday. Ihour. 10:00 PM— ED— WJZ Network. Harold Sanford. 
T37— ORCHESTRAL GEMS— Sunday. V 2 hour. 11:30 PM— ED— WEAF Network. 
T38— RADIO RUBES— Sunday. % hour. 11:00 AM— ED— WEAF Network. 



U1— HOWARD BARLOW AND THE COLUMBIA SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA— Wed. 



and Fri. 

11:00 PM— ED 

WABC WIP 
WDRC WJAS 
WEAN WLBZ 
WGR WOKO 
WHP 
WICC 



10:00 PM— ES-CD 9:00 PM— CS 

WADC WHEC KFAB WGST 



WORC 
WNAC 



WBIG 

WBT 

WCAO 

WDBJ 

WFBL 

WFEA 



WLBW 

WQAM 

WSJS 

WSPD 

WTOC 

CKLW 



Also Sun. 1 hr. 3:00 PM— ED.. 



KFH WHAS 
KMBC WIBW 
KTRH WLAC 
KTSA WMBD 
WBRC WMT 
WCCO WODX 
WDOD WSBT 
WFBM WREC 
and Mon. 10:45 PM— ED 



8:00 PM 

KSL 
KVOR 



-Same Stations. 



U2— LIGHT OPERA GEMS— Tuesday. 
Channon Collinge, Conductor. 



10:45 PM— ED 

WABC WOKO 
WAAB WGR 
WDRC WJAS 
WEAN WLBZ 
WICC WHP 
WORC CFRB 



9:45 PM— ES-CD 

WCAO WHK 
CKOK WFBL 
WSPD WFEA 
WLBW WHEC 
WTAR WDBJ 
WMBG WTOC 
WQAM WDBO 
WSJS 



V2 hour. 

8:45 PM— CS 

KMBC WFBM 
WMBD WGST 
WBRC WDOD 
WREC WODX 
WLAC WDSU 
KTRH KTSA 
WIBW KFH 
WKBH WCCO 
WSBT WMT 



M 

7:45 PM 

KVOR 

KLZ 

KSL 



P 
6:45 PM 

KHJ 

KOIN 

KGB 

KFRC 

KOL 

KFPY 



U4—SYMPHONETTE— Sunday. 
Josef Koestner. 



hour. 4:15 PM— ED— WJZ Network. Cyril Pitts, 



U6— HOLLYWOOD BOWL CONCERT SYMPHONIES UNDER THE STARS-Saturday 
K hour. 12:15 AM— ED— WEAF Network. (Ends Sept. 2). 



VI— BOAKE CARTER— Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday. V. hour. 
7:45 PM— ED 6:45 PM— ES-CD 

WABC WNAC WCAO WBBM 
WGR WCAU WHK CKOK 
WJAS WJSV WBT 

V3— FLOYD GIBBONS THE WORLD'S FAIR REPORTER— Sun., Tues., Thur. % hour. 



8:45 PM— ED 

WJZ WBZA 

KDKA 

WBZ 



7:45 PM— ES-CD 

WBAL WMAL 
WGAR WSYR 
WHAM WLS, 
WOR 



V4— BACK OF NEWS IN WASHINGTON— Wednesday. M hour. 



6:30 PM— ED 

WEAF WBEN 
WJAR 



5:30 PM— ES-CD 

WFBR WCKY 
WWNC WIS 
WMAQ 



4:30 PM— CS 

WJDX KSD 
WDAF KVOO 
WIBA KTHS 



M P 

3:30 PM 2:30 PM 

KOA KPO 



WOAI 
KFYR 
WMC 
WSMB 



KTBS 
WEBC 
WAPI 



V5— EDWIN C. HILL— Mon., Wed. and Fri. 



8:15 PM— ED 

WABC WGR 
WCAU WJAS 
WDRC WOKO 

WEAN WNAC 



7:15 PM— ES-CD 

WADC WKRC 
WCAO WSPD 
WFBL CKLW 
WHK WGN 
WJSV 



H hr. (Starting SepL 11). 
6:15 PM— CS 

KMBC WCCO 
KMOX WFBM 



M P 

3:30 PM 2:30 PM 

KOA KECA 

KPO 
KFSD 



V6— JOHN B. KENNEDY— Thursday. 5 Minutes. 

6:30 PM— ED 5:30 PM— ES-CD 4:30 PM— CS 

WEAF WTAG WWJ WWNC WDAF WIBA 
WGY WIS WSAI KFYR KSD 
WCKY WMAQ KTBS WAPI 
WSMB WOAI 
KTHS WDAY 
WSB WOW 

V8— LOWELL THOMAS, TODAY'S NEWS— Mon., Tues., Wed., Thurs., Fri. \i hour 
6:45 PM— ED 5:45 PM— ES-CD 

WJZ WBZ WLW WHAM 

CKGW KDKA WGAR WBAL 
WBZA WJR WSYR 



V9— THE JERGENS PROGRAM— Sunday. \i hour. 






Walter Winchell with Orchestra. Starting Sept. 3. 






9:30 PM— ED 8:30 PM— ES-CD 7:30 PM— CS 






WJZ WBZ WBAL WLW KOIL KWK 






KDKA WBZA WGAR WMAL KSO WREN 






WHAM WSYR KWCR 






WJR WMAQ . 






V10— INTERVIEW ON NATIONAL AFFAIRS— Sunday. ' t hour. 






Col. Louis McHenry Howe and Walter Trumbull. 


M 


P 


10:00 PM— ED 9:00 PM— ES-CD 8:00 PM— CS 


7:00 PM 


6:00 PM 


WEAF WGY WFBR WTAM KFYR WIBA 


KDYL 


KFI 


WBEN WJAR WRC WWJ KPRC WKY 


KGHL 


KGO 


WCAE WTAG WSAI WMAQ KSD WMC 


KGIR 


KGW 


WCSH WTIC KSTP WOAI 


KOA 


KHQ 


WFI WDAF WOC 




KOMO 


WDAY WOW 






WEBC WSB 






WFAA WSMB 






WHO WTMJ 







ABBREVIATIONS: 



ED — Eastern Daylight, ES-CD — Eastern Standard, Central Daylight, CS — Central Standard, M — Mountain. P — Pacific 

SEE NOTE PAGE 29 



38 



Radio Fan-Fare 



RADIO FAN-FARE PROGRAM FINDER 



wmmmimm \ ~ * ffm 


. . . , .. . : . ^ .,... .- 


X— SKETCHES— DRAMATIC (Continued) 




HBafiBnaK: 'mSM+Aimi 


X6 -DRAKE'S DRUMS— HISTORICAL DRAMA; SONGS— 






W1 CATHOLIC HOUR— Sunday. >/ 2 hour. 


M P 


Monday. H hour. 


M P 




6:00PM-ED 5:00 PM— ES-CD 4:00 PM— CS 


3:00 PM 2:00 PM 


6:30 PM— ED 5:30 PM-ES-CD 4:30 PM— CS 


3:30 PM 2:30 PM 




WEAF WTAG WFBR WRC WEBC KFYR 


KOA KTAR 


WEAF WFBR WJAX KPRC WMC 


KOA KFI • 




WEEI WJAR WTAM WWJ WOAI WOC 


KGHL KPO 


WHAM WWNC KTBS WOC 


KGO 




WCSH WLIT WIOD WRVA WHO WOW 


KDYL 


WIOD WMAQ KVOO WOW 






WGY WBEN WSAI WFLA WDAF WIBA 


KGIR 


WHO WSB 






WCAE WWNC WIS WSM WMC 

WJAX WMAQ WSMB WKY 

WJDX KVOO 




WJDX WSMB 








X7— THE GOLDBERGS— Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday. M hour. 




WBAP KPRC 




Gertrude Berg, James Waters. 






WAPI KSD 




7:45 PM— ED 6:45 PM— ES-CD 5:45 PM— CS 






WDAY WSB 




WEAF WTAG WRC WTAM WKY WFAA 






KTBS 




WEEI WJAR WWJ WSAI WOAI WOW 
WCSH WLIT WBFR WENR WDAF WTMJ 










WGY WBEN KFYR KPRC 






W4 ELDER MICHAUX AND CONGREGATION Saturday. '/ 2 hour. 


WCAE 






7:30 PM— ED 6:30 PM— ES-CD 5:30 PM— CS 

WABC WOKO WBBM CKOK WGST WBRC 












X8— HAPPINESS HOUSE— Tuesday. X hour. 






WAAB WGR WFBL WSPD WDOD WREC 




Burr Blackburn; Dr. Gustav Ronfort, Organist 






WDRC WCAU WLBW WHEC WODX WLAC 




11:30 AM— ED 10:30 AM— ES-CD 9:30 AM— CS 






WEAN WPG WTAR WDBJ WDSU KRLD 




WABC WKBW WCAO WLBW KMBC WISN 






WLBZ WICC WMBG WTOC KTRH KTSA 




WCAU WOKO WFBL CKLW KMOX WMBD 






WHP WORG WQAM WDBO KFH WTAQ 




WEAN WORC WHEC WGN WFBM WTAQ 






CFRB WSJS WSBT WMT 




WJAS WNAC WKRC 










X9— JOHN HENRY— BLACK RIVER GIANT— Sunday. M hour 






W5— THE RADIO PULPIT— Sunday. '/ 2 hour. 




(Second Episode Starts at 8:15 PM— ED) 






Dr. Frederick H. Knubel, Dr. Paul E. Scherer. 


M P 


7:30 PM— ED 6:30 PM— ES-CD 6:30PM— CS 


M 




3:30 PM— ED 2:30 PM— ES-CD 1:30 PM— CS 


12:30 PM 11:30 AM 


WABC WJAS WADC WHK KLRA WDSU 


4:30 PM 




WEAF WEEI WRC WFBR KTHS WOW 


KOA KGO 


WAAB WKBW WBT WJSV KMBC WFBM 


KLZ 




WCSH WBEN WWJ WRVA WDAF WEBC 


KDYL KGW 


WCAU WOKO WCAO WKBN KMOX WGST 


KVOR 




WLIT WGY WIS WWNC KFYR KPRC 


KGIR KHQ 


WDRC WORC WDAE WLBW KOMA WISN 






WJAR WCAE WIOD WJAX KVOO WKY 


KFSD 


WICC WPG WDBJ WQAM KRLD WLAC 






WTAG WTAM WFLA WOAI WHO 


KOMO 


WDBO WSJS KTRH WMT 




i 


WPTF WSAI WOC WMC 


KFI 


WFBL WSPD WBRC WODX 






WJDX WSMB 




WFEA CKLW WDOD WREC 






WSM WSB 




WHEC WTAR 










WBBM 






W6 MORNING DEVOTIONS— Mon., Tues., Wed., Thurs., Fri., 


Sat. Lihour. 9:00AM 









— ED — WJZ Network. Kathryn Palmer, Joyce Allmand, 
Patton. 


Hichard Dennis, Lowell 


X11— LIVES AT STAKE— Tuesday. '/ 2 hour. 8:00 PM— CS 
10:00 PM— ED 9:00 PM— ES-CD WSB WJDX 
WEAF WEEI WFBR WENR WKY KPRC 


M P 

7:00 PM 6:00 PM 

KDYL KFI 




W7— THE WORLD OF RELIGION— Sunday. >/ 2 hour. 




WCSH WTAG WRC WTAM KTHS WHO 


KOA KOMO 




Dr. Stanley High 


M P 


WJAR WFI WWJ WOAI WAPI 


KGO 




5:00 PM— ED 4:00 PM— ES-CD 3:00 PM— CS 


2:00 PM 1:00 PM 


WBEN WGY WMC WBAP 


KGW 




WJZ WBZ WBAL WGAR WREN KFYR 


KOA KGW 


KTBS WOC 


KHQ 




WBZA WBAP WPTF KWK WSM 


KGHL KGO 
KGIR KHQ 
KFSD 


WDAF KSD 






WIS WWNC KWCR WSB 
WIOD WFLA WJDX KPRC 


X1S— MARIE, THE LITTLE FRENCH PRINCESS— Tues., Wed 


., Thurs., Fri. H hr. 




WJAX WRVA WOAI KTBS 


KTAR 


Ruth Yorke and James Meighan. 


M P 




WHAM WCKY KOIL WSMB 
WCFL KVOO WTMJ 
KSTP WKY 


KOMO 


1:00 PM— ED 12:00 N— ES-CD 11:00 AM— CS 

WABC WNAC WKRC WBBM KMBC 


10:00 AM 9:00 AM 

KLZ KFPY 






WCAU CKLW KMOX 


KSL KFRC 




WEBC WMC 




WGST 
WDSU 


KGB 

KHJ 

KOIN 

KOL 

KVI 




W8— SABBATH REVERIES— Sunday. % hour. 1:30 PM— ED 


-WJZ Network 


Dr. William Hiram Foulkes. 








X14— ROSES AND DRUMS— Sun. V> hr. 6:30 PM— ED— WABC I 






Sept. 3). 
X15— SOCONYLAND SKETCHES Monday. > > hour 






X1 CAPTAIN DIAMOND'S ADVENTURES— Thursday. Y 2 hour. 
8:00 PM— ED 


8:00 PM— ED 

WEAF WTIC 
WTAG WEEI 
WJAR WCSH 




WJZ WBZ 




WGY WBEN 




WBZA KDKA 




X16— SUNDAY AT SETH PARKERS 8:45 PM— CS 
Sunday. ^ hour WOC WHO 


M P 

7:45 PM 6:45 PM 










X2— DEATH VALLEY DAYS— Thursday. y 2 hour. Tim Frawley. i< : I Gttoiin 


10:45 PM— ED 9:45 PM— ES-CD WOW WDAF 


KOA KGO 




W. Whitney, Joseph Bonime, Director. 




WEAF WJAR WFBR WRC WTMJ WIBA 


KGHL KGW 




9:00 PM— ED 8:00 PM— ES-CD 7:00 PM— CS 




WCSH WFI WTAM WWJ KSTP WEBC 


KDYL KFSD 




WJZ WBZ WLW WJR KOIL WREN 




WGY WBEN WSAI WRVA WDAY KFYR 


KHQ 




WBZA KDKA WBAL WHAM KWK 




WCAE CFCF WIS WJAX WSM WMC 


KTAR 




WGAR WLS 




CKGW WTAG WIOD WFLA WSB WAPI 
WEEI WWNC WCKY WJDX WOAI 


KOMO 




X3 -COLUMBIA DRAMATIC GUILD— Thursday. J 2 hour. 


M 


KYW KTBS KPRC 
KTHS WBAP 






8:30 PM— ED 7:30 PM— ES-CD 6:30 PM— CS 


5:30 PM 

KLZ 
KVOR 






WABC WJAS WADC WJSV KFAB WDSU 
WCAU WOKO WBT WKBN KLRA WFBM 


X17— THE ROAD REPORTER— Tuesday, Thursday. M hour. 
7:30 PM — ED 6:30 PM— ES-CD 




WDRC WORC WCAO WLBW KMBC WGST 




WABC WNAC WBT WHEC 






WEAN CFRB WDAE WQAM KMOX WISN 




WCAU WCAO WJSV 






WICC WNAC WDBJ WSJS KOMA WLAC 




WFBL 






WDBO WSPD WACO WMT 










WFBL CKLW WBRC WSFA 


X18— TALES OF THE TITANS— Friday. ]/ 2 hour. 




WFEA WTAR WCCO WTAQ 




8:00 PM— ED 7:00 PM— ES-CD 6:00 PM— CS 






WHEC WDOD WREC 




WJZ WBZ WBAL WJR KOIL WSB 
KDKA WBZA WCKY WLW WREN WSMB 




I 


X4 FAMOUS LOVES— Friday. ' , hour. Ulita Torgerson. 


M 


WFLA WSYR 
WGAR WWNC 
WHAM WLS 






3:15 PM— ED 2:15 PM— ES-CD 1:15 PM— CS 


12:15 PM 






WEAF WTAG WFBR WTAM KSD WIBA 


KOA 




i 

i 


WEEI WGY WSAI WWJ WDAY WSMB 
WBEN WCAE WDAF WIS WSM WMC 


X19— BAR X DAYS AND NIGHTS— Friday. } 2 hour. 
Carson Robinson 


M 


WRVA WWNC WKY KTBS 




8:30 PM— ED 7:30 PM— ES-CD 6:30 PM— CS 


5:30 PM 




WIOD WRC WOC WHO 




WABC WICC WADC WHK KFAB WGST 


KLZ 








WAAB WJAS WBIG WJSV KFH WHAS 


KSL 




X5— THE FIRST NIGHTER— Friday. '.: Hour. June Meredith, 


Don Ameche, Carlton 


WCAU WLBZ WBT WLBW KLRA WIBW 


KVOR 




Brickert, Cliff Soubier, Eric Sagerquist's Orchestra. 


M P 


WDRC WOKO WCAH WMBG KMBC WISN 






10:00 PM— ED 9:00 PM— ES-CD 8:00 PM— CS 


7:00 PM 6:00 PM 


WEAN WORC WCAO WQAM KMOX WLAC 




I 


WJZ WBZA WBAL WHAM KWK WREN 


KOA KGO 


WHP CFRB WDAE WSJS KOMA WMBD 






KDKA WBZ WGAR WCKY KOIL KSTP 


KDYL KFI 


WDBJ WSPD KRLD WMT 




j 


WJR WEBC WSB 


KGW 


WDBO WWVA KTRH WODX 






WENR WOAI KTBS 


KOMO 


WFBL CKLW KTSA WSFA 






WKY WSM 


KHQ 


WFEA WTAR WCCO WTAQ 




I 


WAPI KPRC 




WHEC WDSU WREC 






WSMB 




WFBM 




| 



ABBREVIATIONS: ED — Eastern Daylight, ES-CR — Eastern Standard, Central Daylight, CS — Central Standard, M — Mountain, P — Pacific. 

SEE NOTE PAGE 29 



September 



39 



RADIO FAN -FARE PROGRAM FINDER 



X— SKETCHES— DRAMATIC (Continued) 



X20— THE THEATRE OF TODAY— Monday. 


l A hour. 


M 


9:00 PM— ED 


8:00 PM— ES-CD 


7:00 PM— CS 


6:00 PM 


WABC WJAS 


WADC WHK 


ELBA WIBW 


KLZ 


WDRC WKBW 


WBIG WLBW 


KRLD WISN 


KSL 


WEAN WOKO 


WBT WQAM 


KTSA WLAC 


KVOR 


WHP WORC 


WCAO WSJS 


WBRC WSBT 




WICC WNAC 


WDBJ WSPD 


WDOD WSFA 




WIP 


WFBL WTOC 


WFBM WTAQ 






WFEA WWVA 


WGST WREC 






WHEC CKLW 


WHAS 





X23— VIC AND SADE— Mon., Tue., Wed., Thurs., FrL, Sat 'ihr. 1:00PM— ED- 
WJZ Network. Art Van Harvey, Bernardine Flynn. 




Y2— ENO CRIME CLUES— Tues. and Wed. >/ 2 hour. Edward Reese, Georgia Backus. 
(Starting Sept. 5). 

8:00 PM— ED 7:00 PM— ES-CD 

WJZ WBZ WHAM WGAR 

WBZA KDKA WBAL WLW 

WJR WMAL 

WMAQ 



Y6- 



'K-7"— Saturday. 
9:30 PM— ED 

WEAF WTAG 
WEEI WCSH 
WJAR WFI 
WGY WBEN 
WCAE 



V2 hour. 

8:30 PM— ES-CD 7:30 PM— CS 

WRC WFBR KSD WOC 

WTAM WSAI WHO WOW 

WWJ WMAQ WDAF 



Z1— AMOS 'N' ANDY— Mon., Tues., Wed., Thurs., Fri. 



7:00 PM— ED 

WJZ WBZ 
WBZA KDKA 
CKGW 



6:00 PM— ES-CD 

WLW WCKY 
WMAL WRVA 
WPTF WFLA 
WIOD WJR 
WGAR WHAM 

10:00 PM— CD 

WMAQ WENR 



hour. 



9:00 PM— CS 

KWK WREN 
WDAF KOIL 
WTMJ KSTP 
WSM WMC 



M 
8:00 PM 

KOA 
KDYL 



WSB 
KTHS 
KPRC 
WKY 



WSMB 
WBAP 
WOAI 



P 
7:00 PM 

KHQ 

KGO 

KFI 

KGW 

KOMO 



Z2— BETTY AND BOB — Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday. 
3:00 PM— ED 2:00 PM— ES-CD 1:00 PM— CS 

WJZ WBZ WBAL WGAR KWK KOIL 

WBZA KDKA WJR WLW 
WHAM WLS 



hour. 



Z3— BETTY BOOP FROLICS— Friday. % hour. 
Bonnie Poe, Red Pepper Sam, Vic Irwin's Band. 

7:15 PM— ED 6:15 PM— ES-CD 5:15 PM— CS P 

WEAF WJAR WCKY WMAQ KSD WJDX KGW 

WBEN WTAG WIOD KVOO WOC KHQ 

WCSH CRCT WHO WOW KOMO 

WIBA WSMB 

Z4-BERTIE AND BETTY— Sun. U hr. 11:00 PM— ED— WJZ Network. 

Z5 — CLARA, LU 'N' EM — Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday. \i hour 



Louise Starky, Isabelle Carothers, Helen King. 

10:15 AM— ED 9:15 AM— ES-CD 8:15 AM— CS 

WJZ WBZ WBAL WGAR KWK WREN 

WBZA KDKA WJR WCKY KOIL WTMJ 

WRVA WPTF WIBA WEBC 

WWNC WIS WDAY KFYR 

WJAX WIOD WSM WSB 
WFLA WHAM 
WGN 



M 

7:15 AM 

KDYL 
KOA 



WAPI 

WJDX 

KPRC 

WKY 

KSTP 



WSMB 
KVOO 
WOAI 
WBAP 



Z6— CUCKOO PROGRAM— Saturday. \' 2 hour. 
10:30 PM— ED 8:30 PM— ES-CD 



Raymond Knight. Robert Armbruster. 



WJZ KDKA 



WBAL WHAM 
WGAR WCKY 
WIS WJAX 
WIOD WWNC 
WRVA WFLA 
WSYR KYW 



Z8— HORSE SENSE PHILOSOPHY— Sunday. 
7:15 PM— ED 6:15 PM— ES-CD 

WEAF WEEI WRC WTAM 
WJAR WLIT WWJ WMAQ 
WGY 



l i hour. Andrew F. Kelly. 
5:15 PM— CS 

WDAF WOC 
WHO 



Z9— JUST RELAX— Friday. M hour. 
Will Cuppy and Jeanne Owen. 



6:45 PM— ED 

WEAF WGY 
WBEN WJAR 
WCAE WTAG 



5:45 PM— ES-CD 4:45 PM— CS 



WCKY WSAI 
WFBR WWJ 
WIS WWNC 
WJAX WMAQ 



KFYR WFAA 
KPRC WIBA 



M P 

3:45 PM 2:45 PM 

KOA KPO 



KSD 
KSTP 
KTBS 
KTHS 



WJDX 
WKY 
WMC 
WOAI 



KVOO WOW 
WDAY WSB 
WEBC WSMB 



Z10-LUM AND ABNER— Mon,. Tues., Wed., Thurs. V. hour. 
7:30 PM -ED 6:30 PM— ES 9.-15 PM— CS 

WEAF WGY WFBR WTAM KSO WOC 
WBEN WJAR WRC WDAF WTMJ 

WCSH WTAG 10:15 PM— CD WHO WKBF 
WEEI WENR 



Friday. }-i hour. 

10:30 PM— ED 9:30 PM— ES-CD 8:30 PM— CS 

WEAF WGY WFBR WWJ KSD WTMJ 

WBEN WLIT WRC WENR WHO WKBF 

WTAM WOC 
WLW added at 9:45 PM— ES 

Z14— POTASH AND PERLMUTTER— Monday, Wednesday and Friday. }i hour. 8:30 
PM— ED— WJZ Network. Joseph Greenwald, Lou Welch. 



BBS— SEEING THE OTHER AMERICAS— Sun. }| hour. Edward Tomlinson. 
12:15 PM— ED 11:15 AM— ES-CD 10:15 AM— CS 

WEAF WCSH WSAI WTAM WOC WDAF 
WFI WTAG WWJ WCKY WHO 
WGY WJAR 



DD1— BEST FOODS MUSICAL GROCERY STORE— Friday. 
> 2 hr. Fred Allen, Portland Hoffa, Roy Atwell, Jack Smart 
and others: Ferde Grole's Orchestra. 

9:00 PM— ED 8:00 PM— ES-CD 7:00 PM— CS 

WEAF WTIC WFBR WRC KSD WDAF 

WTAG WEEI WTAM WWJ 

WJAR WCSH WMAQ 

WGY WBEN 

WLIT 




DD2— CHASE £ SANBORN HOUR 
Sunday. 1 hour 
Bert Lahr, Lee Sims, llomay 
Bailey, Rubinoff Orchestra. 



8:00 PM— ED 

WEAF WTIC 
WTAG WBEN 
WCAE CFCF 
CKGW WJAR 
WCSH WGY 



7:00 PM— ES-CD 

WTAM WWJ 
WLW WWNC 
WIS WIOD 
WFLA WPTF 
WFBR WRC 
WMAQ 



6:00 PM— CS 

KSD WOC 
WHO WDAF 
WSB WTMJ 
KSTP WEBC 
WDAY KFYR 
WWNC KPRC 
WKY WMC 
WJDX WSMB 
KVOO WFAA 



M 

5:00 PM 

KDYL 

KOA 



P 
4:00 PM 

KGO 

KHQ 

KTAR 

KFI 

KGW 

KOMO 



WOAI 
WOW 



WSM 



(Alter Sept. 11, Eddie Cantor replaces Bert Lahr.) 



DD3— FRED BERRENS AND HIS SATURDAY REVUE 
Vera Van, Phil Regan; Round Towners Quartet and 



9:45 PM— ED 

WABC WJAS 
WCAU WKBW 
WDRC WLBZ 
WEAN WOKO 



8:45 PM— ES-CD 

WADC WLBW 



WHP 

WICC 



WORC 
WNAC 



WBIG 
WBT 
WCAO 
WDBJ 



WMBG 
WQAM 
WSJS 
WSPD 



WDBO WTOC 
WFBL WWVA 
WFEA CKLW 
WHEC WTAR 
WHK 



7:45 PM 

KFAB 

KFH 

KLRA 

KMBC 

KRLD 

KTRH 

KTSA 

WBRC 

WCCO 

WDOD 



— Saturday. 
Orchestra 

QC 

WFBM 

WGST 

WIBW 

WISN 

WLAC 

WMBD 

WMT 

WODX 

WTAQ 

WREC 



Yz hour. 
M 
6:45 PM 

KLZ 
KSL 
KVOR 



DD4— CHICAGO VARIETY PROGRAM— Sun. l/ 2 hr. 7:45 PM— ED— WABC Network 



DD5— CORN COB PIPE CLUB OF VIRGINIA— Wed. V, hour. 
10:00 PM— ED 9:00 PM— ES-CO 8:00 PM— CS 

WFBR WTAM 
WLW WWJ 
WRC WENR 



WEAF WGY 

WBEN WJAR 

WCAE WLIT 

WCSH WTAG 

WEEI WTIC 



KFYR WHO 
KSD WIBA 
KSTP WOC 
WDAF WOW 
WDAY WTMJ 
WEBC 



M 

7:00 PM 

KDYL 
KGHL 
KGIR 
KOA 



P 
6:00 PM 

KFI 

KGO 

KGW 

KHQ 

KOMO 



DD7— TED HUSING AND LEON BELASCO— 
Tuesday and Thursday. \i hour. 

10:30 PM— ED 9:30 PM— ES-CD 



WABC WEAN 
WAAB WJAS 
WCAU WKBW 
WDRC WOKO 



WADC WJSV 
WBT WKRC 
WCAH WBBM 
WCAO WOWO 
WHK 



8:30 PM— CS 

KFH WCCO 
KMBC WGST 
KOMA WIBW 



M 

7:30 PM 

KLZ 



KSCJ 
KTSA 
WBRC 



WLAC 
WMT 



DD8— HARRISBURG VARIETY SHOW— Friday. % hour. 



3:30 PM— ED 

WABC WOKO 
WCAU WORC 
WDRC WPG 
WEAN CFRB 
WJAS 



2:30 PM— ES-CD 

WADC WHK 
WCAO WJSV 
WDAE WKBN 
WDBJ WLBW 
WDBO WSJS 
WFBL WSPD 
WFEA CKLW 
WHEC WBBM 



1:30 PM— CS 

KLRA WGST 
KMBC WISN 
KOMA WLAC 



KRLD 
WCCO 



WMBD 
WMT 



WDOD WSFA 
WDSU WTAQ 
WFBM WREC 



DD9— THE GRAB BAG— Fri. 1/2 hr. Helen Mors, Brooks and Ross, Billy White, 



Freddy Rose, Westphal's Orchestra 



4:00 PM— ED 

WABC WOKO 
WNAC WGR 
WDRC WIP 
WJAS WEAN 



3:00 PM— ES-CD 2:00 PM— CS 

WADC WCAO KMBC WGST 



WPG 
WICC 
CFRB 



WLBZ 
WORC 



WBBM CKOK 
WHK WJSV 
WSPD WFEA 
WCAH WWVA 
WLBW WBIG 
WKBN WTOC 
WDBJ WDBO 
WQAM WSJS 
WDAE 



WDOD WREC 
WSFA WLAC 
WDSU KRLD 
KTRH KLRA 
KTSA WIBW 
WACO KFH 
WTAQ KFAB 
WISN WSBT 
WMT 



M 

1:00 PM 

KVOR 

KLZ 

KSL 



P 
12:00 N 

KHJ 

KOIN 

KGB 

KFRC 

KOL 

KFPY 



ABBREVIATIONS: ED— Eastern Daylight, ES-CR- 



-Eastern Standard, Central Daylight, CS — Central Standard, M — Mountain, P — Pacific 
SEE NOTE PAGE 29 



40 



Radio Fan-Fare 



R AD I O FAN-FARE PROGRAM 



N D E R 



DD— VARIETY SHOWS (Continued) 

DD10— KALTENMEVER'S KINDERGARTEN— Sat. V 2 hr. Bruce Kamman, Marion 
and Jim Jordan, Song Fellows, Merrill Fugit, Johnny Wolf, Loretta Poynton, Don 
Mangano. 

7:30 PM— ED 6:30 PM— ES-CD 5:30 PM— CS 

WJZ WBZ WBAL WMAL KYW KWK 

WBZA CKGW WSYR WHAM KWCR KSO 
CFCF KDKA WCKY KOIL WREN 



DD11— FLEISCHMANN HOUR Thurs. 
1 hr. Rudy Vallee, Connecticut Yankees. 



8:00 PM— ED 

WEAF WTAG 
WEEI WCSH 
WFI WGY 
WBEN WCAE 
CFCF WJAR 



7:00 PM— ES-CD 

WFBR WRC 
WTAM WWJ 
WIOD WJAX 
WFLA WRVA 
WSAI WCKY 
WLW WPTF 
WMAQ KDYL 



6:00 PM— CS 

KSD WOC 

WHO 

WSB 

WEBC 

WDAF 

WAPI 



WOW 

KSTP 

WTMJ 

WMC 

WJDX 



WSMB WOAI 
WKY KFYR 
WDAY KPRC 
WSM WBAP 
KVOO 



M P 

5:00 PM 4:00 PM 

KDYL KFI 
KOA KGO 

KGW 
KOM 
KTA 
KHQ 



DD12— CAPT. HENRY'S MAXWELL HOUSE SHOW BOAT— Thurs. 1 hr. Charles 
Winninger, Lanny Ross, Annette Hanshaw, Muriel Wilson, Molasses V January, 



Don Voorhees. 
9:00 PM— ED 

WEAF WEEI 
WTAG WJAR 
WCSH WFI 
WGY WBEN 
WCAE 



8:00 PM— ES-CD 

WFBR WRC 
WTAM WWJ 
WSAI WRVA 
WWNC WIS 
WJAX WIOD 
WELA WCKY 
WMAQ 



7:00 PM— CS 

KSD WOC 
WHO WOW 
WDAF WTMJ 
WJDX WMC 
WSB WAPI 
WSMB KTBS 
WKY KPRC 
WOAI WSM 
KSTP WBAP 



M P 

10:00 PM 9:00 PM 



KOA 
KDYL 



KGO 

KFI 

KGW 

KOMO 

KHQ 

KFSD 

KTAR 



DD13— OLD GOLD PROGRAM 
Mandy Lou. 
10:00 PM— ED 

WABC WKBW 
WCAU WLBZ 
WDRC WOKO 
WEAN WORC 
WHP WPG 
WICC WNAC 
WJAS WMAS 



-Wed. y 2 hr. Fred Waring's Pennsylvanians and 



9:00 PM 

WADC 

WBIG 

WBT 

WCAH 

WCAO 

WDAE 

WDBJ 

WDBO 

WFBL 

WFEA 

WHEC 



-ES-CD 

WJSV 

WKRC 

WLBW 

WMBG 

WQAM 

WSPD 

WTOC 

CKLW 

WTAR 

WGN 

WOWO 



8:00 PM— CS 

KFH WDSU 
KLRA WFBM 
KMBC WGST 
KMOX WHAS 
KOMA WIBW 
KRLD WISN 
KSCJ WLAC 
KTRH WMBD 
KTSA WMT 
WBRC WODX 
WCCO WREC 
WDOD WKBH 
WNAX 



M 

7:00 PM 

KLZ 
KSL 
KVOR 



DH 

6:00 PM 

KFPY 

KFRC 

KGB 

KHJ 

KOH 

KOIN 

KOL 



DD14— REVOLVING STAGE— Monday. 1 hour. 



2:00 PM— ED 

WEAF WTAG 
WBEN WJAR 
WGY WCSH 
WCAE 



1 :00 PM— ES-CD 12:00 N— CS 

WRC WFBR WOC WHO 

WSAI WTAM WDAF 
WWJ 



DD15— THE RICHFELD COUNTRY CLUB— Friday. 
Orchestra, Betty Barthell, Mary McCoy. 



i hour. Grantland Rice, Golden's 



9:30 PM— ED 

WABC WOKO 
WAAB WKBW 
WDRC WCAU 
WJAS WPG 
WICC WHP 
WEAN WMAS 



8:30 PM— ES-CD 

WCAO WFBL 
WJSV WLBW 
WHEC 



Also Monday. > ■-, hour. 

7:30 PM— ED 6:30 PM— ES-CD 

WJZ WBZA WBAL WMAL 
KDKA CRCT WHAM WSYR 
WBZ 



DD16— WHITE OWL PROGRAM 
Burns & Allen, Comedy. 



Wed. V 2 hour. Guy Lombardo's Royal Canadians, 



9:30 PM— ED 

WABC WOKO 
WNAC WKBW 
WDRC WCAU 

WJAS WEAN 
WORC 



8:30 PM— ES-CD 

WADC WCAO 
WGN WKRC 
WHK CKOK 
WOWO WFBL 
WSPD WJSV 
WBT 



7:30 PM— CS 

KMBC WFBM 
KMOX KTRH 
KTSA KOMA 
KRLD WCCO 



M 

6:30 PM 

KLZ 

KSL 



P 
5:30 PM 

KHJ 

KOIN 

KGB 

KFRC 

KOL 

KFPY 

KVI 



DD17— FREDDIE RICH ENTERTAINS— Sunday. > ., hour. M 

10:30 PM— ED 9:30 PM— ES-CD 8:30 PM— CS 7:30 PM 

WABC WICC WADC WHK KFH WGST KLZ 
WAAB WJAS WBIG WLBW KLRA WHAS KSL 
WCAU WLBZ WBT WQAM KMBC WIBW KVOR 
WDRC WOKO WCAO WSJS 
WEAN WORC WDBJ WSPD 
WGR WNAC WFBL WTOC 
WHP WFEA CKLW 

WHEC WTAR 



KLRA WHAS 
KMBC WIBW 
KRLD WISN 
KTRH WLAC 
KTSA WMBD 
WBRC WMT 
WCCO WSBT 
WDOD WREC 
WFBM 



DD18 SINCLAIR GREATER MINSTRELS— Mon. 1/2 hr. Jean Arnold, Chauncey 
Parsons, Joe Parsons, Bill Childs, Frltx Clark, Mae McCloud, Clifford Soubier, 
Harry Kogen. 

8:00 PM— ES-CD 

WHAM WGAR 
WBAL WWNC 
WIS WJAX 
WIOD WJR 
WFLA WLW 
WLS 



9:00 PM— ED 

WJZ WBZ 
WBZA KDKA 



DD— VARIETY SHOWS (Continued) 



DD19— WEEK-END REVIEW— Saturday. 1 
4:00 PM— ED 3:00 PM— ES-CD 

WEAF WTAG 
WEEI WJAR 
WGY WCAE 
WBEN WFI 
CKGW 



WFBR WRC 
WWJ WTAM 
WSAI WDAF 
WCKY WRVA 
WWNC WIS 
WJAX WIOD 
WFLA WMAQ 



hour. 
2:00 PM— CS 

WOC WHO 
WOW WIBA 
KSTP WEBC 
WDAY KFYR 
WSM WSB 
WMC WSMB 
WKY KPRC 
KTBS 



M 

1:00 PM 

KOA 
KDYL 



DD20— RADIO GUILD 

Monday. 1 Hour. 4:00 PM- 



ED— WJZ Network 



DD21— CALIFORNIA MELODIES— Tuesday. 



10:00 PM— ED 

WABC WJAS 
WCAU WKBW 
WDRC WOKO 
WEAN WORC 
WHP WNAC 
WICC 



9:00 PM— ES-CD 

WBIG WFEA 
WBT WJSV 
WCAO WSJS 
WFBL WTAR 



y 2 hour. 
8:00 PM— CS 

KLRA WLAC 
WDOD WREC 
WDSU 



DD22— WINDY CITY REVUE— Thursday. 



8:00 PM— ED 

WABC WJAS 
WAAB WKBW 
WCAU WOKO 
WDRC WORC 
WEAN WPG 
WICC 



7:00 PM— ES-CD 

WADC WKBN 

WBIG WKRC 

WBT WLBW 

WCAO WMBG 

WDAE WQAM 

WDBJ WSJS 

WDBO WSPD 

WFEA WWVA 

WHEC CKLW 

WHK WTAR 

WJSV WBBM 



J / 2 hour. 
6:00 PM— CS 

KFH WFBM 
KLRA WGST 
KMBC WISN 
KTRH WLAC 
KTSA WMBD 
WBRC WMT 
WDOD WODX 
WDSU WREC 



M 
5:00 PM 

KLZ 
KSL 
KVOR 



DD23— CHESTERFIELD PROGRAM— Fri. y 2 hr. Lou Holtz, Comedian; Grace 
Moore, Songs; Leonard Hayton's Orchestra. 



10:00 PM— ED 

WABC WKBW 

WAAB WLBZ 

WCAU WOKO 

WDRC WPG 

WEAN 
WJAS 



9:00 PM— ES-CD 

WADC WJSV 
WBT WKRC 
WCAO WMBG 
WDBJ WSPD 
WDBO WTOC 
WFBL CKLW 
WHEC WTAR 
WHK WGN 
WOWO 



8:00 PM— CS 

KFH WCCO 
KLRA WDSU 
KMBC WFBM 
KMOX WGST 
KOMA WHAS 
KRLD WISN 
KTRH WLAC 
KTSA WMT 
WBRC WREC 



M 

7:00 PM 

KLZ 
KSL 



P 
6:00 PM 

KFPY 

KFRC 

KGB 

KHJ 

KOH 

KOIN 

KOL 

KVI 



DD24— THE SHIP OF JOY— Wednesday. y 2 hour. 
Captain Dobbsie and the Happy Timers, 



10:30 PM— ED 

WEAF WGY 
WBEN WJAR 
WCAE WTAG 



9:30 PM— ES-CD 

WFBR WTAM 
WFLA WWJ 



8:30 PM— CS 

KFYR WTBA 



WCSH 
WEEI 



CFCF 



WIOD 

WIS 

WRVA 



WWNC 
WMAQ 



KPRC 

KSD 

KSTP 

KTBS 

KTHS 

WDAF 



WJDX 

WKY 

WMC 

WOAI 

WOC 

WOW 



M P 

7:30 PM 6:30 PM 

KDYL KPO 
KOA 



WDAY WSB 
WEBC WSMB 
WFAA WTMJ 
WHO 



DD25— PAUL WHITEMAN AND HIS ORCHESTRA— Thursday. 1 hour. 
Al Jolson and Soloists. M 

10:00 PM— ED 9:00 PM— ES-CD 8:00 PM— CS 7:00 PM 

WEAF WFI WFBR WRC KFYR WHO KDYL 

WBEN WGY WFLA WRVA KPRC WIBA KOA 
WCAE WJAR WIOD WTAM 
WCSH WTAG WIS WWJ 
WEEI WJAX WWNC 

WLW. WMAQ 

WPTF 



KFYR WHO 
KPRC WIBA 
KSD WJDX 
KSTP WKY 
KTBS WMC 
KTHS WOAI 
WAPI WOC 
WBAP WOW 
WDAF WSB 
WDAY WSMB 
WEBC WTMJ 



P 
6:00 PM 

KFI 

KGO 

KGW 

KHQ 

KOMO 



DD26— THE BUICK PROGRAM— Monday. ) ■> hour. M P 

10:30 PM— ED 9:30 PM— ES-CD 8:30 PM— CS 7:30 PM 6:30 PM 

WEAF WGY WFBR WTAM KSD WOC KDYL KFI 

WBEN WJAR WLW WWJ WDAF WOW KOA. KGO 

WCAE WLIT WRC WMAQ WHO KGW 

WCSH WTAG KHQ 

WEEI KOMO 



DD27— THE NESTLE PROGRAM— Friday. > ■> hour (beginning Aug. 25.) 
Walter O'Keefe, Ethel Shutta. 

8:00 PM— ED 7:00 PM— ES-CD 6:00 PM— CS 

WJZ WBZ WBAL WIS KWK 

KDKA WBZA WCKY WJR 

WGAR WMAL 

WHAM WSYR 



ABBREVIATIONS: ED — Eastern Daylight, ES-CR — Eastern Standard, Central Daylight, CS — Central Standard, M — Mountain, P — Pacific. 

SEE NOTE PAGE 29 



September 



41 



RADIO F A N - F A "R E PROGRAM FINDER 



TIME SCHEDULE 



The arrangement of the Time Schedule enables you to deter- 
mine what is on the air at a given time. Eastern Daylight 
time is shown. The key stations listed indicate the chain over 
which the program is broadcast and the Index Numbers under 
each day of the week tell you the programs. The letter preced- 



ing the figures in the Index Number indicates the nature of 
program and reference to the list of classifications set forth on 
page 29 will enable you to select the type of programs you like 
best. SEE NOTE BELOW and explanation of Classified 
Schedule on page 29. 



Start 
EDT 



12:00 
12:15 



12:30 
12:45 



1:00 
1:15 



1:30 
2:00 



2:15 

2:30 



2:45 
3:00 



3:15 



3:30 
3:45 



4:00 
4:15 
4:30 



Key 



♦Index Number 



Sun. 



Mon. Tues. I Wed. Thurs. 



Fit 



MORNING PROGRAMS 



AFTERNOON PROGRAMS 



WEAF 

WABC 

WJZ 

WJZ 

WEAF 



WEAF 
WJZ 
WABC 
WJZ 



WEAF 

WABC 

WJZ 

WJZ 

WABC 

WEAF 



WJZ 

WABC 

WEAF 

WABC 

WEAF 



WJZ 

WABC 

WABC 

WJZ 

WEAF 



WABC 

WEAF 

WABC 

WJZ 

WABC 

WEAF 



WEAF 
WJZ 
WABC 
WABC 



WEAF 

WABC 

WJZ 

WEAF 

WABC 

WJZ 

WABC 

WEAF 

WJZ 



N21 
BB3 



L27 
T7 



J4 
P9 



J4 



W8 

Jl 

K10 

T22 

R4 



F8 
02 
K7 
R19 



A3 
Ul 
L 26 



WS 



S6 
R26 



U4 
K14 



Q16 
M19 
R4 



Lll 
N10 
T8 
R9 



M21 
X23 



H5 
T28 



K10 
DD14 



PI 



Z2 



F23 
T7 



R22 
DD2 
L21 



T6 



Q16 
Q8 



T8 



X13 
X23 



H5 
T28 
L15 
PI 



R31 
MSO 



N17 

T6 

Z2 



F23 
R22 



B3 
12 



K10 



R4 



Lll 
N10 
T8 
R9 



X13 
X23 



M19 



H5 
J2 



PI 



M50 



L3 



Z2 
L14 



F23 
M23 



L17 



T6 



Q16 
M20 
R4 



T27 



Lll 
T8 



X13 
X23 



HS 
T28 



PI 



R31 
K17 



L6 
Z2 



F23 
R22 



11 

N15 



R4 



Lll 
N10 
T 
R9 



X13 
X23 



M25 



H5 
J2 
LIS 



T6 

Q12 



F3 

L10 

T7 

Z2 

L19 

X4 



F23 
DD8 



DD9 

M47 



II 
T2 



Sat. 



7:45 
8:00 


WEAF 
WEAF 
WJZ 
WEAF 




G4 
P4 
Qll 

K15 


G4 
P4 


G4 
P4 
QH 
K15 


G4 
P4 


G4 
P4 
QH 
K15 


G4 
P4 


L25 
N166 


8:30 


K15 


K15 


K15 




9:00 


WABC 

WJZ 

WEAF 

WJZ 

WABC 

WEAF 


C2 
C9 
T32 


R18 
W6 


R18 
W6 


R18 
W6 


R18 
W6 


R18 
W6 


W6 


9:15 


M60 
Q15 
F19 


M60 
Q1S 
F19 


M60 
Q15 
F19 


M60 
Q1S 
F19 


M60 
Q1S 
F19 


M60 




9:30 




F19 




9:45 
10:00 


WABC 

WABC 

WJZ 

WABC 

WEAF 

WJZ 




Q5 


QS 




Q5 




Q5 




Q4 

Q6 

L23 

Z5 


Q4 


T29 




10:15 


Q6 
Z5 




E6 


Q6 
Z5 








N20 






Z5 


ZS 








10:30 


WEAF 

WABC 

WEAF 

WJZ 

WABC 










04 
Q6 

P10 


04 






R24 


Q6 






10:45 




E2 


E2 








P2 






R7 


R42 


R7 


R7 










11:00 


WABC 

WJZ 

WEAF 

WEAF 

WJZ 


T3 
J3 
T38 
N9 






R24 




R42 


CI 




















T31 

E5 


11:15 




El 


ES 
Q8 


El 






















11:30 


WEAF 
WABC 

WABC 






11 

X8 

R24 


HI 
02 

*R7 








*S5 
S5 








T8 


11:45 


*R7 


G5 


*R7 



Q16 



Ml 

M19 

X23 



H5 
J2_ 

T9 



L18 
Q12 



M34 
T19 



P7 

M57 



DD19 



Start 
EDT 



4:45 
5:00 



5:15 
5:30 



5:45 



6:00 
6:30 



6:45 



7:00 



7:15 

7:30 



7:45 
8:00 



8:15 
8:30 



8:45 



9:00 



9:15 
9:30 



9:45 
10:00 



10:15 
10:30 



10:45 
11:00 



11:15 
11:30 



11:45 
12:00 



12:15 
12:30 



1:00 



Key 



WEAF 
WABC 
WABC 
WJZ 



WABC 

WJZ 

WABC 

WEAF 

WABC 

WJZ 

WEAF 



*Index Number 



Sun. 



T33 

W7 



R33 

Q2 
F13 



Mon. 



C7 
C14 



C13 
C4 

Bl 
C8 
Cll 



Tues. 



C7 



C14 



C13 
C4 

M19 

C8 

CIO 



Wed. Thurs. 



Fri. 



C7 

K3 
C14 



C13 
C4 

K3 
C8 
Cll 



C7 
Fl 
C14 



M19 
C13 
C4 

T22 
C8 



C14 



T22 
C13 
C4 

R21 

C8 

Cll 



Sat. 



C4 
R1S 
T15 
C8 



EVENING PROGRAMS 



WABC 

WEAF 

WJZ 

WEAF 

WJZ 

WABC 

WJZ 



WJZ 

WJZ 

WABC 

WEAF 

WABC 

WJZ 

WEAF 



WABC 

WJZ 

WEAF 

WEAF 

WABC 

WJZ 



WJZ 

WABC 

WEAF 

WEAF 

WJZ 

WABC 



WABC 

WEAF 

WJZ 

WABC 

WEAF 

WJZ 



WEAF 

WABC 

WJZ 

WABC 

WJZ 

WEAF 

WABC 



WABC 
WEAF 
WJZ 
WABC 



WEAF 

WJZ 

WEAF 

WABC 

WJZ 



WABC 

WJZ 

WEAF 

WABC 

WEAF 



WEAF 

WABC 

WJZ 

WJZ 

WEAF 

WABC 



WJZ 
WJZ 
WEAF 
WEAF 



WEAF 

WEAF 

WJZ 

WABC 

WEAF 



Q9 
Wl 



F2S 
X14 



L20 
T24 



Z8 

K18 

X9 



DD4 
DD2 



X9 



V3 



R40 
X20 
F9 

V9 
Tl 



V10 



LS 
! R16 



DD17 



Ul 

Til 

X16 

M31 



T37 



Mil 
5 min. 



M10 



Q5 
L12 



X6 



V8 



*C8 
V8 



Zl 



Rl 



Z10 
R41 
DD15 



VI 
X7 

X1S 
T34 
R23 



R32 

Z14 
R17 
T4 



Nl 



DD18 



N6 
DD25 



*K2 
T35 
T21 



DD26 
R18 



M42 
R43 



M56 
M12 



M27 
T20 



*Z10 



L12 
SI 

V8 



*C8 
V8 



T13 
Zl 



Z10 
X17 



T18 
VI 
X7 
Qi 

Y2 



B2 
A3 
Gl 
R17 

V3 



D7 
L28 



Xll 
T17 
DD21 



F17 
DD7 



U2 



*G1 
M8 



T20 



*Z10 
*D2 

M17 



L12 
V4 



T28 
V8 



*C8 
V8 
F20 

R6 
Zl 



Z10 
R41 



VI 
X7 
T5 
Y2 
R23 



R5 



Z14 
R17 



T4 
F7 



R33 



DD16 



DD5 
DD13 



DD24 
R10 



Ul 



M41 
M13 



M7 
T20 



*Z10 

M17 
M29 



L12 

V6 
S3 
Rl 
V8 



*C8 
V8 



R6 
Zl 



L13 
T24 
Z10 
X17 



Q7 

VI 

X7 

DDU 

XI 

D22D 



X3 



V3 



DD12 

X2 

R37 

A3 



DD2S 
T33 



DD7 



L16 



R43 



M56 

M14 



Ml 
M8 
T20 



*Z10 



M15 
*DD12 



C16 
L12 



V8 



*C8 
V8 



Z9 
R6 
Zl 

Zl 



Z3 
R41 



VI 
X7 

N2 

DD27 

R23 



Z14 
X19 

Q3 



DD1 

F7 

M18 

R33 

Dl 

M44 

DD15 



X5 
DD23 



Z10 
RIO 



Ul 



M4 
M31 



M8 
T20 



L12 

Ml 



T13 



*C8 



Rl 



W4 
DD10 



M2 



Y6 



DD3 

M45 



Z6 



R25 



M42 



M17 
M29 
T20 



U6 
M16 



NOTE — *INDEX NUMBER refers to programs in Classified Schedule starting on page 29 where full details are given. Index numbers in the 
Classified Schedule are arranged alphabetically as to type of program and numerically as regards programs under each classification. Asterick (*) 
indicates program is not broadcast over key station but is available on other stations of that chain. 



TELLS YOU WHAT 



WHEN AND WHERE 



42 



Radio Fan-Fare 



RADIO FAN-FARE PROCRAM FINDER 



ARTIST AND PROGRAM SCHEDULE 



"Oh Where Is My Favorite Star Tonight?' 



The days when it was a thrill just to hear a program 
over the air have passed. Mere reception is taken for 
granted now and listeners are picking and choosing the 
programs they want to hear. The movies went through 
the same stages. At first, all that was needed was a 
fairly clear image on the screen. Now movie fans have 
their favorite stars and wait for them to appear in a 
new film. Just so with radio. The listener of today 
wants to hear his favorite star or to select a particular 
program rather than merely tune in on whatever hap- 
pens to be on the air. 

Our Artist and Program Schedule makes this selec- 



tion possible. Program titles, individual artists and 
teams are listed alphabetically. Look down the list for 
your favorite radio personality or the program you want 
to hear and the index number at the left of that name 
will show you where, in the Classified Schedule (pages 
29-40) you can locate all the details regarding time of 
broadcast, stations included in the network, etc. Our 
readers are invited to send in comments on this new 
program service. We want to do everything we can to 
assist the discriminating listener in his search for pro- 
grams and personalities which fit his or her tastes. 



Index* 


Artist 


Index* 


Artist 


Index* 


Artist 


Index* 


Artist 


N 1 


A. & P. Gypsies 


Z4 


Bertie & Betty 


R4 


Commodores, The 


R 10 


Frigidaire Program 


G 5 


Academy of Medicine 


L6 


Berumen, LaForge 






R 10 


Froman, Jane 


G 1 


Adventures in Health 


Z 2 


Betty & Bob 


Jl 


Compinsky Trio 


DD 10 


Fugit, Merrill 


T 24 


Albani, Countess Olga 


Z3 


Betty Boop Frolics 


L 13 


Concert Footlights 


K 17 


Fulton, Dick 


K 17 


Albridge, Gene 


Q6 


Bill & Ginger 


T 8 


Concert Miniatures 














DD 11 


Connecticut Yankees 


M 57 


Gallicchio, Joseph 


DD 1 


Allen, Fred 


M 4 


Biltmore Hotel Ensemble 


K 2 


Contented Program 


R 19 


Garber, Jan 


Q 12 


Allen, Grant 


X8 


Blackburn, Burr 






N 10 


Geddes, Bob 


E6 


Allen, Ida Bailey 


Q 1 


Blackstone Plantation 


DDS 


Corn Cob Pipe Club of 


V3 


Gibbons, Floyd 


04 


Allen, Lucy 


N16 


Blake, George 




Virginia 


P 10 


Glen, Irma 


S3 


Allmand, Joyce 


D2 


Blue Ribbon Orchestra 


M 47 


Cosmopolitan Hotel Orchestra 














M 8 


Cotton Club Orchestra 


X7 


Goldbergs, The 


W6 


Allmand, Joyce 


M 34 


Blue Room Echoes 


Q4 


Coughlin, Bunny 


DD 15 


Golden's Orchestra, Jack 


L23 


Altman, Julian 


K 17 


Bodycombe, Aneurin 


L 13 


Cozzi, Mario 


Q IS 


Goldy & Dusty 


L23 


Altman, Sylvia 


X2 


Bonime, Joseph 






F9 


Goodman Orch., Al. 


X 5 


Ameche, Don 


N 2 


Bourdon, Rosario 


E2 


Crocker. Betty 


N 10 


Gordon, Norman 


T 1 


American Album of Music 


N 9 


Bowes, Major 


C9 


Cross, Milton 














C 10 


Cross, Milton 


DD 9 


Grab Bag, The 


F 1 


American Legion Program 


M 60 


Breakfast Club 


Ql 


Crumit, Frank 


Q4 


Graham, Gordon 


B 1 


America's Grub Street 


B 3 


Brewster, John 


Q2 


Crumit, Frank 


L3 


Grande Trio 


Z 1 


Amos 'n' Andy 


T 5 


Brice, Fanny 






Q4 


Grant, Dave 


M 2 


Antobal's Cubans 


X 5 


Brickert, Carlton 


Z 6 


Cuckoo Program 


Z 14 


Greenwald, Joseph 


M 2 


Antonio and Daniel 


DD 9 


Brooks and Ross 


Z9 


Cuppy, Will 














RS 


Curtain Calls 


T4 


Grofe, Ferde Orchestra 


T 2 


Arcadians 


DD 26 


Buick Program 


L 14 


Cutter, Mme. Belle Forbes 


DD 1 


Grofe, Ferde 


Z6 


Armbruster, Robert 


G 1 


Bundeson, Dr. Herman 




and Orchestra 


T 17 


Guest, Edgar 


C 4 


Armstrong, Jack 


DD 16 


Burns & Allen 


M 57 


Davies, Edward 


T 15 


Guizar, Tito 


D 1 


Armour Jester, The 


K 14 


Cain, Noble 






F 9 


Gulf Headliners 


M 16 


Arnheim, Gus 


C 8 


Cansdale, Harry 


N 15 


Davies, Edward 














X 2 


Death Valley Days 


F 7 


Gulf Program (Cobb) 


R4 


Arnold, Gene 


DD 2 


Cantor, Eddie 


R 7 


DeCordoba, Pedro 


T 13 


Gypsy Nina 


DD 18 


Arnold, Jean 


DD 24 


Captain Dobbsie 


W6 


Dennis, Richard 


T 1 


Haenschen, Gus 


K 2 


Arnold, Jean 


T3 


Carlile, Charles 


M 56 


Denny, Jack 


M 19 


Hall, George 


T 3 


Arnold, Rhoda 


RS 


Carlile, Charles 






DD 12 


Hanshaw, Annette 


R5 


Arnold, Rhoda 


F13 


Carnegie, Dale 


T 8 


Deutsch, Emery 














X 1 


Diamond's Adventures, Capt. 


X 8 - 


Happiness House 


DD 1 


Atwell, Roy 


ZS 


Carothers, Isabelle 


K 12 


Dilworth, George 


04 


Happy Rambler 


Y2 


Backus, Georgia 


V 1 


Carter, Boake 


K7 


Do-Re-Mi (Trio) 


DD 24 


Happy Timers 


G4 


Bagley, Arthur 


S6 


Cathedral Hour 


R6 


Downey, Morton 


R 23 


Happy Wonder Bakers 


DD 2 


Bailey, Ilomay 


W 1 


Catholic Hour 






M 18 


Harris, Phil 


R 1 


Bailey, Mildred 


N 2 


Cavaliers, The 


N 2 


Dragonette, Jessica 














X6 


Drake's Drums 


M 42 


Harris, Phil 


D 1 


Baker, Phil 


M 44 


Chase, Ilka 


T 11 


Duey, Phil 


M 27 


Harris, Phil 


T 32 


Balladeers, The 


DD 2 


Chase & Sanborn Hour 


K 2 


Eastman, Morgan L. 


DD 8 


Harrisburg Variety Show 


N 2 


Banta, Frank 


T 5 


Chase & Sanborn Tea Pro- 


M 17 


Edgewater Beach Orchestra 


K3 


Hayden, Ethel 


L 28 


Barlow, Howard 




gram 






DD 23 


Hayton, Leonard 


U 1 


Barlow, Howard 


F 19 


Cheerio 


T 29 


Edmonson, William 










DD 23 


Chesterfield Program 


Y 2 


Enos Crime Clues 


C 3 


H-Bar-O Rangers 


DD 15 


Barthell, Betty 






L 15 


Essex House Ensemble 


T 18 


Heatherton, Ray 


R3 


Barthell, Betty 


DD 18 


Childs, Bill 


T 21 


Evans, Evan 


C 1 


Helen & Mary Adventure 


E 1 


Barton, Frances Lee 


N 2 


Cities Service Concert 


N 17 


Evers, Chester 


X 9 


Henry, John, Black River 


C8 


Baruck, Allan 


ZS 


Clara, Lu 'n' Em 








Giant 


X 19 


Bar X Days and Nights 


DD 18 


Clark, Fritz 


X 4 


Famous Loves 


W 7 


High, Dr. Stanley 






M 34 


C louder, Norman L. 


P9 


Feibel, Fred 






DD 7 


Belasco, Leon 






Q 1 


Fennely, Parker 


V 5 


Hill, Edwin C. 


X 2 


Bell, Joseph 


F 7 


Cobb, Irvin S. 


M 25 


Fiddler, Dick 


L 15 


Himber, Richard 


C8 


Bell, Shirley 


M 41 


Cole, Richard 


X 5 


First Nighter 


T 1 


Hirsch, Bertrand 


T 2 


Bello, Ruth Kelly 


M 7 


College Inn Orchestra 






DD 1 


Hoffa, Portland 


X 7 


Berg, Gertrude 


U2 


Collinge, Channon 


DD 11 


Fleischmann Hour 


U6 


Hollywood Bowl Symphonies 






S6 


Collinge, Channon 


X 23 


Flynn, Bernardine 






02 


Bernard, Felix 






W 8 


Foulkes, Dr. W. H. 


D7 


Holmes, Taylor 


D 2 


Bernie, Ben 


T 6 


Columbia Artist Recital 


R5 


Four Clubmen Quartet 


M 1 


Hoist, Ernie 


M 7 


Bernie, Ben 


C 2 


Columbia Junior Bugle 


X 2 


Frawley, Tim 


DD 23 


Holtz, Lou 


R 24 


Berrens, Fred 


U 1 


Columbia Symphomy Orch. 






N 1 


Horlick, Harry 


DD 3 


Berrens, Fred 


L 28 


Columbia Symphony Orch. 


R 7 


Friendly Philosopher, The 


Z 8 


Horse Sense Philosophy 



NOTE: *INDEX NUMBER refers to programs in Classified Schedule pages 29-40. To secure complete information regarding - a particular pro- 
gram or an individual artist, locate the index number appearing at the left of the name on this page, in the Classified Schedule. Index numbers 
in the Classified Schedule are arranged alphabetically as to the letters which set off the different types of programs and numerically as regards the 
programs listed under each classification. See also, Note; page 29. 

•Notice of copyright. ' Method of arrangement copyrighted. Infringement will be prosecuted. 



October 



43 



RADIO FAN-FARE PROGRAM FINDER 



ARTIST AND PROGRAM SCHEDULE 



Index* 


Artist 


Index* 


Artist 


Index* 


Artist 


Index* 


Artist 


T 17 


Household Memories 


DD 13 


Mandy Lou 


M 18 


Ray, Leah 


N 10 


Stewart, Elliott 


V 10 


Howe, Col. Louis McHenry 






Z3 


Red Pepper Sam 


L21 


Stewart, Kathleen 


H2 


Hufsmith, Fred 


DD 10 


Mangano, Don 


Y 2 


Reese, Edward 






F20 


Husing, Ted 


R40 


Manhattan Merry-Go-Round 






M 50 
S3 
N 10 
U4 
M50 


Stokes, Harold 
Styers, Earl 
Summerfield, Wesley 
Symphonette 
Syncopators 


DD 7 

L5 
F8 
L23 


Husing, Ted 

Impressions of Italy 
International Radio Forum 
Intondi, Urban 


X 13 
R 10 

Qll 

R41 


Marie, French Princess 
Marsh, Howard 
Martha and Hal 

Martin, Dolph 


R43 
DD 3 

Q5 
F9 
L 16 


Regan, Phil 
Regan, Phil 
Reis & Dunn 
Revelers Quartet 
Rice, Gladys 


Z3 


Irwin's Band, Vic 


L 28 


Martini, Nino 










F 19 


Isles, J. Harrison 


DD 12 


Maxwell House Show Boat 


T 21 


Rice, Gladys 


X 18 


Tales of the Titans 






N 16 


Maxwell, Richard 


R 40 


Tamara 


T 19 ' 


Italian Idyll 


X 13 


Meighan, James 


DD 15 
DD 15 
DD 17 
X 17 


Rice, Grantland 


C 8 


Tedro, Henrietta 


N6 


Jack Frost Melody Moments 






Richfield Country Club 


M 50 


Teela, Dick 


R 15 
C 10 


Jackson, Arlene 
James, Lewis 


X 5 
N 16 


Meredith, June 
Merker, Mary 


Rich, Freddie, Orchestra 
Road Reporter, The 


K14 


Temple of Song 


N 16 

V 9 


Janke, Helen 
Jergens Program, The 


D 1 

M 10 
R 24 


Merrie-Men (Quartet) 
Merrie-Men (Quartet) 
Merry Makers 


T33 
X 19 


Robison, Willard 
Robinson, Carson 


M 45 
X20 


Terraplane, Orchestra 
Theatre of Today, The 
Thibault, Conrad 


N 17 


Johanson, Selma 






R 40 


Rodemich, Gene 


T 4 


DD 25 


Jolson, Al 


W4 


Michaux, Elder 


M 45 


Rolfe, B. A. 


V 8 


Thomas, Lowell 


DD 10 


Jordan, Marion and Jim 


R21 


Miller, Jack 


X8 


Ronfort, Dr. Gustav 


BB 3 


Tomlinson, Edward 


Q8 


Jordan, Marion and Jim 


K 17 


Mitchell, Russ 














T 17 


Mock, Alice 


L 9 


Rooney, Maude 


N 16 


Tone Pictures 


R16 


Joy, Alice 


DD 12 


Molasses 'n' January 


DD 9 


Rose, Freddy 


T 29 


Toney, Jay 


Z9 


Just Relax 






X 14 


Roses and Drums 


X4 


Torgerson, Ulita 


Y 6 


"K-7" 


M 10 


Molina, Carlos 


B 2 


Ross, David 


T 34 


Tours, Frank 


DD 10 


Kaltenmeyer's Kindergarten 


N 2 


Montgomery, Lee 


R31 


Ross, Don 


G4 


Tower Health Exercises 


DD 10 


Kamman, Bruce 


H 1 


Moore, Betty 














DD 23 
W6 


Moore. Grace 


DD 12 


Ross, Lanny 


R41 


Travelers Quartet, The 


Q3 


Kane and Kanner 


Morning Devotions 


K 10 


Round Towners, The 


V 10 


Trumbull, Walter 


O 4 


Kaufman, Irving 






DD3 


Round Towers Quartet 


C 7 


Tucker, Madge 


Z 8 


Kelly, Andrew F. 


N20 


Morning Parade 


DD 16 


Royal Canadians 


Q7 


Tune Detective 


T 22 


Kelvin, John 


DD 9 


Mors, Helen 


M 31 


Royal Canadians 


I 1 


U. S. Army Band 


V6 


Kennedy, John B. 


T 1 


Munn, Frank 














DD 1 


Musical Grocery Store 


DD 2 


Rubinoff, Dave 


I 2 


U. S. Navy Band 
Vallee, Rudy 


R9 


Kennedy, Pat 


H 5 


National Farm & Home Hour 


K 18 


Russian Symphonic Choir 


DD 11 


K 17 


Kennedy, Reed 






X 5 


Sagerquist, Eric 


R33 


Van, Vera 


M 29 


King, Henry 


F 17 


National Radio Forum 


Q 16 


Salt & Peanuts 


DD 3 


Van, Vera 


Z 5 


King, Helen 


T 34 


Neely, Henry M. 


S5 


Salt Lake Tabernacle Choir 


X23 


Van Harvey, Art 


A 3 


King, Wayne 


D 1 


Neil Sisters 










T 20 


Kirbery, Ralph 


DD 27 
R25 


Nestle Program 
Niesen, Gertrude 


02 
Q 1 


Samuels, Walter 
Sanderson, Julia 


T31 
X 23 


Vass Family 
Vic & Sade 


N 17 
Z6 


Kitchell, Alma 
Knight, Raymond 


C 10 


Nursery Rhymes 


Q2 
T 35 


Sanderson, Julia 
Sanford, Harold 


F 22 
DD 12 


Voice of Experience 
Voorhees, Don 


R 5 


Knubel, Dr. F. H. 


M44 


O'Connell.Hugh 


L 18 


Savitt String Quartet 


D 7 


Voorhees, Don Orchestra 


N 15 


Koestner, Josef 


DD 27 


O'Keefe, Walter 










T 17 
U4 
DD 18 


Koestner, Josef 
Koestner, Josef 
Kogen, Harry 


T 1 
DD 13 

T5 


Ohman & Arden 
Old Gold Program 

Olsen, George 


T 28 

W5 
M 11 

N2 


Scherban, George 
Scherer, Dr. Paul E. 
Scotti, William 
Seagle, John 


M 34 
N 17 
M 56 
DD 13 
K 7 


Wade, Fred 

Waldo, Earl 

Waldorf Astoria Orchestra 

Waring, Fred 

Warnow, Mark 


T 21 
L 17 


Kostelanetz, Andre 
Kriens, Christian 


R 7 
Q4 


Osborne, Will 
Oxol Feature 


R26 


Seagle, John 


A3 
C 7 


Lady Esther Serenade 
Lady Next Door 


Z9 

M 41 


Owen, Jeanne 

Palmer House Orchestra 


BB 3 
L 19 

N 2 


Seeing the Other Americas 
Semmler, Alex 
Shaw, Elliot 


R37 
R5 


Warnow, Mark 

Warnow's Orchestra, Mark 


DD 2 


Lahr, Bert 


S3 


Palmer, Kathryn 


M 11 


Shay, Bud 


X 7 


Waters, James R. 


L 12 

K3 


Lande, Jules 
Lang, Arthur 


W6 
T27 


Palmer, Kathryn 
Paperte, Frances 


D 1 


Shield, Roy 


M 57 
DD 19 


Wealth of Harmony 
Week-end Review 






N 1 


Parker, Frank 


Qi 

DD 24 


Shilkret, Jack 






R 17 


LaPalina Program 


X 16 


Parker's Sunday at Seth 


Ship of Joy 


Z 14 


Welch, Lou 


P 2 


Larsen, Larry 






N 2 


Shope, Henry 


DD 9 


Westphal's Orchestra 


R 26 


Lawnhurst, Vee 


DD 18 


Parsons, Chauncey 


DD 27 


Shutta, Ethel 


O 2 


Whitcup, Leonard 


N 10 


Lawrence, Earl 


DD 18 


Parsons, Joe 


DD 2 


Sims, Lee ' 


DD 9 


White, Billy 


P 1 


Leaf, Ann 


N 6 


Pasternack, Josef 






R22 


White, Billy 






S 3 
W6 


Patton, Lowell 


DD 18 


Sinclair Greater Minstrels 






P 4 


Liebert, Richard 


Patton, Lowell 


C 13 


Singing Lady, The 


H 1 


White, Lew 


T 1 


Lennox, Elizabeth 






R 32 


Singin' Sam 


P 7 


White, Lew 


M 1 


Lexington, Hotel Orch. 


M 27 


Pennsylvania Dance Orchestra 


C 14 


Skippy 


DD 25 


Whiteman, Paul 


K 12 


L'Heure Exquise 


M 42 


Pennsylvania Hotel Orch. 


M 44 


Small, Paul 


X 2 


Whitney, Edwin W. 


U 2 


Light Opera Gems 


R 40 


Percy, David 






DD 16 


White Owl Program 


F23 


Littau, Joseph 


T 29 
N 16 


Peters, Lowell 
Peterson, Curt 


DD 1 

T 29 


Smart, Jack 
Smith, Homer 


R26 


Wildroot Institute 


L 13 


Littau, Joseph 






R 17 


Smith, Kate 


M 44 


Wiley, Lee 


R 18 


Little Jack Little 


M 29 


Pierre Hotel Orchestra 


S 3 


Smith, Sidney 


Q 12 


Wilson, Claire 


C 8 


Little Orphan Annie 


K 17 


Pioneers, The 


R 10 


Snow Queens 


DD 12 


Wilson, Muriel 


X 11 


Lives at Stake 


U4 


Pitts, Cyril 






V9 


Winchell, Walter 


DD 16 

M 31 


Lombardo, Guy 
Lombardo, Guy 


02 
Z3 


Playboys, The 
Poe, Bonnie 


X 15 
DD 10 


Soconyland Sketches 
Song Fellows, The 


DD 22 
C 11 
DD 12 
DD 10 
F23 


Windy City Revue 


R 16 

M 25 


Lopez, Vincent 

Lotus Gardens Orchestra 


B 2 

M 44 


Poet's Gold 
Pond's Program 


R42 
X5 


Sorey, Vincent 
Soubier, Clifford 


Wing, Paul 
Winninger, Charles 


K2 


Lullaby Lady 


Z 14 
DD 10 


Potash and Perlmutter 
Poynton, Loretta 


DD 18 


Soubier, Clifford 


Wolf, Johnny 
Women's Radio Review 


Z 10 


Lum and Abner 


M 47 


Quaw, Gene 


T 29 


Southernaires, The 






N 15 


Lyon, Ruth 






T 29 


Southland Sketches 


W 7 


World of Religion 


DD 18 


McCloud, Mac 


N21 


Radio City Concert 


Q7 
L 10 


Spaeth, Sigmund 


V 3 


World's Fair Reporter 


Q9 


McConnell, Smiling Ed 


P4 


Radio City Organ 


Spross, Charles Gilbert 


R 19 


Yeast Foamers, with Jan 


DD 15 


McCoy, Mary 


DD 20 


Radio Guild 


C 16 


Stamp Adventures Club 




Garber 






E5 


Radio Household Institute 






T 34 


Yesterday and Today 


D 7 


McNamee, Graham 


W 5 


Radio Pulpit 






X 13 


Yorke, Ruth 


D 1 


McNaughton, Harry 






I 1 


Stannard, Capt. Wm. J. 






F23 


MacDonald, Claudine 


T 38 


Radio Rubes 


Z 5 


Starky, Louise 






J2 


Madison Ensemble 


N 21 


Rapee, Erno 


M 4 


Stern, Harold 


M 44 


Young, Victor 



NOTE: *INDEX NUMBER refers to programs in Classified Schedule pages 29 to 40. To secure complete information regarding a particular pro- 
gram or an individual artist, locate the index number appearing at the left of the name on this page, in the Classified Schedule. Index numbers 
in the Classified Schedule are arranged alphabetically as to the letters which set off the different types of programs and numerically as regards the 
programs listed under each classification. See also, Note; page 29. 

[•M H-, i , K*J \/> V / E^K*J 

*Hotiee of copyright. Method of arrangement copyrighted. Infringement will be prosecuted. 



44 



Radio Fan-Fare 




Agnes 

MOOREHEAD 

Boston 

REDHEAD 



By R. R. ENDICOTT 






IF YOU are one of the sixty million 
people in this country who think 
they could hecome successful radio 
performers, you may get a few good 
tips from the career of Agnes Moore- 
head. She, you know, is the com- 
parative- youngster who has taken 
only four years to become one of 
radio's leading dramatic actresses. It's 
unusual enough for any girl, unless 
she's a gag comedienne or singer, to 
be given a contract or to be featured. 
Well, Agnes Moorehead not only gets 
contracts and has her name played up 
on each program, but she also has 
entire programs built around the 
characters she plays. And, what's 
more, she is so securely established 
that she can even refuse to allow her 
name to be used in connection with 
programs when she does not like the 
kind of material prepared for her. 

But please don't think I'm implying 
that Miss Moorehead is perhaps a bit 
temperamental or upstage. On the 
contrary. She's a thoroughly pleasant 
person and not at all like Anna, her 
popular "Evening In Paris" program 
character. Anna, you'll recall, is a 
rather plain country gal who somehow 



never seems to get anything just 
right. Agnes, on the other hand, is an 
unusually attractive red-headed city 
gal who impresses you as being likely 
to get almost everything exactly 
right — particularly her dramatic char- 
acterizations. 

I DISCUSSED this and that with 
Miss Moorehead during a rehear- 
sal of her "Evening In Paris" pro- 
gram. When I got to the studio she 
and Andre Baruch were talking and 
gesturing into the microphone while 
Jack Shilkret and the boys in his 
brother Nat's orchestra (Nat is in 
Europe on vacation and Jack is ba- 
toning for him) were sitting around 
laughing at the lines and antics of 
the pair at the mike — even though 
they were hearing the skit for the 
sixth time. I ducked into the control 
room and sat down among a flock of 
production men. Even they were 
laughing and they must have heard or 
read the stuff a dozen times. 

When her part of the rehearsal was 
over Agnes came back to the control 
room and suggested that we find a 
quiet, uncrowded place where we 



could talk. As Jack Shilkret was just 
starting to put the orchestra through 
its paces, the only uncongested nook 
seemed to be the decompression 
chamber, so to speak, between the 
control room and the studio. This 
cubicle, about the size of the ordinary 
New York apartment bedroom 
(5'x8'), was filled with odd bits of 
studio furniture, but only one chair. 
Agnes insisted she would be perfect- 
ly comfortable perched against the 
wall on a low, wooden music rack, so, 
after protesting just about long 
enough (who says chivalry is dead?), 
I sat on the chair and we talked for 
an hour. 

I ASKED Agnes how she ever got 
started impersonating a twangy- 
voiced bit of rustic flora like Anna. 
"That just shows what can happen 
to you in this business," Agnes said. 
"A hick character called Nana was 
written into the fist 'Mysteries In 
Paris' shows to give the mysteries 
comic relief. I got the part and for 
some strange reason the character be- 
came tremendously popular almost 
immediately. Apparently she re- 



September 

reminded listeners of Zasu Pitts. At 
least, hundreds wrote in and said that 
when they heard Nana they could see 
Zasu. Then the whole idea of the pro- 
gram was revised and the name changed 
to 'Evening In Paris.' But the sponsors 
thought they'd better keep the comic 
character. They call her Anna now but 
don't ask me why." 

Although Agnes didn't say so, the 
fact is that Nana, or Anna, stole the 
show, and instead of having just a few 
lines as she did at first, the whole dra- 
matic part of the program is now 
written around her. 

"How do you like being identified 
with that type of character?" I asked 
Miss Moorehead, "Doesn't it tend to 
make listeners and sponsors pigeonhole 
you as a rural comic." 

"I wouldn't say that," she replied. 
"Anna is undoubtedly my best known 
character, but I've played hundreds of 
different parts. I do all kinds of dia- 
lects. And right now I'm even doing a 
rabbit— Peter Rabbit— in A. A. Milne's 
Winnie The Pooh series. This fall 
I'll be back in the Sherlock Holmes and 
the Warden Lawes Twenty Thousand 
Years in Sing Sing programs." 

Miss Moorehead then went on to ex- 
plain how she learns dialects. She does 
it by taking every chance she gets to 
study different types and nationalities. 
She goes down to 'the wharves, for ex- 
ample, and listens to the passengers and 
crews from foreign ships ; she goes to 
prizefights and absorbs the polyglot 
voice of the crowd; and she is a fre- 
quent visitor to New York's Interna- 
tional House, where people of every 
race and country make their home. 

QHE maintains that the only way to 
^ be any good in her kind of work is 
to be forever studying people. It's no 
secret, of course, that most radio writ- 
ers, directors, actors and actresses make 
no intelligent attempt to bring reality to 
their characters. Miss Moorehead 
thinks that is where one great improve- 
ment in radio programs will be made 
in the next few years. She is intensely 
sincere in her belief that slipshod 
writing, directing, and acting are among 
the major reasons for all the damning 
radio has to endure today. And she 
is not going to lay her work open to 
any of the usual criticisms, if painstak- 
ing preparation and intelligent inter- 
pretation will prevent them. 

We talked about radio work in com- 
parison with the stage. Agnes spent 
several years on the stage in St. Louis 
and New York. Although born in Bos- 
ton, she has lived longer in St. Louis 
than anywhere else. Her father is a 
minister, but he did not object when 
she joined the chorus of the St. Louis 
municipal opera company and under- 
studied the comedienne. Then Miss 
Moorehead came to New York and 



played in several Broadway hits (and 
errors) before trying radio. 

"What do you think the chances are," 
I asked her, "for a dramatic actress in 
radio to attain the reputation and in- 
come that are possible on the stage? 
It seems to me that so far every really 
well known and well paid woman in 
radio is either a gag comedienne or a 
singer." 

Agnes laughed. "Well, as far as I'm 
concerned," she replied, "radio has been 
much kinder to me than the stage ever 
was. But I realize that doesn't answer 
your question. I should say that radio 
is slowly making a definite place for 
good actors and actresses. I am so much 
more enthusiastic over the possibilities 
of radio than I ever was about the stage 
that I may be prejudiced. Radio 
obviously offers a far greater audience 
for the artist than any stage, and every- 
thing indicates that radio technique in 
producing plays is improving to such 
an extent that we shall soon be able to 
put on dramatic programs of as absorb- 
ing interest as any stage play. And 
when that happens the stars in radio 
plays will be just as well paid as any 
star ever was on the stage." 

VX7"HETHER you agree with Agnes 
or not, you'll admit that she's a 
girl who seems to know what she's try- 
ing to do. And if you could have heard 
her expound her convictions I think she 
would have convinced you. She's cer- 
tainly an industrious and intelligent 
young lady and, if anyone's success can 
be "explained," that's probably the ex- 
planation of hers. 

The only thing that struck me as 
incongruous about the whole interview 
was that such a small, attractive person 
(five feet three, 114 pounds) could be 
so impressive . . . sitting on a music 
rack. 

PROGRAM REVIEWS 

{Continued ) 
all of the mob that followed the old 
Fire Chief himself. 

"BUICK ON PARADE" 
(Review based on first program) 

(NBC-WEAF, Monday at 10:00- 
11:00 PM-DST) 

Cast — Gus Haenschen's Orchestra, 
Conrad Thibault, Graham McNamee, 
Arlene Jackson, Arthur Boran, 
Oilman and Arden, The Nightingales, 
The Songsmiths. 

Comment — Little imagination 
shown in combining the proven tal- 
ents of this expensive flock of stars. 
Individually they were excellent — ex- 
cept Arthur Boran, whose imitations 
lacked conviction and humor. (Dis- 
obeying doctor's orders, Arlene Jack- 
son postponed an operation to sing, 
and had a nurse beside her at the 
mike. Game kid.) 

The Plug — Graham McNamee fans 
probably found his usual over-enthus- 



45 

iasm digestible — but the majority of 
listeners must have resented Boran's 
imitation of Wiley Post in the testi- 
monial. The faith-shattered public 
is in no condition to stand this flirting 
with the truth. The trick was not 
only unfair but stupid, as Wiley him- 
self had broadcast for Socony on the 
same station two hours before. 

Opinion — Cut out the faking — get 
a good comic — add a dash of show- 
manship, and the show should be a 
wow. VERA VAN 

(CBS-WABC, Sunday at 7:00 PM- 
DST) 

Comment — The folks in Marion, 
Ohio, remember Vera as a child 
dancer who made the neighbors 
"O-o-h!" and "A-a-h!" and predict 
that she would make her mark with 
her toes. Vaudeville audiences re- 
member her as an excellent dancer 
who could also sing a popular tune 
commendably. But Vera had other 
ideas — worked conscientiously on 
them — studied voice — and became so 
popular with West Coast radio fans 
that CBS brought her East and is 
building her up for a sponsor. Miss 
Van has a clear soprano voice that 
takes high notes without offending 
the microphone. With her knowledge 
of rhythm, she can sing hot as well 
as sweet, but she prefers the classic 
field. 

Opinion — Good prospect for a com- 
mercial program. 

"LUM AND ABNER" 

(NBC-WEAF, Monday through 

Thursday at 7:30 PM and Friday at 

10:30 PM-DST) 

Cast — Norris Goff and Chester 
Lauck 

Comment — If you are a customer 
for hick dialect, here are a couple of 
rural character players who know 
how to speak the language. The 
"cracker" lingo is wrapped around the 
usual large hunks of homey happen- 
ings, perked up with the kind of folk- 
sey humor that goes over big with 
people who like hick dialect. And so 
if you are one of those who like hick 
dialect, you will like Lum and Abner 
because these hick character actors 
certainly can do hick dialect, and 
. . . well you probably get the idea. 
In other words, it's a good hick dia- 
lect program. 

The Plug — Pretty easy to take. The 
Ford dealers, who sponsor the pro- 
gram, seem to realize that their prod- 
uct is fairly well known, so they just 
concentrate on a few catch-phrases 
and sneak in an occasional sock dur- 
ing the hick dialect part of the pro- 
gram — or maybe you'd forgotten that 
I said it was a hick dialect program. 

Comment — Entertaining sketches 
for those who enjoy a good hick dia 
. . . now, now — put down that brick. 
I'll quit. 



46 

POPULAR TUNES 

(Continued) 
played from merely looking at the 
black and white notes and lyrics. But 
there are many songs that require a 
demonstration, not alone by a piano, 
but by ' instruments of the sustained 
type as well. I believe "Hold Me" is 
in that class. Had I heard it played 
moderately slowly by a good dance 
orchestra, featuring the reeds and 
strings, I might have realized that the 
song was very much on the same or- 
der as "Tell He," a tune over which 
I went into rhapsodies many, many 
years ago. When I did come to the 
conclusion that "Hold Me" was a 
grand tune for popular consumption, 
it had been whacked out by most of 
my colleagues on the air. And in 
many cases it was played and sung 
so much better than we could ever 
hope to do it that I felt it best to for- 
get about it entirely. 

"THREE WISHES" 
By Douglas Furbur and George Pos- 
ford. Published by Sam Fox Pub- 
lishing Co. 

From the British movie, "The 
Good Companions," comes a song 
that we feel is a credit to our reper- 
toire, "Three Wishes." There seems 
to be something successful about hav- 
ing the word "three" in a song : 
"Three Little Words," "Three 
Guesses," "Three On A Match" are 
examples. 

"Three Wishes" is unusually well 
written. It is, incidentally, one of 



our first recordings for the new Blue- 
bird 25c Victor record. The proofs 
of the records, to which my boys and 
I listened today, were pleasing — es- 
pecially the record of "Three 
Wishes." We play the song after the 
style of Ray Noble, whose English 
Victor record showed me just how 
lovely it really could be. 

"BLUE PRELUDE" 

By Gordon Jenkins and Joe Bishop. 

Published by Keit-Engel, Inc. 

Just a little bouquet in the general 
direction of Isham Jones and his 
orchestra. Two of his boys, Gordon 
Jenkins and Joe Bishop, evidently in- 
spired by the prolific output of their 
director (who has been writing tunes 
since the World War, and whose run 
of hits during 1923 and 1924 was 
unprecedented), have given Isham 
and the rest of us an unusually fine 
number. 

I would call it a combination of 
"Song Of The Bayou" and "Chloe," 
as its thought, rhythm, and general 
minor quality are a bit like both. It 
makes a delightful trombone and 
trumpet feature fox trot. The boys 
saw fit to make it an oddity, having 
no verse, and 40 measures. 

We take it at what is commonly 
called "stomp tempo," with accented 
rhythm, accenting equally the four 
beats of the measure. The "stomp" 
idea came partly fom Harlem and 
partly from Mr. Jolson's building up 
of the last part of his last chorus by 
stamping his feet on the floor with 




DISCARD YOUR AERIAL 

New Scientific $1.00 Invention 

DOES AWAY WITH AERIAL 

ENTIRELY 

Just place an F & H Capacity Aerial Eliminator within your set — forget outdoor aerial trou- 
bles — move your set freely, anywhere. 

BETTER TONE AND DISTANCE GUARANTEED 

Sensitivity, selectivity, tone and volume improved. After tests, the P & H Capacity Aerial 
Eliminator was chosen by the U. S. Government for use in Naval Hospital. 

TRY ONE 5 DAYS AT OUR 
RISK! SEND NO MONEY 

Mail coupon at once — pay postman $1.00 plus few pennies 
postage upon delivery; if not entirely satisfied return in 
5 days and your $1.00 will be refunded without question, 
or sent postpaid, if you remit personal check, M-0 or 
dollar-bill. 

JUST MAIL THIS COUPON 1 

F. & H. RADIO LABORATORIES, 
Dept. 33, Fargo, N. D. 

Send F. & H. Capacity Aerial. Will pay postman 
$1 plus few cents postage. If not pleased will return 
within 5 days for $1 refund. 

Check here if sending $1 with order — thus 

saving postage cost — same refund guarantee. Checfc 
here if interested in dealer's proposition 

NAME. __ _ _. 

ADDRESS _ 

TOWN STATE 



WE PREDICT THIS TYPE OF AERIAL 
WILL BE USED PRACTICALLY ENTIRELY 
IN THE FUTURE. 

EACH TESTED ON ACTUAL 
1127-MILE RECEPTION 

Connected by anyone without tools in a moment. No 
light socket connection: no current used. Fully concealed 
(size IVi" x four inches). 

Satisfied Users Throughout The 
World 

Cape Town. S. Africa — Received Capacity Aerial Elimi- 
nator and find it a very remarkable instrument. Our 
nearest station 1000 miles away comes in with full loud- 
speaker volume. I have also listened on my loud speaker 
to six overseas stations 6000 miles away, among them be- 
ing London, Finland, etc. Kindly send us 72 more 
F. & H. Capacity Aerial Eliminators. Signed: Copper 
Slingsby Company. 

Schenectady, N. Y. — I take pleasure In expressing my 
real satisfaction with the Capacity Aerial Eliminator. I 
can get with loud speaker-volume, KFI, Los Angeles, 
3000 miles away. It Is not only satisfactory — It is 
wonderful. Signed: Robert Woolley. 

F. & H. RADIO LABORATORIES 
Dept. 33 Fargo, N. Dakota 



Radio Fan-Fare 

each beat of the measure — thus 
stamping into the mind of his audi- 
ence each word and each note of the 
composition. 

"FREE" 

By Dana Suesse and Ed Heyman. 
Published by Harms, Inc. 

I have previously mentioned Dana 
Suesse on this page. Her "Jazz Noc- 
turne" brought her into Tin Pan Al- 
ley prominence. And her earlier 
"Whistling In The Dark" and her un- 
usual piano style have made her the 
subject of much discussion at Lin- 
dy's, where musical notables meet 
daily. 

Larry Spier, who was probably re- 
sponsible for the development of 
Johnny Green and Ed Heyman in 
the popular music field, saw fit to 
merge Dana's unusual melody with 
a lyric by Ed Heyman. The com- 
bination is "Free." 

The song haunted me for days after 
I first heard and played it. As to its 
chances of becoming a rival to "Hold 
Me," I have my doubts, because Miss 
Suesse, like Johnny Green, is inclined 
to write beautiful things which rarely 
are as easily absorbed as the triter 
melodic twists of Other composers. 
Still, I thought enough of "Free" to 
include it in our first Bluebird re- 
cordings. The record passed muster 
(although it sounded as if our rhythm 
section had gone out for a shave dur- 
ing the chorus). 

"RADIO UNCLE" 

(Continued) 

11. Jimmie Peterson 

12. Joe Wiggin 

13. Louie Brendel 

14. Helen Connell 

"O.K.," said Nails. "And for Gaw's 
sake, bawl out the key name a little 
louder than the others when you 
come to it. Now, here, on the elev- 
enth, for instance, when you come to 
Jimmy Peterson, give us the Jimmy 
Peterson good and loud, or clear your 
throat or sumpin', so we'll wake up 
and listen. Gawd knows it's hard 
enough to keep awake having to lis- 
ten to all that other drivel of yours, 
just to get ten or fifteen words meant 
for us. Wake us up somehow when 
our turn comes." 

"And try to give us our stuff a little 
earlier on your program. Then we 
can tune out on you and get back to 
doing something useful on the boat." 
This from Splinter. 

"And ain't there something that you 
can do about that giggle of yours? 
That ha, ha, ha makes me sick," 
snarled Sneerface. 



September 

"That's what puts my act across. 
I've got to have personality. I got 
to be a radio artist first and foremost, 
or the radio station throws me out 
and the first thing you know your 
wireless signal service goes haywire. 
It's worked all right so far, hasn't it?" 

"Yeh, it's all right. Here's your 
money for the last two weeks. The 
code stays the same, don't it? 'You 
ought to come when your mamma 
calls' still means the gang on shore 
has got everything fixed and it's all 
right to land a load that night?" 

"Yeh," said Uncle Tom, "but I've 
been thinking about the code. We've 
got to keep getting variety and adding 
new stuff, or my public will get tired 
of the old patter, and somebody might 
get wise. I've written a bunch of new 
messages, just to keep my act fresh." 
He drew another sheet of paper from 
his pocket and handed it to Nails, who 
opened it, looked it over casually, and 
read part of it aloud: 

" 'You ought to wash thoroughly be- 
hind your neck and ears' . . . 'Clean up 
your cargo and bring everything ashore 
tonight.' 

" 'Hang up your wash rag' . . . 
'Lay low, and don't try to land any- 
thing for a week.' " 

AND that is how Mrs. Timothy 
. Tottle, wife of Timothy Tottle 
and mother of Timothy Tottle, Jr., 
unwittingly tied up a rum ship for a 
week and thus temporarily paralyzed 
an important sector of a great Ameri- 
can industry. All because Mrs. 
Tottle had a way of ignoring her hus- 
band's ideas on methods of control- 
ing Junior, and finally took the reins 
in her own hands and wrote to Uncle 
Tom about Junior's wash rag short- 
comings. And all because she hap- 
pened to do it on the second of the 
month and Uncle Tom got around to 
answering it on the fourth and be- 
cause he put Junior's answer early on 
his program, and didn't remember 
that he had a more vital notice for 
a fictitious Timothy Tottle later, 
which would signal the boys on the 
boat to hurry in with everything they 
had. And because Uncle Tom's gig- 
gling made the boys on the boat so 
seasick that when they got what they 
wanted on his program that evening 
they tuned out on him . . . snap . . . 
like that. 

BUT here comes the funniest part 
of all : 

When Timmie Tottle had heard his 
name on the radio, and the admoni- 
tion to hang up his wash rag, he had 
excitedly tuned off Uncle Tom and 
slipped upstairs and hung up the wash 
rag in question, and not only hung 
it up but folded it with great care and 
precision. 

"So!" raged Mr. Tottle to Mrs. 



47 



Tottle, "you really wrote in to that 
low-life, did you? Over my head. 
No respect for my wishes in the mat- 
ter. I'm nobody around here! What 
I say doesn't mean a thing in this 
house !" 

"Now, let's wait and see, Father. 
Let's see. It may do Junior some 
good." 

The next morning, Mrs. Tottle 
called her husband into the bath room 
to see a miracle. 

"That's the first time in his life that 
Timmie ever hung up his wash rag." 

And Timmie hung it up every day 
from then on. 

Mr. Tottle could do nothing but 
suffer in silence. Uncle Tom was now 
tuned in every evening twice as loud 
as ever. Mr. Tottle sat through the 
program a grim, glum martyr. Mrs. 
Tottle and Timmie beamed. 

But about ten days later, Uncle 
Tom failed to come on at the usual 
hour. Without explanation, WQZ 
substituted a good jazz orchestra in 
place of the Uncle Tom act. 

Mr. Tottle was delighted. 

"Somebody has done it at last. 
Somebody has murdered that guy at 
last!" 

He wasn't far wrong. 

IT SEEMS that Uncle Tom had dis- 
appeared from WQZ for three 
days. And when he had come back, 
it was with a black eye, ten stitches in 
his scalp, a court plaster on one 
cheek, and a bruise on his chin. 
Evidently he had been out with some 
rough company, somebody who ap- 
parently must have had a reason for 
being pretty sore at him. 

And even a radio artist can't get 
away with conduct like that . . . ab- 
sence from the studio without permis- 
sion . . . indifference to schedule . . . 
going out with rowdies. 

WQZ had had to give Uncle Tom 
the air — in the good old-fashioned 
sense. 

SHORT WAVES 

(Continued) 
parts of the world widely separated by 
water — the most famous channel being 
the New York to London circuit. It 
happens, however, that all conversations 
worth eavesdropping on are scrambled 
— so distorted that English sounds ex- 
actly like Chinese, and elaborate equip- 
ment is required to unscramble the 
voice on the other end. 

Entertainment value: 5%. 

ADDING these percentages, we find 
l that, altogether, the entertainment 
value of short wave reception is about 
on a par with that of conventional 
broadcasting. But we have neglected 
one consideration which, in many in- 
stances, tips the scales definitely on the 
short wave side — namely the appeal to 
the DX fan. To the twirler of the mid- 




^\>" 




1+2 = 

ThcNozac* 



(no Back). 
Ton know 
when it's filled, 
when to refill it. 
Demand the 
quick* easy* pos- 
itive mechanical 
Nozac filling ac- 
tion. See the Nozac 
before you buy ... 
Compare... $5 and 
more. Other Conk- 
lina $2.75. $3.50 and 
more. Pencils $1.00 
and more •••Ask your 
dealer. 

THE CONKLIN 
PEN COMPANY 
Toledo 
Chicago San Francisco 

♦Proved by over 2 years of 
general public use. 



Ccnklin 

NOZAC 

SATISFACTION GUARANTEED 



night dial, short waves offer a new 
realm of greater pleasure and less pre- 
varication. There is no time, day or 
night, at which it is not possible, on a 
good receiver, to pull in stations many 
thousands of miles away. True, it is 
often possible to receive European sta- 
tions via long wave rebroadcasts, but 
the thrill of direct contact is missing. 
For the fan to whom the crackling 
swish of a distant carrier is more en- 
ticing than a night's slumber, we must 
reverse the order of percentages. The 
short wave set rates 100% — and the 
long wave broadcast receiver somewhat 
less than that. 

It is obvious that short wave recep- 
tion in no way takes the place of long 
wave reception. Rather, it supple- 
ments it. And advantage should be 
taken of its high entertainment value. 
The most simple and satisfactory solu- 
tion to the problem is a high grade 
combination all wave receiver. 

VOICE OF THE LISTENER 

(Continued) 
Wishing Radio Fan-Fare worldwide suc- 
cess and assuring you that each issue 
will find a place in my home. I am, Agnes 
Gearhart, 1746 Arlington Avenue, Toledo, 
Ohio. 

• • • 

In examining the Artist and Program 
Schedule I find the idea of listing the 
artists alphabetically is a great help. 
There are many times when one loses 



48 

track of a favorite and has great diffi- 
culty in locating him or her. The idea is 
a great one and should certainly add to 
the well deserved popularity of your pub- 
lication. Rowena Postles, Box 573, West- 
field, N. J. • • • 

What has happened to Nellie Revell? 
Her column was always very interesting 
and we sure do miss it. The Program 
Finder is good, but I cannot see the ne- 
cessity of it in view of the fact that all 
newspapers have complete radio program 
schedules every day. It would be much 
nicer to give us more interesting news 
about our favorite radio stars. Mrs. A. 
V. Schneider, 1815 Summerfield Avenue, 
Brooklyn, New York. (See pages 10 and 
11 for Nellie Revell. Editor.) 
• • • 

Received my magazine yesterday and 
liked it very much. But would rather 
have reading matter in place of the radio 
programs as I get them in my New York 
paper every day. Otherwise the book is 
O.K. Mrs. G. W. Olney, R.F.D. 2, Ridge- 
field, Connecticut. 

(Daily radio program schedules are 
printed in only a few hundred of the more 
than tivo thousand daily newspapers in the 
United States. The list of nezvspapers 
printing radio news of any sort is rapidly 
decreasing. It is likely that big city news- 
papers soon will carry no radio news that 
is not paid for by advertisers. Fan-Fare's 
Program Finder is intended primarily for 
the majority of its readers to whom a daily 
newspaper schedule is not readily avail- 
able. Features of the Program Finder not 
found in any newspaper are the listing of 
artists and the convenient classification of 
programs by subject matter. Editor.) 




reveals 
9 the ink 
supply at all 
times. Both 
conveniences 
no other pen 
affords. Ask 
to see — com- 
pare — the 
Nozac* (no 
sack) -when 
you shop for a 
sackless pen... 
$5.00 and more. 
Other Conklins 
$2.75, $3.50 and 
more. Pencils $1 
and more. 
THE CONKLIN 
PEN CO., Toledo 
Chicago 
San Francisco 
•Proved by over 2 yeara 
of general public use. 



Conkliit 



NOZAC 

SATISFACTION GUARANTEED 



STOOPNAGLE S SECRETS 

(Continued) • 

her in which was concealed a micro- 
phone, and read out of it to her 
studio audience cryptic society notes 
like this: "Who was the man in a 
green sedan who drove to the apart- 
ment house at the corner of Umpty- 
ninth Street and Walloo Avenue last 
night at ten-forty-six o'clock, stopped 
and looked up at a window shade on 
the sixth floor, then went in and 
stayed until eleven-six and came out 
and drove away?" Curiosity was as 
rampant as if the items had been in 
Winchell's column, while all the time 
they were being manufactured hap- 
pily by F. Chase Taylor. It was then 
that he began to formulate the ideas 
out of which grew the character of 
Colonel Lemuel Q. Stoopnagle. 

Even now that character is an en- 
tirely separate one from his own. He 
steps into it deliberately. It has 
proved a marvelous escape from his 
troubles. The tribulations of F. 
Chase Taylor cannot pursue him into 
the entity of Colonel Lemuel Q. 
Stoopnagle. 

THE big reason for the consist- 
ently fresh quality of his hu- 
mor is that it is original. That is why 
there is in it none of that tired feeling 
which you can detect in the programs 
of comedians whose gags were writ- 
ten or swiped for them by hack joke 
producers — gags apparently collected 
on the theory that if something has 
been sold before it can be sold again 
(which works pretty well in selling 
jokes but has yet to build up a lasting 
following for a comedian). The jokes 
sound stale no matter how clever and 
frolicsome the manner of the artist 
who is breaking his neck to put them 
over. 

Stoopnagle and Budd stick to their 
own style, refuse to be bothered by 
the inevitable suggestions of Broad- 
way-minded professionals. They could 
not stick to their own humor if they 
did not understand exactly what their 
own humor consists of, what under- 
lying principles are its basis. And 
those foundation ideas are what they 
have now broken down and told. 

THERE are certain key words al- 
ways in the back of the creative 
mind of Colonel Stoopnagle. They 
are all twenty-five-cent words, but 
don't let that worry you — they're not 
that way when they come out. 

One word is futility. You and I 
puzzle and sweat and work hard and 
play the game according to the rules, 
and when we are through where are 
we? 

Another word is pretentiousness. 
The big, the solemn, the self-impor- 
tant are always the Colonel's favorite 
targets. A third word is incongruity, 



Radio Fan-Fare 

which explains the delicious contrast 
between Stoopnagle's subject and his 
handling of it that makes everyone 
think he just happened to be born 
cockeyed. The fourth word is hu- 
manity. It is the most important 
word of all, because by keeping it in 
mind he brings his humor close to 
the lives of us, the hundred million. 

Now find those four words in the 
following typically Stoopnagle epi- 
sode, butchered though it will be in 
this version. It is the favorite of the 
Colonel himself and can only be 
relished by true Stoopnappreciators. 
(All others change here.) 

The construction engineer calls up 
the financial big shot. 

"I just wanted to tell you," he says, 
"that your billion dollar bridge over 
the Chesapeake has at last been com- 
pleted." 

"Indeed," says the boss, "why, that 
is just dandy. I certainly am proud 
of you boys. I wish I could have 
been with you for the opening. And 
so the cars are now whizzing merrily 
over it?" 

"No, sir," the engineer admits with 
the mild embarrassment of one who 
has awkwardly upset a tea cup. "You 
see, sir, we made a slight mistake. 
We must have forgotten one of the 
spans, because it doesn't quite reach 
the other shore." 

And the only answer from the big 
executive, the man who has spent a 
billion dollars to build a bridge across 
the Chesapeake, is this : 

"Aw, shucks." 

Well, we warned you. If you're 
not a hundred-percenter, you can't fill 
in with your imagination the fine 
points of their exposition and get 
your laugh. But if you can, here is 
why you got such a deeply satisfying 
chuckle: 

The first key word, pretentiousness, 
is in the bigness of the bridge, the 
tumult and the shouting that always 
go with those stupendous undertak- 
ings, and the pomposity of the big 
official who officiates at ceremonials. 
Colonel Stoopnagle sticks his pin 
square into these balloons. And the 
resulting slow deflation is pure Stoop- 
nagle. "Aw, shucks." Those two 
words do the job. They are incon- 
gruous because they are so inade- 
quate to the billion-dollar situation. 
They show up the futility of the most 
far-flung ambitions, and express the 
puny despair of all humanity when 
our best-laid plans bite the dust. 

NOT all four key words are always 
found in every sketch. Some- 
times three of them, or two, or only 
one. For instance, futility is Stoop- 
nagle's most precious theme. It 
sounds pretty pessimistic, doesn't it? 
One of the curious paradoxes about 
humor is that the better it is and the 
closer it approaches real art, the more 



September 

pathos and futility and basic pessi- 
mism you will find expressed in it. 
Witness Charlie Chaplin in his great 
days. Would you call him a cheerful 
figure ? 

But the swell part of it all is that 
these real artists can take the tough 
things that make us cry in life and 
use them to make us laugh. 

We are all familiar with the feeling 
of frustration and boredom and help- 
lessness at the routine of life, but not 
many of us are conscious of just 
which trifles have mounted up to 
make our shoulders sag down. 

Colonel Stoopnagle, who is himself 
essentially normal and subject to all 
of life's petty annoyances, is gifted 
with the divine ability to select the 
significant cinder in the eye of the 
universe. His "irks" are our irks and 
we get them off our chest through 
him. 

He will get an idea, for instance, 
on a morning when he is lying in bed 
too borne down by life's trifles to get 
up. The closet door is open and he 
notices that the one elegantly pressed 
suit hanging there makes all the rest 
of his clothes look perfectly terrible. 
Out of that comes the invention of 
a "permanently wrinkled suit" for 
hanging in the closet to make your 
other clothes look natty. The futility 
theme combined with the humanity 
chord makes that funny. 

YOU will find that in most Stoop- 
nagle stunts there is a great big 
thing like the bridge across the Ches- 
apeake. He is always on the lookout 
for something stupendous to approach 
from the point of view of small, aver- 
age Mr. Humanity. Hence the enter- 
prise of selling skylines to small 
towns. That's why ship-launchings 
are his meat. And then there is the 
man who has been given a bottle of 
champagne. He doesn't like cham- 
pagne so he buys a yacht to break the 
bottle over the bow. Passing by 
a "yacht store" one day in New York, 
Colonel Stoopnagle could not resist 
the spectacle of this tremendous salon 
with its huge brassbound yachts sit- 
ting around, and thousands of people 
going by for whom these things just 
do not exist. Nobody ever went in 
to buy and the only person in sight 
in the store was a little man sitting at 
a desk figuring and looking impor- 
tant. So out of that is worked the 
idea of the man who goes in a yacht 
store to buy half a yacht, charges it, 
has it wrapped up and sent the next 
day to his apartment. The whole 
transaction takes place in perfect 
solemnity. Only after the clerk has 
figured to the exact cent what exactly 
half a yacht would cost does he break 
down and ask why only the bow is 
being bought. "Because," the pur- 
chaser replies, "my daughter is chris- 



49 



tening a boat next week and she 
wants to practice." 

Sir Hubert Wilkins had only to 
start his absurd underwater expedi- 
tion to the North Pole, forcing us to 
read columns of front page publicity 
about it, when he was presented with 
the S. S. S. S. S. S. Stoopnagle which 
Stoopnagle and Budd launched with 
only one slight mishap : it did not 
float. 

We all get a little sick of success 
stories, so Colonel Stoopnagle inter- 
views "little known personalities of 
industry" and shows us the man who 
is engaged in not writing the things 
you read between the lines in letters. 
Also the telephone operator in a hotel 
who busies herself with not calling 
people who wish not to be called until 
twelve o'clock. She works much 
harder than her colleague whose 
lesser job consists of not calling peo- 
ple until ten o'clock. And there are 
the hookless hooks for not hanging 
your mother-in-law's picture — green 
ones for not hanging it in the dining 
room, blue ones for not hanging it in 
the bedroom, and so on. 

Nothing would be more fun than to 
go on quoting chapter and verse for 
this thesis, but the magazine hasn't 
been published that would hold all the 
choice examples of Stoopnagliana. 
So I'll conclude with a sticker. Even 
the Colonel can't classify it. He 
doesn't know why it's funny, but he 
knows it is truly his own. I think I 
could analyze it like the rest, but it 
would be a shame. It's too sweet. 
I'll leave it to you. 

A modest but stuttering sportsman 
meets a friend. "Well, old chap, and 
where have you been?" asks the 
friend. 

"Oh, just t-t-t-t-tiger-hunting," says 
the sportsman. 

"Tiger hunting, eh? Where?" 

"Oh, Y-Y-Y-Y-Yucatan." 

"Yucatan! Why, there aren't any 
tigers there. You must mean Africa." 

"All right," says our hero with 
charming acquiescence. "I was in 
A-A-A-A-Africa, then." 

"How did you catch your tigers ?" 

"Oh, I worked out a s-s-s-s-system. 
I s-s-s-sort of snuck up on them and 
twisted their tails until their heads 
dropped off." 

"Well, have you seen any tigers 
since you got back to New York?" 

"Yes, I have. I saw one only yes- 
terday in my back yard." 

"Did you get him?" 

"Well, I went down and snuck up 
on him and got hold of his t-t-tail 
and twisted it — " 

"Until his head dropped off?" 

"No. I stopped twisting it." 

"For heaven's sake, why?" 

"Well, as I was t-t-t-wisting I got 
to thinking: 'What if this is some 
p-p-p-poor man's tiger ?" , 



J. E. Smith 
President 



I have 
Doubled 

and 
Tripled f 

Salaries / 



National Radio 
Institute 



Many of 
, My Men 
} Make*40 
/*60 *75 

a Week 




Broadcasting Sta- 
tions employ trained 
men for jobs pay- 
ing up to $5,000 
a year. 




Ill Train\bu 
atHometoFill 

a GOOD Job 

in Radio 

Send for my book of information 
on the opportunities in Eadio. It's 
FREE. Mail the coupon now. Get 
the facts of your opportunities in 
this field with a future. N.B.I, 
training fits you for jobs making, 
selling, servicing sets; to have your 
own business ; to operate on board 
ships, in a broadcasting or com- 
mercial land station; for television, 
aircraft Radio and many other 
branches. My FREE book gives you 
full information on Radio's many 
opportunities for success and how 
you can quickly learn at home to be 
a Radio Expert. 

Many Radio Experts 

Make $40, $60, $75 a 

Week 

Why struggle along in a dull job 
with low pay and no future? Start 
training now for the live-wire Radio 
field. I have doubled and tripled 
salaries. Many men holding key jobs 
in Radio got their start through 
N.R.I, training. 

Many Make $5, $10, $15 a 

'Week Extra Almost at 

Once 

Hold your job. I'll not only train 
you in a few hours of your spare 
time a week, but the day you enroll 
I'll send you instructions which you 
should master quickly for doing 28 
Radio jobs common in most every 
neighborhood. I will give you Radio 
Equipment for conducting experi- 
ments and making tests that teach 
you to build and service practically 
every type of receiving set made. 
Fred J. Dubuque, 19 Church 'St., 
Oswego, N. Y., wrote: "I have 
made about $1,200 in a little over 
two years' spare-time Radio work." 

ACT NOW. Get my Book 

■■FREE 

My book has shown hundreds of 
fellows how to make more money 
and win success. It's FREE to any 
ambitious fellow over 15 years of 
age. Investigate. Find out what 
Radio offers; about my Course: 
what others who have taken it are 
doing and making, about my Money- 
Back Agreement, and the many 
other N.R.I, features. Mail the 
coupon for your copy RIGHT NOW. 

J. E. SMITH, President 

Oept. i JR) 

National Radio Institute 

Washington, D.C. 



Radio is making 
flying safer. Radio 
operators employed 
through Civil Ser- 
vice Commission 
earn $1,620 to $2,- 
800 a year. 




Spar e-time set 
servicing pays many 
N.R.I men $5, $10, 
$15 a week extra. 
Full-t i m e men 
make as much as 
$40, $60, $75 a 
week. 




Television is the 
coming field. Tou 
can get ready for 
it through N.R.I. 
training. 



nowAFREE-"^ 



J. E. Smith, President, 
National Radio Institute, 
Dept. 3JR3, 
Washington, D. C. 

Dear Mr. Smith: Without 
obligating me, send free book 
about spare-time and full- 
time Radio Opportunities and 
how I can train for them at 
home. Please print plainly.) 



Name Age. 



City ; State 




50 



SELECT THIS 
HOTEL 

FOR YOUR SUMMER 
VISIT TO NEW YORK! 



When you come to the "First 
city of the world" for a vaca- 
tion of thrills and shopping, be 
sure to enjoy the added pleas- 
ure of living in the new, smart 
center of New York ... at the 
modern Hotel Montclair. The 
Montclair is adjacent to all the 
railroad and important bus ter- 
minals, the better shops and 
the glamorous theatrical dis- 
trict. It offers you every com- 
fort at rates that are surprising- 
ly moderate. 




800 ROOMS— EACH WITH 
BATH, SHOWER, RADIO 

SINGLE 

from $2.50 to $5.00 per day 

Weekly from $15.00 

DOUBLE 

from $3.50 to $6.00 per day 

Weekly from $21.00 

Something New in New York . . 
Casino-in-the-Air ! For lunch or 
tea, dinner or supper. Moderate 
prices. No couvert or minimum 
charge. Music by Scotti and his 
Hotel Montclair Dance Orchestra. 




Lexington Avenue at 49th Street 
NEW YORK CITY 



SLIPPING AND GRIPPING 

(Continued) 

to slip. The broadcasts were discon- 
tinued only because Phillips Lord (who 
played Seth and was the works of the 
show) left on a well earned round-the- 
world cruising vacation. Accordingly, 
we want to doff our hat to the author 
and cast before their work is forgotten. 
The activities of the Parkers and their 
friends have always been lush with sen- 
timent, but it was never allowed to go so 
far that it became a cheap and ridiculous 
attempt at tear- jerking. It was really 
remarkable how the program always 
stopped laying on the hokum just before 
it got too heavy to bear. Every per- 
former in the cast was good, the 
sketches were written with a convincing 
naturalness, and the capable direction 
kept up the interest of all except those 
who just couldn't get aroused over small 
town doings. As for us, we're a better 
boy for having listened to the folks from 
Jonesport. 

Phil Cook ... is, unfortunately, off 
the air. We recommend that a sponsor 
grab him quick. Phil has one of the 
friendliest, most likable personalities in 
radio. He's versatile and he's original. 
What more do you advertisers want? 

Andy Sannella . . . Phil Cook's radio 
sidekick. Another sure-fire bet for 
some sponsor. 

Edwin C. Hill . . . The best in his 
business if you'll stand for a little flag 
waving and some expressions of opinion 
that you may not hold with. We've 
never heard a broadcast of Mr. Hill's 
that bored us. Barbasol will sponsor 
Ed starting Sept. 11. Be sure to tune in. 

tMISS THESE— Smilin' Ed Mc- 
Connell . . . One of the worst 
one man shows ever conceived 
because of the sappy combina- 
tion of "entertainment" and ad- 
vertising. For instance, on a recent pro- 
gram Smilin' Ed said, "Well, I'd better 
stop talkin' about Acme Ant Killer and 
sing you a little hymn . . . All right, 
folks, I'll sing you the verse of 'Does 
Jesus Care?'" (We should think He 
would.) 

The best one man programs we've 
ever heard were put on several years 
ago by one Charley Hamp on behalf of 
Dr. Straska's Toothpaste. They were 
loaded with advertising and yet Charley 
made folks all over the country take it 
and like it. He was the first of radio's 
singing-playing humorists who could 
actually kid the boys and girls into buy- 
ing the product. It has been reported 
that Charley is now on the West Coast 
looking for a sponsor. We hope he 
finds a good one, quick. 

The First Nighter . . . The old hoke 
overplayed by Charles Hughes, June 
Meredith, and Don Ameche. 

Poland Water Program . . . Ditto, 
only much worse. 



Radio Fan-Fare 

Soconyland Sketches . . . Hick stuff; 
veddy, veddy dull. 

Gypsy Nina . . . The sort of voice we 
don't appreciate, but she's better than 
some who've found sponsors. 

Household Musical Memories . . . 
Josef Koestner's Orchestra, Alice Mock 
(soprano), vocal trio, contest, and Ed- 
gar Guest. We rate them in that order. 
Mr. Guest's extremely folksy personal- 
ity doesn't penetrate the microphone. 
We've heard him make intensely inter- ' 
estihg talks at Father and Son lunch- 
eons, Rotary get-togethers, etc., so the 
trouble is with radio and not with the 
Bungalow Poet. 

Potash and Perlmntter . . . Too bad 
this was revived because people are go- 
ing to think that Montague Glass' two 
Jewish characters were never funny. 
The sponsors may not know about their 
mistake yet because they are apparently 
not perceptive enough to realize how 
offensive their dramatized advertising 
of Feenamint is. 

Chase and Sanborn Coffee Program 
— The music and singing is all that is 
keeping this one going. Mr. Lahr's 
humor is flat and Leo Carrillo's Mas- 
ter of Sermonizing is . . . well, you'd 
have to hear some of the things he says 
to believe he said them. We understand 
that Mr. Lahr has just been given a 
65-week contract by Standard Brands. 
If this is true then one of two things is 
certain. Either Bert has a marvelous 
agent, or he has worked out a new radio 
technique. We believe it must be the 
latter. Mr. Lahr has always been one 
of our favorite stage comedians, and it 
will be good news to know that he has 
at last discovered a formula that will 
put his personality over as effectively on 
the air as it is behind the footlights. 
Lord knows the radio stuff he has been 
doing is a discredit to his ability and 
showmanship. 

GOOD SHOWS— Phil Bak- 
er's Armour program with 
Harry McNaughton, Roy 
Shield's Orchestra, the Merrie- 
Men, and the Neil Sisters. You 
call it madness, but we call it Baker. 
The Sinclair Minstrels with Gene 
Arnold, Chauncey Parsons, Bill Childs, 
Mac McCloud, and Cliff Soubier. Lots 
of variety, good clean fun, and jokes 
that don't seem nearly so old as they 
are. If you ever liked a minstrel show 
this one should please you. 

The Blackstone Plantation with Julia 
Sanderson, Frank Crumit, Parker Fen- 
nelly, and some well done advertising. 
We hope Frank and Julia never lack a 
sponsor. To us they are perhaps the 
friendliest, most pleasing personalities 
on the air. What if their voices aren't 
perfectly trained? We wouldn't care if 
they never hit a note right on the nose 
— so long as they retained their char- 
acteristic warmth, naturalness, and good 
humor. —TUNA 






{^MoneyJ 



BROADCASTING 



offers you these 
and more! 



"T\0 you, too, want to get into Broad- 
casting — the most fascinating, glam- 
orous, highly paying industry in the 
world? Do you want to earn big money — 
more than you ever dreamed possible be- 
fore? Do you want to have your voice 
brought into hundreds of thousands of 
homes all over the land? If you do, you'll 
read every word of this amazing oppor- 
tunity. 

For no matter where you live — no matter 
how old or how young you are — if you 
have talent — then here is a remarkable new 
way to realize your life's ambition. Broad- 
casting needs new talent — in fact the de- 
mand far exceeds the available supply. 

Greatest Opportunity in 
Broadcasting 

Because Broadcasting is expanding so fast 
that no one can predict to what gigantic 
size it will grow in the next few years — 
Broadcasting offers more opportunities for 
fame and success than perhaps any other 
industry in the world today. 

Think of it! Broadcasting has been taking such 
rapid strides that today advertisers alone are 
spending more than 7 times as many millions 
a year as the entire industry did 
only four years ago. Last year, ad- 
vertisers spent $3 5,000,000, while 
Broadcasting Stations themselves 
spent millions for sustaining pro- 
grams. Think of the millions that 
will be spent next year, and the 
year after — think of the glorious 
opportunities for thousands of tal- 
ented and properly trained men 
and women. 

Earn Big Money 
Quickly 

Why not get your share of 
these millions? For if your 
speaking or singing voice 
shows promise, if you are 
good at thinking up ideas, if 
you can act, if you have any 
hidden talents that can be 
turned to profitable Broadcast- 
ing purposes, perhaps you can 
qualify for a job before the 
microphone. Let the Floyd 
Gibbons course show you how 
to turn your natural ability into 
money! 





You can train for a big 
paying position in Broadcast- 
ing as an : 

Announcer Musical Director 

Singer ProgramManager 

Actor Sales Manager 

Advertising Reader 

Publicity Writer 

Musician Director 

Excellent opportunities in 

Broadcasting are open to 

men and women who have 

mastered the technique of 

radio presentation. Read 

how you, too, can prepare 

yourself for your share in 

Broadcasting. 



But talent alone may not bring you Broad- 
casting success. You must have a thorough 
and complete knowledge of the technique 
of this new industry. Many a singer, actor, 
writer or other type of artist who had been 
successful in different lines of entertainment 
was a dismal failure before the microphone. 
Yet others, practically unknown a short 
time ago have risen to undreamed of fame 
and fortune. Why? Because they were 

trained in Broadcasting technique, while those 
others who failed were not. 

Yet Broadcasting stations have not the time 
to train you. That is why the 
Floyd Gibbons School of Broad- 
casting was founded — to bring 
you the training that will start you 
on the road to Broadcasting suc- 
cess. This new easy Course gives you 
a most complete and thorough train- 
ing in Broadcasting technique. It 
shows you how to solve every radio 
problem from the standpoint of the 
Broadcast — gives you a complete 
training in every phase of actual 
Broadcasting. Now you can 
profit by Floyd Gibbons' years 
of experience in Broadcasting. 
Through this remarkable course, 
you can train for a big paying 
Broadcasting position — right in 
your home — in your spare 
time — entirely without giving 
up your present position or mak- 
ing a single sacrifice of any kind 
— and acquire the technique that 
makes Radio Stars. Out of ob- 
scure places are coming the fu- 
ture Amos 'n' Andys, Graham 
MacNamees, Olive Palmers, and 
Floyd Gibbonses — why not be 
among them? 



Complete Course in Radio Broadcast- 
ing by FLOYD GIBBONS 

A few of the subjects covered are: The Studio 
and How it Works, Microphone Technique, How 
to Control the Voice and Make it Expressive, 
How to Train a Singing Voice for Broadcasting, 
The Knack of Describing, How to Write Radio 
Plays, Dramatic Broadcasts, How to Develop a 
Radio Personality, Sports Announcing, Educa- 
tional Broadcasting, Radio Publicity, Advertising 
Broadcasts, Program Management, and dozens 
of other subjects. 

Send for Valuable FREE Booklet 

An interesting booklet entitled "How to Find 
Your Place in Broadcasting" tells you the whole 
fascinating story of the Floyd Gibbons School 
of Broadcasting. Let us show you how to qual- 
ify for a leading job in Broadcasting. Let us 
show you how to turn your undeveloped tal- 
ents into money. Here is your chance to fill 
an important role in one of the most glamor- 
ous, powerful industries in the world. Send for 
"How to Find Your Place in Broadcasting" to- 
day. See for yourself how complete and prac- 
tical the Floyd Gibbons Course in Broadcasting 
is. No cost or obligation. Act now — send coupon 
below today. Floyd Gibbons School of Broadcast- 
ing, Dept. 3K61, U. S. Savings Bank Building, 
2000 14th Street, N.W., Washington, D. C. 

This Book Sent To You FREE 

r 1 

. Flovd Gibbons School of Broadcasting, 
I Dept. 3K61, U. S. Savings Bank Building, 
| 2000 14th Street, N. W., Washington, D. C. 

I Without obligation send me your free 

1 booklet. "How to Find Your Place in Broad- 

| casting," and full particulars of your home 

I study course. 

I Name Aee 



Address 
City 



State 




O hip aboard a 

SCOTT 

ALL-WAVE Qdwcv 
for a 

THRILL CRU IS 

'ROUND THE 
WORLD 



I 



Lf you're an adventurer at heart 
(and aren't we all?) you'll glory in the thrills 
of cruising the ether-waves via a SCOTT 
ALL- WAVE Deluxe Radio. 

Sit right in your own comfortable living 
room . . . there's no sea-bag to pack, no dun- 
nage to stow, no passports to secure. Just 
the twist of a single, simple tuning dial and 
it's "Ho! You're off for strange lands of 
romance and allure!" 

Supreme for Stay-at-Home Listeners 

First a shake-down cruise in home waters. Listen in 
on American broadcast stations near and far — coast- 
to-coast is an easy jaunt. Discover the marvelous 
capability of this dream ship to carty you anywhere 
at your will . . . with a delightful fidelity of tone that 
puts you right into the sending studio, giving you every 
word of speech and every note of music with a glorious 
perfection that transcends all previous heights of 
mechanical sound reproduction. Your own ears will 
tell you so . . . and the evidence is backed up by scientific 
laboratory findings that prove SCOTT radio reproduc- 
tion to be the closest to perfection yet attained. 

As a first venture in short wave reception listen-in 
on the crime wave as reported by police calls from one 
end of the land to the other . . . eavesdrop on gossipy 
amateur wireless telephony "hams", and hear the air- 
planes and their ground stations talk back and forth. 

Hear Canada and Mexico 

Now venture farther! Roam the air-waves to Canada 
and Mexico. Hear something different . . . something 
typical of these near-by foreign lands broadcast on 
wave bands from 15 to 550 meters. Don't fret about the 
rumors you may have heard that these countries are 
soon to change wave-lengths . . . your SCOTT can be 
equipped to receive on all bands between 15 and 4,000 
meters at a small extra charge. 

Listen-in On All of Europe 

And now you've "got the feel of your ship." Head 
out into the open . . . start on a fascinating explora- 
tion cruise for radio joys that arc new and different. 

Here's England, firstl GSB, at Daventry, is sending 
out the news of the day for the benefit of Colonial 



listeners-in . . . there's peppy music from a famous 
London hotel . . . and at signing off time (midnight in 
London, but only 6 P.M. Central Standard Time) the 
chimes of Big Ben, atop the Houses of Parliament, clang 
sonorously as though you were actually there to hear 
them in person. 

Slip your moorings once again. Cross the Channel 
and lend an ear to Radio Colonial, Pontoise, France. 
It's bringing you Parisian music and typically French 
entertainment. 

Varied Programs from Far Countries 

Distance still lures you? Then set your course for 
Germany ... in a jiffy you're listening to Zeesen, with 
programs of glorious symphony orchestras, and per- 
haps a speech by "Handsome Adolph" that will give 
you a different viewpoint on Hitlerism. 

Make port at Madrid, in sunny Spain, and hear 
EAQ broadcasting typical National music. Announce- 
ments from this station are considerately made in 
English as well as Spanish. 

Then swing south to Rome and hear the voice of 
12RO's woman announcer tell you it's "Radio Roma, 
Napoli," that's on the air. Most likely the following 
musical program will be opera direct from LaScala, in 
Milan, or some other musical treat worth going actual 
miles to hear — and you'll be listening to it, with purity 
of tone and richness of reproduction that's truly 
amazing, without stirring from your easy chair at home. 

And now for an adventure-trek that holds a supreme 
"kick" for the radio sensation-seeker! Sail away "down 
under." Listen in to VK2ME or VK3ME, in Sydney 
and Melbourne, Australia. Hear the call of that famous 
Kookaburra bird, listen with delight to an interesting 
and varied program of music and talks on the commer- 
cial and scenic attractions of the Antipodes. 

Owners' Reports Show Real Ability 

And these are but a few of the interesting places to 
be visited by means of your SCOTT ALL-WAVE 
Deluxe Receiver . . . F. L. Stitzinger, for instance, is a 
Scott owner who in a six-month's period received 
1588 programs from 41 stations in 22 foreign lands. A. 
G. Luoma got 1261 programs from 75 different stations 
in 26 countries, and some 200 other SCOTT owners 
reported reception of 16,439 programs from 320 sta- 
tions in 46 countries during the same time. 

"Can such startling radio performance be true?" 



you ask. Do you doubt that any but radio professionals 
can enjoy the delights of exploring the air-waves the 
world over, far from the too-familiar programs of 
broadcast stations here at home? Do you think that it 
may be possible, but feel that the cost of sufficiently 
able equipment is more than you can afford for enter- 
tainment? 

New Value at Moderate Cost! 

Then set your mind at ease! For such performance is 
actually possible ... we gladly prove it to you, and back 
the proof by an iron-clad guarantee of consistent 
foreign reception. 

Laboratory technique, employing the world's most 
skillful, specially trained engineers and craftsmen in 
custom-building a receiver constructed to the highest 
standards of perfection known in radio, makes possible 
the super-performance of the SCOTT ALL-WAVE 
Deluxe for any radio-user, regardless of his experience 
or skill in operating. In this set top efficiency is coupled 
with absolute simplicity of tuning. 

Prohibitively high priced? Not at all! You can have 
a SCOTT, and enjoy the supreme thrill of mastering 
the air-waves of all the world, at moderate cost. 

Get Complete Details — Mail Coupon! 

Because the SCOTT ALL-WAVE Deluxe is on; of 
the truly fine things of the world, custom-built for 
those discriminating people who demand the best, it 
is not distributed broadcast, to be casually picked up 
here, there, or anywhere. To get full particulars re- 
garding it, absolute PROOF of its performance, and 
all the information you require, simply send the coupon 
below direct to the modern scientific laboratories where 
it is built. 

E. H. SCOTT RADIO LABORATORIES, INC. 
4450 Ravenswood Ave., Dep't D-93, Chicago, 111. 

Tell me how I can have a SCOTT ALL-WAVE 
Deluxe to take me radio world-cruising. Include all tech- 
nical details, proofs of performance, and complete 
information. 

Name 

Address 

City State 



fOBER ' ocr ~3 



BURNS & ALLEN WERE CACA EVEN THEN 



CAN DANCE MAESTROS DANCE? 








JEFF MACHAMER • F. C. COOPER 



RUDY VALLEE • HARRY EVANS 




REVIEWS 




HERBERT MITCHELL 



ROSARIO BOURDON 



Famous as a composer, concert soloist on the 'cello, and conductor, Rosario 
Bourdon has just begun his seventh year as leader of Cities Service Orchestra. 
Before Mr. Bourdon entered radio he had studied, written, or played music in 
most of the large countries of the world. He was born in Montreal, in 1881, 
and by the time he was thirteen he had attended the Montclam School and 
the Jesuit College in Montreal and the Quebec Musical Academy. Then he 
went to the conservatory in Ghent, Belgium, and at fourteen became soloist with 
the Kursal Orchestra of Ostend. Mr. Bourdon once worked in a Canadian saw 
mill and he swears that it was there he first had the idea of becoming a 'cellist. 
He composes best before breakfast and he likes baseball, football, golf, and 
tennis. But he says that movie love scenes annoy him to the point of madness. 




TALK OF THE AIR 



What's wrong with Radio? 

WE keep hearing rumors that 
radio is not all it might be and 
you may have read some rather criti- 
cal statements of programs in the 
pages of this magazine. Several bits 
of news have come to our notice 
lately, indicating not only what may 
be wrong with radio but also what 
improvement may be expected soon. 
In the first place, it looks as if both 
the networks and the independent sta- 
tions will be able to sell more of their 
time to advertisers during the coming 
year than they have ever sold before. 
In this event there can be no excuse 
for inferior programs on the grounds 
of economy. 

And consider the bulletin from 
Professor Frank N. Freeman, educa- 
tional psychologist at the University 
of Chicago, who recently conducted 
an intelligence test among radio fans. 
Professor Freeman's figures show 
that the intelligence of radio audi- 
ences is probably higher than the in- 
telligence of the population as a 
whole, and that radio programs are 
probably pitched at too low an in- 
tellectual level at present. 

"It seems to be a common opinion," 
remarks the professor, "that the aver- 
age intelligence of the radio audience 
is only as high as that of the thirteen- 



or fourteen-year-old child. I am 
sure that there is a large group of 
highly intelligent radio listeners, and 
that it is advisable to keep this group 
in mind when planning programs." 

SINCE the beginning of radio, 
broadcasters have talked much 
and done little about improving their 
product. Actually they have known 
practically nothing about who listens 
to their programs and they have been 
afraid to take many chances with 
anything but moron entertainment. 
We believe the radio people would be 
willing to try increasing the quality 
of their programs if they were sure 
of a good alibi in case the experiment 
did not work. Professor Freeman's 
tests, and others like them, should 
provide that alibi. 

THEN there's the question of who 
writes the stuff you hear and how 
it's written. Variety prints this : 

Stipend for the dramatic serial 
writer in radio has taken an appreci- 
able boost the past few months. Free- 
lance confectors of the continued plot 
are now averaging $50 a 15 -minute 
installment. Not so long ago $25 was 
the usual return and $35 was con- 
sidered high. 

So far radio hasn't developed from 



its own continuity writing field one 
notable specialist in the serial craft. 
For this class of material it's still de- 
pending on newspapermen and the 
pidp boys, the latter' s knack of turn- 
ing them out in reams being a heavy 
asset. 

Top men among the serial author- 
ing coterie for radio are Bob An- 
drews and Roland Martini. . . . At 
the height of their typewriter pound- 
ing Andrews ran up a record of 
40,000 words a week, involving 22 
programs, and Martini had a total of 
30,000 words a week with 13 pro- 
grams. 

Shades of Galsworthy ! John might 
be considered to have been fairly pro- 
lific, but he had a wonderful week 
any time he turned out 4,000 to 5,000 
words of good writing. And although 
Variety mentions $50 as the price of 
a 15-minute script, the price for those 
used on the majority of stations will 
continue being nearer $5 or $10 for 
the average sustaining program. (And 
in many cases the writer will be given 
the opportunity of doing it for 
nothing just "for the valuable ex- 
perience.") 

NEXT let's consider the future of 
announcers : Columbia has now 
issued a handbook of "don'ts" which 



Hadio Fan-Fare; combining Radio Digest. Volume XXX,"No. 6/October, 1933. V Subscription rates yearly $1.50 in TJ. S. A.; Foreign. $3.00; Canada. $2.25: Single Copies 15c. 
Entered as seoond-class matter October 19, 1932. at the post office at Mt. Morris. Illinois, under the act of March 3, 1879. Copyrighted, 1933, by Radio Digest Publishing 
Corporation, yAll rights reserved. Radio Fan-Fare, combining Radio Digest, is published monthly by Radio Digest Publishing Corporation. Publication Office: 404 North 
Wesley Avenue, Mount Morris, 111. Editorial and Advertising office: 420 Lexington Avenue, New York City. Not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts or art received by mail. 



should help the present situation. For 
instance, the announcer who tells the 
radio audience what it has been think- 
ing, through the use of some such 
phrase as "You have just been en- 
joying . . . ", is singled out for re- 
buke. Under the heading, "Avoid- 
ing Comments on Quality," Colum- 
bia's handbook has this to say about 
the practice of divining audience re- 
actions : 

"After a speech has been given over 
the network, do not turn to the 
speaker and say : 'Thank you, Mr. 
So-and-so' or 'we appreciate your 
having spoken' or make any comment 
of that nature. 

"Rather — give just a straight an- 
nouncement of what has been on the 
air. In other words, 'You have just 
listened to Mr. So-and-so talking on 
such-and-such a subject,' without any 
additions such as 'the brilliant talk 
of or 'the interesting address of or 
anything else. 

"Avoid the use of such phrases as 
'You are being entertained by.' Nor 
should you say: 'We hope you have 
enjoyed so-and-so as much as we 
have here in the studio'." 

Announcers also are cautioned 
against excess wordage of all kinds. 
An organ is to be referred to merely 
as an organ and not as "the mighty 
organ" or "the great organ." Ad 
libbing of song numbers is to be as 
concise as possible because "the an- 
nouncer is apt to become tiresome if 
he attempts to ad lib extended de- 
scriptions of some of the selections 
played or of the setting." (And how !) 

Also included in the manual is a 
list of program restrictions. One of 
these forbids direct solicitation of 



funds by speakers. It is pointed out 
that in a few instances after a speak- 
er's continuity has been read and ap- 
proved by the continuity department, 
he may attempt to inject spontaneous 
pleas for. money in an already ap- 
proved script. The production man 
or announcer is instructed to read 
every speaker's script just before he 
goes on the air and cut any last- 
minute insertions of such a character. 
"Please bear in mind," reads the 
rule, "that, though we should be tact- 
ful and polite in all instances, these 
instructions apply regardless of the 
importance or prominence of the 
speaker." 

IN commercial programs, the in- 
structions repeat the recently 
formed CBS rule of permitting no 
more than two price announcements 
in a 15-minute program, providing 
the sales talk lasts no longer than one 
and one half minutes ; three price 
mentions in a half-hour program if 
the sales talk is restricted to six min- 
utes ; and five price mentions in an 
hour show with only six minutes of 
sales talk. 

Other restrictions which the an- 
nouncers and production men must 
enforce in commercial programs for- 
bid exaggerated or doubtful claims ; 
misleading statements ; infringement 
of other sponsors' rights through 
plagiarism or imitation of program 
ideas or copy slant; doubtful medical 
advertising ; reflection on competitors' 
goods ; speculation promotion ; slan- 
derous, obscene, vulgar or repulsive 
announcements ; overloading of a 
program with advertising, or any ad- 
vertising matter that may be deemed 
injurious to Columbia, broadcasting in 




u ^ 

"O. K., Pete. I'll get him on the next chorus!" 



Radio Fan-Fare 

general, or honest advertising and 
reputable business. 

Hail Columbia ! It's a step in the 
right direction and undoubtedly many 
other stations will follow suit in your 
new deal. 

ALL of which brings us to the 
A difficult matter of good and bad 
taste in radio. Try as they will, the 
broadcasters have not been able to 
beat the movies in bad taste, but they 
have frequently been accused of not 
caring whether their programs were 
in good taste or not, so long as they 
could make them show a profit. The 
critics have much evidence on their 
side. Personally, we believe good 
taste in radio is increasing and, there- 
fore, we were considerably surprised 
the other day when we learned of cer- 
tain auditions that Columbia was 
holding for a prospective client. The 
program was not bought, happily, be- 
cause the advertiser did not like it — 
not because Columbia had any ob- 
jections to broadcasting it over its 
network. The person to be featured 
on the proposed program was the 
most famous living member of one 
of Europe's former royal families. 
The sponsor was Ex-Lax. 

• • • 

IT'S contagious, that Kentucky 
Colonel dialect of Al Jolson's. Al 
had been rehearsing for several hours 
at the Times Square NBC studio. 
The boys in Paul Whiteman's band 
had sat on the stage all that time ac- 
companying Jolson in his musical 
numbers. Benny, a little Russian 
violinist with a thick Russian accent, 
chopped away with his bow — grunt- 
ing a guttural remark from time to 
time. Suddenly Paul, on the stand, 
darted a question at Benny. He 
blinked his eyes and replied, "Ah 
couldn't tell yo'-all that, Mistah 
Whahtman." His Russian ancestors 
rolled round in their graves. 

So infectious is Al's dialect that a 
Broadway wisecracker claims Jolson 
has the Harlem-born elevator opera- 
tor in the studio talking like a Mis- 
sissippi River boat pilot. 

At a rehearsal a few days ago, Al 
confessed to the use of a strange 
theatrical device when he made the 
picture, "The Jazz Singer." One of 
the outstanding parts of that famous 
picture,' you'll recall, was Jolson's 
singing, in Hebrew, of the song, Kol 
Nidre. Audiences throughout the 
country were enraptured, as Jolson, 
eyes directed heavenward and hands 
upraised, sang this ancient Jewish 









October 






NESTLES 
CANDY KIDS 




WALTER O'KEEFE AND ETHEL SHUTTA 

. . . rehearsing a close-harmony duet — 
with gestures. The title of the song is, 
"When I'm Nestling With You For 
Nestle's." On the right they break clean 
as they come out of the clinch. (George 
Olsen probably just walked in. Yes, he's 
her husband. See the story on page 24.) 



And here Walter gets all 
excited as he talks about 
his product. "Gee whit- 
taker, folks," he says, "you 
must eat Nestle's Choco- 
late. It will make your hair 
grow, whiten your teeth, 
soften your skin, improve 
your mind" ... or have 
we got this mixed up with 
three other plugs? 




song with great feeling. Al now ad- 
mits that the heaven-watching eyes 
were glued to a canvas drop on which 
were painted, in large letters, the 
Hebrew words of Kol Nidre. 



ON the radio in this country Mor- 
ton Downey's fame as a whistler 
is second only to his renown as a 
singer. But while his whistling here 
has brought forth only a few letters 
of complaint and some packages of 
birdseed, it almost resulted in his ar- 
rest in London. 

During his recent trip abroad Mort 
was walking through Burlington 
Arcade, near Piccadilly, whistling a 
popular air. A policeman accosted 
him and threatened to arrest him for 
disturbing the peace. Mort pleaded 
for release, saying that he made his 
living as a whistler in America. 

"All right," replied the bobby, "I'll 
let you go, because you'll never make 
it doing that here. Move on." 

• • • 

SIGMUND SPAETH, the Tune 
Detective, who always gets his 
tune ... or his man . . . has gone 
in for boop-a-dooping. 

In his regular programs, the emi- 
nent scholar of things musical fills in 
passages where he loses track of the 
words with a healthy boop-boop-a- 
doop! 

"It always helps me out of a hole," 
says Sig, "and everybody knows the 
words don't mean a thing anyway." 

• • • 

THE reason Jimmie Mattern in- 
sisted on seeing Fred Waring's 
Pennsylvanians in action as soon as 
he arrived in New York was because 
he feels that he owes his life indirect- 
ly to Fred. 

After a few days in the Siberian 
wastes near Anadyr, Jimmie was on 
the point of going out of his mind. 
Then he stumbled onto a small store 
which boasted a phonograph with one 
record — "In My Gondola" by Fred 
Waring's Pennsylvanians. Jimmie 
says he played it until it was worn 
out, but he thinks it kept him from 
going mad because it was his only 
contact with civilization. 

• • • 

IRV COBB goes all other authors 
five better in his new book, "One 
Way to Stop a Panic." He has long 
been opposed to the idea of having 
forewords written for his volumes, 
saying that forewords either try to 
establish alibis for what follows or 
just do a bit of moralizing. 



But something has apparently hap- 
pened to the Cobbian mind, for his 
new work shows a marked reversal of 
policy. Instead of having one fore- 
word, he has written six of them 
which pop up at you in various parts 
of the book. 

When Irv isn't broadcasting his 
own program, he may often be found 
listening to the various sounds eman- 
ating from rehearsals and broadcasts 
in other studios. Cobb has been par- 
ticularly intrigued by the technique of 
various announcers. In the reception 
room the other day he defined a radio 
announcer as "a studio grandee with 
a drawing room manner and a gold- 
plated set of oratorical tonsils. Even 
when he's gargling a sore throat a ra- 
dio announcer sounds eloquent." 
e • • 

ALL the stories you've read about 
>■ Tony Wons being injured in 
France during the World War and 
being brought home to die are the 
bunk. Tony was in the war, but the 
doctors didn't become interested in 
him until long afterwards. 



A 1 



DD similes : "As uninformed as 
a radio publicity department." 



LENNY HAYTON, that ambitious 
■J young maestro, has turned out a 
new song, "Dizzy Fingers." When 
the first printed copies were placed 
in his hands, he glanced through one 
to see if everything was all right. But 
everything wasn't all right. There 
was one wrong note sticking out 
prominently in the chorus. So Maes- 
tro Hayton ordered every copy al- 
ready off the press destroyed and the 
edition reprinted. 

Lenny is well known as a hard and 
thorough worker. He was the lone 
individual burning the midnight oil 
(by special dispensation of the au- 
thorities) in the New York's Public 
Library the other evening. Requir- 
ing an orchestration of an aria from 
Puccini's "Tosca" for Grace Moore, 
Lenny was unable to buy a score at 
short notice. So he worked all night 
making his own special arrangement 
of the aria from the library's only 

score. 

• • • 

ALTHOUGH they have made in- 
- numerable personal appearances 
in vaudeville and motion picture 
houses and in movie "shorts," there 
still are people who will not believe 
the Mills Brothers use only one mu- 
sical instrument — the guitar. When 
they returned to the air recently for 



Radio Fan-Fare 

their first broadcast in many weeks, a 
phone call came in immediately after 
their program. It was from a lady 
who was having trouble with an 
apartment full of guests. They had 
just listened to the Mills' program, 
but not one of them would believe 
that all the oompahs and things were 
created by the voices of the boys. 

• • • 

JANE FROMAN put on her show 
under rather trying circumstances 
last week. On Friday afternoon a 
lingering siege of sinus trouble be- 
came acutely irritating, but despite 
her discomfort Jane stepped up to the 
mike at her appointed time. As soon 
as the last notes of the program's 
theme song had been played by Jac- 
ques Renard's Orchestra, however, 
she hurried from the studio to the 
office of a doctor who was waiting to 
perform an operation on her nose. 

• • o 

ZEKE, of the hillbilly team of 
Annie, Judy, and Zeke, is hav- 
ing his own troubles these days find- 
ing moss for his horned toad. He 
brought this odd pet with him from 
the foothills of Georgia when the out- 
fit came North to broadcast. Zeke 
says if you want to find out how rare 
moss is on Broadway just go out and 

try to buy some. 

• • • 

DURING one of his recent discus- 
sions on "the human side of the 
news," Edwin C. Hill told of some 
of the thrills of deep sea diving. 
Among the narratives he recounted 
was one concerning Jane Gail. Sev- 
eral years ago Miss Gail, a motion 
picture actress, dove into the shark- 
infested waters off Bermuda as part 
of a role in a film she was making. 
"Despite the dangers," Hill said, 
"Miss Gail is alive today to tell the 
story." Ed should know because 
Jane is now Mrs. Hill! 

• • • 

JULIUS TANNEN, the "chatter- 
box" star of half a dozen Earl 
Carroll "Vanities," could hardly be 
called retiring in his new beer pro- 
gram with Phil Spitalny's band. But 
Julius turned out to be a rather mod- 
est fellow when he dropped around 
to the studios for the first rehearsal 
of the show. The production man in 
charge of the program introduced 
himself and, in a sort of relations- 
cementing manner, said : 

"I've seen you quite often on the 
stage, Mr. Tannen." 

"My sympathy, sir," replied Julius. 
— The Editors 



October 



11 




:lay foot 



a stricken toe (pardon me, Mr. At- 
well) — I mean foe. Shall we run 
down the list together? As if we 
wouldn't anyway . . . 

LOOKA — there's Guy Lombardo. 
J Smooth rhythms from his side 
of the floor. Crooked, weaving, 
puffing, grunting Guy on ours. At- 
tention, Grade Allen . . . looka 
George Burns. A dancing dope ! 
Switch from cigars to those sup- 
posedly milder cigarets and pipe the 
guy at the helm . . . Lenny Hayton 
... a good bandmaster but what a 
dancer, what a dancer ! Or, as the 
Greeks might have said if they could 
have founds words for it, "What a 
dancer !" 

Smiling George Olsen occasional- 
ly steps out from behind his teeth 
to favor the ladies with a two or 
three step . . . but maybe I was 
wrong when I said "favor." As a 
dancer he is, to quote many previ- 
ously happy ladies, not so forte. (Mr. 
Olsen disclaims being even eighteen, 
let alone forte.) 

Still, not all orchestra leaders are 
terrible and a few have even been 
known to gallop gracefully when left 
somewhat alone on the dance floor. 



DRAWING BY F. C. COOPER 



Let's check them off quickly as we 
become nonchalant with a borrowed 
butt and an air of sang froid: 

Ben Bernie in the witness chair 
chortles, "Yowzir, yowzir, boss, ah 
sho does dance . . . why, ah was 
ah hoofer before ah tuhned maestro. 
Sho nuff." 

Rudy Vallee in the now warmed 
witness chair croons, "Heigh-ho, ah 
sho nuff does, sho nuff." 

Meyer Davis, from wherever he is, 
lisps, "Does ah dance? Why, honey 
chile, ah used to run a dancing 
school, sho nuff." 

But now let's desert these syn- 
thetic Southerners and contemplate 
(with the above sang froid) the spec- 
tacle of Jacques Renard, ponderous 
pachyderm of the old school, whirl- 
ing gay ladies about with ease at the 
St. Celia or any local ballroom. 
Cruising nearby under a heavy load 
is B. A. Rolfe, another portly youth 
who twirls about with joie de vivre 
and a lady. Ozzie Nelson is also in 
this chain gang and he nods politely 
to Buddy Rogers, who isn't bad — if 
he savs so himself. Phil Harris 



smothers a chuckle as he admires 
himself and those Harlem honeys — 
Ellington, Calloway, and Henderson 
— as they trip the light fantastic. 
Scotti, of the Montclair, goes in for 
the Scottische, of course. 

ONLY a small group remains to 
snivel in the corner. Roger 
Wolfe Kahn remembers Hannah 
Williams and her many attempts to 
teach him steps. Fred Waring can 
be seen nightly with his two sweet 
girl singers, Priscilla and Rosemary 
Lane. They toss a coin to see who 
dances with him. The loser has to ! 
Eddie Duchin, maestro and ex-phar- 
macist, is still a drug on the dance 
floor. Freddie Martin, whose theme 
song is "I Cover The Waterfront," is 
all at sea in the waltz. Leo Reisman 
gets so absorbed in listening for new- 
rhythms that he can't dance to any 
band. 

I could tell you more about hun- 
dreds of these maestros, but I must 
be off for my dancing lesson. I must 
be off . . . 



12 



Radio Fan-Fake 



/ 



*%^3bU 




FOR THE LOVE OF MIKE 



By RUTH ANDREWS 



THE atmosphere in Studio K was electric in more 
ways than one. It was surcharged with sinister static, 
most of which was generated by the glitter in Fay Allen's 
otherwise beautiful eyes. Her lips, which ordinarily 
shamed the proverbial bow of Cupid, were drawn tightly 
over little white teeth that ground inaudibly. The 
knuckles of her hand holding the tiny uke were livid; 
but the color of her face and exceedingly pretty 
neck was the red of an angry sunburn. Diminutive — 
a volcano in a teacup, perhaps, but nevertheless a vol- 
cano ! 

Tod Wallace sat before the concert grand, his chin 
grim and defiant — eyes steely gray. The nostrils of his 
adonic nose dilated perceptibly as he breathed, and there 
was something ominous in the deliberate way he ran 
his fingers through his black hair. The toe of his right 
shoe tapped the pedal; then reached out, hooked Fay 
about the ankle, and dragged her nearer the piano. The 
corner of his mouth screwed up unpleasantly and she 
read his lips, rather than heard his off-stage whisper: 

"Keep away from that mike — you little hog, you! 
Maybe someone would like to hear the piano in this 
theme song." 

As the announcer approached the microphone, Fay 
ground her French heel, worn but still pointed, into her 
singing partner's foot ; then winced as a vicious kick 
scraped a run in her silken calf. 

The announcer addressed the unseen audience: "And 
now, the Sweethearts of the Air leave us until tomorrow 
at the same time . . ." 

Fay Allen stroked her uke as Tod's left hand felt out 
the first soft chord of their closing melody. Their voices 
mingled in the close harmony of a contralto and tenor: 

Hand in hand and heart in heart, 

Along life's twisting road, 
With roses' bloom our path is strewn — 

True love's an easy load. 

In a pause between measures Tod reached out and 
roughly dragged Fay back from the mike. Her right 
hand darted to his wrist and, when he fingered the keys 
again, spots of blood were on the cuff of his dress shirt. 
His lips moved silently in words that were not written 
on the script. Then: 



A kiss each night— each mom a smile, 

As Time flies unaware. 
With love our guide, naught can divide 

The Sweethearts of the Air! 

THE final twang of the uke faded simultaneously in 
Studio K and in the speaker hidden behind a repro- 
duction of Raphael's cupids in Studio H. There were 
three men in the latter studio — the manager of the broad- 
casting company's commercial department and two 
clients. The commercial manager broke the moment of 
respectful silence. 

"Well, gentlemen, how did you like that? Good, eh?" 

One of the men flicked his cigarette meditatively with 
his little finger. "I should say their theme song is a bit 
er-too-er-well, rather sentimental." 

"Aw, no, Harris," the third man interrupted. "That's 
just what the public want. They like to hear two people 
sing about how much they love each other. It's the old 
hokum, but it's always sure-fire." 

"Yes, I guess you're probably right," agreed the other. 
"Except for that theme song I think they're swell." 

Back in Studio K, Fay and Tod glared mutely at each 
other until the operator in the control room waved 
through the soundproof glass that they were off the air. 
Tod spoke to the announcer: 

"We'll rehearse in here if it's okay." 

"Okay. K Studio is clear for the next two hours." 

The inner door closed behind the announcer and the 
lights went out in the control room. 

Fay erupted in harsh grating laughter. "Ha ! Ha ha ha! 
Rehearse! Rehearse what?" 

Tod Wallace turned on her savagely. "Ha ! Ha ha ha ! 
Ditto for everything. I wouldn't play another program 
with you, you little hog, if they'd give me a coast to 
coast hookup and a thousand bucks to boot—" 

"Who's a hog? It's just self preservation, that's all. 
With you imitating a boiler factory on the piano, no- 
body'd hear me if I climbed into the mike!" 

"Who the devil wants to hear you anyway?" 

"I suppose you think they want to hear you? You!" 
Fay threw up her hands. "Oh Lord — and to think I gave 
up vaudeville to marry you. Cook your breakfasts in a 
filthy flat, slave, rehearse, and what do I get out of it? 
A radio career! Ha! Ha again! Twenty dollars a week 



October 

on a sustaining program and abuse from a maniac with 
professional jealousy." 

Tod started at the domed ceiling as if praying that the 
powers above would forgive the blasphemy. He shook his 
head sadly. "Professional jealousy. My God ! What 
next? What next? All you know is what I've taught 
you—" 

"You taught me — you — Good Lord !" 

"Pardon me. My error. I should have said tried to 
teach you. You can't be taught. You're tone deaf. You 
can't even find the notes on the uke. You don't even 
know the difference between A sharp and B flat." 

"I do so know the difference." 

"Yeh — I thought so. There isn't any!" 

"Oh, shut up!" 

"And so you gave up vaudeville for me ? Well, if it 
hadn't been for you, I'd be in Europe now on a concert 
tour." 

Fay snorted derisively. "You — Europe ! With that bel- 
low the only way you'd get to Europe'd be on a cattle boat. 
Concert tour! Ye gods! All you do is thump with your 
left hand and work a tremolo with your right that makes 
that Steinway sound like a player piano in a tenth rate 
dance hall. Europe . . ." 

Tod's fingers played a rapid rat-tat-tat on high C. Kay's 
rage flared too quickly for the safety 



valve of words. In a flash of motion Illustrated by GILBERT BUNDY 



13 

she flung her uke's carrying case. Tod caught it and re- 
turned the serve — with precision. Kay's hand went to 
her eye. 

"You beast ! You're the vilest — lowest — " 

THE studio door opened, and the commercial manager 
entered with his clients. Kay dove into her pocket- 
book and came up powdered wisely and too well. The 
manager made the introductions — 

"Gentlemen — Fay and Tod, the Sweethearts of the Air. 
This is Mr. Harris — Mr. Carruthers, of the Maiden's 
Dream Perfume Company. They are bringing out a new 
perfume which you have inspired — their Sweetheart per- 
fume. They are interested in starring you two in a series 
of weekly programs. I'll leave you folks to fight it out." 
The door swung noiselessly behind the commercial man- 
ager. 

Fay and Tod shook their heads simultaneously. 

"Nothing doing!" declared Tod. 

Fay agreed. "Mr. Wallace and I have decided definite- 
ly to appear on no more programs together." 

Neither Mr. Harris nor Mr. Carruthers seemed prop- 
erly disappointed. Both Miss Allen and Mr. Wallace 
observed, with slight pique, that Mr. Carruthers appeared 
pleased. 

"Well, well— "Mr. Carruthers rubbed 
(Continued on page 48) 




'Keep away from that mike — you little hog, you! Maybe someone would like to hear the piano in this theme song." 



14 



Radio Fan-Fare 



REVIEWING THE CURRENT PROGRAMS 



By DYAL TURNER 



"NESTLE'S CHOCOLATEERS" 

(NBC-WJZ Friday at 8:00 PM- 
EST) 

Cast— Ethel Shutta, Walter 
O'Keefe, Don Bestor's Orchestra. 

Comment — Judging by the first 
program of this series, it looks as 
if the sponsors have picked them- 
selves a real air show. In the first 
place, Walter O'Keefe is about the 
nearest thing to home folks that the 
radio has found. He's thoroughly 
at ease in the capacity of announcer, 
performer, and master of ceremonies. 
And he sounds just like what he is — 




CAROL DEIS 
. . she deserves more to do 

a clever, good-natured, happy-go- 
lucky young bird, with a swell sense 
of humor, and a lack of self-import- 
ance which keeps him from smelling 
of ham. And he is fortunate in his 
repertory of comedy material, as 
most of the stuff he has used on the 
stage and down in Barney Gallant's 
night club can be used on the air 
with a bit of re-dating, and a once- 
over lightly with Flit. 

Ethel is, of course, a foolproof 
radio attraction. She knows how to 
sing songs, and she knows how to 
sell 'em. Furthermore, she fits in 
perfectly with Walter's type of kid- 
ding, and between them they should 
give you many happy moments. 

And certainly there can be no com- 
plaints about Don Bestor's band. 
Okay all the way. 

The Plug — If the sponsors keep 
their paws off Walter's sense of hu- 
mor, he'll continue to pull the sting 
out of the ballyhoo just as he did 




GEORGE M. COHAN 
... he should talk more 

Opinion — Should go to town with 
the customers. 

"GULF HEADLINERS" 
Comment — It is impossible to bat 
out a review every time these Sun- 
day evening shows switch stars. 
They change comedians oftener than 
they advise you to change your oil. 
So this squib is just to bring the pro- 
gram up to our press date. 

The big news of the shows so far 
was Will Rogers' act with Fred 
Stone. Their teamwork was a riot, 
and should be repeated. 



George M. Cohan was better on 
the second program than on the first. 
His stories in song are cleverly put 
together and tuneful. Although they 
offer nothing new they are undoubt- 
edly good popular stuff. (And Al 
Goodman may take as many bows as 
he likes for his accompaniments.) 
In my humble opinion, however, Mr. 
Cohan would please even more peo- 
ple if he sang less and talked more. 
Ten minutes of almost continuous 
singing by one person is too much 
— unless he happens to be a Law- 
rence Tibbett. Mr. Cohan is due to 
go off the air soon, but some sponsor 
will surely bring him back. 

Carol Deis (former winner of an 
Atwater Kent audition), who has 
appeared occasionally with Mr. 
Cohan, is exceptionally good. She 
should be given an opportunity to 
do more. 

Opinion — These Gulf shows main- 
tain a remarkably high standard of 
entertainment. In addition to an in- 
teresting comedian or speaker, they 
offer the splendid singing of James 
Melton and the Revelers ; the ex- 
cellent and colorful music of Al 
Goodman's band; and Harold 
Tighe's pleasant announcing and un- 
objectionable advertising blurbs. The 
definite personality and consistent 
pace of the programs indicate that 
some smart bird is directing them. 




JULIUS TANNEN and PHIL SPITALNY 
. . . they're snowed under with superlatives 



October 

"THE SALAD BOWL REVUE" 

(NBC-WEAF Friday at 9:00 PM- 
EST) 

Cast— Fred Allen, Portland Hoffa, 
Phil Duey, Jack Smart, Roy Atwell, 
Ferde Grofe's Orchestra 

Comment — Mr. Allen's first pro- 
gram for his new sponsor was a dis- 
appointment. But since then Fred 
seems to have hit his stride and his 
material is not only better, but it is 
also presented with more of the typi- 
cal Allen showmanship. Fred's 
humor, at its best, is a nice blend 
of some of the oldest and worst gags 
ever resurrected, and others that are 



15 



has an orchestra that is as fine as 
you would expect it to be. And it 
seems as if Mr. Grofe, or some other 
good judge of music, should insist 
on giving Phil Duey better spots on 
the program. His singing merits it. 

The Plug — Except for the unob- 
jectionable and often amusing adver- 
tising which Fred Allen springs oc- 
casionally, the plugs are just the 
same old — oh well, you know. 

Opinion — At its best this program 
offers the best comedy now on the 
air. And the Grofe music is not ex- 
celled nor equalled by more than a 
handful of radio orchestras. 




THE HUMMINGBIRDS 
Margaret Speaks, Dorothy Greeley, and Katherine Cavalli are the Hummingbirds, Nightin- 
gales, and Snow Queens. The man is Whispering Jack Smith, with whom the girls made their 

■first real success in radio. 



as fresh as a kid with his first long 
pants. The good thing about Fred's 
bad gags is that — thanks to his un- 
emotional, t w a n g y delivery — the 
worse the gag is the funnier he can 
make it sound. The bad thing about 
Fred's good gags is that — because of 
this same delivery — they never seem 
so funny as they really are. The 
Allen personality gives us, however, 
one of the most unique and funda- 
mentally amusing characters in 
radio. We should be grateful for 
even this much relief from the legion 
of not very funny fellows with com- 
pletely stale material. 

Portland Hoffa makes a perfect 
stooge for her husband. Her as- 
sumed ingenuousness is a delight. 
Roy Atwell gets his usual share of 
laughs with his usual word mix-ups, 
and the veteran radio actor, Jack 
Smart, is excellent in the sketches. 

The musically brilliant Mr. Grofe 



THE OLDSMOBILE PROGRAM 

(CBS-WABC Tuesday and Thurs- 
day at 10:30 PM-EST) 

Cast — Ted Husing, Barbara 
Maurel, Leon Belasco's Orchestra, 
the Hummingbirds, and Kenneth 
Roberts 

Comment — Mr. Husing is the star, 
and while he is not exactly down- 
hearted about himself, he knows how 
to pat himself on the back without 
straining a verbal elbow. Ted may 
consider himself a radio success now 
because he has joined the ranks of 
reminiscers. When they allow you 
to make a living reminiscing, you're 
in. Ted exhumes a flock of anecdotes 
which are labelled "Stories Of 
Championship Performance," and 
O. K., but something should be done 
about the spectators who burst in 
with, "My, how exciting !" and "Too, 
too thrilling!" This, of course, is 




ROY ATWELL 
he gets his usual share of laughs. 



supposed to get old John Radio Fan 
all worked up. For some reason the 
birds who run this air business be- 
lieve that old John is not capable of 
a single voluntary emotional reac- 
tion. Always he's got to be tipped 
off. Now he's supposed to get ex- 
cited. Now he's supposed to applaud. 
Now he's supposed to laugh. 
And, quite frankly, I think old John 
is getting a bellyfull of it, to put it 
plainly. (And Ted. Just as a per- 
sonal favor, the next time you are 
discussing a contest do not say they 
had the game "figuratively won." 
Tck, tck.) 

Barbara Maurel's "songs of ro- 
well chosen and well 
Belasco's music is al- 



mance are 
-Leon 



sung- 



( Continued on page 45) 




TONY WONS 
Ring Lardner cheered him 



16 



POPULAR TUNES 

An Analysis and Opinion 



By RUDY VALLEE 



"LAZY BONES" 
By Hoagy Carmichael and John Mer- 
cer. Published by the Southern 
Music Publishing Co., Inc. 

I'm starting my department this 
month with "Lazy Bones" because 
I'm tremendously enthusiastic about 
this recent hit. And because I find 
that our audiences share my enthu- 
siasm. 




You might expect a person with 
as odd a name as Hoagy Carmichael 
to have some unusual talent. Hoagy's 
genius lies in being able to "sell" 
almost anything he plays. His out- 
standing hit was "Stardust" and for 
the past few years he has been writ- 
ing tunes for the Southern Music 
Publishing Co. It was at their sug- 
gestion that Hoagy and I got to- 
gether one Sunday not long ago and 
wrote "Old Man Harlem." At the 
time we realized it would never be 
a good seller, but it has been a good 
tune for the dance bands. When 
last heard from, Hoagy was in the 
Balkans collecting ideas for unusual 
tunes and when he comes back he'll 
find that in "Lazy Bones" he has 
written a song which beats "Star- 
dust" in popularity. 

Johnny Mercer, who wrote the 
lyrics for "Lazy Bones," is a chap 
Avith fine breeding and background. 
Until now he has written little stuff 
of the commercial type, his lyrics 
having been for the better kind of 
musical comedy music. In writing 
the verses of a great commercial suc- 
cess Johnny has not, however, com- 
promised at all with the quality of 
his work, for the lyrics of "Lazy 



Bones" are highly intelligent and 
amusing. 

One of the greatest tributes to the 
song is the fact that when it was 
first played and sung on Our Fleisch- 
mann broadcast the audience 
applauded enthusiastically — even 
though a glass curtain was between 
them and us. That, to you who 
know your broadcasting, is proof 
enough that they were greatly 
pleased. 

"WALTZING UP THE SCALE" 
By M. K. Irving and Otis Spencer. 
Published by E. B. Marks Music Corp. 

The two gentlemen who wrote 
"Waltzing Up The Scale" would 
probably deny that they are ama- 
teurs, but so far as I know their 
names have not echoed within the 
walls of Tin Pan Alley during the 
past four or five years. Now they 
have written a creditable waltz, dif- 
ferent in construction and thought. 
The solfeggio notes of the scale are 
the mainstay of the lyrics and the 
melody goes up the scale at the be- 
ginning of each phrase. Thus 
"Waltzing Up The Scale" is unusual 




enough to provide a welcome relief 
from the more familiar type of song. 

"MY LAST YEAR'S GIRL" 

By Lou Alter and Arthur Swanstrom. 

Published by Leo Feist, Inc. 

Both choruses of this one have 
clever lyrics, which are somewhat 
reminiscent of "Kitty From Kansas 
City." Arthur Swanstrom wrote 
them. You may recall that he and 
Bobby Connelly were the producers 
of that grand show, "Sons O' Guns," 



Radio Fan-Fare 
which featured Lili Damita and Jack 
Donohue. Now that lean days have 
fallen on musical comedy, Arthur 
has gone back to his first love — lyric 
writing. 

Lou Alter is a young, aristocratic 
looking individual who came down 
from Boston to write Broadway's 
and New York City's first musical 
expression in "Manhattan Serenade." 
Many of Lou's piano suites and some 
of his popular tunes are well known. 
Helen Morgan, who is a close friend 
of his, has introduced and popular- 
ized several of his best songs. Lou 
has always written the better type 
of melody and lyrics and I was a 
trifle surprised, therefore, to learn 
that he is the author of the odd 
little idea expressed in "My Last 
Year's Girl." He probably did it 
for diversion. 




"TO BE OR NOT TO BE IN LOVE" 

By Allie Wrubel and Ed Grennard. 

Published by Harms, Inc. 

The chorus of this one is unusual 
because it has Only about 20 meas- 
ures. The story is the old Bill 
Shakespeare idea set to music and a 
good piece of work, too. 

Being the schottische type of mel- 
ody, it lends itself particularly to 
dancers of the Ray Bolger school, 
who bring out their best steps, kicks, 
and taps to that rhythm. Tunes of 
this type are best when played as 
the Lombardos play them, which is 
probably one of the reasons that 
their music is so enjoyable on the 
dance floor. This song — "Lazy 
Bones"— and "Don't Blame Me" will 
probably be our greatest commercial 
successes on the Bluebird records. 

"DONT BLAME ME" 

By Dorothy Fields and Jimmie Mc- 

Hugh. Published by Robbins 

Music Corporation. 

More than a year ago in Detroit, 
Lew Leslie's "Klowns in Klover" 
show Opened with a good cast and 
fine songs by Dorothy Fields and 
Jimmie McHugh. The depression 
drove the revue out of Detroit into 
(Continued on page 47) 



October 



17 



MARY McCOY 




BAY LEE JACKSON 



This is Schumann-Heink speaking"— it was the voice of opportunity. 



Not so many years ago In Great Bend, Kansas, Laura Townsley Mc- 
Coy was born. When she was three she began taking piano lessons. 
At nine she made her first public appearance as a musician. A few 
years later she got a job singing over a Kansas City radio station. 
One evening, three years ago, she was called to the telephone after 
one of her broadcasts. A voice said, "Miss McCoy, this is Ernestine 
Schumann-Heink speaking. I have enjoyed your program and I wish 
you would come over to my hotel. I'd like so much to talk to you." 
Madame Schumann-Heink was on her Golden Jubilee tour and when 
her entourage left Kansas City, Laura went along as companion and 
assisting artist to the famous contralto. Together they toured the 
nation, the young soprano alternating with the famous singer in the 
recitals. The next summer Laura lived at the Schumann-Heink home 
in California, where the diva coached her protege in operatic roles 
and taught her vocal technique. That fall Laura came to New York 
and the Shuberts gave her the lead in "My Maryland." She played 
Barbara Frietchie, and changed her name to Mary because it was 
simpler than Laura Townsley. You'll enjoy Mary's songs on the 
Richfield Country Club programs. Away from the mike Mary is 
a demon horseback rider and an aviation enthusiast. She isn't afraid 
of stunt flying, but roller coasters in amusement parks terrify her. 



18 



Radio Fan-Fare 







This pair of redheaded youngsters once loaded a 
couple of midget pianos into an 18-passenger plane 
and banged away for dear old publicity's sake while 
the ship soared two miles up in the air over New 
York. It was the "first successful broadcast of music 
from an airplane in flight", but just what it proved 
we couldn't tell you. Since then the girls have done 
all their stunts on land. Right now they are polish- 
ing off a combination of classical and jazz tunes for 
Johnson's Auto Polish. Peggy and Sandra don't 
write out any musical score for their programs. They 
merely get together in one of the big Columbia 
studios, decide which classics they'd like to scramble 



PECCY KEENAN and SANDRA PHILLIPS 

with which jazz melodies, and then work on the ar- 
rangements until they get something they like. Af- 
ter rehearsing the mixture until they think it jells, 
they put it in their show — and it usually makes novel 
and interesting entertainment. Both Peggy and 
Sandra are musicians from way back. Peggy got 
her start in Los Angeles when she was six and 
worked her way up to recitals in Paris and Berlin. 
Sandra is a Berwick, Pennsylvania, gal who started 
teasing the piano when she was four. She finally 
made her debut in vaudeville as accompanist for 
Howard Marsh. Neither of the girls is married, 
which just goes to show how dumb bachelors are. 



October 



19 



The history of Betty Barthell In radio is another one 
of those Horatio Alger stories. Only a little more 
than a year ago Betty was just a Nashville, Ten- 
nessee, belle who hadn't even considered becoming 
a professional entertainer. But then one day Betty 
sang a song at a charity bazaar or some such social 
function, and the manager of a local radio station 
heard her. He haled her into the studio and per- 
suaded her to broadcast. She scored an immediate 
hit and it wasn't long before the networks got en- 
thusiastic. Now the listeners who belong to the 
Richfield Country Club are tuning in to hear the 
dark haired, soft voiced southern gal chant ditties 
of young love under a great, big yaller Dixie moon. 



BETTY BARTHELL 








"■■-■'■'"*■-'■ ;-■—-■■ -..- ■ -,- 








W%£& 




20 



Radio Fan-Fare 



AR1ENE JACKSON 

Her first opportunity was an 

accident— to somebody else 



Lady Luck wandered into station KFI, Los Angeles, one day just as 
Arlene Jackson was being told that she might get an audition — in 
six weeks or so. Arlene was leaving the studio when an entertainer 
who was scheduled to go on the air phoned and said an accident 
would prevent arrival on time for the broadcast. Arlene was called 
back and asked if she could do the program without any rehearsal. 
Could she! And how! Half an hour after she stopped singing she 
was signing a contract. And in another year she was in New York 
on a network program. If that wasn't the friendship of Lady Luck, 
it was probably the fruit of long study and hard work. At the ripe 
old age of three Arlene entertained a church sociable by rendering 
that touching ballad, "Dolly, I'm Sorry I Broke You." At six, Miss 
Jackson first got chummy with a piano. Later she studied voice, 
dramatics, and piano at the Toronto Conservatory of Music, and at 
sixteen landed her first contract as piano soloist on a Chautauqua 
circuit. She toured Canada, then went into vaudeville, and later 
journeyed to England to play in London musical comedies. Next 
came more trouping in the United States and Canada. Arlene's 
now on the Buick program and doing nicely, thank you. She works 
hard and likes it. Every time she broadcasts she's nervous as a kitten 
and won't sing unless she has a handkerchief to massage in her fist. 




RAT LEE JACKSON 



October 



21 



SLIPPING «*/ GRIPPING 



k 



cS? 



VI 



PEOPLE have been complain- 
ing about uncomplimentary 
things we've said in this depart- 
ment. Some ask whether we say- 
nice things only if we're paid for 
it. The answer is "Yes." You 
should see all the bon bons radio 
artists have sent us so we'll say 
they're lovely. (We sent out a 
circular letter telling them we 
had a "sweet tooth.") And the 
fruit ! We've had fruit, too, be- 
cause the news got around that 
we'd do it for a big red apple. 
So they sent us watermelons. 
Now we've had to establish a 
scale of rates (we can't live 
entirely on fruit and candy) and 
we ask that radio artists be gov- 
erned accordingly. Hereafter a 
contralto will be "soothing" for 
a carton of Chesterfields, an ac- 
tor or actress will give a "power- 
ful, convincing performance" for 
a new pair of shoes (size 13), 
and a torch singer will get us "in 
a lather" for a new suit ($16.85 
— two pairs of pants). A come- 
dian can be "screamingly funny" 
if he'll buy us a new radio, a 
writer might be able to "hold us 
completely absorbed" with a 
month's rent, a soprano could 
perhaps "put us in a dither" by 
buying us a trip to Bermuda, and 
an announcer might possibly 
persuade us that he has "a beau- 
tifully mellow delivery, utterly 
without unction" — in return for 
a Rolls Royce. The tariff may 
seem a trifle steep, but we've just 
found out what some of the other 
writing boys are getting. A 
couple of issues ago we made the 
mistake of being complimentary 
without getting a thing for it, 
but never again. From now on 
the boys and girls must "kick in" 
(as we used to say when we were 
just a mugg) or we pan 'em. Of 
course, if they should kick in 
with a really good performance, 
that would melt us a little and 
we'd give them kind words, but 
not the pretty phrases mentioned 
above. 

And if we don't get out of this 
business pretty soon we'll have 
to mail out another circular letter 



and ask them all to send us some 

cocaine. 

• • • 

tGOOD FOR WHAT AILS 
YOU— A & P Gypsies 
. . . Still an entertaining 
program. Nothing spec- 
tacular and no tricks — just music 
carefully selected for quality and 
variety, Harry Horlick's good 
band. Frank Parker's pleasant 
singing, and advertising that 
doesn't make you bristle. 

Jack Frost's Melody Moments 
. . . Conventional orchestra-and- 
singer type of show with Josef 
Pasternack as the satisfactory 
wand-waver and John Fogarty, 
Phil Duey, and the Melody Sing- 
ers taking turns warbling the old 
timers. Advertising only fair, 
with cracks against "unidentified 
sugar" which made us realize, 
with a start, that all along we've , 
been eating identified sugar with- y 
out even dreaming that we were 
doing it. 

American Album of Familiar 
Music . . . with Gus Haenschen's 
Orchestra, Frank Munn, Eliza- 
beth Lennox, and Ohman and 
Arden. This one deserves all of 
its tremendous popularity. 

Light Opera Gems . . . Harold 
Sanford's Orchestra and guest 
soloists doing well by that grand 
songwriting team, Gilbert and 
Sullivan. 

The Voice of Experience . . . 
Good human interest stuff that 
has swept the country. Too bad 
there are now so many imitators 
because, unless this type of pro- 
gram is done exceedingly well, 
it's nothing but simon pure ad- 
vice-to-the-lovelorn drivel. In 
the case of The Voice of Experi- 
ence, we object strenuously to his 
plugging his sponsors. It makes 
the listener wonder about the 
honesty of The Voice's opinions 
on the human problems he dis- 
cusses. The Voice has mentioned 
Radio Fan-Fare in a couple of 
his programs and we're grateful 
for the free advertising, but those 
plugs were entirely voluntary on 
the part of The Voice. If he 
hadn't approved of the recent 



-^ 



\> 



»/ 



22 



Radio Fan-Fare 



article about him in Fan-Fare he could have 
panned us and we wouldn't have kicked. 

John B. Kennedy ... A trenchant writer 
whose comments combine sharp humor with 
horse sense. On our list of required listen- 
ing. 

Death Valley Days . . . Well done West- 
ern hokum with friendly personalities in the 
Old Ranger (Tim Frawley) and The Lone- 
some Cowboy (John White). Popular with 
the Old Folks At Home. Advertising O. K. 

The Cuckoo Hour . . . We'd like to rec- 
ommend anything that kids the ridiculous 
aspects of radio, but these programs should 
sound funnier than they do. Perhaps the 
edge is taken off the stuff burlesqued by 
Raymond Knight and his troupe by the fact 
that it's on tap for any listener eighteen 
hours a day over several hundred stations. 
Adelina Thomason, Mary McCoy, Eustace 
Wyatt, and Jack Arthur are the other 
Cuckoos who deserve a hand. 



TAKE 'EM OR LEAVE 'EM— Just 
Relax ... We like what Will 
Cuppy writes for The New 
Yorker, but the same kind of 
humor, as put on by him and Jeanne Owen, 
doesn't jell on the air. 

Ralph Kirbery . . . Pretty good voice, 
but anyone who is called The Dream Singer 
goes to bat with two strikes on him as far 
as we're concerned. 

One Man's Family . . . Sermons that 
usually sound like sermons with ideas that 
will be startling only to shut-ins. Popular 
on the Pacific Coast for several years, this 
program is now on the networks. By taking 
up the problems of a "typical" family it at- 
tempts to be outspokenly modern. Some- 
how it all doesn't seem to carry conviction. 
Sorry. 

Contented Program . . . Good music but 
the rest is pretty dull unless you like your 
singing and your sentiment saccharine. 
There's also poetry of the homely philosophy 
type. Need we say more? 

• • • 

tPIPE THIS— You can't hate a guy who 
starts a program by saying, "If 
hokum's what you want, hokum's 
what you're gonna get 'cause that's 
what we've got plenty of" — who calls his 
entertainment a "disturbance" — who refers 
to the other performers as "ham actors" and 
"opera stars of the crossroads" — and who 
says, "My kingdom for an actor !" That's 
Pat Binf ord, folks — the truly appealing mas- 
ter of ceremonies of that row-de-dow Corn 
Cob Pipe Club show. New entertainers 
keep bobbing up on these programs and most 
of them are good. We wish there was space 
to mention the names of all we've enjoyed. 
The only regulars who miss are the come- 
dians, Sawdust and Moonshine. They need 





MORTON DOWNEY 
As popular as ever, but 
sponsors are faking their 
time. Camel's nibbling 




BARBARA MAUREL 
She's too good not to be 
featured. Are ye listenin'? 




WILLARD ROBISON 
His sermons would please 
even a confirmed atheist 




ANN ELSTNER 
She made the hillbilly's 
heart throb. Swell actress 



fresher jokes. Squire Hicks has a swell 
radio voice. There are, in fact, almost no 
bad spots in this friendly, impromptu pro- 
gram. You're bound to like its unpreten- 
tiousness. Even the advertising is good, 
except when they make statements like 
"Men who do things are usually found to be 
pipe smokers." That's the bunk. 

• • • 

t WANTED: A FLOCK OF SPON- 
SORS — Nobody can say Columbia 
isn't putting on the sales pressure 
these days, what with all its unspon- 
sored talent. Prospects either won't pay the 
price or are taking their time, knowing that 
if they lose one act they can get another just 
as good, and maybe for less. Bing Crosby 
has wanted too much money for radio, as he 
can make plenty in the movies. Morton 
Downey, as popular as ever, was piped to 
St. Louis to interest the beer boys. No go. 
Camels are nibbling for Mort, Jane Froman, 
and Stoopnagle and Budd. Kate Smith, still a 
tremendous attraction, is willing to talk terms, 
but wants to look all around first and get 
just the right spot. She has plenty of work 
right now anyway — doing an Elsie Janis as 
chairman of the stage, screen, and radio en- 
tertainment committee of the NRA. With 
John Mills completely recovered after his 
attack of pneumonia, the Mills brothers and 
Don Redman's band are back on the net- 
works, but with no advertising to sweeten 
the weekly pay check. We can't see that 
their enforced vacation hurt their value to 
sponsors, and they were certainly going 
great guns when they went out from under 
the ether. Connie, Martha, and Vet are 
back from Europe with Connie's mumps all 
gone, and the gals are wondering who's go- 
ing to find a place for them in his ballyhoo 
budget. They're still the class of the field, 
but, with all the sister teams that have been 
imitating them, the public may be getting 
a bit fed up with that brand of harmony. 
All we can say to this raft of talent is, 
"Happy landings ... in some nice soft ap- 
propriations." 

• • • 

t BOUQUETS— Barbara Maurel has a 
huge following among those who pre- 
fer something slightly classical. Her 
singing deserves to be featured more 
than it is . . . Willard Robison's "Synco- 
pated Sermons" and his "Deep River" pro- 
grams will please even an atheist, probably 
because they're so unlike real sermons . . . 
The Southernaires — now there's a negro 
quartet worth losing a little shuteye on Sun- 
day to hear. They've been on the NBC 
network three years and should be moved 
to a later spot so more people can hear them 
. . . Those exchange programs from Canada 
are good. Caro Lamoureux, the soprano, 
and everyone else on the Sous Les Ponts De 
Paris half -hour (Continued on page 49) 



October 



23 



THAU'S "OLD GOLD" IN THEM STILLS 



JOHNNY DAVIS ... is the "scat singer" 
of the band. Note the hands. Scat singers 
always rub the thumb and forefinger to- 
gether as they yell, "Skeet'n Scat'n Hi-de- 
ho." Silly? 







24 



Radio Fan-Fare 




GRAND DUCHESS MARIE ... "I beg your 
pardon. I'm afraid I didnt' catch the name." 




SIGMUND SPAETH , 
of what?" — and was 



my 



said "Reminiscent 
friend's face red! 




THE PERSONAL 



THE first time I met George Ol- 
sen (who's been doing such a 
swell job on the Chase and Sanborn 
Tea program) was in Havana, Cuba. 
You know, the place where the Presi- 
dents always wear their hats, because 
they never know when they may be 
leaving. George was playing at the 
Casino, one of the swellest pastime 
spots in the world. Not only was he 
playing with his band, but he was 
playing with the Casino roulette 
wheels, and the evening we arrived 
he hit the house for eight thousand 
berries. 

The gang I was with included Ray 
Bill, publisher of this magazine ; 
Clair Maxwell, prexy of Life; Bill 
Curley, managing editor of The New 
York Evening Journal; Rodney 
Boone, Hearst ad executive ; and the 
artists, McClelland Barclay and Jef- 
ferson Machamer. Mr. Olsen wears 
what is usually described as a million 
dollar smile. This night it was a mil- 
lion and eight thousand dollar smile, 
and he welcomed us in grand style. 
(Or, rather, eight-grand style.) 

Everything was hunky dooley until 
someone in the party remembered 
that I knew the routine of the Five- 
Step. In case you don't remember it, 
this was a dance introduced by 
George White in one of his "Scan- 
dals" and it was danced to a tune of 
the same name. Mr. Bill and Mr. 
Maxwell also had a slight knowledge 
of the steps. I can't explain it now, 
but it seemed like a good idea at the 
time for us to show the other Casino 
guests how the thing went. So 
George agreed to play the tune. In 
fact, he insisted. Some of the guests 
liked it, and one very, very nice Cu- 
ban boy threw me a rose. I think he 
took it out of his hair. But a moment 
later I heard a dark, squat gentleman 
saying, "This is an outrage. These 
Americans should be asked to leave." 
This bird must have had something 
on the management, because they 
seemed to concur in his opinion. 

However, it was a very nice party 
while it lasted, and George was 
charming. As I remember it, he even 
agreed to leave with us. 



ND speaking of policemen, did 
vou ever hear how George 

LEON BELASCO . . . gasped. The pianist % , . , , . .,, ,. . r 

blew a sax-the drummer puffed a harmonica. Started his Courtship With hlS Wife, 



A 



Ethel Shutta? (Ethel has just 
started a new series of programs with 
Walter O'Keefe for Nestle's Choco- 
late.) At the time, Ethel was ap- 
pearing in "Louis The Fourteenth," 
with Leon Errol, and also singing one 
number in the "Follies." To get from 
one theatre to the other and back 
again, Mr. Zeigfeld arranged for a 
motorcycle escort which led her 
through traffic. 

In addition to this double shift 
Ethel was rehearsing for "Sally." 
One day she complained that her mu- 
sic was not being played right. Mr. 
Zeigfeld said, "Speak to the leader, 
Mr. Olsen, and he'll do something 
about it." He did— and how! That 
night when she stepped in her car to 
travel from "Louis The Fourteenth" 
to the New Amsterdam Theatre, 
where the "Follies" were playing, she 
found a man in the back seat. "I'm 
Olsen," he said. "I came to discuss 
your music." From then on she found 
George waiting every night, and he 
didn't quit discussing music with her 
until she finally said "Yes." 

But he always complained that he 
had to woo her under police surveil- 
lance. 

• • • 

AND in case you are one of the 
•a*, thousands who admire Miss 
Shutta's work on the air, you may be 
interested (if you don't already know 
it) in the pronunciation of her name. 
The accent is on the last syllable, and 
the word should be pronounced as if 
it were written "Shu-tay." (Shu as in 
"shut") 

« • • 

HERE is one of those stories that 
sound like gags . . . except that 
you can't make up gags about such 
people and get away with it. I was 
invited to lunch one day — a very nice 
lunch — and seated next to me was a 
lady. She was past middle age, had 
an accent, and was perfectly charm- 
ing. We chatted, she told me a very 
amusing story, I told her my latest 
one, and we had a perfectly swell 
time. 

A few weeks later I attended a 
dinner at the Central Park Casino 
given by Miss Beth Leary, famous 
for her parties. I was talking to my 
hostess before dinner when I saw her 
turn suddenly to greet a newly ar- 



October 



25 



TOUCH 



By HARRY EVANS 



rived guest, and as she took the 
woman's hand she dropped a curt- 
sey. "Either that's somebody or her 
foot slipped," I says to myself. And 
then taking another look I recognized 
my former luncheon partner. 

"Hello, my friend," she said cor- 
dially, giving me a warm handclasp. 
"How are you, and what new stories 
have you for me?" 

"So you two know each other," 
said Miss Leary, with a^ slightly quiz- 
zical expression. 

"Oh, yes indeed," said my frend 
graciously, turning to me, "but I am 
afraid you must tell me again who 
you are." 

"I'm Harry Evans, of New York," 
I said, being cute. "And now you 
must tell me who you are." 

Miss Leary's face was a study. 

"This is the Grand Duchess 
Marie," she said in a coldly calm 
voice, "of Russia." 

The situation was saved by Marie's 
laugh, and I never heard a heartier 
one. When she stopped I said, 

"I'm really very sorry, but I guess 
I didn't catch the name the first time 
we met." 

What happened? She requested 
that our hostess seat us next to each 
other at dinner, we gossiped, we 
swapped stories, we danced — and I 
never hope to meet a sweeter, more 
regular person. 

All this is apropos of radio because 
the Grand Duchess has appeared sev- 
eral times on the air, and right now 
several sponsors are trying to get her 
signature on contracts. 
• • • 

THIS social error reminds me of 
one a friend of mine pulled when 
we were both the guests of Fred G. 
Cooper (who illustrated pages 10 and 
11) at the Dutch Treat Club. This 
organization, as you may know, is 
composed of the most famous writers, 
artists, editors, actors, and musicians 
in New York. 

After a pianist had played one of 
his recent compositions, a gentleman 
at the next table leaned over to Fred 
and said, "Good tune — and an original 
idea." 

"Do you think so ?" said my friend. 
"It sounded like a steal to me." 

"A steal on what," said the gentle- 
man at the next table, politely. 



"Well, I don't know exactly," my 
friend dodged, "but it's a steal all 
right." 

When the gentleman turned back 
to his companions, my friend whis- 
pered to Fred, 

"That guy don't know what he's 
talking about. What's his name?" 

"Sigmund Spaeth," said Fred. 
• • • 

THERE have been some interest- 
ing tennis matches during the 
past few months. For instance, 
there were the Davis Cup matches, 
the Wightman Cup matches, the 
Southampton and Newport Invita- 
tion Tournaments, and the United 
States National Championships. But 
standing out as the most unusual 
tennis encounter of the year was the 
recent meeting of Paul Whiteman, 
NBC maestro, and Dudley Field 
Mal'one, internationally known 
lawyer, at the Atlantic Beach Club. 
I speak as one of the two eyewit- 
nesses of this struggle. The other 
was the artist James Montgomery 
Flagg, who was Mr. Malone's week- 
end guest. 

It happened late on a Saturday 
afternoon, after all the regular ten- 
nis hounds had perspired and retired 
from the courts. I was walking 
down the equally deserted beach 
when a tennis ball suddenly fell at 
my feet. Looking around and see- 
ing no one, I concluded that the ball 
must have come from the tennis 
courts, though how it could travel 
that far from home I couldn't im- 
agine. Picking up the ball with the 
intention of returning it, I trudged 
over to the courts and there I saw 
the explanation. 

Paul was serving-. On his first 
ball, Dudley ducked, the pill whistled 
past his ear and hit the backstop on 
the fly. The next one floated over 
the net, Dudley charged in with the 
speed of an antelope and swung at 
it from Port Arthur, as the boys say. 
Socko ! The ball cleared the back- 
stop by fifty feet and, as Paul ran 
over to try to get a general idea of 
where it finally landed, Dudley said, 

"Aw, the hell with it." 

They played four more points, 
looked around, walked solemnly to 
the net, shook hands, and started off 
the court. 




LILLIAN EMERSON HARTS . 
found hiding in the "Show 



. . society girl 
Boat" chorus. 




J>AUL WHITEMAN ... he and Dudley Field 
Malone have their own peculiar tennis rules. 




KATE SMITH . . . will not sing "Without Love," 
because it recalls a most unhappy experience. 



26 

"What's the matter?" I asked. 
"Don't go, fellows. It's fun. Are 
you tired?" 

They both smiled blandly and 
shrugged their shoulders. Then I 
looked around and saw the answer. 
They had run out of tennis balls. 
When I offered to lend them some 
more Paul said, 

"No thanks. We never play longer 
than a dozen balls. That's how we 
know when the game's over." 

• • • 

A LITTLE later I was telling 
some people about the match, 
and I mentioned the distance I saw 
Mr. Whiteman get on his last drive. 

"You think that was a wild shot?" 
snorted Mr. Flagg. "Boy, you didn't 
see anything. I went out to retrieve 
a couple of balls they hit, but after I 
located them I couldn't bring them 
back." 

"Why not," I inquired. 

"Because," Jim replied, "I didn't 
have a guest card to the Lido Club." 

(Editor's Note: The Lido Club is 
several miles from the Atlantic 
Beach Club . . . at least.) 

• • • 

1ATER that evening Kate Smith 
■J dropped in at the club for din- 
ner with her manager, Ted Collins, 
and Mrs. Collins. There's a three- 
some you seldom see separated. We 
had a swell time swapping radio 
gossip, and finally fell to discussing 
songs. When I asked her which of 
the recent crop of ditties she enjoyed 
singing most, she said, 

"There have been so many good 
tunes lately it is hard to pick one. 
But I really believe my favorite of 
the past few months is 'The Last 
Roundup.' " 

Then I had what I thought was a 
real inspiration. 

"Look here," I exclaimed in the 
heat of my hunch, "why don't you 
ever sing some of the songs you fea- 
tured in the show, 'Flying High'? 
For instance there's 'Without Love.' 
Say, if any one song really estab- 
lished your popularity on Broadway 
and led to your radio success, it was 
that One." 

Kate shook her head slowly, and 
all the fun went out of her expres- 
sion. 

"I've had plenty of requests to 
sing it," she said grimly, "but I'll 
never sing a song from that show 
again as long as I live." 

Glancing up at Ted, I got one of 
those unmistakable looks. Then I 
(Continued on page 46) 



Radio Fan-Fare 



THE 
SALAD 
BOWL 
REVUE 

a mixture of crisp wit 
and musical dressing 



1. FERDE GROFE, famous maestro, in four 
characteristic poses. First — contemplating the 
oboe player, as that gentleman fixes his 
mouth and gets set for a solo flight. Sec- 
ond — quieting the brass and lifting the strings. 
Third — listening intently to Phil Duey's vocal 
delivery, as he keeps the band in perfect co- 
ordination. And fourth — sustaining a note, 
preparatory for a crescendo finish. 

2. PORTLAND HOFFA, Fred Allen's wife 
and stooge, looking surprisingly sophisticated 
as she prepares to deliver one of her in- 
genuous inanities. 

3. JACK SMART, veteran air actor. And he 
is not singing. He's acting. When Jack acts, 
he acts out loud. 

4. PHIL DUEY, between numbers, listens to 
the announcer. What is he thinking? Well, 
what do you think when you listen to an- 



nouncers/ 



5. FRED ALLEN, prize funny man, looking 
just as unfunny as these boys sometimes do 
when they are being humorous over the air. 
In the first pose he stops up one ear and 
tries to hear himself think while the singing 
is going on. In the second and third he as- 
sumes his usual nonchalant pose as he hands 
out laughs. And in the fourth (looking a bit 
like Jimmy Walker) he seems particularly un- 
happy as he pulls what is probably the best 
laugh of the shew. 




October 




28 



FAN-FARE'S HUMOR CAFETERIA 



Radio Fan-Fare 



(RADIO COMEDIANS HELP YOURSELVES) 



Minister: Macpherson, I haven't 
seen you at church lately. 

Macpherson : Oh, dinna bother yesel' 
aboot that, meenister. Ye havena lost 
ma' business. I'm not gang anywhere 
else. — Tit-Bits 



Lecturer (giving radio audition) : 
Of course, you all know what the in- 
side of a corpuscle is like. 

Studio Official : Most of us do, but 
you'd better explain it for the benefit 
of them as have never been inside one. 

— Red Cat 



You can't blame the bankers for be- 
ing sentimental about their golf. It's 
about the only thing they have that is 
still above par. — Judge 



"How can I get my husband to tell me 
about his business affairs?" a wife asked 
Dorothy Dix. 

Try to get him to buy a new car. 

— Atlanta Journal 



Did you hear of the Hollywood 
actress who went to Reno for a divorce 
and had to wire back for her husband's 
name ? — Passing Sh ow 



First Man (in art museum) — Look! 
Here's the Mona Lisa. 

Second Man — Aw, come on ! That 
dame's smile reminds me of my wife's 
when she thinks I'm lying. 

— Cleveland Plain Dealer 



As the doorman ran down the club 
steps to open the car door, he tripped 
and rolled down the last four steps. 

"For heaven sake, be careful !" cried 
the club manager. "They'll think 
you're a member." — he Rire 



Some folks don't even like to get up 
to see the dawn of a new era. 

— Atlanta Constitution 



An historian announces that women 
used cosmetics in the middle ages. 
Women still use cosmetics in the mid- 
dle ages. — Punch 



"Can I sell you a burglar alarm?" 
"No, but if you've got anything that 
will keep my wife from waking up 
when one visits us, trot it out." 

— Benton Times 




"And now, kiddies of the Wee Folks Club, you will all be glad to know that 
14-year-old club member Osa Sahib of Ceylon, India, just had a baby." 



Mother : What did your father say 
when you smashed the new car? 

Son: Shall I leave out the swear 
words ? 

Mother: Yes, of course. 

Son : He didn't say a word. 

— Indiana Bored Walk 



Steamships, stabilized, lose their roll, 
whereas business, treated the same way, 
gets it back. — Arkansas Gazette 



"How's your daughter's golf?" asked 
one grande dame of another. 

"Oh, she is going around in less and 
less every week." 

"Yes, I know. But how about her 
golf?" — Answers 



A professor at an American uni- 
versity complains that many of his lady 
undergraduates are more interested in 
love-affairs than in work. Putting the 
heart before the course, so to speak. 

— Punch 



Landlady: A professor formerly oc- 
cupied this room, sir. He invented an 
explosive. 

New Roomer : Ah ! I suppose those 
spots on the ceiling are the explosive. 

Landlady : . No'm, they're the profes- 
sor. — Annapolis Log 



One way to assure the peace of the 
world would be to arrange that a na- 
tion couldn't have another war until it 
had paid for the last one. 

— American Lumberman 



"Let me see," said the young man, 
thoughtfully. "I've got to buy flowers 
and chocolates and theatre tickets 
and—" 

"Doing mental arithmetic ?" asked his 
friend. 

"Sentimental arithmetic," he sighed. 

— Pastime 



"A crocodile is harmless as long as 
he is occupied," says an African ex- 
plorer. Still, we shan't take any chances 
on being the occupant. 

— Atlanta Journal 



Teacher : Now, if I write "n-e-w" 
on the blackboard, what does that spell ? 

Johnny : New. 

Teacher : Now I'll put a "k" in front 
of it and what have we? 

Johnny : Canoe. 

— Boston Transcript 



October 



LEAH RAY 

she was 

elected 

to a 

fraternity! 




How these youngsters do it is beyond us. Two years ago Leah Ray was in 
high school in Norfolk, Virginia, averaging 94 in all her school work, editing 
the school paper, and monopolizing the whole football squad. Then she and 
her folks went to Hollywood, and it wasn't long before she was featured with 
Phil Harris's orchestra at the swanky Cocoanut Grove. Maurice Chevalier 
dropped in one night, heard her sing, and immediately cast her for a promi- 
nent part in his picture, "A Bedtime Story" — although she had never had 
either stage or movie experience. For a gal one year out of high school to 
make the grade in two such hard-boiled spots as Hollywood and Broadway — 
well, she must have what it takes, that's all! And here's another amazing thing 
about Leah: She belongs to one of the oldest and largest fraternities for col- 
lege men! Last year the Stanford University Chapter of Alpha Tau Omega 
initiated Leah and, whenever the brothers gather in convention, she's on hand 
to sing their favorite college ditties. Leah is now broadcasting from New 
York's Pennsylvania Roof, and we recommend that you tune in on her pronto. 



30 



Radio Fan-Fare 



BIG PRIZE CONTEST 



By R. R. ENDICOTT 



THE Big Prize Contest, of 
which the broadcasters are the 
high priests, got its original 
start selling papers, so to speak. You 
recall the white hot competition 
among the nation's youth twenty- 
years ago for Shetland ponies, catch- 
er's mitts and shiny new bikes with, 
yes sir, coaster brakes ! Tame stuff, 
surely, when one realizes that today 
any child, with much less effort, can 
become eligible for a Grand Prize of 
$5,000 merely by letting a few sim- 
ple rules guide him to answer prop- 
erly the question, "How can / avoid 
Bird Cage Mouth?" or "Why do 
Reed's Irradiated Radishes prevent 
Social St. Helena?" 

The whole technique of the 
Big Prize Contest has, therefore, 
changed. It is now the headline act 
on the Big Time, combining the best 
features of medicine show and pony 
contest glorified with better than 
Ziegfeldian artistry. It is designed 
to appeal to everyone, so the crowds 
are pulled in here with a hot-cha- 
cha and there with a bit of Brahms. 
The stakes have been multiplied 
many thousand times, making the 
Big Prize Contest more popular than 
any other indoor or outdoor sport. j 

It is not my intention to minimize 
the importance Of the Big Prize 
Contest as a social phenomenon by 
treating it lightly. Neither is it my 
intention to disparage the suppliers 
of radio entertainment or the makers 
of advertisements. After all, wheth- 
er you like what they do or not, 
their main job is to give the most 
people what they most want. Un- 
questionably, right now, they want 
contests — chances at big money. 
And advertisers are willing to give 
them these chances provided they 
think they can foresee a profit for 
themselves. Recently there were so 
many contests on one of the net- 
works that officials of the company 
began to hear rumblings of "Noth- 
ing but contests," "Lotteries," 
"Cheap entertainment," "Monoto- 
nous," and so on. Now if there is 
anything a network likes to give its 
radioafs, it is variety, so a big de- 
cision, neatly combining good busi- 
ness with a high feeling for art, was 



reached : no new contests until one 
then running was over. 

Radio is, of course, the logical 
medium for carrying the tidings of 
easy money to the folks because it 
makes possible a combination of 
come-on music and the barker's 
spiel — the old medicine show tech- 
nique. And add the fact that in the 
advertising business, as in every oth- 
er, it is easier and safer to copy than 
to create (and usually more profita- 
ble) and you have the answer to why 
contests fill the air. Some show a 
sales profit above the cost of bally- 
hoo, overhead and prizes ; others do 
what is known in the trade as a swell 
educational job. The rest are also- 
rans, but as yet their sponsors either 



gentleman who wrote to one of our 
largest national advertisers as fol- 
lows : 

Last night you announced, on your 
radio program, prizes for the largest 
number of words made from the letters 
in your trade name. It is likely to cause 
you many a moment of anguish and I 
suggest that you take out insurance 
against — well, against a lot of things. 
It's this way : 

Several months ago I heard a peanut 
company out in Iowa announce that prizes 
would be given to those who formed the 
letters in "Happy Days Peanuts" into the 
largest number of words. Just as diver- 
sion I started. Soon I saw it was more 
of a job than I thought. So I decided to 
take a small dictionary of about a thou- 
sand pages and make the list systematic. 
Well, I spent spare time for four evenings 
and then concluded that I'd better get a 
larger dictionary. With this I found that 




don't know it, won't admit it, or 
don't know what to do about it. 
Meanwhile many people benefit from 
them, in ways various and strange. 

CONSIDER the word "game" 
which apparently fascinates mil- 
lions of people. It is always deceiv- 
ingly simple at first. Its knotty 
complications never appear until the 
contestant has gone so far that he 
will not stop. In fact, he can not, 
for letters haunt him and mists of 
words blur his reason. 

Your heart will go out to this 



my first list was entirely inadequate so I 
started all over again. 

In all it took me eight evenings and 
two afternoons, fully eighteen hours. I 
finally had a list of 1,100 words. The 
prizes were ten watches and some bags 
of peanuts. When the contest closed the 
programs stopped. The awards were 
never broadcast. I never learned who 
won. 

I lay awake nights spelling words and 
trying to memorize them to copy next 
morning, only to forget them. I had 
nightmares in which I thought I had 
been shipwrecked in an endless sea of 
alphabet soup. My wife plead with me 
to quit. No, I said. I never quit unless 
I'm licked but (Continued on page 49) 



October 



31 




Rudy Vallee picked Phil Harris to follow him at the Penn- 
sylvania Roof, New York, and if you know how particular 
Rudy is, that means something. Phil has had a phenomenal 
rise in the musical world. He and his orchestra were a tre- 
mendous hit for eighteen months at Hollywood's famous 
Cocoanut Grove. Then they moved on to Chicago's Col- 
lege Inn where they scored another amazing success. Phil 
has made a couple of movies. One, a short called "So This 
Is Harris," got good reviews. The other, a feature called 
"Melody Cruise," proved that Phil is not well suited for 
romantic movie roles. When he was a student at Lebanon 
Military Academy he organized his first band. It was made 
up of his classmates, and after graduation he took them on 
a tour of the United States and Australia. On his return he 
went into the Beverly Wilshire Hotel in Los Angeles and has 
never been away from California for long since. At times 
there is something reminiscent of the late Bert Williams in 
Phil's deep and sonorous singing voice. Then, again, he dis- 
plays vocal mannerisms which bring Harry Richman to mind. 



BAT LEE JACKSON 



PHIL HARRIS 

Bert Williams' low notes- 
Harry Richman's style 



32 



Radio Fan-Fare 



PEGGY DAVIS 







the champion 
long distance 
radio commuter 



It's gratifying to be able to say truthfully that Peggy's radio 
acting is equal to her beauty. Nothing further need be said 
on that point. Peggy plays leading roles in the "Princess Pat" 
program which is broadcast over an NBC network from Chica- 
go. She can claim the long distance commuting record for 
radio artists. A year ago she married Hugh Whipple, an an- 
nouncer who talks to 'em from a Davenport, Iowa, station. 
Now Peggy makes the trip to Chicago for each of her broad- 
casts. Although she's only a little more than twenty, Peggy 
has been in radio about three years. Before that she played 
in stock a year. She was born in Northumberland, England, 
educated at Ward-Belmont School in Nashville, Tenn., and at 
National Park Seminary in Washington. Peggy's a blonde with 
brown eyes, and without high heels measures five feet three. 



October 



LATEST GOSSIP 

heard around the studios of 

LOCAL STATIONS 



33 



Collected by 

BARRY STEVENS 



KMOX-St. Louis 

MERYL F RE I DEL, the live 
wire in charge of spreading the 
good news at KMOX, reminds us of 
this and that : KMOX gets many of 
its sound effects from a comedian 
known as Checkerboard Sam, whose 
versatile vocal chords can imitate a 
pack of hounds chasing and killing 
a wild cat, two dogs getting a hog 
Out of a potato patch, and early 
morning on a farm — starting with 
the rooster and going through the 
whole routine of barnyard noises. 
Anybody who needs a little more 
noise in his life should get in touch 
with Sam . . . That program with 
Art Gilham, the well known whis- 
pering pianist, and Tommy the 
Office Boy is one you shouldn't miss. 
Art, by the way, recently had a rail- 
road car named after him — "The 
Art Gilham Special." It was put ex- 
clusively at his disposal for a trip to 
the World Fair in Chicago. This 
was the first time any railroad has 
ever been so nice to a radio per- 
former . . . Dick Macaulay's "Knut- 
krackers" sketches should be 
heard, by all means. Dick is author 
and chief knutkracker. Not long 
ago Dick kidded sponsors who offer 
gifts in return for coupons. He 
offered a free "Holy Moses Pneu- 
matic Hammer" and the fans sent 
him stacks of phony cigar bands and 
three paper monkey wrenches . . . 
KMOX got a letter the other day 
from a deaf man in Arkansas, saying 
he listens constantly to programs by 
putting a small steel file between his 
teeth and then touching his radio 
set. Station engineers explain that 
steel is sensitive enough to pick up 
a wide range of frequencies such as 
are used in modern broadcasting 
equipment . . . Carl Hohengarten, 



KMOX musical director, is a real 
trouper. A few minutes before" an 
important dramatic audition last 
week one of the cast phoned he 
couldn't make it. Frantic search 
around the studio revealed no actor 
who could take the part. Although 
he had never done a dramatic part 
and with 'only a few minutes to go 
over the script, Carl did the job so 
well that only the producer and the 
other actors knew a substitute had 
been used . . . Marvin E. Mueller, 
youngest announcer for KMOX, is 
a second Phil Cook. Marv has forty 
characters he can step into quicker 
than you can say KMOX . . . Tues- 
day is audition day at KMOX and 
about one hundred aspirants to radio 
fame come in for tryouts. They're 
of all ages, from all walks of life, 
and they often travel a good many 
miles for a chance before the mike. 
Last week brought a frail, bent, 
poorly dressed woman of seventy 
who played concert piano composi- 
tions with delicate hands that still 
showed evidence of artistic sensi- 
tivity, but now refused to do the 
bidding of their owner. Another 
hopeful was a young boy of seven 
who, with doting mother standing 
close by, did imitations of famous 
people. And next came a trio of 
young girls full of hot-cha music; 
and so on and on and on. Ralph 
Stein, in charge of auditions at 
KMOX, is fortunately a swell judge 
of human nature. With infinite pa- 
tience he listens to everybody, sym- 
pathetically breaks the news to those 
who won't do, suggests the proper 
training to those who show promise, 
and gets all excited over the rare 
"find" who possesses the talent 
which good radio shows require . . . 
J. L. Van Volkenburg, president of 
KMOX, is probably the youngest 



man in radio to hold such a promi- 
nent position. Van is only 29 years 
old. He used to have an act on the 
Keith circuit. He is a good musi- 
cian and singer, and knows the en- 
tertainment business inside and out. 
Smart fellow. His life story is al- 
most too good to be true. Too bad 
Horatio Alger didn't know about 
him . . . And here's a tip for other 
radio stations to follow : KMOX has 
a program, "The Exchange Club," 
On which ideas and suggestions sent 
in by listeners are broadcast for the 
benefit of other listeners. Harold E. 
Bolande, staff announcer, is the 
originator and "broker of ideas" of 
the program. The suggestions range 
from novel home-making ideas to 
offers for exchanging services for 
commodities, like dental service for 
a sewing machine, or general repair- 
ing for a violin. The program has 
become so popular that it's impossi- 
ble to broadcast every idea received. 
So the KMOX Exchange Bulletin 
has been started. It's published once 
a week and prints all the ideas not 
given over the air. Subscribers are 
charged enough to cover the cost of 
printing and mailing, and the bulle- 
tin now has a circulation of ten 
thousand . . . Here's one for the 
book : Two listeners, one in Fulton, 
New York, and the other in Pine 
Bluffs, Arkansas, liked the KMOX 
Farm Folks Hour so much that they 
actually paid for advertisements in 
their local newspapers to tell other 
people how good it was so they could 
enjoy it, too. There are real radio 
fans for you ! 

KYA— San Francisco 

EUGENE MANCINI, romantic 
tenor who gained wide popular- 
ity as conductor of the "Souvenirs of 
Italy" program, is now giving a song 



34 

recital every Monday evening. Al- 
ready the fan mail has proven that 
Eugene is one of KYA's greatest 
drawing cards . . . Bob Robb, the 
Sports Reviewer, has a brand new 
commission in the U. S. Army. Bob 
is a second lieutenant in the Military 
Intelligence Reserve. ... If you're at 
all interested in art, don't miss that 
new series of talks by Helen Gordon 
Barker. Helen gives out dope on the 
Old Masters that any layman can un- 
derstand. . . . And while you're at it, 
be sure and catch the act put on three 
times a week by Eb and Zeb, those 
funny, funny fellows from Corn Cen- 
ter. . . . Virginia Miller, staff pianist, 
is celebrating her tenth year in radio. 
Judging from her looks, Virginia 
must have started broadcasting when 
she was in grammar school. . . . Ted 
Maxwell and Bernice Berwin, well 
known NBC dramatic players, are 
worth hearing in that new skit : "Jack 
and Ethel in Roads to Hollywood.". . . 
G. Donald Gray, announcer and staff 
baritone, is passing out cigars. Are 
you going to tell the youngster what 
the "G" stands for, Don? . . . Donald 
Novis is good in that "Strange Ad- 
ventures in Strange Lands" show 
on Friday nights. . . . The San Fran- 
cisco Department of Education is 
now using KYA regularly for broad- 
casting timely announcements to 
teachers and educators. . . . Lester 
Malloy, high school student an- 
nouncer who has broadcast weekly 
editions of high school news for the 
last twenty months, is now writing 
a radio column for a newspaper syn- 
dicate. Ten papers print Lester's 
stuff. Nice going, boy. ... A prom- 



inent railroad official tries to set his 
watch daily by the government time 
signal relayed by KYA from Mare 
Island. If he misses the signal he 
always calls up and gets the correct 
time. . . . Chef Hanges has found his 
fan mail a constant blow to his self- 
respect. Listeners can't seem to get 
his name right. The latest laugh he 
got was a letter which started "Dear 
Chympanzie." 

WSM-Nashville 

CHUCK and Ray, the Harmony 
Slaves, featured for several 
years with the Sinclair Minstrels, sing 
with a card index at their elbows. 
Whenever a request comes in for a 
number a card is whipped out of the 
file and the boys give the listener 
what he wants. Chuck and Ray have 
on file all of the popular songs of the 
last thirty-five years and they have 
never repeated a number except by 
urgent request. . . When WSM was 
started in 1925 it had a ten-foot of- 
fice and one secretary, Zena Jones. 
Although the station now employs 
about 100 people, almost every busi- 
ness transaction still passes through 
the hands of Zena. Quiet and unas- 
suming, Zena has never had nor 
wanted publicity. But those who know 
the reasons for the success of WSM 
will gladly tell you that the station has 
had few assets so valuable as the in- 
telligence and pleasant personality of 
Zena Jones. . . . Except for the Eifel 
Tower, which has recently been used 
for broadcasting, WSM's new single 
antenna (878 feet high) is the tallest 
broadcasting structure in the world. 
On a stormy day the tip of the an- 




Stealing their thunder 



Radio Fan-Fare 

tenna pierces the low-lying clouds and 
acts as a lightning rod, discharging 
the clouds that become charged with 
electricity. During the discharge, a 
blue haze appears around the ball on 
top of the flagpole which caps the 
antenna. When the charge in the 
clouds becomes too great, a bolt of 
lightning runs down the tower and 
goes into the ground, although it is 
not visible more than a quarter of the 
way down. WSM's gigantic lightning- 
rod thus clears the atmosphere for 
miles around and is a protection in- 
stead of a danger to the immediate 
community. . . Facts about WSM's 
Grand Old Opry : Oscar Stone, the 
fiddler with Dr. Humphrey Bates and 
his Possum Hunters, is the father of 
ten children, and Arthur Smith, head 
of the Dixie Liners, has just as many. 
Arthur can play a fiddle until it burns. 
He says he can play about four hours 
straight and no one has yet dared to 
doubt his word. DeFord Bailey, the 
little hunchbacked colored boy who is 
the harmonica wizard of the Saturday 
night shindig, receives letters every 
week from all over the country ask- 
ing him what special kind of instru- 
ment he plays. The answer is that 
they're just ordinary little mouth or- 
gans. It's the way DeFord handles 
them that makes them sound differ- 
ent. The Delmore brothers, Alton 
and Rabon, learned to play those 
guitars that way a good many years 
ago down in Alabammy. After pick- 
ing cotton in the hot sun all day they 
turned to music for diversion in the 
evening. These two soft spoken but 
hard fisted boys now have a large 
repertory of old folk songs that sound 
as if they might have come out of the 
Ark itself. Uncle Ed Poplin and the 
other members of the Poplin Band 
drive the seventy-five miles between 
Lewisburg and Nashville every Sat- 
urday night just to play in the Grand 
Old Opry. There's nothing too good 
we can say about Fred Shriver, the 
beloved member of the Opry com- 
pany who passed away a few weeks 
ago. Blind from infancy, Fred edu- 
cated himself and studied music. He 
never whimpered about his affliction. 
Tapping his way around the city, he 
did his daily work with a smile and 
a good word for everybody. He con- 
sidered that his mission was to en- 
tertain people. His entire life was a 
shining example of courage of the 
highest order. Little Jimmie Size- 
more, the five-year-old radio star, 
(Continued on page 38) 



October 

MARGARET McDONALD 



35 



Not only is Margaret one of radio's outstanding charmers, through her portrayal 
of Dorothy Regent in the "Chandu" series (over the Don Lee stations along 
the Pacific Coast), but she also is very much in demand in the movie studios be- 
tween her broadcasts. She has a face the camera loves to touch (and one that 
doesn't have to be retouched). For the past three years Margaret has been so 
busy playing Dorothy Regent, making electric transcriptions, and doing film work, 
that she hasn't had time for any sort of a vacation. However, we will reserve 
our sympathy for gals not so generously endowed with talent and good looks. 




36 



Radio Fan-Fare 




ALL OVER 



DIANA CHASE, the Boston deb who gave up So- 
ciety for the thrills of Broadway and radio. Her 
rich soprano is heard over WINS, New York. 



#•% 




STUART BUCHANAN and 
Betty Webb of the "Omar 
Khayyam" show on KHJ, Los 
Angeles. "I loaf you," says 
Omar, as he hugs the jug and 
prepares to take a bough. 





MARY ROSETTI and Alan Rogers have just received twen- 
ty pounds of new gags by air mail. They're two of the 
principal funsters of "The Royal Order Of Optimistic 
Doughnuts" program on KNY, Los Angeles. 




TIM RYAN, star of 
"Tim Ryan's Nite Club" 
on KPO, San Francisco, 
was born in New Jersey, 
raised in Oklahoma, got 
his stage start in Texas, 
and covered the coun- 
try in vaudeville with his 
present radio partner, 
Irene Noblette. Swell 
team of air performers. 




FRANK NOVAK, 
The One Man Band, 
plays twenty instru- 
ments and can be 
heard over lots of 
local stations in the 
recorded "Outdoor 
Girl" programs. 



GINGER, one half of "Bill and Ginger," the popular harmony 
team that broadcasts from WCAU, Philadelphia. Ginger used 
to be a dancer, and her real name is Virginia Baker. 




October 



37 



THE DIAL 



ART GILHAM, "The Whispering Pianist," who 
ad libs his way through the program of the Enter- 
prise Cleaning Company over KMOX, St. Louis. 






FLORA FERN BLACKSHAW, 
contralto, and Florence Gold- 
en, actress, (who have plenty 
on the ball) taking it easy at 
Cincinnati's Coney Island after 
a hard day at WLW. 



"JOE TWIRP." who is 
the stuttering reporter 
(and very funny) in the 
"Royal Order Of Opti- 
mistic Doughnuts" skits 
on KNY, Los Angeles. 
Joe is radio's Roscoe 
Ates. If you've seen Mr. 
Ates on the screen 
you'll appreciate the 
compliment 






EILEEN WENZEL, famous "Follies" and "Vanities" 
beauty, has been heard in a series of beauty talks on 
WMCA, New York. The rumor is that a sponsor is 
about to sign Eileen up for another series. 



BETTY WEBB (with- 
out her drapes this 
time) is the talented 
Glenvale, California, 
girl who plays Mer- 
cedes in "The Count 
Of Monte Crisco" 
every weekday night 
over WOR, Newark; 
WBBM, Chicago; 
KNX, Los Angeles. 




1 





COL. 

views 
Jack 




* 



BOB NEWHALL, WLW's Mail Pouch Sportsman, inter- 
file royalty of sport on his weekly broadcast. Recently 
Dempsey and Max Baer gave Bob's fans the low-down. 



38 

once got 13,000 letters after one fif- 
teen minute broadcast. He and his 
dad just finished a personal appear- 
ance tour through the south and mid- 
dle west during which they broke 
fifty-one house records over a period 
of six months. . . . Arthur "Tiny" 
Stowe, the popular announcer and 
continuity writer, went home to Texas 
for his vacation. Velma Dean, Tiny's 
wife, has been headlining in vaude- 



to plan his programs so that they will 
appeal to the whole family and he has 
become a welcome visitor in tens of 
thousands of homes. His deep and 
mellow voice carries with it a friend- 
liness that will not be denied. Dean 
thinks that radio is a great help to 
humanity in many ways. He says, 
for example, that it gives people a 
chance to express themselves in writ- 
ing letters, which is good business for 




ville in Texas this summer. She is 
back now, singing the blues with the 
two other members of the Three On 
A Mike trio. . . . Don't let anybody 
tell you that religious broadcasts don't 
have a big following. Especially when 
the speakers are as interesting as Dr. 
James I. Vance, Dr. Roger T. Nooe, 
Dr. John L. Hill, and Dr. Ralph W. 
Sockman. . . . Freddie Rose, the vet- 
eran composer and entertainer who is 
now on the staff of WSM, has just 
released five brand new songs. Most 
of Freddie's ditties are what are 
known as "heart songs." Freddie 
says he writes about the everyday 
sparks from the grindstone of life. 
His latest sparks are : "In My Book 
Of Dreams," "That Old Leather 
Pocketbook Of Mother's," "I Am In 
The Spell Of The Night," "So 
Happy," and "To Think It Had To 
Happen To Me." . . . Ole Bill, the 
Shield Man who broadcasts for the 
National Life and Accident Insur- 
ance Company every evening, has 
been in radio for more than ten years. 
His real name is Dean Yocom. He 
began life on a farm in Kentucky 
and studied music with several prom- 
inent teachers in Chicago. Dean tries 



Uncle Sam and releases a lot of steam 
that might break out in more danger- 
ous ways. To prove his point, Dean 
showed us a letter he got last week: 
"My Dear Friend — I come to you in 
a great hour of trouble because I be- 
lieve you are someone whom I can 
really trust. I hope you will advise 
me to the best of your ability in this 
grave matter and answer me as you 
would a member of your own family 
in trouble. The question I am about 
to ask is more serious than life and 
death and the inevitability of taxes. I 
dare not even sign my name, so think 
this over carefully and give me your 
undivided attention. The question is, 

'Will Jeff ever be as tall as Mutt ?' " 

• • • 

THE University of Kentucky is 
doing fine work in bringing edu- 
cational opportunities, through 
radio, to the sparsely settled and in- 
accessible sections in the eastern 
part of the state. Many new "lis- 
tening centers" have just been es- 
tablished in the Kentucky mountains 
where schools are few and far be- 
tween. The names of the communi- 
ties where the centers have been 
established may interest you : Caney 



Radio Fan-Fare 

Creek, Davella, Wooten, Hyden, Dry 
Hill, Stinnett, Beech Fork, Pippa- 
pass, Bolyn, Vest, Mars Fork, and 
Thousand Sticks. Several of the 
receiving - sets put into service are 
battery sets donated by Kentuckians 
and residents of nearby states. 
Mountaineers from miles around 
come to the centers regularly to lis- 
ten to educational broadcasts from 
the university and to other worth 
while programs. Already this method 
of instruction by radio has been a 
tremendous success because of the 
eagerness of the "students" to obtain 
information and training that they 
could not otherwise get. 

HERE AND THERE 

WHEN an orchestra leader can 
keep the personnel of his band 
intact for three years without a 
change in the line-up, it's a pretty 
good indication that he knows how 
to get the best out of his men and 
that the orchestra has become 
"smooth" through working together 
for such a long period. Norman 
Cloutier has done this very thing 
with his Merry Madcaps. Norm has 
been a member of the WTIC (Hart- 
ford, Conn.) staff since 1926 and is 
now associate musical director of that 
station, in charge of dance music 
broadcasts. Before taking up radio 
he was a bank clerk, with violin play- 
ing and orchestra directing as a side- 
line. When he found himself writ- 
ing sharps and flats instead of dollar 
signs and percentage symbols in his 
ledgers, he resigned his bank job— to 
the benefit both of the bank and him- 
self — and devoted all his time to 
music . . . Eddie Peabody, master of 
the banjo and thirty-one other instru- 
ments, is certainly pulling the cus- 
tomers into the Safeway stores with 
his lively program over KDYL (Salt 
Lake City) . . . Nancy Garner, the 
Corsicana, Texas, gal who sopranos 
over WFAA (Dallas), is a niece of 
John Nance Garner. Remember him? 



Please send us news of your 
favorite station 

We should appreciate receiving 
all publicity releases about pro- 
grams and artists (with pictures) 
from independent radio stations, as 
K'ell as bits of gossip or unusual 
information from radio fans about 
their favorite performers and pro- 
grams. We'll print all we have 
room for. Please send them to 
Gossip Editor, Radio Fan-Fare, 
Room 400, 420 Lexington Ave., 
New York City. 



October 



FRANCES LANGFORD 



39 
Here's a girl who's burned plenty of young men up. There's 
something about that throaty voice that gets 'em. Stay away, 
television! Frances is a contralto by accident. While she was 
in a Florida boarding school she had her tonsils out. And the 
first time she sang after that her lyric soprano had entirely dis- 
appeared! During Frances' four years at Southern College 
she sang on a commercial program over a Tampa station. 
Rudy Vallee, vacationing in the south, visited the studio and 
heard her. A week later she was a guest star on a Fleischmann 
program broadcast from New Orleans. It was a good start, 
but only after months of hard work did she become a star. 
Frances is just past twenty-one and weighs about 100 pounds. 
Her complexion is dark and she has coal black hair. When she 
sings you could shoot a machine gun on the University of Flor- 
ida campus and not hit a soul. All the lads are squatting, 
moon-eyed, around their radios, and thinking of the days when 
Frances was the belle of their hops. You can't blame, can you? 




40 



SHORT-WAVE FAN-FARE 



Radio Fan-Fare 



A Department of Radio Information 



Conducted by ZEH BOUCK, The Circuit Judge 



WHEN winter comes, old man Boreas 
will undoubtedly bring- along with 
him the usual improvement in short-wave 
receiving conditions — notably on the 13 to 
25 meter band. Long distance short-wave 
communication is, actually, far less af- 
fected by seasonal variations than is long- 
wave reception. (This is partly because 
short-wave reception is consistently car- 
ried on between winter and summer hemi- 
spheres, and partly because summer static 
is less violent on the high frequencies.) 
But, even so, generally improved reception 
should be noted in the U. S. A. as cold 
weather sets in. Noise on the 25 to 50 
meter band should be reduced, fading will 
be less severe and of slower periods — un- 
less some unsuspected sun-spots go off on 
a rampage. 

RECEIVING SHORT-WAVES 

THERE are available to the short-wave 
broadcast fan several methods of re- 
ceiving signals below the conventional 
broadcast band. If he already possesses 
a good broadcast receiver, and does not 
care to splurge in the way of short-wave 
investment, he can supplement his present 
equipment with an adaptor or a convertor. 

The adaptor is the cheapest — and also 
the least efficient — system of short-wave 
reception. It consists of a device, often in- 
corporating only one tube, which is plugged 
into the detector socket of the broadcast 
receiver. The detector tube itself is re- 
moved, and usually placed in the adaptor. 
The adaptor, technically, is nothing more 
than a short-wave receiver — seldom a good 
one — which utilizes part of the broadcast 
receiver for amplification and reproduction. 
The section of the broadcast receiver which 
contributes the real efficiency on the broad- 
cast waves is eliminated. 

The, convertor is a more complicated 
and effective arrangement which is con- 
nected between the antenna and ground and 
the broadcast receiver. It converts the 
short-wave signal to a broadcast wave and 
turns it over to the broadcast set where 
it goes through the usual processes. The 
convertor system therefore utilizes the full 
efficiency of the receiver itself. The prin- 
cipal drawback to the convertor is the prob- 
ability of a high noise level — due usually 
to poor matching between the convertor 
and receiver. If, in operating a convertor, 
you find the noise considerably worse than 
on the broadcast waves, take the matter 
up with a good serviceman and tell him, 
with a perfectly straight face: 

"I'm not satisfied with the signal-to- 
noise ratio on short-waves, and suspect 
that a lack of impedance balance between 
the output of the convertor and the input 
circuit of the receiver is the fault. I sug- 



gest that you investigate this — probably 
changing the input circuit to a better match 
at the intermediate frequency. I'd do it 
myself, only my signal generator and out- 
put meter are packed-up somewhere in the 
garage with the Russian crown jewels." 

If he's not enough of an engineer to 
make the alteration, have him communi- 
cate with the makers of the convertor and 
receiver for detailed information on the 
most efficient method of combining the 
two units. 

Best short-wave results will be secured 
with a high grade, single control short- 
wave superheterodyne, operated altogether 
independently of your broadcast receiver. 
However, the most satisfactory all around 
cembination is, as we explained last month, 
an all-wave receiver. There are several 
excellent ones on the market. 

GENTLEMEN ONLY! 

^FB, Hamilton, Bermuda, on 29.8 meters, 
*-* provides one side of the international 
daytime 'phone channel with WNB, New 
York. With the exception of some ship- 
to-shore communication, this is the only 
traffic of any importance that is usually 
unscrambled — that is, intelligible on the 
usual home receiver. The fact that speech 
may occasionally be of dubious articulation 
can be blamed on the well known charac- 
teristics of the Bermudian land telephone 
system, rather than on deliberate messing 
up by an inverter. 

We publish this information in order 
that all of us — gentlemen of course — will 
eschew the portion of the dial surround- 
ing 29.8 meters and not eavesdrop on 
private conversations, particularly when 
they are of a confidential nature. To date 
we have heard three telephoned requests 
for additional funds, one bride asking per- 
sonal information from her mother, and 
one description of the ingredients and tech- 
nique going into the manufacture of a 
Planter's Punch. 

However, most of the ,ZFB — WNB con- 
versations are explanations by the Hamil- 
ton operator of why the party at Paget, 
or Warwick, or Tuckertown cannot be 
reached for several hours — usually because 
he is at Elbow Beach, or at the Mid-Ocean 
course, or the Riddle's Bay links, or 
cycling, or has just hung out a "Please 
do not disturb" sign at the bar. 

CUCKOOS AND BUGLE CALLS 

IDENTIFYING sounds, borrowed from 
-*- the zoo and laboratory, seem to be the 
same order of sine qua non to short-wave 
radio that the theme song was to the early 

Station VE9HX, Halifax, N. S., broad- 
casts a four gong signal before each half 



hour announcement. VE9HX is on the 
air daily, from 8 :30 A. M. to 11 :30 A. M., 
and from 5:00 P. M. to 10:00 P. M., on 
49 meters. 

CT1AA takes a tip from the ultimate fate 
of short-wave fans, and broadcasts the 
notes of the cuckoo bird before and after 
broadcasts, and occasionally before an- 
nouncements or between selections. 
CT1AA is Lisbon, Portugal, broadcasting 
Tuesdays and Fridays on 31.2 meters. 
Best reception is from 4 :00 to 8 :00 P. M. 
—EST. 

■Rabat, Morocco (no call letters), ac- 
companies announcements with the beat of 
a metronome. Rabat is on 32.3 meters, 
daily, and is heard best early in the after- 
noons in the eastern part of the United 
States. 

VK3ME, .Melbourne, Australia, 31.5 
meters, reverts to the zoo, opening and 
closing the program with the laughing 
notes of the kookaburra bird (page Doctor 
Traprock!). VK3ME may be received 
in America early Sunday mornings — about 
5:00 A.M.— EST. 

Station T14NRH, plumb on 31 meters, 
goes in for bugle calls between selections. 
We prefer the bugle calls. T14NRH is lo- 
cated in Heredia, Costa Rica, and broad- 
casts a daily schedule from 5 :00 to 7 :00 
P. M.— EST. 

Daventry, England (GSE, 25.3 meters, 
GSD, 25.5 meters, GSC, 31.3 meters, GSB, 
31.5 meters, and GSA, 49.6 meters), broad- 
casts a 1000 cycle tuning signal for fifteen 
minutes preceding each transmission. 

DJD, Zeesen, Germany, takes piano les- 
sons and plays six chords over and over 
for hours at a time. Transmission fol- 
lows no set schedule and is on 25.5 meters. 
The piano is excellent. 

We had an idea that we had discovered 
a new one the other day — up here in our 
rural listening post. The characteristic 
signal was the faint tinkle of a bell, and 
it stumped us every time we tried to center 
the carrier. When we finally discovered 
that it was all over the dial our suspicions 
were aroused. A quick investigation dis- 
closed that it was Guernsey — cow, not Eng- 
land — just outside the shack. 

SHORT-WAVE ANTI-NOISE 

ANTENNAS 

TUST what can be done in the way of 
" noise reduction on amateur short-wave 
antennas is a matter of much argument 
pro and con — the con part being taken, 
for the greater part, by the manufacturers 
of such equipment. These devices work 
on the basis that if the antenna is high and 
clear, artificial static, caused by automo- 
biles, power line leakage, etc., will be 
(Continued on page 48) 



October 



41 



FREEMAN F. GOSDEN 

Here we see Amos V Andy doing their 
daily exercise on the balcony of their 
office high up in a Chicago skyscraper. 
It seems a little odd, doesn't it, to realize 
that the boys are really big business men 
in Chicago besides being in the taxicab 
business in Harlem? This exercising is 
not just a publicity stunt, either, we'll 
have you know. The boys would never 
be able to do all the work they do unless 
they kept in the best possible trim. And 
just think what would happen if one of 
them became ill and couldn't go on the 
They're now starting the fifth year 
of their Pepsodent program and we 
hope that the next four will be even 
more successful than the last. Amos 'n' 
Andy fully deserve their great success. 
They have written every word that they 




have spoken on the air — more than two 
million words — which would be no small 
writing job for several men to do in the 
same time. One of the amazing things 
about the partnership is the harmony 
with which Sosden and Correll work. 
Correll (Andy) is the balance wheel of 
the combination. His is the jovial per- 
sonality that always moves on an even 
keel. Sosden is the dynamo that drives 
hard as long as there is an ounce of en- 
ergy left. Both boys live the parts of 
their brain children when they are writ- 
ing the scripts or are in the studios. At 
other times they regard them as sepa- 
rate characters — two people whom they 
know very well, but who are in no way 
connected with the everyday personali- 
ties of Messrs. Gosden and Correlf 

CHARLES J. CORRELL 



42 



Radio Fan-Fare 
II 



OH, WHAT SAN INNOCENT GALTO DO? 



By MARGARET D. WORTHINCTON 



IT'S getting so you don't know 
what to believe with all the mag- 
azines, newspapers, and now radio 
advertising everything as the best. If 
people believed all they heard and 
saw they would be crazy in no time at 
all. 

Take the radio program that ad- 
vertises Tangee lipstick. I bet no 
girl will come right out and say that 
she lets her friend kiss her and that 
it doesn't come off — the lipstick I 
mean. I know my friend says, 
"What do you put that stuff on for? 
You know I hate it." But a girl can't 
go around looking as if she were 
sick or something. I think this stuff 
about it giving you more charm is a 
lot of bunk, too, as I don't see any 
new men rushing around to date me 
up. 

I'm also kind of disappointed in 
Walter Winchell. I always read 
every line he writes and I know he 
tells the truth about most people 
even though it hurts, but I can't say 
the same for the lotion he advertises. 
Maybe I haven't used it long enough, 
but I got a bottle at Woolworth's 
and used it almost all up the first 
couple of nights. I didn't see any 
change and so I couldn't figure why 
I should buy more. Walter's spon- 
sor says it will give you charm and 
that you will be alluring, but I fail 
to see it. My friend didn't notice it. 
All he said was, "What is that funny 
smelly stuff on your hands?" He 
smelled it because I tried patting his 
face as I've seen the stars do in the 
movies, but he didn't like it. So I 
guess I'll just keep on using Life- 
buoy so they can't say I've got 
B.O. I thought maybe that lotion 
might help my nails grow but I 
guess they don't make it for that 
purpose. Anyway, it didn't help. 
My skin is rather dark and I 
thought from what they said on the 
radio that maybe that Linit stuff 
would help make it white. But I 
tried it and as far as I can see my 
skin is just as dark as ever and I 
have to use just as much powder as 
always. Linit does smell nice but is 
sort of gritty on the bottom of the 
tul). Maybe the water was not hot 
enough to melt all the powder. Any- 



way, it wasn't very comfortable. 
I'd like to see some of these girls 
they claim have all that charm just 
from using a package of some kind 
of bath salts. Nobody I know ever 
gets that kind of results. 

And doesn't it make you mad to 
hear all the things they say about 
coffee? They say "you can do it 
better on dated coffee." What can 
you do any better ? I tried a can of it 
to compare with the nineteen-cent 
kind from the A & P which I have 
been using. I didn't find that I did 
anything any better on dated coffee 
I was late at the office just as often 
and hated getting up just as much. 
I got just as sick of trying to curl 
my hair. I don't think they make 
those tests on real people. They 
must use some sort of a mechanical 
thing which accelerates results be- 
cause I can't see one bit of difference 
between the kind of coffee we've al- 
ways used and the kind they adver- 
tise. My mother says she wishes 
I'd not be such a sucker and buy 
everything advertised over the radio, 
but I say to her that she's not pro- 
gressive. I ask her, "How can you 
learn anything unless you try new 
things?" But I guess she wins be- 
cause we never see anything differ- 
ent after I go and buy the stuff. I 
guess I ought to take my money and 
get a permanent wave instead. I 
wish they would advertise a good 
place where I could get my hair 
done to look like Joan Crawford's 
for about $5, but now that I con- 
sider it, I don't recall ever hearing 
anything advertised over the air that 
I really wanted and could also afford 
to buy. 

It's a good thing I don't care 
much about smoking. I try to do it 
once in a while just to make my 
friend mad, but that's about all. I 
listen to the radio to try and find out 
which one won't hurt my throat and 
what I hear just about drives me 
crazy. One minute they tell you not 
to smoke a cigaret that's toasted and 
the next minute they say to smoke 
one that is toasted because it is bet- 
ter for your throat. Then in about 
fifteen minutes they say that an- 
other kind is the only kind that 



satisfies, and next you hear about 
a smooth one. Well, honestly, 
I am just sick from trying to find 
which one of them is right for me. 
I guess I'll just have to use one of 
each in order to be sure that I have 
the right one, but as long as I don't 
smoke more than one a day I guess 
none of them will hurt me. 

My friend says he would go crazy 
if he paid any attention to all the 
gasoline programs on the air. He 
says gas is gas and all the poppy- 
cock they say about it won't make 
his car go any faster. I am certain- 
ly glad to hear that as you have no 
idea what a reckless driver he is. 
He is just a daredevil. I always tell 
mamma that if I don't come home 
she'll know I've been killed in an 
auto accident as my friend just 
doesn't care how he drives. I really 
like fast driving, but I have to 
scream and pretend I don't or 
there's no telling what he might do. 
He's very funny that way. He says 
that soon when you buy a gallon of 
gasoline you'll be disappointed un- 
less a rabbit jumps out of each can. 
I pride myself on being modern, 
but I do think that some things are 
better left unsaid. Honestly, it seems 
as if nothing is in bad taste any 
more. I thought I'd just die when 
my friend and I were listening to a 
program and the announcer started 
to talk about a laxative. I felt that if 
I turned the program off it would 
make things worse because my 
friend might not have noticed it. I've 
observed that sometimes when I'm 
talking to him he's paying no atten- 
tion to me so I was hoping that he 
wouldn't notice that program. Well, 
you could have knocked me down 
with a crowbar when he said he 
guessed he'd try some of that stuff 
sometime. He said he remembered 
his mother used to give him sulphur 
and molasses in the spring and he 
guessed it was about the same thing. 
I just could not answer him, I felt 
so terrible. I really felt that I 
wanted to write to the station and 
give them a piece of my mind. They 
don't seem to care how they em- 
barrass us young women these 
days. 



October 



43 



SHOW BOAT ON 

SHORE LEAVE 



I AST Sunday some of the Maxwell 
J House Show Boat troupe decided 
it was about time to get away from it 
all so they piled into a car, rode up to 
the Westchester-Biltmore Country Club, 
and had themselves a time. The club 
photographer thought it was a good 
chance to get a bit of publicity so he 
stalked the stars. As long as we're 
printing his pictures, we'll fill up what 
space is left with some stuff about the 
boys and girls which you may not know. 

Lancelot Patrick (Lanny) Ross, that 
old lawyer from Columbia, is about to 
tangle with the talkies. Paramount has 
just given him a five year contract. 
Lanny goes to Hollywood in January. 
They'll pipe his tenor into the Show 
Boat program from one of the West 
Coast stations. 

Lanny, by the way, almost had a 
chance recently to be a Sir Lancelot and 
rescue a fair maiden in distress. An- 
nette Hanshaw was ill for two weeks 
and couldn't sing on the program. The 
script writers were in a fix because they 
knew listeners would expect her absence 
to be explained. The brain trust finally 
decided to have Annette kidnapped 
(now there was an original idea!) and 
then have Lanny gallop up on his 
charger, knock the kidnappers for a 
flock of home runs, and bring little 
Annette back to her breathless public. 

The plan was vetoed by the NBC 
officials (and quite wisely) because of 
the recent McMath kidnapping in 
Massachusetts which was supposedly 





CHARLES WINNINGER 




ANNETTE HANSHAW 



LANCELOT PATRICK ROSS 



"inspired" by a radio kidnapping. 

Conrad Thibault, who not so long ago 
was a floorwalker, is celebrating his 
first anniversary this month as a net- 
work warbler. Now he is featured on 
three important commercial programs : 
Maxwell House, Buick, and Phillip 



MURIEL WILSON 



LANNY ROSS 
ANNETTE HANSHAW, 
CONRAD THIBAULT I 



-zzm 




Morris. That's a phenomenal record, 
Conrad, and you deserve all your success. 

Muriel Wilson isn't far behind Con- 
rad in the amount of time she puts in 
on the air. Besides being the Show 
Boat's heavy love interest she charms 
the radioafs (Good God! We're writ- 
ing like Winchell!) in Light Opera 
Gems, Light Opera Nights, and Na- 
tional Opera Company programs. Muriel 
was born in New York City and still 
lives in the same house where she let 
out her first high note. She used to 
have a job checking up on people who 
failed to pay their income taxes. 

Charles Winninger, a Black River, 
Wisconsin, boy, started entertaining the 
folks publicly when he was seven. 
Crashing New York at twenty-three, 
he did everything possible to get the 
critics to notice his work. Finally Alan 
Dale, the famous play reviewer, summed 
up a Winninger performance with this 
line : "Something with a German ac- 
cent came on the stage." Charlie now 
chuckles constantly when he talks into 
the microphone. Maybe he's still think- 
ing about Mr. Dale's remark. 



44 



VOICE OF THE 
LISTENER 



I have been a reader of Radio Digest 
for years and felt very sorry when it began 
slipping and finally ended in Fan-Fare, 
which would be more appropriately Pan 
Fare. Taking an example from your mag- 
azine, I am going to criticise, but I hope 
that my criticism will be constructive. 

First, I do not like the pictures. They 
are too small and are very poorly printed 
and arranged. One good picture of an ar- 
tist is better than many poor ones. 

Second, the same artists are played up 
month after month, with only fragmentary 
write-ups. One good write-up is worth 
several sketchy ones. 

Third, the department which I particu- 
larly dislike, "Slipping and Gripping." In 
a very short time an artist becomes a dear 
member of the family and one does not 
like to have him or her publicly annihilated. 
Just because Tuna has indigestion and is a 
little deaf in the left ear, must we forsake 
our favorites? The only way to judge the 
success of a program is by popular vote, 
and even that is limited. It is humanly 
impossible for an artist to register 100%, 
twelve months of the year. Tuna has only 
been on the job four months and is show- 
ing signs of skidding. After all, what is 
one man's (or woman's) opinion? 

Perhaps you are not aware that you have 
a very dangerous rival in the magazine 
called "Radio Stars." This is just a 
friendly tip. 

I wonder if you are courageous enough 
to print this honest if severe opinion of 
your publication. — J. L. Nesibeth, Union- 
town, Pennsylvania. 

• • • 

During the past several months I have 
become an interested reader of your pub- 
lication and consider it the best radio 
magazine on the newsstands. This is 
due not only to your excellent articles, 
but also to your frank criticism of cur- 
rent programs and popular songs. I par- 
ticularly admire your practice of not be- 
ing afraid to mention names in these 
criticisms, a characteristic notably ab- 
sent in other radio publications. — J. 
Walter Lord, 4314 Roland Court, Balti- 
more, Maryland. 

• • • 

Please send me your next number; the 
one I have is marked Summer Number. 

It really is the best radio magazine 
printed. I also think that a lot of your 
criticisms have helped, for some of these 
programs have either got a lot better, or 
gone off the air entirely. 

We like the music of Richard Himber of 
the Essex House, New York, and the sing- 
ing of Joe Marsh ; also the Hotel Lexing- 
ton music. 

We like Ben Bernie, too, but we know 
what he is going to say and play before he 



starts ; if he were not so likeable, it would 
be very tiresome. 

Thanks again for the pleasure your 
magazine gives us. — Mrs. Charles F. 
Keene, Hotel Park Lane, Chicago. 

• • • 

Your stories are interesting; the pictures 
are new ! I'm particularly grateful for the 
picture and story of Conrad Thibault. The 
story alone has made me a Thibault lis- 
tener. I shouldn't be surprised if I'd break 
out and echo the "call for Philip Morris" — 
all of which is neither here nor there, but 
no doubt would please the sponsor. 

The most consistent complaint I hear is 
the absence of the "Voice of the Listener." 
No doubt you'll find room for it in your 
next issue. My only criticism, outside of 
that, is of your proof reader . . . 

Other than that, I congratulate you. 
You've made a rapid stride toward perfec- 
tion. Keep it up — and the best of luck. 
—Mary E. Lauber, 119 West Abbottsford 
Avenue, Germantown, Philadelphia, Pa. 

• • • 

I have read the last two issues of your 
magazine. "Tuneful Topics" by Rudy 
Vallee, "Radio-Grins," and "Reviewing 
The Current Programs" appeal to me the 
most of your monthly features. More in- 
formal and "action" photographs of radio 
performers (like those you have in the 
Summer Number) will improve the maga- 
zine. O. L. Lee, San Francisco, Cali- 
fornia. 

• • • 

The last issue is very good, but I like 
to read more about the artists. Marie 
Thellaberger, 132 North Pearl Street, 
Covington, Ohio. 

• • • 

I have just received a copy of your very 
excellent radio magazine. It is quite the 
best thing of its kind I have ever seen. 
Len Hunt, News Editor of "Rhythm," 202 
High Holborn, W.C. 1, London, England. 



Today I received a copy of your maga- 
zine and I want to say that I like it very 
much. . . . Harold L. Roberts, 116 Ho- 
bart Street, Jackson, Michigan. 



I suggest that you run a sort of contest 
in your magazine in the near future, to 
note whether the subscribers are willing 
to pay ten cents more (twenty-five cents 
in all). If so, you could improve your 
magazine just that much more. There 
was a time when I paid thirty-five cents 
for Radio Digest and it was worth it 
Prices are going up and you ought to 
charge more also. Norman Richard, 3240 
Rochester Avenue, Detroit, Michigan. 



Radio Fan-Fare 

Time after time I have purchased the 
different radio magazines published in the 
East only to be disappointed. If you 
want western subscribers you must give 
western news. Mrs. Dorothy Clark, 1437 
Chestnut Street, San Francisco. 



Happening to write the following poem 
to David Ross in appreciation of his 
poetry and lovely voice reaching me way 
over here, thousands of miles away, I 
thought you might like to put it in your 
magazine. 

To David Ross 

On wings of music clear 
Through waves of atmosphere, 
A voice enchanting, bold, 
Dispenses poet's gold. 

Through clouds up in the sky 
O'er mountains steep and high, 
A poet's dreams well told 
Rings out your poet's gold. 

Your hour of poet's gold 
Brings memories of old 
To me, my golden share — 
The bounty of the air. 

The past is far and gone 
And life is nearly done; 
A heart that's growing cold 
Is warmed by poet's gold. 

Theodore Carmen, 919 Stone Street, Los 
Angeles, California. 



I like to read the VOL department in 
the finest radio magazine yet published, 
Radio Fan-Fare. 

I have read a lot of All-Star Orchestras 
as submitted by other readers of your 
magazine but just because some of them 
know the names of some of the players in 
those orchestras they like to tell the world 
about it. Here's my idea of what I call 
a real All-Star Orchestra. 

Piano Harry Sosnik 

Piano Johnny Johnson 

Banjo Harry Reser 

Drums Abe Lyman 

Bass Isham Jones 

Trombone Buddy Rodgers 

1st Trumpet Lebert Lombardo 

2nd Trumpet Arthur Weems 

1st Sax Rudy Weidoft 

2nd Sax „ Merle Johnson 

3rd Sax Clyde Doerr 

Director Ben Bernie 

Arranger Ted Weems 

Vocalists — Bing Crosby, Ruth Etting, Irene 
Taylor, Arthur Jarret, Rudy Vallee 

Why don't you give us the lowdown on 
some of the leading song writers? I'm 
sure the readers would be interested in 
reading about the boys who give us the 
tunes our favorite orchestras play. By the 
way, will some of you song writers write 
to me? Especially you amateur melody 
composers. 

Please give us the story of Isham Jones, 
will you? 

With best wishes to the best radio maga- 
zine, I remain, Norman Robinson, Calu- 
met, Michigan. 



October 



REVIEWING THE CURRENT PROGRAMS 

Continued 



ways worth while— and the Hummingbirds 
add a great deal to the program with 
their humming, incidental singing, instru- 
mental imitations, and clever arrange- 
ments. General Motors seems to think 
a lot of this vocal group. Besides being 
the Hummingbirds, they are the Night- 
ingales on the Buick program and the 
Snow Queens of the Frigidaire show. 

The Plug — You've already guessed that 
it's tied up with Husing's tales of cham- 
pionship performance. There's also a lot 
of chat about Oldsmobile being the Style 
Leader and about smart centers, smart 
people, and smart cars. All in all a 
pretty weak attempt to be sophisticated. 

Opinion — A good musical show bearing 
the almost inevitable burden of silly ad- 
vertising. The whole program would be 
greatly improved if they eliminated 80% 
of the blurbs, took the high hat off the 
other 20%, and got some personality and 
a little less technical perfection into the 
talks. As it stands, it's a rather chilly 
fifteen minutes. 



"LITTLE KNOWN FACTS ABOUT 
WELL KNOWN PEOPLE" 

(NBC-WEAF Sunday at 5:30 PM- 
EST) 

Cast — Dale Carnegie, Harold Sanford's 
Orchestra, John Holbrook 

Comment — An interesting program. 
Dale Carnegie sounds a bit like Ed Hill 
and his material is also human interest 
stuff. It's unfortunate, perhaps, that any- 
one who now talks over the air about peo- 
ple in a warm and friendly fashion is im- 
mediately compared to Mr. Hill, whether 
there is any conscious imitation or not. 
However, Mr. Carnegie's material is not 
enough like Mr. Hill's to cause a conflict. 
Harold Sanford's music is as pleasing as 
Mr. Carnegie's talks. 

The Plug — Sensible advertising well 
handled by John Holbrook. 

Opinion — An appealing, unpretentious 
show which will entertain you. It is a 
pleasure to recommend it. 



"THE GOLDENROD REVIEW" 

(CBS-WABC Friday at 8:30 PM- 
EST) 
Cast — Julius Tannen, Phil Spitalny's 
Orchestra, Ethel Pastor, the Goldenrod 
Singers, and Harry Von Zell 

Comment — When are the radio people 
going to learn that it's bad showmanship 
to give a program too much ballyhoo ? 
The more you promise, the more critical 
your audience. In "The Goldenrod Review" 
the announcer describes what's coming as 
the "fastest moving" variety show on the 
air. It turns out to be a conventional or- 
chestra-comedian-singer-chorus program. 
The announcer describes Julius Tannen as 
"the sharpest wit on the Main Stem." 



Mr. Tannen is, actually, a moderately 
amusing comedian who used to be a fa- 
vorite on the Keith circuit and in musical 
comedy, but who has never really clicked 
on the air. The announcer also claims 
too much for Mr. Spitalny, Ethel Pastor, 
and the Goldenrod Singers. Of all the 
members of the cast Mr. Spitalny and 
the chorus come closest to living up to 
the superlative. Miss Pastor, who is in 
the show only occasionally, has a voice 
almost as good as you're told it's going 
to be. Misrepresenting the talents of the 
artists not only hurts their reputation, 
but disappoints the audience. 

The Plug — Here again the claims seem 
too strong. And if Goldenrod Beer is as 
different from the advertising as the en- 
tertainment is from the ballyhoo — I'll take 
vanilla. 

Opinion — This would be a good pro- 
gram if the exaggeration were eliminated 
and if Mr. Tannen could bring the quality 
of his weaker sallies closer to his best 
brand of humor. Phil Spitalny and the 
singers will surely be enjoyed by most 
radio fans. 




DON ROSS 

(CBS-WABC Tuesday and Thursday 
at 2:30 PM-EST) 

Comment— This program, sponsored by 
Pontiac, is an experiment to determine 
whether it's smart to advertise automo- 
biles directly to the housewife by radio. 
The idea is to catch her off her guard, 
so to speak, with a romantic approach in 
the middle of the afternoon. Don Ross 
is using the vagabond stuff on the gals 
and telling them what a wonderful car 
the Pontiac is to vagabound around in. 
This writer has never cared much for 
shows in which the singer goes folksy and 
tries to wheedle and cajole the audience 
into doing something. And I'm a little 
tired of hearing anyone get cues for sales 
talks from song titles. Don Ross has a 
rich voice which should appeal to the 
women and it's too bad he can't just sing 
and let someone else sell the medicine. 



45 

Plug — It may be a big success in rural 
sections although I should think that even 
the farmers would be getting pretty sick 
of the synthetic down-country stuff by 
now. 

Opinion — Don Ross will probably make 
money for his sponsor, but I think he'd 
make more if he changed his act. 



TONY WONS 

(CBS-WABC Sunday at 10:45 AM 

and Monday and Thursday at 11:30 

AM-EST) 

Cast — Tony Wons, Peggy Keenan, San- 
dra Phillips, Andre Baruch 

Comment — Tony the Boy Wonser is the 
same old Tony, which means that millions 
of listeners will keep on thinking there's 
nobody like him. And other millions will 
agree, only they won't mean it the same 
way. (Which reminds me of the cheer 
Ring Lardner suggested for him : "Tony 

Wons, Tony twice, holy jumping 

") But it certainly is true that 

homespun philosophers, such as Tony and 
Edgar Guest, give enjoyment, encourage- 
ment, and courage to perfectly estimable 
people everywhere. I believe that 
Mr. Wons does what he tries to do well, 
although I don't see eye to eye with him 
when he stops right smack in the middle 
of a smear of philosophy, and whispers, 
"Say, you're listenin' to me, aren't you?" 
It gives too many anti-Wonsers a chance 
to talk back. 

The Peggy Keenan-Sandra Phillips 
piano team is one you'll want to hear, 
no matter how you feel about Tony. 

The Plug — It wouldn't be so bad if they 
left out the dramatized part ("Why John, 
that can't be our old car. It looks just 
like new\"). And say, Mr. Baruch, how's 
to relax a little? 

Opinion — Swell entertainment for 
Wonsers. Good double piano work. And 
a chance for those who do not crave 
Mons. Wons to get a lot of venom out of 
the system. 



"JACK ARMSTRONG— ALL AMER- 
ICAN BOY" 

(CBS-WABC Monday through Sat- 
urday at 5:30 PM-EST) 

Comment — The Rover Boys are back, 
only this time one of them is a girl. Why 
is one a girl? Because girls can eat 
Wheaties, too, and if girls want to get 
big and strong so they can bust guys in 
the snoot when guys get frisky, why then 
girls had better eat Wheaties so they'll 
get big and strong, etc. I doubt if the 
original Rover Boys would seem so com- 
pletely impossible to me now as Jack Arm- 
strong and his little-friends do. Jack and 
Betty and Billy talk as no boy or girl 
talks. At least, none I know. The con- 
versation is all carried on in clipped sen- 
tences delivered in a staccato manner : 
"Can't be done. Too risky. Tell you 
what. Guard the door. Don't show your- 
self. Yell if he comes. What? No. 
Won't work. Better guard the door." 
Every incident is supposed to offer a big 



46 

thrill, with Jack, the Master Mind, and 
his two unimaginative but plucky little 
friends outwitting the big bad bully and 
X13 and his "desperate gang of interna- 
tional criminals." 

The Plug — If you eat Wheaties you'll 
be like Jack Armstrong — you'll make the 
football team — you'll catch the interna- 
tional criminals who are trying to steal 
the secret of your crash-proof airplane— 
you'll be able to fight for your honor 
when you get to be a big girl. But to 
find out all the amazing things you will be 
able to do you must listen to Jack Arm- 
strong — and is it worth it? 

Opinion — The idea of presenting tales 
for tots that attempt to work the wee ones 
into a lather of excitement seems foolish 
and short-sighted. In the first place, it 
arouses the antagonism of parents, as has 
been proved by the letters that have 
flooded the studios objecting to thrillers. 
Then, too, if the interest of the kiddies is 
to be held, each episode has to be more 
exciting than the one before, and pretty 
soon the hard-pressed script writers have 
to resort to stuff that has a definitely bad 
effect on youngsters. And some of the 
attempts to create excitement become so 
far fetched that even the gullible adoles- 
cents are no longer taken in. 
• • • 

"RED DAVIS" 

(NBC-WJZ Monday, Wednesday, 
and Friday at 8:45 PM-EST begin- 
ning Sept. 25th) 
Cast — Jack Roseleigh, Curtin Arnall, 
Ethel Blume, Marion Barney 

Comment — The Davis family (father, 



mother, Red, and a kid sister) is another 
one of those "typical American families" 
(which are usually so unlike any other 
American family you ever heard of). The 
Davises, however, 'are pretty believable 
home folks. The sketches are frequently 
amusing, and, even if the writing and 
acting are a trifle exaggerated, we should 
still be grateful for the program because 
it is not filled with the usual phony 
radio "thrills." 

The Plug — Pretty reasonable advertis- 
ing, comparatively. The Beech-Nut peo- 
ple deserve so much credit for resisting 
the temptation to put on a synthetic 
thriller that I hope the show greatly in- 
creases the sales of their products. 

Opinion — While "Red Davis" is pretty 
conventional stuff, with no more humor 
than the average comic strip, it should be 
successful. Certainly Red is much more 
of an All American boy than Jack Arm- 
strong is. And, in my naive way, I still 
believe that people prefer naturalness to 
the usual affectations of the child radio 
hero. (It may interest you to know that 
"Red Davis" is the same story that had 
a short sustaining run over the NBC 
about a year ago. It was called "Red 
Adams" then. This is the first time that 
an abandoned sustaining script has been 
dusted off and sold to a sponsor.) 

THE PERSONAL TOUCH 

(Continued) 
remembered. A girl who was in that show 
had once told me something about a feud 
between Kate and one of the other mem- 
bers of the cast. The girl said the affair 




DISCARD YOUR AERIAL 

New Scientific $1.00 Invention 

DOES AWAY WITH AERIAL 

ENTIRELY 

Just place an F & H Capacity Aerial Eliminator within your set — forget outdoor aerial trou- 
bles — move your set freely, anywhere. 

BETTER TONE AND DISTANCE GUARANTEED 

Sensitivity, selectivity, tone and volume improved. After tests, the P & H Capacity Aerial 
Eliminator was chosen by the U. S. Government for use in Naval Hospital. 

WE PREDICT THIS TYPE OF AERIAL 
WILL BE USED PRACTICALLY ENTIRELY 
IN THE FUTURE. 

EACH TESTED ON ACTUAL 
1127-MILE RECEPTION 

Connected by anyone without tools in a moment. No 
light socket connection; no current used. Fully concealed 
(size iy 2 " x four inches). 

Satisfied Users Throughout The 
World 

Cape Town. S. Africa — Received Capacity Aerial Elimi- 
nator and find it a very remarkable instrument. Our 
nearest station 1000 miles away comes in with full loud- 
sneaker volume. I have also listened on my loud speaker 
to six overseas stations 6000 miles away, among them be- 
ing London, Finland, etc. Kindly send us 72 more 
F. & H. Capacity Aerial Eliminators. Signed: Copper 
Slingsby Company. 

Schenectady, N. Y. — I take pleasure in expressing my 
real satisfaction with the Capacity Aerial Eliminator. I 
can get with loud speaker-volume, KFI, Los Angeles, 
3000 miles away. It is not only satisfactory — It is 
wonderful. Signed: Robert Woolley. 

F. & H. RADIO LABORATORIES 
Dept. 33 Fargo, N. Dakota 



TRY ONE 5 DAYS AT OUR 
RISK! SEND NO MONEY 

Mail coupon at once — pay postman $1.00 plus few pennies 
postage upon delivery: if not entirely satisfied return in 
5 days and your $1.00 will be refunded without question, 
or sent postpaid, if you remit personal check, M-0 or 
dollar-bill. 

JUST MAIL THIS COUPON * 

F. & H. RADIO LABORATORIES, 

Dept. 33, Fargo, N. D. j 

Send F. & H. Capacity Aerial. Will pay postman l 

$1 plus few cents postage. If not pleased will return I 

within 5 days for $1 refund. j 

Check here if sending $1 with order — thus i 

saving postage cost — same refund guarantee. Check I 

here if interested in dealer's proposition I 



| NAME 


1 


ADDRESS " 


TOWN 


STATE . 





Radio Fan-Fare 

had made Kate miserable night after night. 
I took it the way you take a lot of other 
chatter you hear on Broadway— with a 
grain of salt. But this story was true— so 
true that the mere mention of that show, 
years later, can change Kate Smith's en- 
tire mood in a moment. 



\1/"ALKING along Broadway the other 
v ™ evening, I dropped in at The Silver 
Dollar to get some clams. (They sell you 
a cocktail with five clams* for ten cents.) 
And who should I run into at the clam 
counter by Lillian Emerson Harts and her 
husband. Lillian is the society gal who 
has been appearing in Broadway shows the 
past two years. 

"What are you doing here?" I asked. 

"Just came from a Maxwell House 
broadcast," said Lillian. And so it de- 
veloped that one of my very good friends 
is a radio performer and I didn't even know 
it. She sings in the Maxwell House 
chorus. Good acress, Lillian, with a very 
nice singing voice, and when television 
comes along . . . well, take a look at her 
photograph. 

o • • 

TEON BELASCO was the victim of a 
-*-' perfect practical joke the other day. It 
was framed by Kay Binford, Leon's guitar- 
ist, and Kay told me about it in a restau- 
rant a few nights ago. 

The idea of the thing was a fake broad- 
cast, and it was entered into not only by 
the lads in the band, but by two Columbia 
Broadcasting officials. At ten o'clock the 
orchestra was playing as usual on the roof 
of the St. Moritz Hotel, when Leon was 
suddenly called to the phone. 

"Hello, Leon? This is Jim, at Columbia. 
A program that was supposed to go on 
the air at ten-thirty has just been called off 
and we've got to have you to fill in for 
fifteen minutes, so get all set and I'll send 
a man right over." 

Click went the receiver, and Leon was 
left with nothing to do but get set. Be- 
tween dance numbers he made up a routine 
of selections and gave special instructions 
to the men in the band. The radio man 
arrived and got the microphone hooked up. 
At eleven, Leon, a trifle nervous and ex- 
cited because he had been so rushed, 
mounted the platform and stood anxiously 
waiting for the signal. The sound man 
nodded, and Leon waved his baton. To 
his amazement the entire band came in 
right in the middle of his upbeat, but he 
followed them and they went through their 
theme song. On the last note the entire 
brass section was flat. Leon blinked his 
eyes, glared at the men, but carried on. 
There was nothing else he could do. The 
announcer said, 

"Leon Belasco and his masters of har- 
mony will now play 'Lazy Bones' — as only 
they can play it." 

"No, no," Leon whispered, making fran- 
tic gestures. "Not Lazy Bones.' We will 
play 'Stormy Weather'." 

The announcer was calmly looking up 
at the ceiling and didn't hear him. With a 
look of desperation Leon waved his arms, 
and the band started playing "Look What 
I've Got." Leon couldn't believe his ears, 
and his jaw dropped down on his chest. On 
the second chorus there was a sudden move- 
ment in the orchestra, and Leon's eyes al- 
most popped out. 



October 

"Look what I've got, look what you've 
got" went the music, and Leon looked. The 
guitar player had a clarinet; the pianist 
was blowing a saxophone; the bass violin- 
ist was picking a mandolin ; the first trum- 
pet player was poised expectantly over the 
xylophone; and the drummer was puffing 
happily on a harmonica. Everybody was 
perfectly serious. Leon gestured desperately 
at the announcer. He was still looking at 
the ceiling. It was more than anybody 
could stand. 

"Say, you idiots," Leon howled. "What 
is this anyhow? Are you crazy?" 

And without a word every man in the 
orchestra dropped his instrument. Leon's 
face was worth going miles to see. 

"Don't raise your voice at me that way," 
said the bass violinist. "Who do you think 
you are, anyway?" 

And with that he picked up his instru- 
ment and stalked off the platform — followed 
by the entire orchestra. 

Leon looked over at the announcer, and 
that gentleman was doubled up on the floor. 
Then Leon got it, and what he said was a 
classic of descriptive adjectives. 

When you run into Mr. Belasco now, all 
you have to do to set him off is to whistle 
the first few bars of "Look What I've Got." 

THEY WERE CAGA 
EVEN THEN 

(Continued) 
played a town in which they had friends, 
they would be driven to a swanky hotel, 
wait for a moment in the lobby, and then 
sneak out to a cheaper one ! 

Playing the Palace Theatre for the first 
time ! They were on the bill for one week, 
and made such a success that the manager 
said he'd hold them over if they changed 
their routine. In those days Burns and 
Allen hardly dared change a line of their 
act for fear of ruining something that they 
knew was successful. So they decided that, 
rather than stay over and take a chance 
of spoiling their excellent record, they'd 
turn down the extra week and leave. How- 
ever, Georgie Jessel, who had great faith 
in the ability of Burns and Allen, called 
up the Keith office, said he was George 
Burns, and okayed the second week. So 
Georgie and Gracie had to change cheir 
act — and the new one was a wow. 

The time Burns and Allen followed Ethel 
Barrymore in the "Twelve Pound Look," 
and everyone in the audience flocked to see 
Ethel. Burns and Allen were moved from 
second after intermission to number two 
on the bill — a humiliating thing! They 
used to arrive at' the theatre early and 
leave late — to avoid meeting anybody. 

Breaking in on the air. Eddie Cantor 
asked Gracie to go on with him, and 
George agreed to split the act. Gracie had 
everybody in stitches, including Eddie and 
the orchestra. Ten days later Burns and 
Allen made their debut with Rudy Vallee, 
and shortly after that were signed for 
Robert Burns Panatela. George and Gracie 
thought names they used, such as Clap- 
• saddle and Dittenfest, would be undupli- 
cated, and therefore safe to use on the air. 
But they heard from both the Dittenfests 
of Virginia and the Clapsaddles of Penn- 
sylvania. George wrote to the Dittenfests 
and told them to get in touch with the 
Clapsaddles, possibly to form a club! 

Burns and Allen making "International 
House" — in Hollywood during the earth- 



47 



quake! George started to run into' an 
archway on the set, and Gracie ran into 
what she thought was an elevator. George 
dashed back to get Gracie and discovered 
her still standing in the movie prop ele- 
vator. At least, she would have died in 
character. 

Gracie going into Macy's to buy a roll- 
ing pin for her cook. The sales girls all 
recognized her and began to stare and 
whisper, which got Gracie so fussed that 
she was ashamed to admit she'd come to 
buy a rolling pin. (She thought it sounded 
silly.) So she bought a table — which she 
didn't need at all! 

Burns and Allen, vacationing at Palm 
Springs. George got on a bicycle and tried 
to show his wife what a big outdoor man 
he was. Gracie got on another bicycle and 
rode down a hill with her feet on the han- 
dle bars — scaring George almost to^ death ! 

George and Gracie being stopped by a 
motorcycle cop the other day in Central 
Park. "Pull over to the curb, you," the 
cop bellowed. "What do you think you're 
doing?" "Well," began Gracie, in spite of 
George's warning look, "it was this way. 
I saw you riding behind us sort of fast, 
so I thought you wanted to race, and I 
didn't want to spoil your fun, so I raced." 
George holding his breath. "Good Lord, 
what a story!" said the cop. "You sound 
like Gracie Allen." Gracie giggled. "No 
wonder," she chirped, "I am Gracie Allen." 
She proved it, the cop laughed, shook hands 
and rode off. As Gracie stepped on the 
gas, George patted her on the shoulder, 
shook his head and said, "Boy, what a life ! 
Never a dull moment." 

POPULAR TUNES 

(Continued) 
Chicago, but conditions were almost as 
bad there and the venture had a short 
life. 

Some of the music was too good for 
any depression to kill, however, and "Hey 
Young Feller" became a nationwide hit. 
"Don't Blame Me," the really outstanding 
song of the show, was not released for 
general consumption until recently, al- 
though I hoped Robbins would release it 
earlier. 

Ever since Katherine Perry, a clever 
colored girl, introduced the song on one 
of our Thursday night broadcasts recently 
it has been used by the best bands and 
vocalists. It may well become a sweep- 
ing hit, for it has a good melody and 
Dorothy Fields has done an excellent job 
with the lyrics. 

"MISSISSIPPI BASIN" 

By Andy Razaf and Reg Foresythe. 

Published by Joe Davis, Inc. 

Here is another "Blue Prelude," except 
that this time the scene is Dixie. Andy 
Razaf, the talented colored boy who wrote 
"S'posin' " and "My Fate Is In Your 
Hands," and who has shown real talent 
in lyric writing, has now given us an un- 
usually good "Song Of The Bayou" type 
of melody and lyric. 

He and his collaborator have kept in 
mind the limitations of the average dance 
orchestra vocalist and I am grateful that 
they have put in no exceptionally low or 
high notes. I thank them, too, for the 
beautiful middle part of the chorus. 

Diminutive Joe Davis, the publisher, 
used to manage Rudy Wiedoeft. Joe ar- 







WINDS 
LIKE A 
WATCH 

Asky our dealer 
to show you a 
Nozac* (no sack) - 
Demand both 1 
and 2 in the foun- 
tain pen you buy. 
Compare the 
Nozac with any 
other Backless pen . 
It alone provides 
quick, easy filling by 
positive mechanical 
action and at a glance 
reveals the ink supply. 
$5.00 and more. Other 
Conklins $2.75, S3. 50 and 
more. Pencils §1.00 and up. 

The Conklin Pen Co. 

Chicago Toledo San Francisco 

♦Proved by over 2 years of general public use. 

Conklin 

NOZAC 

SATISFACTION GUARANTEED 



ranged for me to meet Rudy in 1921 when 
I first came to New York. I've never 
forgotten Joe's courtesy and I hope he 
has all the good luck in the world with 
this song. 

"I MAY BE DANCING WITH 

SOMEBODY ELSE" 

By Phil Kornheiser. Published by 

Miller Music, Inc. 

Phil has recently become one of the 
chief executives of Miller Music and this 
song is his first job for them. For more 
than 20 years Phil has been one of the 
most prominent creators of popular songs 
and I wish him great success with his 
latest. It is extremely tuneful and lends 
itself easily to a bright fox trot tempo. 
I enjoy singing it as one of our opening 
numbers. 

"IT MIGHT HAVE BEEN A DIFFER- 
ENT STORY" 
By Ray Klages, Jimmy Monaco, and 

Jack Meskill. Published by Don- 
aldson, Douglas & Gumble, Inc. 

Another one of those depressing songs. 
But Tin Pan Alley wouldn't be itself 
without its preponderance of Dixie-Mam- 
my songs and its unrequited love stories. 

When two old masters like Ray and 
Jimmy team with a comparative new- 
comer like Jack, something unusual is 
bound to happen, and for the kind of 
song it is, they wrote a good one. Dance 
bands will find the melody easy and 
enjoyable to play. For the sake of good 
old Mose Gumble, of the publishing com- 
pany, I sincerely hope the song surpasses 
his fondest expectations. 



48 
FOR THE LOVE OF MIKE 

(Continued) 

his hands together — "that fits in more or 
less with what I had in mind. We were 
just listening to your program over in Stu- 
dio H, and it occurred to me that it might 
be a good idea to make a substitution for 
one of you — Miss Allen. May I be per- 
fectly frank?" 

Fay raised her eyebrows inquiringly. 
"Of course." 

"Well, Miss Allen, I don't think you've 
got a voice suited to the kind of enter- 
tainment we have in mind. I really think 
we need a singer with a little more train- 
ing for your end of the program. You 
see — " 

Tod exploded. "More training! How 
do you get that way? Fay here's one of 
the finest little natural born singers that 
ever faced the mike. And even if she 
hasn't gone the rounds of a half dozen 
conservatories of music, she can teach a 
lot of concert stars technique, control, 
and expression. And she handles that uke 
of her's like Kreisler does his Strad. 
Listen — I'm willing enough to go on any 
program you want. But as far as Sweet- 
hearts of the Air is concerned you could- 
n't substitute Lily Pons for Fay." 

I'M INCLINED to agree with Wal- 
lace," Harris interrupted. "I rather 
like Miss Allen's voice. It has a charm- 
ing quality. And also, Carruthers, we 
must bear in mind that the sweetheart 
angle is better exemplified in the female 
voice. I think what we should do is re- 



tain Miss Allen, and ask Mr. Wallace if 
he is willing to step aside. You were 
frank before, Carruthers, so I'm sure I'll 
be pardoned for expressing my candid 
opinion. You have a technique, Wallace, 
a sort of player piano technique — no 
offense meant, you understand — which 
hardly fits in with the program we are 
planning. And your voice is not quite 
what we should like to have. I really 
think—" 

"I for one don't care what you think," 
Fay interrupted. "And while everybody's 
being so frank I don't mind telling you 
that as a judge of music you may be a 
good perfume manufacturer. If it wasn't 
for him plugging away and trying to in- 
ject something really high class in radio 
programs, Tod'd be in Europe right now 
on the concert stage. And that goes for 
his voice as well as his piano. Tod can 
do anything he wants. I won't stand in his 
way. But as far as I'm concerned, I 
wouldn't play Sweethearts of the Air with 
Lawrence Tibbett. So there!" 

Carruthers and Harris exchanged 
puzzled looks. Peabody expressed his be- 
wilderment — 

"But Miss Allen— Mr. Wallace. We 
were banking on at least one of you. And 
we had planned to start rehearsals this 
week. We wanted to open in Paris next 
month — " 

"Paris !" — both Fay and Tod at once. 

"Why, yes — you see, we want to give a 
Parisian flavor to our Sweetheart per- 
fume. So we were going to make our first 
broadcast from gay Paree by means of 
short-waves with a nationwide long-wave 



THE HEART OF NEW YORK 




TO STAY AT THE LINCOLN 
. . . IS A HAPPY REMEMBRANCE 

-•I An interesting cosmopolitan atmos- 
I phere . . Cheerful Rooms . . Pleasant 
Service . . Fine Restaurant . . Moder- 
ately Priced . . Around the corner 
are theatres, clubs and glamorous 
Times Square . . 

Conveniently accessible to raihoad 
terminals, steamship piers, the busi- 
ness and shopping centers . . 

"A Perfect Hotel for The Visitor" 

ROOM with PRIVATE BATH, 
RADIO and SERVIDOR 



Special suites and sample 

rooms for visiting sales 

representatives. 



$0.50 single 
£ per day 



$0-50 double 

per day 



Special weekly and monthly rates. 



HOTEL LINCOLN 

JOHN T. WEST, Manager 

44th io 45ih Sis.— 8th Ave.— New York 

UNDER NEW MANAGEMENT "A RELIANCE HOTEL" 



Radio Fan-Fare 

hookup over here. Now if you two won't 
sing alone — won't you reconsider the 
possibility of teaming up again? You can 
name your own figure. We bow to your 
superior knowledge of music. We are 
trying to do exactly what you have been 
trying to do — put something really good 
on the air." 

Fay searched her pocketbook for lip- 
stick. Tod took a deep breath. 

"We'll have to think it over," he said. 

"We'll get in touch with you tomorrow," 
Fay added. 

Carruthers and Harris' nodded, said 
goodbye, and left. 

AS THE door closed behind them, Mr. 
-^*- Harris smiled. "Very nice work, Bill. 
I think we can pat ourselves on the back. 
Excellent psychology." 

Carruthers agreed. "But I think we'd 
better share the credit with the control 
operator who forgot to cut Studio K off 
from Studio H when they went off the 
air. Which reminds me that we might 
be able to see how things are working 
out . . ." 

The two men stopped before the portals 
of Studio H. As they opened the inner 
door, they turned and grinned at each 
other complacently. From the speaker 
behind the cupids came the sound of 
music — the soft twang of a uke, a racing 
treble tremolo, and two voices in close 
harmony — 

Hand in hand — heart in- heart . . . 

SHORT-WAVE FAN-FARE 

(Continued) 
picked up almost altogether by the down 
lead. A leadin which will not pick up 
the noise (nor a radio signal either) is ac- 
cordingly designed — the idea being that 
such disturbances are not powerful enough 
to reach way up to the aerial. This may 
be so for some disturbances, but certainly 
does not hold for ignition interference 
from passing cars. Our own listening post 
is located some four hundred feet from a 
main highway, and when the receiver is 
tuned to maximum sensitivity in the neigh- 
borhood of 20 meters (where this inter- 
ference is at its worst) autos can be de- 
tected well over a quarter of a mile away. 
Obviously, a noise reduction leadin would 
do us no good at all — and, as a matter of 
fact, would only reduce signal strength. 
A noise reduction leadin will be effective 
only when the down lead passes through a 
noise area which is greatly attenuated by 
the time it reaches the antenna. The 
prevalence of such conditions is, as we 
have suggested, subject to argument. In 
the average installation, the short-wave 
fan should not condemn the equipment if 
it fails to reduce the effects of artificial 
static to the expected degree. 

THE LINGUIST AT DJA 

1~"\JA, broadcasting daily from Zeesen, 
*^* Germany, on 31.3 meters, puts over an 
excellent program of music and news 
broadcasts. Announcements are made in ' 
French, Spanish, English, and German. 
The French and Spanish announcements 
are couched in typical high school tech- 
nique — presumably so, anyway, because we 
can understand them. We take it the Eng- 
lish announcements are of the same variety, 
because we can't understand them. The 
German is excellent. 



October 



49 



ODDS FROM THE ENDS OF THE EARTH 



"DECENTLY, while tuning the short- 
■*-*■ wave bands, I came upon a program 
of current Broadway dance music. The 
reception was of almost perfect fidelity 
and of almost local volume. Among the 
tunes I enjoyed were : "I Cover The 
Waterfront," "A Night In June," "Maybe 
I Love You Too Much," and others 
familiar to the American listener. The 
orchestra, with its fast, novel, and scin- 
tillating tempo, was not a bit hard to 
listen to. I could hardly believe I wasn't 
listening to a local broadcast until I 
heard the accented announcement : "Hello, 
radio friends, this is Roy Fox and the 
boys playing for you from the Kit Kat 
Restaurant, London, over the British Em- 
pire Short-Wave Station, at Daventry." 

• • • 

TF WE think our reception is marred 
*- by too many program alterations, we 
should glance for consolation at similar 
conditions across the seas. One station, 
"Radio Paris" of the French capital, 
makes a point of announcing details of 
its broadcasts three times daily. Three 
times a day, they believe, is often enough 
to keep the public informed of changes 
in the transmitting schedule ! Most for- 
eign stations are government owned, of 
course, and there are no enormous 
salaries to lure the stars. Thus the pro- 
gram director faces such frequent ob- 
stacles as artists refusing to take part 
in a scheduled broadcast unless they re- 
ceive additional rewards, authors holding 
out because they think their rights have 
been infringed upon, the occurrence of un- 
expected and conflicting engagements 
more important to the talent's time, etc. 
The station manager considers it fortu- 
nate that he has the phonograph always 
by his side. 

• • • 
"DEBELLIOUS natives in parts of 
-*-^- Africa are being greeted with a new 



kind of radio reception — in place of 
bombs! Government airplanes have been 
equipped with microphones, powerful am- 
plifiers, and loud speakers so that warn- 
ings, in the natives' own languages, may 
be addressed to them. The booming 
voices from the sky leave the tribesmen 
awestruck, and this ingenious device has 
often made it unnecessary to bomb a 
village. 

• • • 

WCAU, the modern 50kw. transmitter 
located outside of Philadelphia, is 
greatly enjoyed by European radio fans. 
In fact, during the winter months, WCAU 
is heard better than their short-wave sta- 
tion, W3XAU. While reception fades 
and is distorted on the low waves, the 
same program is heard clearly on 1170 
keys. The listeners across the Atlantic 
are extremely well pleased with our 
"snappy" programs, as they refer to them, 
and many overseas set owners will stay 
up until the wee small hours of their 
morning to hear a favorite program from 
the land of the free — at least the land of 
free dialing, for in Europe listeners are 
taxed every time they use their radio re- 
ceivers. 

• • • 

"DADIO Station KGU, Honolulu, was 
-*-^- forced to change its transmitting 
frequency because KOIN, Portland, Ore- 
gon, zvith no more power, was received in 
sections of the Islands better than the 
home station! KOIN is over 2,000 miles 
from Hawaii and operates on the same 
channel as did KGU. High mountains, 
which shield the Hawaiian transmitter's 
radiations from parts of the Territory, 
get the blame for this phenomenon. When 
the natives tuned in American jazz in- 
stead of Hawaiian guitars, it was time 
for KGU to make a change ! 

—GEORGE LILLEY 



SLIPPING AND GRIPPING 

(Continued) 
should be heard. And Singing Strings, with 
Millicent Russell and Anton Young, is pleas- 
ant entertainment . . . Ray Collins and 
Stephen Fox are good actors. Columbia 
has just started to build Stephen up in a 
big way and is referring to him as "the 
outstanding male actor in radio." Ever 
generous, we forgive the tautology and 
wish Stephen luck. The movies are after 
him and we hope he "makes good." Radio's 
loss is radio's loss, we always say . . . The 
"Betty Boop Frolics" is a mad skit, with 
Betty (Bonnie Poe) sounding like a road 
show of Jeannie Lang, and Ferdinand Frog 
giving imitations of Poley McClintock But 
still we like it. Alois Havrilla is the an- 
nouncer and he's one of the best in the 
business, except when he puts on the Ritz 
. . . That old Kentucky colonel, Bradley 
Kincaid, who's known as the Cumberland 
mountain minstrel and broadcasts from 
Schenectady, is one of the few people we 
can bear listening to when we get up out 
of the wrong side of the bed . . . Another 
is Cheerio, whose morning half-hours must 
bring about as much happiness to people 
as any programs on the air . . . "Today's 



Children" with Irna Phillips, Walter 
Wicker, Bess Johnson, Lucy Gilman, 
Freddy Van, and Jean McGregor is a well 
acted, wholesome program which might be 
made a little more exciting without over- 
stimulating the young . . . "The Optimistic 
Mrs. Jones" with George Frame Brown 
(formerly Matt Tompkins, mayor of 
Tompkins Corners) offers a couple of 
amusing characterizations, and some stuff 
which could be stepped up to first class 
entertainment . . . Clara, Lu 'n' Em are 
starting their fourth year on the air and 
they're just as amusing and worth listening 
to as ever. But the advertising is cer- 
tainly written on the assumption that the 
listeners are half-wits. It goes in strong 
for soft soaping the audience, but, consid- 
ering that the sponsor is Super Suds, per- 
haps that's the most appropriate kind of 
plug, after all. , . . Phil Ohman and Victor 
Arden — there's a great piano team, folks 
. . . Ann Elstner — gosh, we wouldn't want 
to forget her because she's one of the finest 
actresses in radio. Too bad her Hillbilly 
Heart Throbs program, with Frank Lu- 
ther's amusing trio, was discontinued. It 
was one of the best shows on the air. You 
can hear Ann now in Mountain Music and 
in Miss Lilla. —TUNA 



BIG PRIZE CONTEST 

(Continued) 

my stubbornness was foolish. For a 
month my eyes have ached badly. I have 
had to go to an oculist twice and get a 
new set of glasses. It will cost about 
twenty-five dollars for eye trouble. I al- 
ready had a watch and I've decided that 
peanuts aren't very good for one any- 
way. And why spend eighteen hours on 
words, and punish your eyes and nerves 
and pocketbook when you can buy a bag 
for a nickel. What saps we are ! 

I write this as a friendly warning 
against suits for nervous breakdowns, loss 
of eyesight, and loss of earnings by some 
members of the family as a result of your 
contest. 

Now consider some statistics of the 
contest held by the company warned 
against lawsuits : There were twelve 
prizes totalling $250, first prize $100. 
The rules were broadcast only twice. 
The contest lasted only ten days. 
But more than a hundred thousand 
people sent in lists and some thirty 
thousand of the lists exceeded a thou- 
sand words. The winning list had 
twenty-six thousand. So, multiplying 
the probable number of hours of 
work per list by the number of con- 
testants, we get more than one 
million hours of work for a total of 
$250 cash — less than one-quarter of 
one-tenth of one cent per hour. How 
a Chinese coolie would laugh if he 
knew ! 

WHEN such contests were new it 
was believed advertisers would 
benefit because contestants would say 
the name of the product over and 
over as they thought of words. Ac- 
tually, contestants dissect the trade 
name into letters, list them alphabeti- 
cally, and never think of the name 
again as a whole until, in a greatly 
befuddled and unretentive mental condi- 
tion, they write it on the envelope that 
is to hold their entry. Unless, there- 
fore, they have to buy the product to 
enter, the advertiser probably loses 
money because now there are so many 
big word marathons that no single one 
makes much impression even when it is 
going on. 

But the contests do help paper and 
pencil manufacturers, alienists, ocu- 
lists and psychiatrists. Also the tele- 
phone and telegraph companies. Often 
those who finally deliver themselves 
of a list of a few hundred words (out 
of a possible 35,000) wire or phone, at 
a cost of from one to five dollars, to 
plead with the judges to cross out a 
word that was put in by mistake, or 
to put in a word that has just been 
thought of, or not to disqualify en- 
tries that are late, "because the post- 
man forgot to pick them up." 

What's more, publishers of encyclo- 
pedias, dictionaries, glossaries and 
other reference works have been re- 
freshed bv a mild flutter in their bus- 



50 

iness lately. Such books available in 
public places are quickly mutilated 
or stolen by contestants, or borrowed 
and never returned. Those who fail 
to lay even a gentle hand on free 
copies have actually been discovered 
buying their own. Many a hoarded 
dollar left the mattress when the New 
York Public Libraries were com- 
pelled, because of plunder and pillage, 
to remove from their shelves those 
books that would be of help in cur- 
rent contests. 

WE may dismiss the big word con- 
test by saying that it is becom- 
ing far less enticing to the millions 
of people who have made what they 
consider supreme attempts without 
ever winning. There does seem, how- 
ever, to be a long and incandescent 
future for the mammoth slogan con- 
test and for the super-stupendous ed- 
ucational contest. No mere lull in 
bad times is going to stop the folks 
from toying with possibilities for get- 
ting rich quick. And certainly no 
such mild antidote as common sense 
will ever convince them that they are 
not all potential writers of snappy ad- 
vertising copy. 

The person who is painstaking and 
intelligent, therefore, is almost cer- 
tain to have his entry among the one 
or two per cent that reach the finals. 
He will then be in competition, of 
course, with the professional contest- 
ants, who are increasing rapidly. They 
spend many days on each contest, 
send in many entries, and go to elab- 
orate lengths to have the entries 
different in wording, handwriting, 
signature and geographical origin. 
This they do by having correspond- 
ents in many parts of the country. 
The belief persists, rather without 
foundation I think, that sponsors of 
contests spread the winners thickest 
where their products need promotion 
most. Unquestionably this used to be 
the practice, on the theory that if a 
winner was picked in Dubuque all 
the unsuccessful entrants for miles 
around would think they had almost 
won. 

SOME of the slogan and letter con- 
tests have attracted more than 
two million entries. About eighty or 
ninety per cent are eliminated by the 
judges with no more than a glance, 
because some contest rule is broken. 
It has been learned that people who 
can't follow rules don't write very 
good answers. For even in contests 
that cost a dollar to enter most of the 
entries are unbelievably bad. 

The comparatively few papers that 
remain after the first examination are 
read more carefully until there are 
left only a few more than the total 
number of prizes. These papers are 
then turned over to the "official" 



judges, usually minor celebrities, 
whose glamor and prestige lend ele- 
gance and dignity to the contest. If 
their critical opinions are not always 
worth all they are paid for them, the 
best entries still win, because men 
from the advertising agency are 
standing ever ready to guide an ex- 
pert's erring judgment back to the 
opinion he is supposed to reach. 

The names of the major winners 
once decided upon, the advertising 
boys start the check-up to see 
whether the winners are "worthy." 
Standards vary with contests. Here 
is one an advertising man told me: 
"We've got to be sure none of them 
are Niggers, or hunks, or anything 
like that." 

It is distressing to have to report 
that contestants are even more sus- 
picious of advertisers (and with less 
cause, as I shall presently show) than 
are advertisers of contestants. Nat- 
urally it is difficult for the man who 
has spent days on his entry and wins 
no prize to avoid harsh thoughts. Es- 
pecially if the winning answers are 
made public is he able to convince 
himself that his differed from them 
only by a word or two and that his 
words actually were better. Any Big 
Prize Contest leaves in its wake a 
heavy cloud of active ill will, or at 
least the tolerant assumption that the 
contest was crooked. Some outraged 
contestants actually sue, presenting 
evidence to prove that the winners 
were picked out of a hat. Most of 
the losers, however, just say to them- 
selves, "Sure it's a racket, but what 
of it? Somebody wins, and if I go 
into enough of them maybe some day 
I'll get a break." 

IT should be emphasized that a 
heavy majority of Big Prize Con- 
tests are entirely on the level ; the 
sponsors and their advertising agents 
go to much trouble and expense to 
make the judging fair. 

And v take our word for it, attempts 
at fraud among contestants are com- 
mon. In fact, they are so frequent 
and so patent that one begins to won- 
der if one's fellow man, given a choice, 
is really honest, as the good books 
say. In one of the largest contests 
ever held there were hundreds of 
thousands of duplicate entries, all of 
poor quality, and even many hun- 
dreds run off on multigraph or print- 
ing press. Parents filled out entries 
and gave their ages as twelve to four- 
teen in order to get the special con- 
sideration given to children. Most of 
these cheats believed that the contest 
was dishonest or would be judged 
haphazardly. They decided, accord- 
ingly, to increase the chances in their 
favor. Even the final judges received 
scores of letters, a few threatening, 
but most of them suggesting a split of 
the prize money. 



Radio Fan-Fare 

Many contestants try to be, or just 
are, "different." Some write their 
entries in verse, and what verse ! Us- 
ually, too, these lyricists write: 
"Please note, this is a poem." Some 
fill the paper with their life story, or 
a plea for help in their present mis- 
fortunes. There are those who ridi- 
cule the contests or write perfectly 
irrelevant wisecracks and sign names 
like Franklin Roosevelt, Gandhi, or 
Cleopatra. (This often happens in 
the pay-as-you-enter contests.) There 
are diatribes against the product ad- 
vertised, the Government, capitalism 
and what not. Oddly enough, there 
are almost no papers covered with, 
obscenity — and I confess I don't know 
why after seeing all the other things 
entrants have thought of to do. 

If there is a rule that a certain con- 
test blank must be used you may be 
sure that thousands of people will say 
to themselves, "Well, now, they don't 
really mean that. If I make my entry 
unusual enough they'll surely give it 
special consideration." All kinds of 
whimsies that take days and even 
weeks to make are sent in : a beautiful 
silk patchwork quilt with embroidered 
words and pictures; tricky electric 
displays; large books bound in leather 
with professional art work inside; a 
volume bound in velvet with a gold 
cloth bookmark tipped with ermine; 
wagons, automobiles and airplanes 
with answers lettered on the sides; 
and hundreds of less ambitious at- 
tempts to be "different." 

In most of such entries the quality 
of the answers is low indeed; almost 
always simple words are misspelled. 
A newspaper ran a contest in which 
entrants were supposed to assemble 
pieces of photographs of the Presi- 
dents as published by the paper daily. 
One man sent in as his entry a model 
in wood of the White House, large 
enough to fill a small bedroom. He 
neglected to include pictures of the 
Presidents. He received nothing but 
the silent maledictions of the contest 
manager who had already been sent 
over a carload of similar handicraft. 

So America's Prize Sideshow goes, 
playing to full houses day and night 
all over the land. Listen for yourself, 
tonight. As the crooner's voice fades 
away, as the band is stilled, the 
barker, radio script in hand, begins : 
"And now, ladies and gentlemen, and 
kiddies too, here is the good news 
you have been waiting for. Here is 
how you may win $5,000. Just follow 
a few simple rules — just write a few 
simple words — and have the time of 
your life doing it. ('Smile in voice' 
here according to the script.) Here 
is all you have to do . . ." And you 
and I and millions more who say a 
cynical "Oh, yeah ?" are reaching, 
even while we say it, for our 
pencils. 







HI trainYou Quickly for 
Radio's GOOD spare time 
and full time Jobs • • • 




Jobs in Broadcasting Stations are fas- 
cinating, interesting, and pay well. 




Set servicing has paid many N. R. I. 

men $200 to $1,000 a year for their 

spare time. Full-time men make as 

much as $40, $50, $65 a week. 



IP "-"y - 




1 


1 ^" "^ ~ 


p t$ j§f* 


* 


PImBSk:' -« J 


\ ' 


in nr 



Television, the coming field of great 
opportunities, is covered in my course. 



Some Other Jobs 
N.R.I. Trains Men For 



Broadcast Engineer. 
Operator in Broadcast Station. 
Aircraft Radio Operator. 
Operator of Airway Beacons. 
Service Man on Sound Picture Ap- 
paratus. 
Operator of Sound Picture Apparatus. 
Ship Operator. 

Service Man on Public Address Sys- 
tems. 

Installation Engineer on Public Ad- 
dress Systems. 

Sales Manager for Retail Stores. 

Service Manager for Retail Stores. 

Auto Radio Installation and Service 
Man. 

Television Broadcast Operator. 

Set Servicing Expert. 



Mail Coupon 
for FREE 
Information 




Why slave your life away in a 
no-future job? Why skimp, 
why scrape trying to pay your 
bills? I'll train you quickly 
for the live- wire field — the 
field with a future — RADIO. $50, $60, $75 a 
week — that's what many Radio Experts make. 
$5, $10, $15 a week extra money — that's what 
many of my students make in their spare time 
shortly after enrolling. My free book tells you 
about Radio's spare-time and full-time oppor- 
tunities — about my tested training — about my 
students and graduates — what they are doing 
and making. Get this book. Be a Radio Ex- 
pert. The Radio field is big enough to absorb 
many more properly trained men. 

I'll train you for jobs like these 

Spare-time and full-time Radio Servicing, Operating, 
Broadcast, Aircraft Radio, Commercial Land, Ship, and 
Television stations. A Radio service business of your 
own. I'll train you for these and other good jobs in the 
manufacture, sale, and service of Radio, Talking Movie, 
Sound, and Television apparatus. My FREE book tells 
you about the many moneymaking opportunities in Radio. 

Save — learn at home in your spare time 

You don't have to leave home and spend $500 to $1,000 
to study Radio. I'll train you quickly and inexpensively 
right in your own home and in your spare time for a good 
Radio job. You don't need a high school or college edu- 
cation. Many of my successful graduates didn't even 
finish grade school. My amazingly practical 50-50 meth- 
od of training — half with lessons, half with Radio equip- 
ment — gives you broad practical experience — makes 
learning at home easy, fascinating, practical, and rapid. 

Turn your spare time into money 

My book shows how my special training, instruction mate- 
rial, plans, ideas and my seventeen years experience 
training men for Radio careers help many students make 
$200 to $1,000 a year quickly in their spare time. My 
course is famous as "the one that pays for itself." 

Your money back if not satisfied 

I'm so sure you will be satisfied with my training that I 
agree in writing to refund every penny of your money if 
you are not entirely satisfied with my lessons and in- 
struction service when you finish. 

Find out what Radio offers you 

Act today. Mail the coupon. My 64-page book will be 
sent free to any ambitious fellow over 15 years of 
age. It tells about Radio's opportunities — explains 
the eighteen star features of my course — shows ^^jf 
letters of what others are doing and making. S^£^ 




He res Proof 



$50 to $75 a week 

"The National Ra- 
dio Institute put , 
me in a position to j 
make more money 
than I ever made 
in good times. I 
am in the Radio 
service business 
for myself, where it is possi- 
ble for me to make from $50 
to $75 a week. Service work 
has increased because people, 
who in normal times would 
buy a new Radio, now are 
contented to have the old one 
'pepped up. ' " — BERNARD 
COSTA, Box 83, Station "G," 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 

"Made $6,000 in 2 Years" 

"Soon after the depres- 
sion started, I found my- 
self without a job, but I 
was well protected with 
N. R. I. training. I 
swung right to full-time 
Radio servicing and I 
have made over $6,000 in 
a little over two years." 
-WJ1. SPARTIVENT. 

Sparty Radio Service, 93 Broadway, 

Newark, N. J. 

"$500 a Year in Spare Time" 

"Although doing spare- 
time Radio work only. I 
have averaged about $500 
a year extra in addition 
to my regular income. 
Full-time Radio work 
would net me many times 
that amount." — EDW. 
H. FAWCETT. Slough 
Rd., Leaner. B. C. 
Canada. 

"Good Position, Good Pay" 

"I am Chief Operator at 
Radio Station WSMK. 
This is a good position 
with good pay. I have 
advanced in Radio right 
along. I recommend^ 
N. R. I. to anyoneirl 
who wants to be^ I 
successful in Ra-jr I 
dio." — JOHN*' 

HAJDUK, JR., 3 BroxeyX 

Apts., Southern Hills, -* 

Dayton, Ohio. 






M 



*;$& 



There is no obligation Mail the coupon. 

J. E. SMITH President 

National Radio Institute 

Department 3KR3 

Washingtor D. C. 



cv> N 

>°k9 



<>*<** 



MAILTHIS /^> FREE 64 P ade book 



*«<* 
*& 



w 






J? 



F 






-£-J 



Ship aboard a 

SCOTT 

ALL-WAVE £>duxv 

/p-» 
or a 

THRILL CROIS 
'ROUND THE 
WORLD 







I 



_ «ci 



Lf you're an adventurer at heart 
(and aren't we all?) you'll glory in the thrills 
of cruising the ether-waves via a SCOTT 
ALL-WAVE Deluxe Radio. 

Sit right in your own comfortable living 
room . . . there's no sea-bag to pack, no dun- 
nage to stow, no passports to secure. Just 
the twist of a single, simple tuning dial and 
it's "Ho! You're off for strange lands of 
romance and allure!" 

Supreme for Stay-at-Home Listeners 

First a shake-down cruise in home waters. Listen in 
on American broadcast stations near and far — coast- 
to-coast is an easy jaunt. Discover the marvelous 
capability of this dream ship to carry you anywhere 
at your will . . . with a delightful fidelity of tone that 
puts you tight into the sending studio, giving you every 
word of speech and every note of music with a glorious 
perfection that transcends all previous heights of 
mechanical sound reproduction. Your own ears will 
tell you so . . . and the evidence is backed up by scientific 
laboratory findings that prove SCOTT radio reproduc- 
tion to be the closest to perfection yet attained. 

As a first venture in short wave reception listen-in 
on the crime wave as reported by police calls from one 
end of the Land to the othet . . . eavesdrop on gossipy 
amateur wireless telephony "hams'*, and hear the air- 
planes and their gtound stations talk back and forth. 

Hear Canada and Mexico 

Now venture farther! Roam the air-waves to Canada 
and Mexico. Hear something different . . . something 
typical of these near-by foreign lands broadcast on 
wave bands from 15 to 550 meters. Don't fret about the 
rumors you may have heard that these countries are 
soon to change wave-lengths . . . your SCOTT can be 
equipped to receive on all bands between 15 and 4,000 
meters at a small extra charge. 

Listen-in On All of Europe 

And now you've "got the feel of your ship." Head 
out into the open . . . start on a fascinating explora- 
tion cruise for radio joys that are new and different. 

Here's England, first! GSB, at Daventry, is sending 
out the news of the day for the benefit of Colonial 



listeners-in . . . there's peppy music from a famous 
London hotel . . . and at signing off time (midnight in 
London, but only 6 P.M. Central Standard Time) the 
chimes of Big Ben, atop the Houses of Parliament, clang 
sonorously as though you were actually there to hear 
them in person. 

Slip your moorings once again. Cross the Channel 
and lend an ear to Radio Colonial, Pontoise, France. 
It's bringing you Parisian music and typically French 
entertainment. 

Varied Programs from Far Countries 

Distance still lures you? Then set your course for 
Germany ... in a jiffy you're listening to Zeesen, with 
programs of glorious symphony orchestras, and per- 
haps a speech by "Handsome Adolph" that will give 
you a different viewpoint on Hitlerism. 

Make port at Madrid, in sunny Spain, and hear 
EAO. broadcasting typical National music. Announce- 
ments from this station are considerately made in 
English as well as Spanish. 

Then swing south to Rome and hear the voice of 
12RO's woman announcer tell you it's "Radio Roma, 
Napoli," that's on the air. Most likely the following 
musical program will be opera direct from LaScala, in 
Milan, or some other musical treat worth going actual 
miles to hear — and you'll be listening to it, with purity 
of tone and richness of reproduction that's truly 
amazing, without stirring from your easy chair at home. 

And now for an adventure-trek that holds a supreme 
"kick" for the radio sensation-seeker! Sail away "down 
under." Listen in to VK2ME or VK3ME, in Sydney 
and Melbourne, Australia. Hear the callof thatfamous 
Kookaburra bird, listen with delight to an interesting 
and varied program of music and talks on the commer- 
cial and scenic attractions of the Antipodes. 

Owners' Reports Show Real Ability 

And these are but a few of the interesting places to 
be visited by means of your SCOTT ALI^WAVE 
Deluxe Receiver . . . F. L. Stitzinger, for instance, is a 
Scott owner who in a six-month's period received 
1588 programs from 41 stations in 22 foreign lands. A. 
G. Luoma got 1261 programs from 75 different stations 
in 26 countries, and some 200 other SCOTT owners 
reported reception of 16,439 programs from 320 sta- 
tions in 46 countties during the same time. 

"Can such startling radio performance be true?" 



you ask. Do you doubt that any but radio professionals 
can enjoy the delights of exploring the air-waves the 
world over, far from the too-familiar programs of 
broadcast stations here at home? Do you think that it 
may be possible, but feel that the cost of sufficiently 
able equipment is more than you can afford for enter- 
tainment? 

New Value at Moderate Cost! 

Then set your mind at ease! For such performance is 
actually possible . . . we gladly prove it to you, and back 
the proof by an iron-clad guarantee of consistent 
foreign reception. 

Laboratory technique, employing the world's most 
skillful, specially trained engineers and craftsmen in 
custom-building a receiver constructed to the highest 
standards of perfection known in radio, makes possible 
the super-performance of the SCOTT ALL-WAVE 
Deluxe for any radio-user, regardless of his experience 
or skill in operating. In this set top efficiency is coupled 
with absolute simplicity of tuning. 

Prohibitively high priced? Not at all! You can have 
a SCOTT, and enjoy the supreme thtill of mastering 
the air-waves of all the wotld, at moderate cost. 

Get Complete Details — Mail Coupon! 

Because the SCOTT ALL-WAVE Deluxe is one of 
the truly fine things of the world, custom-built for 
those discriminating people who demand the best, it 
is not distributed broadcast, to be casually picked up 
here, there, or anywhere. To get full patticulars re- 
garding it, absolute PROOF of its performance, and 
all the information you require, simply send the coupon 
below ditect to the modern scientific laboratories where 
it is built. 



E. H. SCOTT RADIO LABORATORIES, INC. 
4450 Ravenswood Ave., Dep't D-93, Chicago, 111. 

Tell me how I can have a SCOTT ALL-WAVE 
Deluxe to take me radio world-cruising. Include all tech- 
nical details, proofs of performance, and complete 
infotmation. 

Name 

Address 

City C. State.., 








w 



■ 



■1 

■ 
■ 






■ 



,i> 



II 






H 



■ 



H 



:t!n',i 



■ 






■ 



■ 






.i,fi 



) i < i!i IB 



I 



< ...M_.J. .jtlili